This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Robert Owen Centre review of Active Literacy'.







 
 
 
 
Robert Owen Centre for Educational Change  
Active Literacy – A Focused Review of Literature Supporting 
North Lanarkshire Council’s Professional Learning Approach for 
Literacy  
September 2023 
Deja Lusk, Kevin Lowden & Stuart Hall  

 
1  INTRODUCTION  
This focused literature review has been prepared by researchers at the Robert Owen Centre 
for  Educational  Change  at  the  University  of  Glasgow  in  response  to  a  request  from  North 
Lanarkshire  Council  Education  Services  for  a  focused  review  of  the  research  literature 
regarding  the  underpinning  concepts  and  theories  of  the  Service’s  professional  learning 
programme to enhance practitioners’ teaching of literacy. 
This review is a ‘light touch’ scoping of relevant recent literature (2010 to date). The focused 
review  was  tasked  with  updating  the  extensive  literature  review  conducted  by  North 
Lanarkshire’s  Educational  Psychologists  in  2006  to  inform  the  design  of  the  Council’s 
successful and widely adopted literacy pedagogical professional learning programme.  The 
original  review  was  extremely  comprehensive  and  provided  a  robust  foundation  for  the 
professional learning programme for primary school teachers that was piloted for four years. 
This  was  positively  evaluated  and  highly  rated  by  the  Scottish  Government  in  2007.  This 
review aimed to verify the Local Authority’s ongoing pedagogical professional programme and 
confirm the conceptual foundations of the current approach or, identify new findings that have 
implications for its revision. Therefore, the main focus of the review was on any new published 
research that confirmed or challenged the current professional learning approach for literacy 
adopted by North Lanarkshire Council. 
2  METHODS 
The review was a focused study to ascertain whether new research has emerged since 2010 
- the most recent date of references appearing in the original review. The original literature 
review,  including  details  of  its  approach,  search  terms  and  the  bibliographical  sources 
accessed was not available at the time of writing. However, the research team has had access 
to the main references used by the original review. These  helped to frame the new search 
terms and scope of the review. 
2.1  KEY AREAS OF FOCUS 
The  senior  leadership  team  at  North  Lanarkshire  highlighted  the  following  areas  of  the 
programme as key foci for the review:  
Primary areas of focus -  
•  Phonics/ phonics debate  
•  Reading comprehension  
•  Dialogic reading  
•  Writing pedagogy  
Additional areas of focus -  
•  Impact of Covid Pandemic on Acquisition of Early Literacy Skills 
•  Play Pedagogy  
•  Using ICT with Pupils with Persistent Literacy Difficulties (when to move to this) 
•  Curriculum Rationale: The Development of Literacy Skills (beyond the basics) through 
Relevant Contexts for Learning 
 


 
2.2  SEARCH TERMS  
The search terms were generated around the key foci for the review stated above and are 
shown  below. These were reviewed and revised following the outcome of the initial search 
results.  
Phonics; reading comprehension; dialogic reading; writing pedagogy; primary education.  
2.3  BIBLIOGRAPHICAL DATABASES AND SOURCES  
Academically recognised bibliographical educational research databases were accessed by 
the research team. These included:  
•  Australian Education Index; 
•  British Education Index; 
•  CUREE Centre for the Use of Research and Evidence in Education; 
•  Educational Endowment Foundation (EEF); 
•  Education Information Resources; 
•  Education-line; 
•  ERIC; 
•  Google Scholar (with caution); 
•  Higher Education Academy website  
•  International Bibliography of the Social Sciences;  
•  International Education Academy website;  
•  JSTOR (Journal Storage); 
•  Scopus (inc. Web of Science).  
Those sources that contained existing systematic reviews of recent peer-reviewed evidence 
and  meta  analyses  were  privileged.  For  example,  the  Educational  Endowment  Foundation 
sources were particularly helpful in that they synthesised key research findings on much of 
the search foci and also assessed impact and rigour of sources. Articles accessed, therefore 
were  typically  peer  reviewed,  scholarly  articles,  books  and  other  relevant  publications. 
Analysis  of  key  themes  regarding  the  reviews  focus  were  considered  against  the  broader 
design features of the North Lanarkshire Active Literacy Programme. 
3  REVIEW OF LITERATURE 
3.1  KEY AREAS OF FOCUS 
This  section  reports  on  the  literature  review’s  main  areas  of  focus  that  reflect  the  core 
components of the Active Literacy Programme.   
 
