This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Selection of Scientific Advice'.


 
 
 
PROJECT SPECIFICATION 
 
 
HIGHLY PROTECTED MARINE RESERVES: 
 
DEFINING A PROCESS FOR IDENTIFICATION OF HPMRs IN WALES 
 
 
1. BACKGROUND 
 
The Countryside Council for Wales (CCW) is the statutory advisor to government on 
sustaining natural beauty, wildlife and the opportunity for outdoor enjoyment throughout 
Wales and its inshore waters. We provide expert advice to Government on issues in relation 
to the nature conservation and natural heritage of the marine and coastal environment.  
 
The Welsh Assembly and UK Government have signed up to the Ecosystem Approach under 
the Convention on Biological Diversity.  CCW recently provided advice to the Welsh 
Assembly Government on implementing the ecosystem approach in Welsh waters1.  One 
element of this advice was the need for Highly Protected Marine Areas (or Reserves - 
HPMRs) to secure recovery of the Welsh marine environment and to ensure resilience of the 
marine environment to current and future pressures.  Dernie et al. (2006)1 define the term 
‘Highly Protected Marine Areas’ as areas ‘where there is a presumption against human 
activities, unless it can be demonstrated they will not have a negative impact’. 
 
Further work commissioned by CCW investigated the potential benefits of HPMRs in 
Wales2 and the options for their delivery3.  Gubbay (2006)2 shows that clear marine 
biodiversity benefits can be expected from establishing HPMRs around Wales including 
enabling recovery and resilience of Welsh marine ecosystems.  A companion report by 
Andrews (2006)3 concludes that it is not possible to create HPMRs with existing legislation 
and that a new Marine Protected Area (MPA) mechanism would be needed to deliver such 
sites. 
 
The 2007 Marine Bill White Paper4 proposes the creation of a new flexible Marine 
Conservation Zone (MCZ) designation that will enable the creation of HPMRs by setting site 
objectives that exclude all damaging or potentially damaging activities.  The White Paper 
also contains details on site objectives, site selection, consultation and designation, and 
                                                 
1 Dernie, K.M., Ramsay, K., Jones, R. E., Hill, A. S., Wyn, G. C., and Hamer, J. P. (2006) Implementing the Ecosystem 
Approach in Wales: current status of the maritime environment and recommendations for management
 CCW Policy Report 
06/9.  
2 Gubbay, S. 2006. Highly Protected Marine Reserves – Evidence of benefits and opportunities for marine biodiversity in 
Wales
 CCW Science Report No: 762. 
3 Andrews, J. W. (2006) Analysis of options for delivering Highly Protected Marine Reserves in Wales  CCW Policy 
Research Report No: 06/42. 
4 Defra (2007) A Sea Change: A Marine Bill White Paper Defra March 2007 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


subsequent site management.  CCW stated in its response to the White Paper that the priority 
in Wales is to ensure that existing marine sites (primarily SACs) are properly managed, that 
a new system of marine spatial planning allows for the sustainable management of the wider 
environment and that a mechanism is available for securing HPMRs.  In Wales, we 
anticipate that the principle use of the new Marine Conservation Zone mechanism would be 
to secure sites with this level of protection.  These sites will provide a useful contribution to 
securing the resilience of existing designated sites and protected species by enabling the 
recovery of ecosystem structure and function for the long term.  
 
CCW have been asked by the Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) to provide further 
advice in relation to HPMRs.  This work will contribute to CCW’s thinking on what process 
would be most appropriate for establishing HPMRs in Welsh waters.   
 
The purpose of HPMRs in Wales 
CCW’s overall objective for HPMRs in Wales is to facilitate recovery and enhance the 
resilience of the wider marine ecosystem (including marine SACs) to current and future 
pressures and changes. In our advice to WAG (i.e. Dernie et al. (2006)1) we state that 
HPMRs would provide the following: 
o  Protection and recovery of large and long-lived species; 
o  Protection and recovery of sensitive habitats; 
o  Increased resilience of European Marine Sites (and the wider environment), and 
o  Better understanding of what a ‘natural’ maritime ecosystem would look like. 
 
