This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Request for English Literature exam papers'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

FACULTY OF ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
 
 
 
 

EXAMINERS’ REPORTS 2020 
 
 

Contents  
 
1.   PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 2019-20 .......................... 4 
2.  FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE ............................................... 5 
Part I .................................................................................................................................................. 5 
A.  STATISTICS ............................................................................................................................. 5 
B.  NEW EXAMINING METHODS AND PROCEDURES ................................................................. 5 
C.  POTENTIAL FUTURE CHANGES TO THIS YEAR’S PROCEDURES ............................................. 6 
D.  CANDIDATE AWARENESS OF EXAM CONVENTIONS ............................................................. 7 
Part II ................................................................................................................................................. 7 
A.  GENERAL COMMENTS ON THE EXAMINATION .................................................................... 7 
B.  EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY ISSUES AND BREAKDOWN OF THE RESULTS BY GENDER ........... 7 
C.  DETAILED NUMBERS ON CANDIDATES’ PERFORMANCE IN EACH PART OF THE 
EXAMINATION ....................................................................................................................... 7 
D.  COMMENTS ON PAPERS AND INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS ....................................................... 8 
Course I ..................................................................................................................................... 8 
Paper 1: Shakespeare Portfolio ............................................................................................ 8 
Paper A (CII Paper 3): Literature in English, 1350-1550 ....................................................... 9 
Paper B: Literature in English, 1660-1830 .......................................................................... 10 
Paper 6: Special Options ..................................................................................................... 11 
1.  Film Criticism ............................................................................................................. 11 
2.  Others and J. M. Coetzee .......................................................................................... 11 
3.  LGBTQIA: Wilde to the Present ................................................................................. 12 
4.  The Avant-Garde ....................................................................................................... 12 
5.  The Literary Essay...................................................................................................... 13 
6.  Writing Feminisms/Feminist Writing ........................................................................ 13 
7.  Postcolonial Literature .............................................................................................. 13 
8.  Writing Lives .............................................................................................................. 14 
9.  Literature and Science .............................................................................................. 14 
10. 
Fairytales, Folklore and Fantasy ............................................................................ 14 
11. 
Tragedy .................................................................................................................. 14 
12. 
Texts in Motion: Literary and Material Forms, 1550-1800 ................................... 15 
13. 
Literature, Culture and Politics in the 1930s ......................................................... 15 
14. 
Political Reading .................................................................................................... 16 
15. 
In Defence of Poetry ............................................................................................. 16 
16. 
Border Crossings 1350-1645 ................................................................................. 16 
17. 
Early Modern Literature & Crime .......................................................................... 17 
18. 
Hit and Myth: Re-Inventing the Medieval for the Modern Age ............................ 17 

 

19. 
Contemporary Drama on the British Stage ........................................................... 17 
20. 
The Good Life: Morality, Film, Literature .............................................................. 18 
Paper 7:  Dissertation ......................................................................................................... 18 
Course II .................................................................................................................................. 19 
Paper A: Literature in English, 650-1100 (see above, CI Paper A1, for 1350-1550) ........... 19 
Paper 2: Lyric ...................................................................................................................... 20 
Paper 4: History of the English Language to c.1800 ........................................................... 20 
E.  COMMENTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF IDENTIFIABLE INDIVIDUALS AND OTHER 
MATERIAL WHICH WOULD USUALLY BE TREATED AS RESERVED BUSINESS ...................... 20 
F. 
NAMES OF MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS ...................................................... 20 
Part III: EXTERNAL EXAMINERS’ REPORTS (UG) .............................................................................. 22 
FHS Appendix: Communications to students regarding exam conventions and other 
arrangements ........................................................................................................................... 32 
Guidance for Candidates for English FHS, 2020 ......................................................................... 32 
Letter for English Finalists on Classification, 20 April 2020 ........................................................ 34 
English FHS 2020 FAQs ............................................................................................................... 36 
3.  M.ST AND M.PHIL (MEDIEVAL STUDIES) IN ENGLISH (INCLUDING M.ST IN ENGLISH AND 
AMERICAN STUDIES) ............................................................................................................................. 41 
Part I ................................................................................................................................................ 41 
A.  STATISTICS ........................................................................................................................... 41 
B.  EXAMINING METHODS AND PROCEDURES ........................................................................ 41 
C.  CHANGES FOR THE FACULTY TO CONSIDER ....................................................................... 42 
D.  PUBLICATION OF EXAMINATION CONVENTIONS ............................................................... 42 
Part II ............................................................................................................................................... 42 
A.  GENERAL COMMENTS ABOUT THE EXAMINATION ............................................................ 42 
B.  EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES ISSUES .......................................................................................... 42 
C.  DETAILED NUMBERS ........................................................................................................... 42 
D.  COMMENTS ON PAPERS AND INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS ..................................................... 42 
E.  COMMENTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF INDIVIDUALS ...................................................... 42 
F. 
THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS ................................................................................................ 42 
M.St. and M.Phil. in English, Chair of Examiners’ Report for 2019-20 ........................................... 43 
A.  Process ................................................................................................................................ 43 
B.  Administration .................................................................................................................... 45 
C.  Criteria ................................................................................................................................ 45 
D.  External Examiners’ Comments .......................................................................................... 45 
EXTERNAL EXAMINERS’ REPORTS (PGT) ......................................................................... 49 

