Request for information about the university's student sex work policy and toolkits

Currently waiting for a response from University of Leicester, they should respond promptly and normally no later than (details).

Dear University of Leicester,

Please can you provide the following information in relation to (1) the University of Leicester Student Sex Work Policy; (2) the University of Leicester Student Sex Work Toolkit; and (3) the University of Leicester Toolkit for Student Sex Workers – Keeping safe and access to support:

1. What steps were taken to ensure the policy and toolkits comply with the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) specified in the Equality Act 2010, and that they do not disadvantage any group based on their protected characteristics, particularly women (protected characteristic = sex) and other disadvantaged groups, including disabled people, people of colour and LGBT people?

2. What steps were taken to assess the impact of the policy and toolkits on the duty under the PSED to eliminate discrimination and harassment of individuals on the basis of their sex, including the need to eliminate the widespread harassment of women and girls by men on the streets, in the university, in workplaces, public places and online?

3. What steps were taken to assess the impact of the policy and the toolkits on the duty under the PSED to foster good relations between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it – and particularly between men and women in the university and the wider community?

4. Please provide full records, including any impact assessments, of all steps taken.

5. What was the basis for the decision to include no guidance in the policy or toolkits to men about the ethics of buying sexual access to women and girls?

6. What was the basis for the decision to include no mention in the policy or toolkits that buying sex from someone who’s been forced, coerced, or deceived is a criminal offence under Section 53A of the Sexual Offences Act 2003?

7. Article 6 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against women (CEDAW) implicitly positions prostitution as a form of violence against women and girls and requires ratifying states to explicitly prohibit any third-party profiting from the prostitution of women and girls. How does the University of Leicester square this with the view that the policy and toolkits implicitly condone the system of prostitution and third-party profiteering from women's prostitution, and therefore the University of Leicester could themselves be viewed as a third-party profiteer of students’ prostitution?

Yours faithfully,

Anna Fisher