Additional benefits of HPMRs could include:  
o  Engaging communities in protecting sites with high levels of public interest and 
support; 
o  Maximising potential benefits to other sectors, e.g. tourism, fisheries, and 
o  Maximising potential for research and education. 
 
The above will be achieved by designating HPMRs that together represent the diversity of 
marine habitats, species and ecological functioning in the Welsh maritime environment. We 
have already stated that because of the extensive marine SAC network and in order to 
maximise synergies and benefits from such sites, any new sites are likely to be situated 
primarily within existing protected sites. 
 
The next steps towards establishing HPMRs in Wales  
Whilst provision of the appropriate legislative tools is vital to securing HPMRs in Wales, it 
is also important to understand what would be the most appropriate process for identifying 
and agreeing sites.   
 
This project seeks to identify a suitable process (within the broad framework established by 
the White Paper) for identifying potential HPMR sites in Wales and final site selection, 
including optimum consultation requirements.  This project will not identify actual sites but 
will map out a clear, workable and inclusive process based upon best practice and lessons 
learnt from elsewhere.  
 
 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


2. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 
 
Aim 
To define a process for the identification of HPMRs, and recommend a policy approach to 
establishing HPMRs in Welsh waters. 
 
Objectives 
1.  To recommend a suite of ecological criteria for identifying representative HPMRs in 
welsh waters and parameters for their application5 
2.  To examine and recommend a process for specific site selection, including: 
a.  Potential secondary criteria that could help to refine site selection. 
Criteria could include, for example: socio-economic 
considerations; public support; mutually beneficial objectives with 
other sectors (such as fishing); access opportunities, and research 
and education opportunities.  
b.  Process for incorporating secondary criteria into final decision-making, 
for example, how would secondary criteria be prioritised such that 
decisions could be made between potential sites with  different 
social impacts. 
3.  Set out the recommended steps for the whole process of site identification, 
designation and review, including stakeholder consultation process and requirements, 
and roles and responsibilities of organisations in the designation process. 
4.  Recommend a policy approach to establishing HPMRs in Wales. 
5.  Clearly define next steps for Wales towards establishing HPMRs 
(e.g. testing of criteria and parameters against different scenarios, 
further advice needed from CCW, guidance required from 
Government etc). 
 
3. SCOPE 
 
This work will consider the process for identifying sites for a new conservation designation 
for Wales, owned by WAG as the likely confirming body for MCZs.  It is therefore 
important that other key stakeholders are involved in, and aware of, this project.  
 
The work should draw on examples of existing HPMR (or equivalent) identification 
processes from elsewhere. Useful examples include: 
o  The Finding Sanctuary Project in South West England 
o  Great Barrier Reef Marine Park 
o  New Zealand MPA network 
o  Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, USA 
 
In addition, the work should draw on the UK SAC process, the OSPAR MPA process, the 
Irish Sea pilot and experience with Marine Nature Reserves.  The work should also consider 
various available tools and information to assist site selection, such as the UKSEAMAP 
project’s marine landscapes data6. 
 
The work should follow on from previous relevant CCW policy and research reports1,2,3 as 
well as the Marine Bill White Paper and CCW’s response. 
 
                                                 
5 In this context, ecological criteria refers to aspects such as rarity, representivity, etc., whilst parameters refers to physical 
issues such as scale, minimum / maximum size of a site, or total sites, minimum / maximum amount of a feature etc.. 
6 Further information on the UKSEAMAP project can be found at www.jncc.gov.uk/UKSeaMap 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


It is important that the process and criteria (ecological and non-ecological) recommended are 
capable of effective application now, with existing data availability, and in the future, as new 
data becomes available, understanding of issues improves or priorities change.  The process 
and criteria therefore need to be workable both now and as circumstances change, without 
needing to redesign the process.   
 
