This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Selection of Scientific Advice'.



 
 
 
The Countryside Council for Wales champions the environment and landscapes of Wales 
and its coastal waters as sources of natural and cultural riches, as a foundation for 
economic and social activity, and as a place for leisure and learning opportunities. We 
aim to make the environment a vital and valued part of everyone’s life in Wales. 
 
 
 
 
PROJECT SPECIFICATION 
 
 
HIGHLY PROTECTED MARINE RESERVES: 
DEFINING DAMAGING AND DISTURBING ACTIVITIES 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Version 
FINAL 
Author 
Mary Lewis 
Date   
5th November 2008 
 
 


 
1. BACKGROUND 
 
The Welsh Assembly Government has confirmed that it intends to use the new Marine 
Conservation Zone (MCZ) designation in the draft Marine Bill to create some highly 
protected sites, or Highly Protected Marine Reserves (HPMRs), in order to enhance the 
existing network of marine protected areas (MPAs) in Welsh waters1. 
 
Highly Protected Marine Reserves (HPMRs) are a certain type of marine protected area 
where a high level of protection exists – CCW defines HPMRs as site that are protected 
from extraction and deposition of living and non-living resources, and all other damaging 
or disturbing activities.  A summary of CCW’s advice on and approach to using HPMRs 
is contained in the enclosed booklet ‘Highly Protected Marine Reserves: their role in 
protected Welsh seas’. 
 
It is important that the activities that are considered ‘extractive’, ‘depositional’, 
‘damaging’ and ‘disturbing’ are clearly defined in order to provide clarity over the 
implications of HPMRs for sea users, and to inform site selection. 
 
2. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 
 
Aim: to provide clarity on the types of activities that are compatible with HPMRs. 
 
The project is split into five discrete work packages, associated with the following five 
objectives: 
 
1.  Review the types of activities excluded and permitted in MPAs that are equivalent 
to HPMRs around the world.  
2.  Provide clear definitions of: 
a.  the terms ‘depositional’, ‘extractive’, ‘damaging’ and ‘disturbing’;  
b.  the types of activities that are considered extractive and depositional and 
hence incompatible with an HPMR, and 
c.  the types of activities that are considered damaging or disturbing at certain 
levels of activity or in certain types of HPMRs (referred to from here on as 
‘potentially damaging activities’ – this term include disturbing activities) 
3.  Define the circumstances under which potentially damaging activities would be 
considered damaging or disturbing in HPMRs. 
4.  Provide suggested conservation objectives that could potentially be used as part of 
an MCZ designating order to secure a highly protected site, for a variety of types 
of site. 
5.  Provide text for public guidance on the above, i.e. activities that are and aren’t 
compatible with HPMRs.  
 
                                                  
1 The current network of marine protected areas in Wales covers 32% of Welsh territorial seas. These include the 
Marine Nature Reserve at Skomer; a suite of Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Special Protection Areas 
(SPAs), as well as intertidal and coastal Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs).  
 
 


 
3. SCOPE 
 
Work package 1: review of activities in highly protected sites 
There are many MPA initiatives around the world that include sites, whether as a network 
or a one-off site, which are equivalent to highly protected MPAs.  (In general HPMRs 
can be considered equivalent to IUCN protected area management categories 1a and 1b2.)  
A literature search should be carried out to collate information on the types of activities 
excluded and permitted in MPAs equivalent to HPMRs around the world.  This work 
should be presented as a review that also identifies common themes.  Similarities and 
differences between examples reviewed and the Welsh definition of HPMRs should also 
be presented. 
 
Work package 2: defining activities for Welsh HPMRs 
Definitions provided under this work package should be specifically for Welsh HPMRs 
and based on CCW’s definition of HPMRs. 
 
The first task in this work package (Objective 2a) is defining the terms ‘depositional’, 
‘extractive’, ‘damaging’ and ‘disturbing’3.  This should be worked up and agreed with 
CCW before progressing with objectives 2b and 2c.   
 
The report to CCW by Sue Gubbay in 20064 makes an initial assessment of the types of 
activities that are compatible with an HPMR designation, drawing on the MARLIN 
activity categories.  These two sources of information should be used as a starting point 
to define the types of activities that should be prohibited in HPMRs, and those activities 
that may be damaging or disturbing at certain levels or for certain HPMRs (objectives 2b 
and 2c). A rationale for inclusion in each list should also be provided, linked to CCW’s 
definition of HPMRs. 
 
Further information for this work package and work package 3 should be obtained 
through literatures searches.  Research carried commissioned by Defra to support the 
Marine Bill and the Bill Impact Assessment should also inform the work5. 
 
