UK accident statistics for pedestrians on the pavement for collisions with cars and bicycles

The request was partially successful.

Dear Office for National Statistics,

Please could you furnish me with the national statistics, as available, for:

1) Deaths and KSIs arising from collisions between pedestrians and bicycles on pavements

2) Deaths and KSIs arising from collisions between pedestrians and cars on pavements

I would like the statistics for the last three recorded years.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Yours faithfully,
DW Atkinson

Jan Cosgrove left an annotation ()

I suspect that, for all it annoys people, such cyclist/pedestrian accidents are relatively rare. As a former Councillor I attended a working party where the local civic lot trotted out the stats that 3 people had died in this way .... locally I asked? No nationally? In the past year I asked again? No more like ten years.

Dear Office for National Statistics,

I requested information from you regarding UK accident statistics for pedestrians on the pavement for collisions with cars and bicycles. You should have responded by the 6th December and it's now the 9th, so please submit a response as soon as possible. And happy Christmas!

Yours faithfully,

DW Atkinson

Dear Office for National Statistics,

This FOI request is now long overdue, please action ASAP.

Yours faithfully,

DW Atkinson

Dear Office for National Statistics,

I'm still awaiting a reply to this FOI request and I'm formally requesting an internal review to explain why the request hasn't been answered.

Yours faithfully,

DW Atkinson

Jan Cosgrove left an annotation ()

Naughty peeps indeed. Perhaps there's a stat about how long they take on average to answer an FoI ...? Keep me posted as I think the figures will be low. By the way, what of the injuries caused by electric carts on pavements to pedestrians? Many folk do get upset at the speed some users achieve in these things on pavements. I doubt there will be a huge figure but interesting to compare this with cyclists and peds.

Paul Wearn, Office for National Statistics

Our Reference: FOI01042/Atkinson/QE1

Thank you for your email, firstly please let me apologise for the handling
of your case so far. This particular request had disappeared in the
system. I am sorry for any inconvenience caused.
Under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, you requested the following
information:

1) Deaths and KSIs arising from collisions between pedestrians and
bicycles on pavements

2) Deaths and KSIs arising from collisions between pedestrians and cars on
pavements

ONS response:

The table attached provides the number of deaths where a pedestrian was
injured in a traffic accident as a result of a collision with (a) pedal
cycle or (b) car, pick-up or truck, in England and Wales, for the years
2006 to 2010 (the latest year available).

The mortality data held by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) comes
from the information recorded at death registration. The causes you listed
would all be referred to a coroner, so the cause of death is taken from
the conditions / events mentioned on the coroner's death certificate. All
of the conditions mentioned on a death certificate are coded using the
International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision (ICD 10), and an
underlying cause of death is selected using ICD coding rules.

Accidental causes of death are subdivided to reflect the victim***s mode
of transport and type of event. Transport accidents involving pedestrians
are subdivided into the type of vehicle involved in the collision and
whether the accident was classified as ***traffic***, ***non-traffic*** or
***unspecified***. The term ***traffic*** denotes that the accident
occurred on the public highway which could have occurred on either the
road or a pavement; therefore deaths that occurred on a pavement cannot be
specifically identified.

ONS are only able to provide statistics on deaths, not on accidents where
the pedestrian was seriously injured but not killed. Information on
numbers of KSIs is available from the Department for Transport
([1]www.dft.gov.uk).

.
Table 1: Number of deaths where a pedestrian was injured in collision with
(a) a pedal cycle, or (b) a car, pick-up truck or van, England and Wales,
2006-2010

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Deaths (persons) |
|------------------------------------------------------------------------|
| Year | (a) Pedestrian hit by | (b) Pedestrian hit by |
| | pedal cycle | car, pick-up or truck |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2006 | 3 | 233 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2007 | 6 | 267 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2008 | 3 | 247 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2009 | 0 | 141 |
|------+------------------------------+----------------------------------|
| 2010 | 2 | 123 |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

^1 Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of
Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes V01.1, V01.9 (Pedestrian injured
in collision with pedal cycle) and V03.1, V03.9 (Pedestrian injured in
collision with car, pick-up truck or van).

^2 Deaths include accidents in traffic and where the place of death was
unspecified whether the accident was in traffic or in nontraffic.

^3 Includes deaths of non-residents, based on boundaries as of May 2011.

^4 Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year. ^

You have the right to have this response to your freedom of information
request reviewed internally by an internal review process and, if you
remain unhappy with the decision, by the Information Commissioner. If you
would like to have the decision reviewed please write to Frank Nolan,
Office for National Statistics, Room 1127, Government Buildings, Cardiff
Road, Newport, Gwent, NP10 8XG.

If you have any queries about this email, please contact me. Please
remember to quote the reference number above in any future communications.

Kind regards,

Paul Wearn LLB (Hons)
Legal Services
Office for National Statistics

For the latest data on the economy and society consult National Statistics
at http://www.ons.gov.uk

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References

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Dear Paul Wearn,

Thanks very much for your reply. It's a shame that the incidences of accidents on the pavement can't be specifically identified, but the figures are helpful all the same.

Yours sincerely,

DW Atkinson

Jan Cosgrove left an annotation ()

Much as I thought. Anyone ask about mobility karts? Some are driven at speed on pavements. Fair Play for Children believes we need to revisit use of pavements with a view to schemes for sharing.

Chris Peck left an annotation ()

Mr Batstone left an annotation ()

Chris Peck's link is broken, but this might do: http://www.ctc.org.uk/campaigning/views-...

Eric D left an annotation ()

The CTC have published a relevant report:
http://www.ctc.org.uk/sites/default/file...

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