 

1.  
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
2019-20 
Prelims examinations were not held this year due to Covid-19 restrictions. 
 
 

 

2. 
FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
Part I 
A.  STATISTICS 
There were 223 candidates, of whom 10 took Course II. 
 
Class 
Number 
Percentage (%) 
 
2019/20 
2018/19 
2017/18 
2019/20 
2018/19 
2017/18 

93 
(79) 
(87) 
41.7% 
(33.9%) 
(39.7%) 
II.I 
127 
(154) 
(127) 
57.0% 
(66.1%) 
(58.0%) 
II.II 

(0) 
(2) 
0.9% 
(0) 
(0.9%) 
III 

(0) 
(0) 

(0) 
(0) 
Pass 

(0) 
(0) 
0.4% 
(0) 
(0) 
Fail 

(0) 
(0) 

(0) 
(0) 
 
One ‘alternative first’ was awarded (requiring three of five marks at 70+ and an average of 
67.5+). 
All scripts in coursework, and all essays in the remote written papers, were double blind 
marked. In accordance with the Guide for Examiners, scripts/essays were third-marked 
wherever markers 1 and 2 could not reach agreement, and automatically third-marked in 
cases where the initial marks varied by 15 marks or two classes. 
No scaling or cohort-wide adjustment of marks was necessary or undertaken. 
No candidate made an application for DDH. 
 
B.  NEW EXAMINING METHODS AND PROCEDURES 
The COVID-19 pandemic, lockdown, and closure of the University’s buildings and libraries 
led to the wholesale restructuring of the written examinations. In recognition of the many 
difficulties faced by candidates, the overall assessment was reduced by half, and the 
weighting of the written examinations within the overall marks profile was also reduced.  
 
The four three-hour written closed-book examinations in Course I (Papers 2, 3, 4, 5) were 
combined into two four-hour remote open-book examinations (Papers A and B), counted as 
two of five papers (alongside Paper 6, Shakespeare, and the Dissertation), instead of four of 
seven. In Course II Papers 1 and 3 were combined into a four-hour remote open-book 
examination (Paper A); Paper 2 became a 2.5 hour remote open-book examination; these 
were counted as two of six papers (alongside Paper 4, Paper 6, Shakespeare/Material Text, 
and the Dissertation), instead of three of seven. The written exams therefore accounted for 
40% (instead of 57%) of the marks profile in Course I, and 33% (instead of 43%) of the marks 
profile in Course II
 
 
  
 
A new classification scheme was devised for the five Course I and six Course II papers: 
 

 

EITHER: Two marks of 70 or above, an average mark of 68.5 or greater and no 
mark below 50. 
First 
OR: Three or more marks of 70 or above, an average mark of 67.5 or greater and 
no mark below 50. 
Two marks of 60 or above, an average mark of 59 or greater and no mark below 
II.i 
40. 
Two marks of 50 or above, an average mark of 49.5 or greater and no mark 
II.ii 
below 30. 
III 
Average mark of 40 or greater and not more than one mark below 30. 
Pass 
Average mark of 30 or greater. Not more than two marks below 30. 
 