Terminology, such as ecosystem approach, recovery etc. should follow the definitions set out 
in Dernie et al. (2006)1.  
 
Objective 1: Ecological Criteria to underpin selection of HPMRs 
Identification of ecological criteria is the first step in identifying potential representative 
HPMRs.  These must encompass the primary purpose of HPMRs, i.e. to secure recovery and 
enhance resilience of the Welsh marine environment.  
  
A comprehensive review of the literature, existing approaches, and available tools and 
information should form the basis of a recommended suite of ecological criteria to underpin 
selection of HPMRs.  Ecological criteria should include nature conservation considerations 
such as sensitivity. Identification of ecological criteria should be accompanied by 
investigation of parameters for their application.  Parameters refer to physical issues of scale, 
size, boundaries etc. of sites and features both individually and collectively. Different 
options should be assessed and a preferred approach recommended, with alternatives. 
 
Steering Group agreement on this primary suite of criteria and parameters will be critical to 
continuing with the rest of the project. 
 
It is anticipated that application of the ecological criteria and parameters would generate 
options for some sites, which would be refined by applying socio-economic issues for final 
site selection. 
 
Objective 2: Process for site selection 
The site selection process will require the development of further ‘secondary’ criteria to 
assist in site selection, to maximise non-environmental benefits of individual sites and to 
avoid unacceptable negative effects of proposed sites.  These criteria may include: socio-
economic considerations; public support and local interest; mutually beneficial objectives 
with other sectors (such as fishing); access opportunities, and research opportunities.  The 
criteria would be used to make individual site selection from the full range of potential sites 
identified through application of the primary ecological criteria.  The use of various available 
tools to assist with site selection should also be examined. 
 
In addition to the site selection criteria, a process for final decision-making also needs to be 
defined to assist in selecting between choices for sites with different social and or economic 
impacts and opportunities.  Eventually this part of the process will require advice from 
Government before the process of HPMR identification can proceed, as the responsibility of 
providing socio-economic advice and identifying relative priorities of activities will be the 
responsibility of Government.  Links will also need to be made to the UK Marine Policy 
Statement and associated Marine Objectives. 
 
Due to the potential mutual benefits, or restrictions of HPMRs, a variety of marine 
stakeholders will have an interest in this stage of the site identification process.  To reflect 
this, the project should include a workshop with the Wales Coastal and Maritime Partnership 
(WCMP).  The workshop will be used to: 
o  present the purpose of HPMRs in Wales; 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


o  present the purpose of this study; 
o  present draft ecological criteria, and 
o  provide the opportunity for stakeholders to help define the site selection process 
using the secondary criteria (Project Objective 2).  
 
Objective 3: Steps in the whole site identification, designation and review process 
Following the detailed work in defining a site identification process (above), this will then 
need to be set within a wider process for site identification, designation and review.  Critical 
to this wider process will be the incorporation of stakeholder consultation at the appropriate 
stages and in an appropriate manner, with the right audiences at each stage.    
 
In addition to existing HPMR / MPA examples, consultation processes from other 
designations or other fields may be useful for comparison, as well as views of stakeholders at 
the WCMP workshop.  
 
The whole process should be summarised in an annotated diagram. 
 
Objective 4: A recommended policy approach for establishing HPMRs in Wales 
A policy approach to establishing HPMRs in Wales should be recommended, based on the 
ecological criteria and parameters identified. 
 
Objective 5: Define next steps for Wales towards HPMRs 
The final requirement for the project is to recommend specific next steps for CCW and for 
Wales and the Welsh Assembly (as the likely designating body for HPMRs) to take forward 
development of HPMRs in Wales.   
 
4. OUTPUTS  
 
As part of this work the contractor will be expected to produce: 
o  draft and final criteria (primary and secondary); 
o  a PowerPoint presentation for the WCMP workshop;  
o  a draft report and presentation; 
o  a final report, and 
o  a final PowerPoint presentation and poster. 
 