Phonics – particularly Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP).   
Major evaluative research conducted as recently as 2021, confirms the  EEF assessment of 
Systematic Synthetics Phonics approach as impactful for all learners as well as being cost-
effective.  The  EEF  evidence,  based  on  121  studies,  states  that  there  is  some  variation  in 
impact between different phonological approaches, and overall synthetic phonics approaches 
have  a  greater  impacts  than  analytic  approaches  (EEF  2023;  Brady,  2020).  A  recent 
evaluation of a systematic synthetic-informed phonics intervention (Molotsky and Nakamura, 
 


 
2022),  found  that  the  approach  had  a  positive  impact  on  learners’  phonics  outcomes, 
equivalent  to  one  month’s  additional  progress.  However,  one  somewhat  cautionary  note 
comes from Joseph, et al (2023) who state that further large scale- randomised control trials 
are  required  to  conclusively  say  whether  systematic  synthetic  phonics  instruction  is  more 
effective than other approaches to teaching reading. However, the weight of the EEF meta-
analysis would indicate that there is confidence in their claims for SSP. 
Teaching phonics is more effective on average than other approaches to early reading, such 
as whole language or alphabetic approaches. Evidence collated by EEF demonstrates that 
‘Phonics has a positive impact overall (+5 months) with extensive evidence and is an important 
component  in  the  development  of  early  reading  skills,  particularly  for  children  from 
disadvantaged backgrounds.’  1  
Studies of phonics approaches have found they are effective in supporting younger learners 
(particularly  4-7  year  olds)  to  master  the  basics  of  reading,  with  an  average  impact  of  an 
additional five months’ progress over a year. Importantly, to be effective, phonics approaches 
should be embedded in a  ‘rich literacy environment’ and seen as part of an overall literacy 
strategy. This reflects the way it is currently used in the NLC ‘s Active Literacy approach. 
There is some evidence that socio-economically disadvantaged learners get a proportionally 
greater  benefit  from  phonics  approaches.  The  EEF,  therefore,  suggest  targeted  phonics 
interventions  are  likely  to  improve  decoding  skills  more  quickly  for  pupils  who  have 
experienced  barriers  to  learning  that  arise  from  contexts  where  discussion  and  reading  at 
home is limited. 
The  EEF  evidence  also  provides  advice  on  how  phonics  should  be  taught  including, 
systematically supporting children to make connections between sound patterns heard and 
the way they are written and matched to children’s level of phonic awareness and skil s. This 
evidence notes that phonics ‘improves the accuracy of the child’s reading but not necessarily 
their comprehension’. Therefore, the EEF guidance states that ‘it is important that children are 
successful  in  making  progress  in  all  aspects  of  reading  including  comprehension,  the 
development of vocabulary and spel ing, which should also be taught explicitly’. The research 
highlights that intensive phonics approaches that are led by teaching assistants have slightly 
lower overall impact (+4 months) compared to those involving teachers. The EEF, therefore, 
advises that teaching assistants should receive appropriate training and support in phonics 
for interventions before they take such a lead role. 
Therefore, of the research that has been conducted to date included in this scoping of relevant 
literature,  most  support  the  use  of  phonics  in  schools  for  reading  comprehension,  dialogic 
reading and writing pedagogy (Bowers, 2020; Shanahan, 2020; Solity & Vousden, 2009; Wyse 
& Bradbury, 2022a; Molotsky, et al 2022). This includes studies of the effectiveness of SSP 
approaches in different contexts (particularly, Molotsky, et al 2022). One systematic literature 
review  of  effective  reading  interventions  while  finding  that  synthetic  phonics  has  powerful 
effects on children’s early word reading skil s, states that the effects are ‘far smaller at follow 
up.  Overall,  though,  such  recent  research  adds  further  weight  to  the  EEF  assessment  of 
 
1 https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-
toolkit/phonics?utm_source=/education-evidence/teaching-learning-
toolkit/phonics&utm_medium=search&utm_campaign=site_search&search_term=Phonics 

 
 


 
phonics, particularly SSP, as being an approach that is ‘High impact for very low cost based 
on very extensive evidence’.2 
Phonics in the context of the Active Literacy programme 
It is important to note that North Lanarkshire Council’s (NLC’s) Active Literacy programme is 
a  theory-informed  approach  to  teaching  reading which  is  supported  by  adaptable  practices 
and comprehension strategies framed by Systematic Synthetic Phonics (SSP). However, it is 
also  an  integrated  approach  that  incorporates  Phonics,  Spelling,  Reading  comprehension, 
Dialogic Reading, and writing with each element reinforcing the other. The SSP aspect is a 
synthesised  approach  which  primarily  supports  reading  through  an  adaptable  phonics 
approach.  The  approach,  when  reaching  higher  stages  of  comprehension,  incorporates  a 
whole language approach using the phonics as a foundation and expanding on it to engage 
confident readers through more meaningful books. The SSP aspect of NLC’s Active Learning 
programme,  therefore,  is  a  core  element  within  a  balanced  and  integrated  instruction 
approach.  
The  phonics  aspect  of  the  programme  also  reflects  the  research  literature  on  appropriate 
adaptation  for  learner  needs.  For  example,  each  stage  of  phonics,  while  synthetic  and 
analytical in nature, also uses activities and approaches which include the use of “high quality 
novels and non-fiction texts generally P4-P7 (not schemes)” (Cowan & Glover, n.d., p. 6). This 
is  a  means  through  which  children  and  young  people  can  engage  in  meaningful  reading 
balancing the approach of phonics focus with engagement and enthusiasm of real-life reading 
skills. 
Phonics has perhaps stimulated more debate in the field of literacy learning than any other 
aspect.  (Wolfe,  2015;  Wyse  &  Bradbury,  2022a,  2022b;  Wyse  &  Goswami,  2008;  Wyse  & 
Styles,  2007).  This  debate  has  continued,  despite  clear  evidence  being  available,  and  in 
recent years the debate has sparked renewed interest calling into question, once again, which 
pedagogical practices are most appropriate for teaching reading and writing in classrooms.  
Prominent  in  the  field  of  literacy  learning  literature  using  phonics  is  the  Department  for 
Education’s  (DfE  2023)  recommendations  for  teaching  through  a  strictly  synthetic  phonics 
approach in England (Wolfe, 2015; Wyse & Bradbury, 2022a, 2022b; Wyse & Goswami, 2008; 
Wyse  &  Styles,  2007).  The  DfE  is  criticised for  adopting  a  quite  prescriptive  approach  and 
limiting teachers to rigid pedagogical practices. Research indicates that a more effective use 
of phonics education occurs when it uses a range of activities that assist children in making 
connections with broader works. Wolfe argues that in prescribed pedagogical practices “not 
only is choice reduced, one might also argue that insistence on the exclusive use of a single 
approach might result in ‘deskil ing’ teachers professionally” (2015, p. 501).  
While NLC’s Active Literacy programme is considered an SSP, it does not strictly follow the 
DfE’s prescriptive guidelines. For example, within the many robust resource packs provided 
for educators, there are no prescriptive methodologies which teachers must follow. Instead, 
teacher autonomy is encouraged while sticking to the foundations of the programme. That is, 
teachers are offered a range of options to frame their praxis and heavily encouraged not to 
‘cherry-pick’  lessons.  In  this  way,  teachers  are  supported  to  autonomously  use  their 
professional judgement in alignment with Scottish Curriculum for Excellence (CfE) guidelines 
 