A further new mechanism was the University’s 2020 Safety Net procedure. This provided 
that wherever (1) a candidate’s overall performance in remotely administered exams was 
significantly below the level of achievement indicated by their previously submitted work; 
and (2) the student’s Self-Assessment or MCE indicated very serious impact on that 
student’s performance in the remote written examinations, the Board would be permitted 
to implement the 2020 Safety Net procedure, by which: (1) the candidate’s highest 
coursework mark is counted twice; (2) the candidate’s lowest remote written exam mark is 
disregarded; (3) the result is averaged. Classification then proceeds on that average, with 
the proviso that the double-counted top mark does NOT count as two units (i.e., a double-
weighted coursework mark of 70+ cannot produce a first in the absence of another 70+ 
mark). 
 
The same assessment criteria were used for the remote open-book examinations as have 
previously been used in marking written examinations. Where candidates had included 
content which would not have been available in an offline, closed-book, handwritten 
examination, it was neither rewarded nor penalized. 
 
The combination of two papers into one required an adjusted marking process. Rather than 
the two markers’ comparing and agreeing marks for whole scripts, individual essays were 
each double-blind marked and then given an agreed, or third, mark; these agreed marks, 
averaged, then produced the final mark for the paper. 
 
C.  POTENTIAL FUTURE CHANGES TO THIS YEAR’S PROCEDURES 
This year’s examination format was an emergency response to an unanticipated situation. In 
that context it succeeded admirably, producing robust assessment and classification, with 
further necessary adjustments limited to action in response to individual MCE declarations. 
Nonetheless, some concerns were raised by examiners and assessors about the essentially 
different nature of a remote, open-book examination, and our need to adapt to the 
implications of this format. 
 
Students were encouraged by the University and faculty to treat the 2020 exercise as a 
typed version of the normal written examination, in which instead of having to memorize all 
quotations they could also consult their notes – and hence simply to type exam-essay 

 

answers in the standard one-hour slot. It was abundantly clear that only a very small 
minority of candidates approached the exercise in precisely this manner.  
 
Wider research shows that this style of assessment calls for more substantial changes in 
order to be most effective. The current term for the non-invigilated remote exam is OBOW: 
‘open book, open web’; standard practice is to use significantly longer submission windows. 
The model for effective assessment in these circumstances is one that recognizes the 
resources available to the student, and sets tasks that test the students’ learning and 
performance within that context. In designing proposals for remotely administered exams in 
2021, we are guided by these principles. 
 
D.  CANDIDATE AWARENESS OF EXAM CONVENTIONS 
Candidates received the Examination Circulars (available on Canvas) prior to the COVID-19 
outbreak. Once the new examination format was developed, they received new ‘Guidance 
for Candidates for English FHS, 2020’; a ‘Letter for English Finalists on Classification, 20 April 
2020’; and a series of ‘English FHS 2020 FAQs’. See FHS appendix for documents. 
 
The University also provided a variety of guidance. 
 
 
Part II 

A.  GENERAL COMMENTS ON THE EXAMINATION 
This year’s examination must be assessed and reflected upon in context of the extraordinary 
measures taken to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Candidates are hugely to 
be congratulated on the high standard of their overall performance, which in many cases 
was achieved against the background of severe challenge, and in all cases in a time of great 
anxiety and difficulty. For the same reasons, as Chair I want to express great gratitude to the 
Board examiners, and all assessors and markers, for their work in this difficult period. 
 
As intended, the reduced assessment regime broadly mitigated the adverse effects of the 
pandemic: prior to any adjustments made in recognition of candidates’ individual MCEs, the 
cohort’s marks produced 40.4% classifications of First. The final proportion of 41.7% firsts, 
while the highest ever seen in English, is not wholly unprecedented (2018: 39.7%). In any 
case, there is no intention of retaining the combined papers by which the assessment was 
halved. In future years, even given the necessity of pandemic-controlling measures, it is 
proposed that the four separate papers be reinstated, unless similar emergency measures 
should again be required. 
 
 
B.  EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY ISSUES AND BREAKDOWN OF THE RESULTS BY GENDER 
See Section E. 
 