Work package 3: defining circumstances for potentially damaging and disturbing 
activities 
This work package deals exclusively with ‘potentially damaging activities’, and not 
‘extractive’ or ‘depositional’ activities. The full list of potentially damaging activities 
                                                  
2 IUCN CATEGORY Ia: Strict Nature Reserve: protected area managed mainly for science.  Definition: Area of land 
and/or sea possessing some outstanding or representative ecosystems, geological or physiological features and/or 
species, available primarily for scientific research and/or environmental monitoring. 
IUCN CATEGORY Ib Wilderness Area: protected area managed mainly for wilderness protection.  Definition: Large 
area of unmodified or slightly modified land, and/or sea, retaining its natural character and influence, without 
permanent or significant habitation, which is protected and managed so as to preserve its natural condition. 
3 For example. does ‘damaging’ and ‘disturbing’ equate to permanent impact on populations, or temporary impact on 
individual etc.? 
4 Gubbay, S. 2006. Highly Protected Marine Reserves – Evidence of benefits and opportunities for marine biodiversity 
in Wales
 CCW Science Report No: 762. 
5 In particular the following report and annexes should be referred to - ABP MER (2007) Cost impact of marine 
biodiversity policies on business – the Marine Bill, 
Defra, Report No. CR0378.  This and other relevant reports be 
found at www.defra.gov.uk/marine/biodiversity/evidence.htm 
 


 
should be assessed to provide advice on the circumstances in which these activities would 
be incompatible with an HPMR.  Whether an activity is to be considered damaging or 
disturbing (and hence prohibited) or not will relate to a variety of factors, such as 
intensity, or the methods used to undertake an activity, and / or the types of habitats or 
species found within the HPMR.  The assessment should also indicate where an activity 
would only be considered damaging or disturbing on a seasonal basis, and why.  
Supporting information should be obtained through literatures searches.   
 
It is appreciated that different reserves will have different management approaches 
depending upon the precise features and the conservation objectives (see work package 
4), but nevertheless, given the specific nature of HPMRs, it should be possible and 
necessary to make some general conclusions in relation to damaging and potentially 
damaging activities. 
 
Work package 4: conservation objectives 
Defra and the Welsh Assembly Government produced a series of guidance notes to 
accompany the draft Marine Bill. One of the guidance documents covers selection and 
designation of MCZs, including drafting of conservation objectives6 for inclusion in 
MCZ designating orders.  This guidance, and the draft Marine Bill, should form a starting 
point for delivery of this work package.   
 
The wording of conservation objectives will be critical to securing appropriate 
management of sites in keeping with the definition of HPMRs as management of sites is 
largely secured through public body compliance with conservation objectives.  Although 
in general it is anticipated conservation objectives for individual HPMRs will be very 
similar, there may be local differences depending on the nature of activities that occur in 
or near a site.  A series of suggested conservation objectives should therefore be 
produced linked to a minimum of 4 theoretical sites, drawing on the different 
circumstances assessed in work package 3. It is anticipated that this work package will 
help inform the development of final conservation objectives for HPMRs, once actual 
sites have been selected. 
 
It should be noted that the emphasis on wording of conservation objectives for MCZs is 
different to other nature conservation designations; MCZ conservation objectives should 
be impact focussed rather than status focussed (further details can be discussed with the 
nominated project officer). 
 
Work package 5: public summary text 
Work packages 1 to 4 will be provided as advice to CCW in report format (see outputs 
below).  However, a key audience for this advice will be stakeholders in order to provide 
greater understanding of the implications of HPMRs.  A public summary of the advice 
should therefore be developed that can be used as accessible guidance.  The outputs from 
                                                  
6 Defra and Welsh Assembly Government (2008) Draft guidance on selection and designation of Marine Conservation 
Zones (Note 1): Draft guidance on the proposed approach to the selection and designation of Marine Conservation 
Zones under Part 4 of the draft Marine Bill
, Defra, May 2008, draft version 1.1 This and other guidance is available at 
www.defra.gov.uk/marine/biodiversity/marine-bill/guidance.htm 
 


 
work packages 1 to 4 will need to be agreed with and signed off by CCW before 
progressing to the public summary. 
 
4. OUTPUTS 
 
Work package 1: review of activities in highly protected sites 
•  Interim report* 
•  Final report* 
 
Work package 2 – defining activities 
•  Interim report* 
•  Final report* 
 
Work package 3 – defining circumstances for potentially damaging and disturbing 
activities 
•  Interim report* 
•  Final report* 
 
Work package 4: conservation objectives 
•  Interim conservation objectives 
•  Final conservation objectives 
 
Work package 5 – public summary  
•  First draft text 
•  Final draft text 
 
*Note: Some of the interim and final reports in the above individual work package 
outputs may be amalgamated as appropriate, although an interim report on work 
packages 1 and 2 should be signed off before progressing to 3 and 4.   
 
