Dear Supreme Court of the United Kingdom,

My understanding is statute law is the consent of the governed and is contract law.

So can you explain to me how statute law is legally enforceable if express consent is removed so there is no misunderstanding of implied consent.

Example say a Statute law was introduced that said you had to wear a hat on a Sunday.
If I wrote legal notices and a notice of estoppel-
Could one still be fined/sentenced or imprisoned?
Or would removed consent revert to common law.

If statute law is legally enforceable with removal of express consent-could you provide a location of the information that expresses this

Yours faithfully,

Mr Young

Achow, Ann,

Dear Mr Young

Thank you for your e mail below.

Your request has not been handled under the Freedom of Information Act
(FOIA) 2000 regime, as you are seeking an explanation of an aspect of
the law rather than asking for recorded information. The FOIA gives
people the right to ask for recorded information held by public
authorities, and if it is held, to be provided with a copy of it,
subject to certain exemptions. It does not give the right to seek
explanations or opinions from public authorities.

Your query is, therefore, being treated as a routine enquiry. The
response to your query is that this is not a matter for the Supreme
Court of the United Kingdom (UKSC) to answer because the UKSC does not
provide a legal information or advice service. Staff can only advise on
procedural matters in relation to the cases which come before the UKSC.
For the cases which it hears the Court's decisions are handed down in
judgments which are publicly available on our website at
www.supremecourt.gov.uk.

Printed information explaining the law can be found by using the
websites of legal bookshops for example www.wildy.com or
www.hammickslegal.co.uk/shop to name just two. You should be able to
access books through your local library or through the Inter Library
Loan Service. For information about Acts and statutes you may wish to
access the following websites:
www.opsi.gov.uk/acts
www.statutelaw.gov.uk
www.parliament.uk

Yours sincerely,

Ann Achow (Mrs)
Departmental Records Officer
The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
Parliament Square
London
SW1P 3BD

Tel: 020 7960 1983

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Dear Achow, Ann,

"Under English Common Law (namely Article 61 of the Magna Carta - 1215) if a subject of the realm feels he/she is being governed unjustly, then they have the right to enter into lawful rebellion.

Lawful rebellion allows quite simply for the following recourse:

Full refusal to pay any forms of tax, fines and any other forms of monies to support and/or benefit said unlawful governance of this country.

Full refusal to abide by any Law, Legislation or Statutory Instrument invalidly put in place by said unlawful governance that is in breach of the Constitutional safeguard.

To hinder in any way possible all actions of the treasonous government of this land, who have breached the Constitutional safeguard; defined with no form of violence in anyway, just lawful hindrance under freedom asserted by Constitutional Law and Article 61.

Yours sincerely,

Mr Young

Achow, Ann,

Dear Mr Young

Thank you for your e mail below in which you appear to be asking for an
internal review of my reply to your request for information. I explained
in my reply that your request was being treated as a general enquiry as
you were seeking an explanation of an aspect of the law rather than
asking for recorded information.

As the internal reviews procidures only apply to replies received under
the Freedom of Information Act, not to general enquiries, an internal
review will not be conducted nor can I enter into correspondence with
you about the statements made in the body of your e mail below.

Yours sincerely,

Ann Achow (Mrs)
Departmental Records Officer
The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
Parliament Square
London
SW1P 3BD

Tel: 020 7960 1983

show quoted sections

Psuedo of Nom family left an annotation ()

I suggest Mr Young reads which parts of the Magna Carta are still in legal force before he makes any further comments.

Nick left an annotation ()

Magna Carta (of 1215) is a contract, that is both lawfully and legally binding.

The Contract cannot be rescinded unless all parties agree.

The Magna Carta Act (which was an attempt to deceive the populace into thinking the contract no longer applies to the Crown/Parliament), was partially repealed, and THAT no longer applies. However, the original contract, laid out betwixt the men and women of these islands and the Crown, is still lawfully binding.

jon clayman left an annotation ()

I would suggest the spirit of Magna Carta is just and continued questioning of Governmental profiteers and in my opinion Bosch opportunists be continually questioned and Ergo lawfull Rebellion....Even more so if you happen to be Scots or Irish....!

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