Ecological criteria 
Following a Steering Group meeting the contractor will be required to produce draft 
ecological criteria for selection of all potential HPMR sites and options for parameters to 
apply to the ecological criteria.  This should be sent to the Project Officer in electronic 
format (Microsoft Word 2000).  The Project Officer will then collate comments from the 
Steering Group.  Following receipt of comments, the contractor should provide the Project 
Officer with final draft criteria in the same format, prior to the WCMP workshop (below). 
 
Presentation for WCMP workshop 
Part way through the project there will be a workshop with the WCMP to contribute to the 
development of Project Objectives 2 and 3.  The workshop will be facilitated by the Project 
Officer and Steering Group.  The contractor will be required to provide a presentation 
introducing the project, its background, aims and objectives, as well as draft ecological 
criteria (Project Objective 1).  The presentation should be a PowerPoint presentation, on a 
standard CCW template (which the Project officer can provide), which may be used at 
subsequent events by CCW.  
 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


Draft report and poster and presentation 
The draft report should address all four Project Objectives, be concise, and represent a 
synthesis of information (supported by annexes where appropriate) highlighting the key 
points, clearly addressing each individual objective of the project.  The whole recommended 
process for site identification, designation and review should be summarised in a diagram.  
The draft report should be in electronic format (Microsoft Word 2000) and sent by email to 
the Project Officer.  A draft poster, summarising the work should also be produced.  The 
draft report will be presented to CCW staff at a meeting. 
 
Final report  
In addition to the above requirements for the draft report, the final report should also include 
a 1 page executive summary (including Welsh translation though a CCW approved supplier) 
and be supported by annexes where appropriate.  40 hard copies of the final report should be 
supplied to the Project Officer.  The Project Officer will provide distribution covers for the 
report bearing the appropriate logos.  Electronic copies of the report shall be supplied in 
Microsoft Word 2000 format and as a pdf, and a reduced pdf suitable for web download.  
More detail of report style and format to be used is given in Annex 1.  
 
Final workshop presentation and poster 
The contractor will be required to provide a final presentation summarising the work and 
final recommendations, to be presented to CCW and WAG representatives and other key 
stakeholders.  The presentation should be a PowerPoint presentation (using standard CCW 
template), which may be used at subsequent events by CCW. The contractor will also 
provide a poster for the meeting summarising the work that can be used to promote the work 
and recommendations at meetings and events.  
 
5. PROJECT SCHEDULE
 
 
N.B. We will be unable to diverge significantly from the timetable set out below.  Please 
note that the date of the first Steering Group meeting is already confirmed. 
 
Milestone  Details 
Date  

Initial project meeting to discuss scope of the work.  
2.00 pm 
Contractors to produce a planned schedule for delivery of project 
20th Sep 
outputs, incorporating any amendments identified at the project 
07 
meeting, within 1 week of the meeting. 
 

Meeting with Steering Group to discuss ecological criteria and 
Oct 07 
parameters for HPMRs (Project Objective 1).   

Production of draft ecological criteria and parameters for 
Nov 07 
consideration by the Steering Group and other stakeholders.   
Project officer to collect feedback and return to contractors. 

WCMP workshop to provide input to project on Project Objectives 2  Jan 08 
and 3.  This should also include reporting on draft ecological 
criteria.  A Steering Group meeting will be combined with the 
workshop to discuss the remaining stages. 

Production of draft report, and poster, and presentation of draft to 
Mar 08 
CCW staff.. A Steering Group meeting will follow the presentation. 

Amended draft report and poster to be copied to Project Officer (for 
Apr 08 
return of final comment within 1 week of receipt) 

Submission of final report (40 copies) and poster and draft 
Early 
presentation. 
May 08 

Final presentation to WAG and production of poster. 
May 08 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


 5. PROJECT MANAGEMENT  
 
Project Steering Group 
The nominated Project Officer is Mary Lewis.  A Project Steering Group will be appointed 
to  liaise  with  the  Project  Officer  and  contractor  to  ensure  appropriate  development  and 
implementation of the project.  The Steering Group will include CCW and WAG officers.  
 