2 Phonics | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk) 
 


 
which contradicts the typical prescriptive pedagogy of the typical SSP prescribed by the DfE 
in England.  
In  2022,  Dominic  Wyse  and  Alice  Bradbury  published  a  report  examining  these  areas  of 
practice.  This  report,  funded  through  the  Helen  Hamlyn  Trust,  was  based  on  research 
conducted  by  the  Institute  of  Education,  University  College  London  (IOE  UCL).  It  initiated 
interest on the effectiveness of current teaching approaches (Herald Scotland, 2022; National 
Literacy Trust, 2023; The Conversation, 2022; UCL Institute of Education, 2022). The resulting 
debate,  called  ‘reading  wars’  (Wyse  &  Bradbury,  2022a),  can  easily  be  misconstrued  as 
questioning the method of teaching reading and writing through phonics which has featured 
in most western educational systems since the late 1990’s. However, this is not the case, as 
Wyse and Bradbury (2022) do not question the sound conceptual underpinnings for the use 
of  phonics  in  literacy  teaching,  but  rather  how  phonics  is  taught.  The  practice  for  teaching 
phonics  are  categorised  into  three  primary  areas  (Wyse  &  Bradbury,  2022a).  These  three 
primary areas of practice are as follows: 
Phonics only approach – This approach, consists of one or a combination of methods focusing 
on  teaching  children  about  phonemes  and  letters.  The  phonics  only  approach  focuses 
primarily on identifying phonemes (sounds) and graphemes (letters). Within this approach are 
varying  ways  in  which  the  phonemes  and  graphemes  are  used.  The  Synthetic  phonics 
approach  is  where  the  phonemes  and  graphemes  are  pronounced  in  isolation  before 
synthesising the sounds together. This approach separates sounds and letters forming each 
word.  This  is  the  primary  approach  supported  by  the  English  Government  for  more  than  a 
decade  (Bowers,  2020,  2021;  Department  of  Education,  2023).  The  Analytical  phonics 
approach is more closely associated with Scotland according to the National Literacy Trust 
(2023). It supports a similar approach to phonemes and graphemes; however, they are not 
read  in  isolation  before  being  synthesised.  Instead,  they  are  analysed  as  a  whole  in 
association with other words that are alike in nature.  
The phonics only approach, whether synthetic or analytical, uses books which are specifically 
supported  for  identifying  phonemes  and  graphemes  and  are  often  criticised  for  not 
encouraging  enjoyment  and  thus  engagement  in  reading  (Wyse  &  Bradbury,  2022).  In 
contrast, the whole language approach is praised for engaging young readers, encouraging 
enthusiasm for reading alongside phonetic understanding.  
Whole language approach – Also called embedded phonics (National Literacy Trust, 2023), 
this approach is a form of reading in which whole texts are sourced for instruction, in lieu of 
reading  materials  specifically  designed  for  phonetic  acquisition  and  understanding.  This 
approach  is  primarily  focused  on  reading  for  meaning  and  understanding,  often  engaging 
readers through phonics via examples from books in a non-systematic way (Bowers, 2020; 
National Literacy Trust, 2023; Wyse & Bradbury, 2022a).  
Balanced  instruction  approach  –  This  approach  is  focused  primarily  on  finding  a  balance 
between approaches while emphasising the meaning and understanding through whole books 
with systematic and targeted links to phonics (Bowers, 2020; National Literacy Trust, 2023; 
Wyse & Bradbury, 2022a).    
 


