This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Welsh Government office in Qatar'.



Grŵp yr Economi, y Trysorlys a’r Cyfansoddiad  
Economy, Treasury and Constitution Group 
 
 
 
 
Patricia C. Moresby 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx  
 
 
 
 
11 March 2024 
 
Dear Patricia Moresby,  
 
ATISN 20204 – Qatar Meetings 
 
Thank you for your request which I received on 13 February 2024. In your email, you asked 
for records of any official meetings and correspondence between Welsh Government and the 
following: 
 
Q.1   Qatari state ministers  
Q.2   Qatari civil servants 
Q.3   Qatari businesspeople 
 
All of the requests above relate to the period from August 2018 to January 2024 and 
include agendas, minutes, emails, and any official communications. 
  
A response to each question is set out in Annex A
 
Next steps 
  
If you are dissatisfied with the Welsh Government’s handling of your request, you can ask 
for an internal review within 40 working days of the date of this response.  Requests for an 
internal review should be addressed to the Welsh Government’s Freedom of Information 
Officer at:  
 
Information Rights Unit  
Welsh Government 
Cathays Park  
Cardiff  
CF10 3NQ  
or e-mail: Freedom.ofinformation@gov.wales 
 
Please remember to quote the ATISN reference number above.     
 
 
 
 
Parc Cathays ● Cathays Park 
CentralDepartments-FOI/DP@gov.wales 
Caerdydd ● Cardiff 
Gwefan ● website: www.llyw.cymru 
 
CF10 3NQ  
www.gov.wales 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

You also have the right to complain to the Information Commissioner. The Information 
Commissioner can be contacted at:   
 
Information Commissioner’s Office  
Wycliffe House  
Water Lane  
Wilmslow  
Cheshire  
SK9 5AF 
Telephone: 0303 123 1113 
Website: www.ico.org.uk      
 
However, please note that the Commissioner will not normally investigate a complaint until it 
has been through our own internal review process. 
 
Yours sincerely 
 
 
 
 
Louise McShane 
International Relations and Trade  
 
  
 
 

 
ANNEX A 
 
 
Meetings with Qatari State Government and Civil Servants 
 
The information requested is exempt from disclosure under Section 27 (International 
Relations) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. 
 
Section 27 is a qualified exemption, and a Public Interest Test has therefore been applied. 
Reasons for withholding the information are detailed below.  
   
Section 27 (International Relations)  
The exemption states: Section 27(1) Information is exempt if its disclosure would, or would 
be likely to, harm UK interests which are set out in the exemption. Sections 27(2) and (3) 
provide an exemption for information obtained in confidence from another state, international 
organisation or international court. Section 27(4) provides an exemption from the duty to 
confirm or deny whether information is held if doing so would or would be likely to prejudice 
the interests protected by section 27(1) or would involve the disclosure of confidential 
information protected by section 27(2).  
 
Public interest arguments in favour of release: 
The Welsh Government acknowledges the general public interest in openness and 
transparency that release would engender. Further, we recognise that there is public interest 
in understanding the process by which the Welsh Government discusses certain policy 
matters with foreign governments and that the release of the information could lead to greater 
transparency and openness in the way the Welsh Government conducts business with other 
governments, which can improve accountability and public trust.  
 
Public interest arguments in favour of withholding: 
We have considered the information held and believe that its release would be prejudicial to 
Welsh Government’s future ability to have frank and open discussions with international 
stakeholders, including foreign governments and state-owned organisations, and would affect 
Welsh Government’s ability to gather information to conduct effective policy making across a 
wide number of areas with countries where we have common interests. The release of this 
information will inhibit the openness of discussions. Disclosure of the information, which was 
generated within this climate of trust and expectation of confidence, would be likely to result 
in the same trust and confidence being eroded and a reluctance to share information which 
would be likely to prejudice relations between both parties on both this and other matters. 
Such prejudice would not be in the public interest. 
 
I believe therefore that the balance of the public interest falls in favour of withholding the 
withheld information for the reasons outlined above. 
 
Meetings with Qatari Businesspeople 
 
During the period covered by the request, there are records of two meetings held between 
Welsh Government’s Qatar Office and Qatari businesspeople.  Details of the correspondence 
around these meetings are at Annex B, with commercially sensitive (section 43 – see below) 
and/or personal information redacted.   
 
Section 43 (Commercial Interests) 
The exemption states: Section 43(2) exempts information whose disclosure would, or 
would be likely to, prejudice the commercial interests of any legal person (an individual, a 
company, the public authority itself or any other legal entity). 

 
Section 43 is a qualified exemption, and a Public Interest Test has therefore been applied. 
Reasons for withholding the information are detailed below.  
 
Public interest arguments in favour of release: 
The Welsh Government acknowledges the general public interest in openness and 
transparency that release would engender. Further, we recognise that there is public interest 
in understanding the process by which the Welsh Government discusses economic 
opportunities with overseas investors, and potential customers for Welsh exporters, and that 
the release of the information could lead to greater transparency and openness. 
 
Public interest arguments in favour of withholding: 
I have considered the information held and believe that the release of the company names 
(both Welsh and Qatari) contained within the correspondence would be prejudicial to these 
companies and their commercial interests. Companies have an expectation that their 
commercial interests remain protected during discussions with government and releasing 
commercial information could damage future trade and investment opportunities and 
economic partnerships for those companies. Furthermore, disclosure of the information, 
which was generated within a climate of trust and expectation of confidence, would be likely 
to result in the same trust and confidence being eroded and a reluctance to share 
information, which would be likely to prejudice relations between both parties on both this and 
other matters. Such prejudice would not be in the public interest. 
 
I believe therefore that the balance of the public interest falls in favour of withholding the 
withheld information for the reasons outlined above.