A minimum of four Steering Group meetings are anticipated, at milestones 1,2 4 and 6.   
 
Resources to be provided 
The successful contractor will be provided with copies of key CCW commissioned reports 
within this specification. 
 
Identification, collation and purchase of all other information required to meet the objectives 
of this study will be the responsibility of the contractor. 
 
6. OWNERSHIP AND COPYRIGHT 
 
The ownership of all reports, both paper and electronic copies, produced by the Contractor in 
connection with the project shall be vested with CCW. 
 
7. TENDERING 
 
Tenders should be sent in duplicate according to the arrangements specified in the covering 
letter.  They should be structured as follows: 
 
 
 
 
a planned schedule for delivering work based on the timetable described above, 
including confirmation that you have the available resources to meet the project 
milestone deadlines; 
 
a statement of no more than 1000 words setting out the capability and suitability 
you have in undertaking this commission, with particular reference to the specific 
matters set out in the preceding paragraphs; 
 
details of the position, background and qualifications of any individual working 
on the contract, including relevant experience, respective hourly rates and period 
in employment with practice; 
 
a breakdown of costs (including an hourly rate) for contractor time for each of the 
levels of work outlined above, including a reasonable amount for travel and 
subsistence costs (at a rate not exceeding CCW standard rates), and 
 
any anticipated additional costs. 
 
Due to the mix of expertise and outputs required, tenders that include additional 
subcontracted consultants are welcome. 
 
Selection criteria 
The contract will be awarded on the basis of a review against the following criteria: 
o  Capacity to deliver (staff, time, management process) 
o  Value for money 
o  Previous relevant experience and related work 
o  Technical understanding 
 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


8. FURTHER INFORMATION 
 
For further information and to discuss this project specification please contact the Project 
Officer: 
 
Mary Lewis 
Maritime Policy Officer 
Countryside Council for Wales 
Maes y Ffynnon,  
Penrhosgarnedd,  
BANGOR,  
LL57 2DW 
Tel. 01248 385432 
 
xxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx 
 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


ANNEX 1. GUIDE TO CCW POLICY REPORT FORMAT 
 

Introduction 
 
This guide has two aims: 
•  to present the main elements of the CCW Policy Report style, so that you can prepare 
your typescript so that it requires the minimum amount of handling 
•  to provide technical information about how to supply word processor files, drawings, 
photographs etc. 
 
Please follow these guidelines: they will reduce the amount of work required by you and the 
CCW. 
 
Style 
General 
The report must have a contents list and a list of Tables and Figures where appropriate. 
Spelling 
 
Use the Concise Oxford Dictionary for spelling, hyphenation, capitalisation etc. of normal 
English words. 
Headings 
•  Indicate clearly, via bold and/or italic type, the headings and subheadings that you have 
used.  An electronic copy of a proforma document can be supplied by the Project Officer 
with necessary style types already incorporated. 
•  Do not number headings. 
•  Use only essential capital letters in headings (as in this annex). 
 
Illustrations and tables 
•  Ensure that each illustration and table is numbered and mentioned in the text (e.g. Figure 
1.1; Table 2.3). 
•  Ensure that each illustration and table has a caption. 
 
Lists 
Lay out lists as follows: 
(1) List item 
(a)  Sub-list item 
(b) Sub-list item 
(i)  Sub-sub-list item 
(ii) Sub-sub-list item 
(2) List item 
... 
or 
•  List item 
–  Sub-list item 
–  Sub-list item 
 Sub-sub-list item 
 Sub-sub-list item 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 