 
 
Reading comprehension strategies 
These  strategies  use  a  range  of  approaches,  including  collaborative  learning,  to  facilitate 
learner’s understanding of text, including meaning associated with context. Meta analyses and 
other reviews of peer reviewed evidence have found that reading comprehension strategies 
have a high impact, particularly 10 week interventions. There is consensus in peer-reviewed 
evidence  over  the  past  decade  that  Reading  Comprehension  Strategies  have  a  significant 
impact on average (+6 months over a year) and alongside phonics, it is a crucial component 
of early reading teaching. 3 The approach can also particularly benefit lower attaining learners. 
An EEF summary of key research literature reveals that successful reading comprehension 
approaches enable activities to be tailored to pupils’ reading capabilities, and involve activities 
and texts that provide an appropriate level of challenge. Reading comprehension strategies 
can be effectively combined with collaborative learning approaches, phonics and use of digital 
media  to  enhance  reading  skills.  This  aligns  wel   with  North  Lanarkshire  Council’s  Active 
Literacy Programme. The research highlights the importance of effective diagnosis of learners’ 
reading abilities and issues to inform the use of reading comprehension strategies which need 
to be taught explicitly and consistently with support for learners to ‘apply the comprehension 
strategies independently to other reading tasks, contexts and subjects’. 
Dialogic reading 
Dialogic reading (DR) is an approach to reading aloud in which the reader encourages children 
to  actively  engage  with  the  story  through  an  intentional  scaffolding  instructional  sequence 
(Pillinger  &  Vardy,  2022;  Towson,  Fettig,  Fleury,  &  Abarca,  2017).  This  is  accomplished 
through a shared book reading experience in which the reader engages the children by posing 
questions  of  them  over  multiple  readings  and  conversations  where  the  children  are 
encouraged  to  take  on  the  role  of  storytellers  (Doyle  &  Bramwell,  2006;  O’Sullivan,  2021; 
Pillinger & Vardy, 2022; Pillinger & Wood, 2014; Wall, Foltz, Kupfer, & Glenberg, 2022). 
There is strong evidence to support the use of Dialogic Reading which has been shown to 
significantly increase expressive language vocabulary and category naming skills, which are 
among  the  early  literacy  skills.  There  is  evidence  that  the  experience  of  dialogic  reading 
correlates with future literacy skills (Watkins, 2018); such as “emergent writing, knowledge of 
graphemes,  grapheme–phoneme  correspondence,  and  phonological  awareness  (all  skills 
important for later reading)” (Doyle & Bramwell, 2006, p. 555). Further, there is evidence which 
supports the use of Diagnostic Reading in promoting not only emergent literacy but also social-
emotional learning (Doyle & Bramwell, 2006). 
Skill acquisition is supported by the oral language development used in small groups through 
listening as well as actively engaging in conversation about the books being read (Doyle & 
Bramwell, 2006; Pillinger & Vardy, 2022). This is further supported by the strong evidence that 
Diagnostic  Reading  significantly  increases  expressive  language  vocabulary  and  category 
naming skills, which are among the early literacy skills (Flynn, 2011). 
 
3 https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-
comprehension-strategies 
 


 
There  is  limited  research  indicating  the  effectiveness  of  dialogic  reading  on  children  with 
moderate  to  severely  delayed  language  skills,  but  one  small-scale  study  has  shown  that  a 
significant increase in expressive vocabulary of children with these needs (Ramsey 2021). 
Brannon and Dauksas (2014) found that the children of those parents who were provided with 
dialogic  reading  training,  acquired  significantly  more  words  from  pre-test  to  post-test  and 
enhanced expressive language skills. 
The  findings  from  a  recent  PhD  research  study  (Gordon,  2018)  found  that  while  a  dialogic 
approach supported critical literacy, certain aspects of critical literacy were difficult to enact. 
However  this  study  indicated  the  potential  of  ‘dialogic  teaching  in  valuing  culturally-and-
linguistically diverse students’ contribution during the meaning-making process’, as well as the 
importance of understanding the teacher’s role in shaping the direction of critical dialogue. 
In 2022, Pillinger and Vardy (2022) conducted a systematic literature review of the impact of 
Diagnostic Reading on the literacy and non-literacy skills of children and found evidence to 
support  the  use  of  Diagnostic  Reading  to  promote  the  engagement  of  children  a  positive 
impact  on  children’s  enjoyment  and  motivation  for  reading.  However,  while  Pillinger  and 
Vardy’s  review  (2022)  does  not  contradict  prior  evidence  supporting  the  use  of  Diagnostic 
Reading  in  educational  and  home  settings  in  supporting  language  acquisition  skills,  they 
suggest  that there are limitations on the extant research and call for further research to be 
conducted.  
The recent evidence, therefore, suggests that Diagnostic Reading is a positive and effective 
means to engage children while promoting literacy and language acquisition skills. However, 
like much of the research in this area, a call for more research in understanding effective and 
sustainable pedagogy in this area would aid in fully assessing its impact. 
Writing pedagogy 
There  appears  to  be  limited  recent  relevant  research  evidence  on  this  field,  particularly 
evaluative  research.  The  most  recent  literature  in  this  key  focus  area  highlights  teacher 
education in the discourses of teaching writing (Bomer, Land, Rubin, & Van Dike, 2019). This 
research recaps six discourses relating to wiring pedagogy from a leading expert in the field, 
namely  Skills,  Creativity,  Process,  Genre  and  Social  practices  (Bomer  et  al.,  2019;  Ivanič, 
2004). While all of these discourses are important pedagogical practices for the development 
of  writing  skills,  the  most  relevant  to  this  literature  review  is  that  of  skills  discourse.    Skills 
discourse  is  an  emphasis  on  learning  and  linguistic  patterns  such  as  phonics  and  word 
formation which eventually leads to the formation of sentences, paragraphs and whole texts. 
This discourse relies on grammatical instruction. Additionally, this discourse is often the  ‘go 
to’ for many educators to help identify gaps in language acquisition. 
One other theme in this research field reveals an emphasis on promoting writing pedagogy 
aimed  at  educational  policy  makers  involved  in  developing  standards  and  accountability 
measures (Bomer et al., 2019; Eutsler, Mitchel , Stamm, & Kogut, 2020; Ivanič, 2004).  
 