 

C.  DETAILED NUMBERS ON CANDIDATES’ PERFORMANCE IN EACH PART OF THE 
EXAMINATION 

 

The majority of papers in English Course I and Course II are compulsory, with a wide range 
of specialized options taken within Paper 6 (a 6,000 word extended essay, or a written exam 
for a small number of language options) and Paper 7 (the 8,000 word dissertation). 
The newly-designed Papers A and B showed good consistency of performance with 
candidates’ prior performance in submitted papers, and with the performance in written 
exams of cohorts in previous years. 
 
 
D.  COMMENTS ON PAPERS AND INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS 
Examiners’ Reports are not submitted for papers with 3 candidates or fewer. 
 
Course I 
Paper 1: Shakespeare Portfolio 
251 candidates took this paper, including 13 English and Modern Languages, 10 Classics and 
English, and 9 History and English candidates. The overall standard of work was very high 
and showed sustained and independent engagement with relevant materials. The very best 
portfolios this year contained work of publishable quality; many included polished 
responses that were the result of thoughtful and diligent personal research. The Examiners 
rewarded clarity of argument and quality of analysis as evidenced across the portfolio as a 
whole. This meant that well-proposed topics, balanced arguments, precision in close 
readings and an adventurous spirit did well. Most essays were on Shakespeare’s drama and 
thematic approaches were the most popular.  
 
This year a high number of candidates included work on the main tragedies (Hamlet
MacbethOthelloLear) in their portfolios. The comedies Much Ado about NothingTwelfth 
Night
As You Like It along with Henry IVTempestCymbeline and Coriolanus also received a 
good deal of consideration. Wider range from across Shakespeare’s canon (including the 
poetry) often allowed candidates to produce more rigorously considered and more 
confidently positioned responses. Some very careful lexical work that applied the 
supplementary materials found in scholarly editions to advantage or was otherwise 
informed by skilled use of databases was submitted. The weaker portfolios seen this year 
often concentrated on a very narrow range of texts and without any identification of further 
contextual opportunities or demonstrations of knowledge of the rest of Shakespeare’s 
works. While most candidates had read a wide range of critics and showed at least adequate 
understanding of the major shifts within Shakespeare studies, weaker essays were often 
over- reliant on limited (sometimes dated) critical texts. Over-reliance on a single lecture 
(i.e. retooled lecture material lacking any further independent extension of the theme or 
intellectual challenge) also resulted in less successful essays. Few portfolios set 
Shakespeare’s writing in the context of his contemporaries; those that did tended to be 
strong and some of the best essays this year discussed Shakespeare with other 
contemporary authors. There was more work submitted on 18thc print cultures than on 
either 17thc or 19thc contexts.    
 
The Examiners were impressed by the variety and scope of many portfolios. There were 
rigorously argued essays across a range of materials; some imaginatively framed topics 

 

across the Shakespeare canon; engagement with theory or with a breadth of critical 
methods and issues; approaches ranging from close reading to forays into Shakespearean 
legacies and reception history. There was some interesting work on the modern politics of 
Shakespeare’s plays, including issues of disability, gender, and age in casting and in film 
adaptations. Less well-focussed essays often came with convoluted or over-lengthy titles, 
whilst well-chosen shorter titles often proved an early indicator of effective preparation and 
focussed thinking. Essays on adaptation this year were (in the main) of a high standard 
because they applied the appropriate analytical skills independently and balanced their 
interest in reception/alternative media with new insights into the underpinning 
Shakespearean texts. Such approaches proved far less successful when reliant on critical 
secondary literature or when overly descriptive or when the focus wandered too far from 
Shakespeare. The same was true of work that looked at Shakespeare in popular or 
contemporary culture.      
 
A few candidates opted for less conventional essay forms. Examples of this included work 
that offered analytical accounts of the staging of particular plays or scenes, or in other 
cases, attempts at editing a section of a play, often with a particular performance vision in 
mind. The best essays that accompanied such work foregrounded their own interpretive and 
analytical thinking as represented by the edited passage or staged performance, and 
incorporated rigorous close attention to the primary material itself. Less strong versions of 
this work tended to summarise and explain editorial or directorial choices without 
grounding these choices within a fully coherent argumentative framework.    
 