All work packages: 
For all work packages the following further outputs are required: 
•  Poster summarising the work – draft and final 
•  Power point slides (up to 12) summarising the work – draft and final 
•  Full final report incorporating all work pages undertaken from 1 - 4 – draft and 
final. (N.B. the public summary text is a separate output, and should not be 
included in the final full report, but provided separately). The final report should 
include a 1-page executive summary (including Welsh translation though a CCW 
approved supplier) and be supported by annexes where appropriate.  30 hard 
copies of the final report should be supplied to the Project Officer.  The Project 
Officer will provide distribution covers for the report bearing the appropriate 
logos.  Electronic copies of the report shall be supplied in Microsoft Word 2000 
format and as a pdf, and a reduced pdf suitable for web download.  More detail of 
report style and format to be used is given in Annex 1. 
 
 


 
5. PROJECT SCHEDULE 
 
The project is to be completed by 28th February 2009. 
N.B. We will be unable to diverge significantly from the timetable set out below.   
 
Milestone 
Details 
Date  

Project initiation meeting 
Mid Dec 
(Note: Staging on individual work packages and 
delivery of draft outputs will be agreed with the 
contractor at the inception meeting) 

Delivery of full draft report, draft power point 
By 6th Feb 09 
slides and draft poster 

Steering Group meeting 
By 13th Feb 09 

Delivery of full final report and power point slides,  28th Feb 09 
and poster 
 
6. PROJECT MANAGEMENT 
 
The nominated Project Officer is Mary Lewis.  CCW’s HPMR Working Group will also 
act as a steering group for the project.  
 
7. OWNERSHIP AND COPYRIGHT 
 
The  ownership  of  all  reports,  both  paper  and  electronic  copies,  produced  by  the 
Contractor in connection with the project shall be vested with CCW. 
 
8. CONTENTS OF TENDERS 
 
Tenders  should  be  sent  in  duplicate  according  to  the  arrangements  specified  in  the 
covering letter.  The document should include the following: 
 
 
•  a planned schedule for delivering the work based on the timetable described 
above, including confirmation that you have the available resources to meet 
the project milestone deadlines; 
•  a statement of no more than 3000 words setting out how you intend to 
approach the work including the capability and suitability you have in 
undertaking this commission (including any previous maritime policy and / or 
marine protected area contract experience); 
•  details of the position, background and qualifications of any individual 
working on the contract, including relevant experience, respective hourly rates 
and period in employment with practice; 
•  a separate breakdown of costs for each of the five work packages outlined 
above  including an hourly rate for contractor time and including a reasonable 
amount for travel and subsistence costs (at a rate not exceeding CCW standard 
rates), and 
•  any anticipated additional costs, identified per work package where possible. 
 


 
 
9. SELECTION CRITERIA  
 
The contract will be awarded on the basis of a review against the following criteria: 
•  Capacity to deliver (staff, time, management process) 
•  Value for money 
•  Previous relevant experience and related work 
•  Technical understanding 
 
10. FURTHER INFORMATION 
 
For further information and to discuss this project specification please contact the Project 
Officer: 
 
Mary Lewis 
Maritime Policy Officer, Countryside Council for Wales 
Tel. Mold 01352 706651, or Bangor 01248 387102, or mobile 07720 719294 
xxxx.xxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx 
 
 


 
ANNEX 1. GUIDE TO CCW POLICY REPORT FORMAT 
 

Introduction 
 
This guide has two aims: 
•  to present the main elements of the CCW Policy Report style, so that you can 
prepare your typescript so that it requires the minimum amount of handling 
•  to provide technical information about how to supply word processor files, 
drawings, photographs etc. 
 
Please follow these guidelines: they will reduce the amount of work required by you and 
the CCW. 
 
Style 
General 
The report must have a contents list and a list of Tables and Figures where appropriate. 
Spelling 
 
Use the Concise Oxford Dictionary for spelling, hyphenation, capitalisation etc. of 
normal English words. 
Headings 
•  Indicate clearly, via bold and/or italic type, the headings and subheadings that you 
have used.  An electronic copy of a proforma document can be supplied by the Project 
Officer with necessary style types already incorporated. 
•  Do not number headings. 
•  Use only essential capital letters in headings (as in this annex). 
 
Illustrations and tables 
•  Ensure that each illustration and table is numbered and mentioned in the text (e.g. 
Figure 1.1; Table 2.3). 
•  Ensure that each illustration and table has a caption. 
 