 


 
3.2  ADDITIONAL AREAS OF FOCUS 
This review was also tasked with a secondary focus on several additional areas of interest 
that impinge on the teaching of literacy and the use of the Active Literacy programme. These 
expansive and additional areas of interest for the review were.: Impact of Covid Pandemic on 
Acquisition  of  Early  Literacy  Skills;  Play  Pedagogy;  Using  ICT  with  Pupils  with  Persistent 
Literacy  Difficulties;  Curriculum  Rationale:  The  Development  of  Literacy  Skills  through 
Relevant Contexts for Learning. Given the brief timescale of this review and a main focus on 
the key topics in Section 3.1, the review for the additional areas of focus was far more limited. 
Moreover, the scale and scope of the literature on these additional areas was considerable 
and  each  could  justify  a  separate  review.  However,  within  these  limitations,  a  number  of  
insights emerge: 
The impact of COVID-19 on literacy learning 
Research  conducted  by  the  Department  for  Education  (DfE)  in  autumn  2020,  using  STAR 
assessments for over 400,000 learners found a learning loss of up to 2 months in reading in 
both primary and secondary pupils (DfE, 2022), but younger primary learners experienced the 
greatest learning loss (Twist et al  2022), particularly regarding reading (Rose et al 2021). This 
loss was exacerbated for learners from disadvantaged backgrounds, with those in secondary 
education showing 50% greater learning loss (e.g. EEF, 2020). In the primary sector, learners 
experienced up to 2 months learning loss and there were regional variations that were more 
severe (DfE, 2021). Other research found that the poverty-related attainment gap, across all 
subjects, was exacerbated by COVID-19 (Blainey et al., 2021; Blainey et al., 2020). 
It  is  arguable  that,  compared  to  England  and  Wales,  the  Scottish  Government  has  been 
reticent  about  providing  specific  estimates  of  the  scale  of  learning  loss  due  to  COVID-19. 
However, the Scottish Government has stated that educational outcomes are likely to have 
been negatively impacted, but stresses that the evidence on the scale of the impact so far is 
limited given and will take time to accurately assess and understand (Scottish Government, 
2021).  
There  were  no  sources  identified  that  specifically  addressed  what  types  of  pedagogical 
strategies were effective in addressing literacy recovery associated with the detrimental Covid-
related learning loss. However, given the insights gleaned from the literature on phonics and 
diagnostic reading regarding their appropriateness for literacy recovery, we can speculate that 
these approaches would have potential here. 
Numerous  studies  report  that  parental/carer  participation  and  engagement  in  reading  with 
children during the COVID pandemic has a related impact on literacy skills (e.g.: Nevo, 2023; 
Wheeler  &  Hill,  2021),  however much  of  this research  also  indicates that  more  studies  are 
needed to understand this process. Research cautions that, due to the complexity of learning 
experiences and learning loss during the pandemic, a single approach to learning recovery is 
unlikely (Twist et al 2022). This has important implications for learning recovery approaches 
within schools and educational policy. 
Play pedagogy 
The  literature  indicates  that  play  pedagogy  can  be  an  effective  approach  for  literacy  skill 
acquisition (Jones & Christensen, 2022), however, it is noteworthy that practitioners should 
 


 
use different types of pedagogical approaches to ensure that all learning needs are met.  It is 
also  important  to  note  that  any  pedagogical  approach  in  a  classroom  setting  should  afford 
opportunities for the learner to deepen understanding of taught concepts/ allow for application 
of skills; it should not be in place of intended learning within a literacy curriculum.  Furthermore, 
the evidence base for play-based learning is not strong or consistent (EEF, 2023), therefore 
further research is required in this area. 
ICT and literacy learning 
The  literature  on  this  topic  often  focuses  on  teacher’s  ICT  awareness  and  skil s,  but  does 
encourage the use of ICT for language acquisition and emphasises its use to enhance other 
appropriate  pedagogical  practices  and  resources.  Evidence  collated  by  EEF  indicates  that 
approaches  using  digital  technology  alone  tend  to  be  less  successful  than  those  led  by  a 
teacher  or  teaching  assistant,  particularly  when using  phonics.  Further,  research  regarding 
the use of ICT with pupils primarily focuses on teacher awareness and encourages the use of 
it for language acquisition,  but little is reported on when to move to this as an intervention. 
While  outwith  time  frame  for  this  review  (10  year  period),  there  is  an  EPPI  analysis  of 
systematic reviews. It reports that a meta-analysis of 12 randomised controlled trials (mostly 
US) found little evidence to support the widespread use of ICT in literacy learning in English 
and only weak evidence of a positive effect on writing (Torgesson et al.2003). However since 
the  pandemic,  digital  and  ICT  approaches  in teaching  the  curriculum  have  proliferated  and 
newer approaches might offer more promise regarding the teaching of literacy. 
The  development  of  literacy  skills  through  relevant  contexts  for  learning  as  part  of 
curriculum rationale
 