•  List item 
 
References 
•  Use the Harvard (name and date) method for citing references: 
–  It has been shown (Smith et al. 1997a,b; Jones 1998; Smith and Jones 2000) that... 
–  Smith (1997) demonstrated that... 
Use ‘et al.’ if there are three or more authors. 
•  Use the following basic models for references in the reference list: 
–  Paper in a journal 
–  Smith,  R  S  and  Charman,  D  J  (1988)  The  vegetation  of  upland  mires  within  conifer 
plantations in Northumberland, northern England. Journal of Applied Ecology25, 579–
594 
–  Books and reports 
–  Digby,  P  G  N  and  Kempton,  R  A  (1987).  Multivariate  analysis  of  ecological 
communities. Chapman & Hall, London 
–  Howson,  C  M  and  Picton,  B  E  (1997)  The  species  directory  of  the  marine  flora  and 
fauna of the British Isles.  Ulster Museum and the Marine Conservation Society, Belfast 
and Ross-on-Wye.  Ulster Museum Publication No. 256.  509pp. 
–  Chapter in book 
Smith, R S (1988) Farming and the conservation of meadowland in the Pennine Dales 
Environmentally Sensitive Area. In Ecological change in the uplands (eds M B Usher 
and D B A Thompson), pp. 183–200. Blackwell Scientific, Oxford 
–  Theses 
Hiscock, K (1976) The effects of water movements on the ecology of sublittoral rocky 
areas
. PhD Thesis, University College of North Wales 
 
Scientific names 
•  Use italics for scientific names 
•  Taxonomy should follow Howson & Picton (1997) 
 
Scientific units 
•  Use SI units and abbreviations throughout. 
•  Units should be separated from each other and from the preceding number by a single 
space, for example: 
37 kg m–3 or 10 m s–1 
•  Use positive and negative powers for units, not the solidus (i.e. m s–1, not m/s). 
 
Numbers 
•  Spell out numbers from one to ten, except in measurements. 
•  Use commas to separate groups of thousands in large numbers (e.g. 1,000 or 1,000,000). 
•  Use scientific (or exponential) notation for very large or very small numbers: e.g. 5×109 
rather than 5,000,000,000; 5×10–6 rather than 0.000005 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 
10

 
Technical information 
 
Word processing in the digital age 
•  Type everything using a clear, standard font (preferably Times New Roman) at a size of 
12 points. Do not use more than one font unless this is absolutely essential.   
•  Use the minimum amount of formatting (bold, italic, superscript, subscript). It is time 
consuming to reflow a document, removing unnecessary  
•  Type each chapter in a separate file if document is large.  Alternatively, Microsoft Word 
allows documents to be split into sub- and master documents allowing them to be linked 
together. 
 
Illustrations 
•  Non-electronic artwork: see instructions under ‘Supplying the finished work to CCW’. 
•  Electronic artwork: discuss the file formats to be used with CCW if not specified in the 
contract specification. In general, TIFF files are always acceptable. 
•  When drawing illustrations, bear in mind that they must be legible when reproduced on an 
A4 page. The maximum dimensions are 160 mm × 230 mm (or 240 mm × 150 mm for 
landscape illustrations), including allowances for a short (one line) caption. 
•  Label the illustrations using Times New Roman. 
 
Supplying the finished work to CCW 
•  Supply your report to CCW, in Microsoft Word 2000 format (exceptionally, in agreement 
with the Project Officer you may be permitted to supply in an earlier version of Microsoft 
Word.  Contractors will also supply an Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) version 
•  Include a printout of all files to act as a reference in case of problems with the files. 
•  Supply non-electronic artwork only if absolutely necessary, in which case it should be as 
good quality prints or clear line drawings. Provide clear full-size illustrations and ensure 
that each illustration is clearly labelled.  
•  Supply electronic artwork both as separate files (TIFF format) and embedded into 
Microsoft Word documents (the contractor may choose to compress or change the file for 
embedding purposes if required for optimising performance). 
•   Files will be accepted on archival quality CD-Rom.  If you use a Macintosh or Unix 
computer, ensure that the disks you supply are formatted for MS-DOS. 
 
 
 
CCW project specification: Defining a process for identification of a network of HPMRs in Wales 
11