Lists 
Lay out lists as follows: 
(a)  List item 
(b) Sub-list item 
(c)  Sub-list item 
(1) Sub-sub-list item 
(2) Sub-sub-list item 
(d) List item 
... 
or 
 


 
•  List item 
(e)  Sub-list item 
(f)  Sub-list item 
–  Sub-sub-list item 
–  Sub-sub-list item 
•  List item 
 
References 
•  Use the Harvard (name and date) method for citing references: 
(g)  It has been shown (Smith et al. 1997a,b; Jones 1998; Smith and Jones 2000) that... 
(h)  Smith (1997) demonstrated that... 
Use ‘et al.’ if there are three or more authors. 
•  Use the following basic models for references in the reference list: 
(i) Paper in a journal 
(j) Smith, R S and Charman, D J (1988) The vegetation of upland mires within conifer 
plantations  in  Northumberland,  northern  England.  Journal  of  Applied  Ecology,  25
579–594 
(k)  Books and reports 
(l) Digby,  P  G  N  and  Kempton,  R  A  (1987).  Multivariate  analysis  of  ecological 
communities. Chapman & Hall, London 
(m)  Howson,  C  M  and  Picton,  B  E  (1997)  The  species  directory  of  the  marine  flora 
and fauna of the British Isles.  Ulster Museum and the Marine Conservation Society, 
Belfast and Ross-on-Wye.  Ulster Museum Publication No. 256.  509pp. 
(n)  Chapter in book 
Smith, R S (1988) Farming and the conservation of meadowland in the Pennine 
Dales Environmentally Sensitive Area. In Ecological change in the uplands (eds M 
B Usher and D B A Thompson), pp. 183–200. Blackwell Scientific, Oxford 
(o)  Theses 
Hiscock, K (1976) The effects of water movements on the ecology of sublittoral 
rocky areas
. PhD Thesis, University College of North Wales 
 
Scientific names 
•  Use italics for scientific names 
•  Taxonomy should follow Howson & Picton (1997) 
 
Scientific units 
•  Use SI units and abbreviations throughout. 
•  Units should be separated from each other and from the preceding number by a single 
space, for example: 
37 kg m–3 or 10 m s–1 
•  Use positive and negative powers for units, not the solidus (i.e. m s–1, not m/s). 
 
Numbers 
•  Spell out numbers from one to ten, except in measurements. 
 


 
•  Use commas to separate groups of thousands in large numbers (e.g. 1,000 or 
1,000,000). 
•  Use scientific (or exponential) notation for very large or very small numbers: e.g. 
5×109 rather than 5,000,000,000; 5×10–6 rather than 0.000005 
 
Technical information 
 
Word processing in the digital age 
•  Type everything using a clear, standard font (preferably Times New Roman) at a size 
of 12 points. Do not use more than one font unless this is absolutely essential.   
•  Use the minimum amount of formatting (bold, italic, superscript, subscript). It is time 
consuming to reflow a document, removing unnecessary  
•  Type each chapter in a separate file if document is large.  Alternatively, Microsoft 
Word allows documents to be split into sub- and master documents allowing them to 
be linked together. 
 
Illustrations 
•  Non-electronic artwork: see instructions under ‘Supplying the finished work to CCW’. 
•  Electronic artwork: discuss the file formats to be used with CCW if not specified in the 
contract specification. In general, TIFF files are always acceptable. 
•  When drawing illustrations, bear in mind that they must be legible when reproduced on 
an A4 page. The maximum dimensions are 160 mm × 230 mm (or 240 mm × 150 mm 
for landscape illustrations), including allowances for a short (one line) caption. 
•  Label the illustrations using Times New Roman. 
 
Supplying the finished work to CCW 
•  Supply your report to CCW, in Microsoft Word 2000 format (exceptionally, in 
agreement with the Project Officer you may be permitted to supply in an earlier 
version of Microsoft Word.  Contractors will also supply an Adobe Portable Document 
Format (PDF) version 
•  Include a printout of all files to act as a reference in case of problems with the files. 
•  Supply non-electronic artwork only if absolutely necessary, in which case it should be 
as good quality prints or clear line drawings. Provide clear full-size illustrations and 
ensure that each illustration is clearly labelled.  
•  Supply electronic artwork both as separate files (TIFF format) and embedded into 
Microsoft Word documents (the contractor may choose to compress or change the file 
for embedding purposes if required for optimising performance). 
•   Files will be accepted on archival quality CD-Rom.  If you use a Macintosh or Unix 
computer, ensure that the disks you supply are formatted for MS-DOS. 
 
 
10