Within the timescale for the drafting of this report, no relevant peer reviewed sources on this 
topic were identified. However, educational advice, particularly from Educational Scotland is 
available and features good practice for the teaching of literacy and its assessment across the 
curriculum  to  reflect  learner’s  needs.4 While  not  peer-reviewed,  this  material  is  based  on 
evidence  of  effective  practice  and  is  research  informed.  The  overall  content  and  advice 
contained in this type of material aligns very well with the design features of the NLC Active 
literacy approach. 
4  SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION 
The original literature review conducted by NLC Educational Psychologists, provided a strong 
conceptual framework and sound evidence-informed basis for the design of the NLC Active 
Literacy  approach.  There  appears  to  be  no  research  in  the  past  10  years  that  seriously 
contradicts the  NLC  approach’s  underpinning theory  and  methods.    Therefore,  we  suggest 
that guidance on the implementation of the NLC’s literacy approach continues unchanged and 
is followed to promote reliability of translation into practice. 
Reflecting on available evidence, NLC’s Active Literacy approach programme is relevant in its 
use of  supporting language development through supported activities, balanced praxis and 
pedagogical  resources.  The  research  suggests  that  practitioners  are  provided  with  robust 
 
4 https://education.gov.scot/media/qteey2ju/literacy-across-learning-pp.pdf 
 
10 

 
training  and  follow-up  support  when  necessary  to  effectively  teach  the  combination  of 
approaches that make up the Council’s approach to teaching literacy . 
The  EEF  evidence,  in  particular,  also  strongly  suggests  that  the  components  of  the  North 
Lanarkshire approach are pertinent for recovery following the Pandemic and for supporting 
pupils with persistent literacy difficulties associated with ASN. 
Given the relatively limited range of recent literature, the team did explore a limited amount of 
‘grey literature’ since 2010. This largely consisted of blogs and non-peer-reviewed sources 
that  debate  the  efficacy of  phonics  approaches. However,  as  commentators  highlight  (e.g.: 
Buckingham et al 2019), this debate largely reflects the many vested interests and ideological 
stances of the various contributors and is of limited use for designing interventions. 
The Active Literacy programme, as supported by school level evidence, continues to remain 
an effective theory-informed approach. The underpinning SSP conceptual framework is still 
validated  by  very  robust  research  evidence.  This  evidence  continues  to support  the  use  of 
NLC’s  Active  Literacy  programme  and  endorses  its  use  for  promoting  the  learning  of  all 
children and young people, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds and SEN.  
There is a major strand of literature that focuses on evidencing the impact of phonics in the 
teaching  of  literacy.  We  know  that  while  this  is  a  key  part  of  the  North  Lanarkshire  Active 
Literacy approach, it is also a unique combination of other components. It is, therefore, difficult 
to find  definitive  evidence  to  compare  with the combination  of  design  features  of  the  North 
Lanarkshire Active Literacy Programme. However, the literature, including systematic reviews, 
and  particularly  the  Education  Endowment  Foundation’s  assessment  of  impactful  literacy 
approaches,  indicates  that  the  main  components  of  the  North  Lanarkshire  approach  have 
been  demonstrated  to  be  effective  separately  (i.e.  Phonics,  Reading  comprehension 
Strategies and Dialogic reading). It is logical, therefore, to assume that these components can 
reinforce one another to provide a comprehensive and holistic approach to literacy learning 
for all children in primary education. A final caveat, however, is the importance of the quality 
of  the  professional  learning  that  builds  capacity  of  practitioners  and  the  extent  to  which 
practitioners  and  school  leaders  apply  this  professional  learning  and  adhere  to  the  Active 
Literacy model. 
5  REFERENCES 
Blainey, K. and Hannay, T. (2021). The Impact of School Closures on Autumn 2020 School 
Attainment. [online]. Available: https://www.risingstars-uk.com/media/Rising-
Stars/Assessment/RS_Assessment_white_paper_2021_impact_of_school_closures_on_aut
umn_2020_attainment.pdf [9 March, 2022] 
Bomer, R., Land, C. L., Rubin, J. C., & Van Dike, L. M. (2019). Constructs of Teaching 
Writing in Research About Literacy Teacher Education. 
Https://Doi.Org/10.1177/1086296X19833783, 51(2), 196–213. 
https://doi.org/10.1177/1086296X19833783 
Bowers, J. S. (2020). Reconsidering the Evidence That Systematic Phonics Is More 
Effective Than Alternative Methods of Reading Instruction. Educational Psychology Review, 
32(3), 681–705. https://doi.org/10.1007/S10648-019-09515-Y 
 
11 

 
Bowers, J. S. (2021). Yes Children Need to Learn Their GPCs but There Really Is Little or 
No Evidence that Systematic or Explicit Phonics Is Effective: a response to Fletcher, 
Savage, and Sharon (2020). Educational Psychology Review, 33(4), 1965–1979. 
https://doi.org/10.1007/S10648-021-09602-Z 
Brady, S., (2020) A 2020 Perspective on Research Findings on Alphabetics (PA & Phonics): 
Implications for Instruction. The Reading League Journal. pp20-28. 
https://www.thereadingleague.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Brady-Expanded-Version-of-
Alphabetics-TRLJ.pdf (accessed 28/08/2023) 
Brannon, D., and Dauksas, L. (2014) The Effectiveness of Dialogic Reading in Increasing 
English Language Learning Preschool Children’s Expressive Language. International 
Research in Early Childhood Education. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2014, pp 1-10 
Buckingham, J., Wheldall, K., and Beaman-Wheldall, R. (2019) Why Jaydon can't read: The 
triumph of ideology over evidence in teaching reading. Policy: A journal of public policy and 
ideas. Volume 29. Issue 3. pp 21-32 
Cowan, T., & Glover, A. (n.d.). An Overview of Active Literacy. North Lanarkshire. 
Department of Education. (2023). The reading framework. London. 
Doyle, B. G., & Bramwell, W. (2006). Promoting Emergent Literacy and Social–Emotional 
Learning Through Dialogic Reading. The Reading Teacher, 59(6), 554–564. 
https://doi.org/10.1598/RT.59.6.5 
Educational Endowment Foundation (2020) Rapid evidence assessment Impact of school 
closures on the attainment gap. 
https://d2tic4wvo1iusb.cloudfront.net/production/documents/guidance/REA_-
_Impact_of_school_closures_on_the_attainment_gap_summary.pdf?v=1694100771 
Eutsler, L., Mitchell, C., Stamm, B., & Kogut, A. (2020). The influence of mobile technologies 
on preschool and elementary children’s literacy achievement: a systematic review spanning 
2007–2019. Educational Technology Research and Development, 68(4), 1739–1768. 
https://doi.org/10.1007/S11423-020-09786-1/FIGURES/3 
Flynn, K. S. (2011). Developing Children’s Oral Language Skil s through Dialogic Reading. 
TEACHING Exceptional Children, 44(2), 8–16. 
https://doi.org/10.1177/004005991104400201 
Gordon, C. (2018) The Role of Dialogic Teaching in Fostering Critical Literacy in an Urban 
High School English Classroom. Dissertation, Georgia State University, 2018. 
https://scholarworks.gsu.edu/mse_diss/58 
Herald Scotland. (2022, May 30). Education in Scotland: Phonics failures “mean whole 
classes reach secondary without reading skil s” | HeraldScotland. Retrieved August 24, 
2023, from https://www.heraldscotland.com/politics/20174305.education-scotland-phonics-
failures-mean-whole-classes-reach-secondary-without-reading-skills/ 
Ivanič, R. (2004). Discourses of writing and learning to write. Language and Education, 
18(3), 220–245. https://doi.org/10.1080/09500780408666877 
 
12 

 
Jones, M. E., & Christensen, A. E. (2022). Play, Cognition, and Early Literacy. In 
Constructing Strong Foundations of Early Literacy (pp. 119–142). 
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780429284021-9/PLAY-COGNITION-EARLY-LITERACY-
MALINDA-JONES-ANN-CHRISTENSEN 
Joseph, A., Siddeeqa, A., and Crenna-Jennings, W. (2023) Essex Year of Reading 2022-23: 
Reading skills, outcomes and interventions – A review of the evidence. Essex Education 
Task Force. Education Policy Institute.  
Lucas, M., Nelson, J. and Sims, D. (2020). Schools’ responses to Covid-19: Pupil 
engagement in remote learning. Slough: NFER. Available: 
https://www.nfer.ac.uk/media/4073/schools_responses_to_covid_19_pupil_engagement_in_
remote_learning.pdf  
Molotsky, A., Dias, P., and Nakamura, P.  (2022) Read Write Inc. Phonics and Fresh Start: 
Evaluation Report. Education Endowment Foundation. 
National Literacy Trust. (2023). What is phonics? | National Literacy Trust. Retrieved August 
22, 2023, from https://literacytrust.org.uk/information/what-is-literacy/what-phonics/ 
Nevo, E. (2023). The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Low SES Kindergarteners’ 
Language Abilities. Early Childhood Education Journal, 1–11. 
https://doi.org/10.1007/S10643-023-01444-4/FIGURES/1 
O’Sullivan, J. (2021). Replacing a reading scheme with dialogic reading: an action research 
case study in 15 London nurseries. International Journal of Early Years Education, 29(1), 
25–40. https://doi.org/10.1080/09669760.2020.1754172 
Pillinger, C., & Vardy, E. J. (2022). The story so far: A systematic review of the dialogic 
reading literature. Journal of Research in Reading, 45(4), 533–548. 
https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9817.12407 
Pillinger, C., & Wood, C. (2014). Pilot study evaluating the impact of dialogic reading and 
shared reading at transition to primary school: Early literacy skills and parental attitudes. 
Literacy, 48(3), 155–163. https://doi.org/10.1111/LIT.12018 
Ramsey, W. R., Bellom-Rohrbacher, K., & Saenz, T. (2021). The effects of dialogic reading 
on the expressive vocabulary of pre-school aged children with moderate to severely 
impaired expressive language skills. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 37(3), 279–
299. https://doi.org/10.1177/02656590211019449 
Rose, S., Badr, K., Fletcher, L., Paxman, T., Lord, P., Rutt, S., Styles, B. and Twist, L. 
(2021). Impact of School Closures and Subsequent Support Strategies on Attainment and 
Socio-Emotional Wellbeing in Key Stage 1: Research Report [online]. Available: 
https://d2tic4wvo1iusb.cloudfront.net/documents/pages/projects/Impact-on-KS1-Closures-
Report.pdf?v=1638448453 
Scottish Government (2021) Scotland’s Wellbeing: The Impact of COVID-19 – Summary. 
Edinburgh. 
https://nationalperformance.gov.scot/scotlands-wellbeing-impact-covid-19-summary 
 
13 

 
Shanahan, T. (2020). What Constitutes a Science of Reading Instruction? Reading 
Research Quarterly, 55(S1), S235–S247. https://doi.org/10.1002/RRQ.349 
Solity, J., & Vousden, J. (2009). Real books vs reading schemes: a new perspective from 
instructional psychology. Educational Psychology, 29(4), 469–511. 
https://doi.org/10.1080/01443410903103657 
The Conversation. (2022, January 19). Phonics teaching in England needs to change – our 
new research points to a better approach. Retrieved August 24, 2023, from 
https://theconversation.com/phonics-teaching-in-england-needs-to-change-our-new-
research-points-to-a-better-approach-172655# 
Torgerson C, Zhu D (2003) A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of 
ICT on literacy learning in English, 5-16. In: Research Evidence in Education Library
London: EPPI Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of 
London. 
Towson, J. A., Fettig, A., Fleury, V. P., & Abarca, D. L. (2017). Dialogic Reading in Early 
Childhood Settings: A Summary of the Evidence Base. 
Https://Doi.Org/10.1177/0271121417724875, 37(3), 132–146. 
https://doi.org/10.1177/0271121417724875 
Twist, L., Jones, J., and Treleaven, O. (2022) The Impact of Covid-19 on pupil attainment. A 
summary of research evidence. National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). 
Slough. 
UCL Institute of Education. (2022, January 19). Government’s approach to teaching reading 
is uninformed and failing children | UCL News - UCL – University College London. Retrieved 
August 24, 2023, from https://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/2022/jan/governments-approach-
teaching-reading-uninformed-and-failing-children 
Wall, D., Foltz, S., Kupfer, A., & Glenberg, A. M. (2022). Embodied Action Scaffolds Dialogic 
Reading. Educational Psychology Review, 34(1), 401–419. https://doi.org/10.1007/S10648-
021-09617-6/TABLES/5 
Watkins, P. (2018). Teaching and Developing Reading Skills. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press. 
Wheeler, D. L., & Hill, J. C. (2021). The impact of COVID-19 on early childhood reading 
practices. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy. https://doi.org/10.1177/14687984211044187 
Whitehurst, G. J., Falco, F. L., Lonigan, C. J., Fischel, J. E., DeBaryshe, B. D., Valdez-
Menchaca, M. C., & Caulfield, M. (1988). Accelerating Language Development Through 
Picture Book Reading. Developmental Psychology, 24(4), 552–559. 
https://doi.org/10.1037/0012-1649.24.4.552 
Wolfe, S. C. (2015). Talking policy into practice: probing the debates around the effective 
teaching of early reading. 43(5), 498–513. https://doi.org/10.1080/03004279.2013.828765 
Wyse, D., & Bradbury, A. (2022a). Reading wars or reading reconciliation? A critical 
examination of robust research evidence, curriculum policy and teachers’ practices for 
 
14 

 
teaching phonics and reading. Review of Education, 10(1). 
https://doi.org/10.1002/REV3.3314 
Wyse, D., & Bradbury, A. (2022b). The passion, pedagogy and politics of reading. English in 
Education, 56(3), 247–260. https://doi.org/10.1080/04250494.2022.2091987 
Wyse, D., & Goswami, U. (2008). Synthetic phonics and the teaching of reading. British 
Educational Research Journal, 34(6), 691–710. https://doi.org/10.1080/01411920802268912 
Wyse, D., & Styles, M. (2007). Synthetic phonics and the teaching of reading: The debate 
surrounding England’s “Rose Report.” Literacy, 41(1), 35–42. https://doi.org/10.1111/J.1467-
9345.2007.00455.X 
Yasemin., Y and Cemal, A. (2022), The Effect of a Dialogic Reading Program on the Early 
Literacy Skills of Children in Preschool Period (December 13, 2022). Education Quarterly 
Reviews, Vol.5 Special Issue 2 Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=4301081 
 
 
15