The presentation of work for the portfolio this year was generally of a high standard and 
gave due regard to the importance of correct footnoting and consistency within 
bibliographical citations. The Shakespeare portfolios were submitted before the disruptions 
caused by the global pandemic. The Examiners are pleased to note the quality of thought 
and scholarship produced on this paper in FHS 2020. 
 
Paper A (CII Paper 3): Literature in English, 1350-1550 
The examiners for Paper A were unanimous in praising the very high standard of work 
achieved under very difficult circumstances this year. The range achieved by candidates was 
particularly impressive, in terms of both the set of authors and texts studied and the variety 
of critical approaches taken. As usual, stronger answers addressed the titular quotation 
directly and relevantly, often demonstrating a very sophisticated understanding of the 
issues at stake and tailoring their material and line of argument so as to address these issues 
head on. Less successful essays engaged more loosely with the quotation, either by 
reproducing arguments that were generally rather than specifically appropriate or by 
responding to particular words in the quotation without giving sufficient attention to their 
meaning in context. Candidates are reminded of the need to read titular quotations 
carefully and critically. In general, detailed engagement with primary and secondary sources 
was a strong feature of work for this paper, although some candidates struggled to strike a 
balance between expounding information and analysing that information in the service of 
an argument. The most impressive essays employed critical writing critically, engaging with, 
rather than relying upon, other people’s opinions. A small number of scripts were marred by 
a lack of clarity in expressing and organizing ideas.  
 

 

Examiners highlighted the wide range of prose, verse, and dramatic texts studied for section 
A1, with some notably good work on early Tudor writing (especially Skelton, More, Wyatt, 
and Surrey). As in recent years, particular attention was paid to devotional texts, with 
Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich very much to the fore. Much of this work successfully 
interrogated critical terms such as ‘affective piety’ and located the texts within a European 
context. Some essays, however, focused on the content of these texts to the exclusion of 
any consideration of their literary form and linguistic strategies. Medieval and early Tudor 
drama also proved a popular topic, although question 18 was sometimes taken as an 
opportunity to write on any aspect of this topic rather than an invitation to address the 
purpose of medieval drama specifically.  
 
Examiners for section A2 highlighted rigorous argumentation as a particular feature of the 
work produced this year. The attention paid to language, rhetoric, and form was highly 
impressive (particularly in relation to the work of Tasso, Drayton, and Jonson). Question 4 
elicited several excellent meditations on print and coterie manuscript circulation. Other 
areas of particular strength included the various uses of translation in the period and 
interrogations of same-sex desire, race, and colonialism. Several generally less popular texts 
and authors featured prominently this year, including the Marprelate pamphlets, Marston, 
the Cavalier poets, and Cowley. The Interregnum was well represented particularly, and 
unusually, through female authors. In some cases, work for this section was weakened by 
too many general statements or by limited range.  
 
Paper B: Literature in English, 1660-1830 
Strong and well-focused work was not in short supply in 2020, and there was some truly 
exceptional work. A number of essays were written to an impressively high standard, with 
focused and persuasive argumentation, a wealth of textual and contextual detail, clear and 
engaging critical prose, etc. As we say every year, the best answers engaged directly with 
the question and managed to convey both breadth and depth in their understanding of the 
period.  
 
On the other hand, there were a significant number of scripts of notable polish and equally 
striking irrelevance. Even with the addition of prescriptive questions to some of the 
quotations, too many candidates are still failing to attend properly to the specific terms and 
argument of a quotation. Overall, the best essays demonstrated a clear and, often, witty 
engagement with the prompt itself, and it is worth reminding candidates that the relevance 
of the essay to the prompt/question is necessary to producing a fresh intellectually engaged 
and engaging essay. 
 
B1: There were some especially strong essays on difficult authors (e.g. Milton, Cavendish, 
Pope, Swift, Montagu, and Richardson) that experimented with a variety of approaches and 
fruitful pairings: i.e. placing Milton alongside the new science and/or women writers; Pope 
and landscape gardening or English Romanitas; Swift and religious politics (including 
postcolonial methods of reading); the novel in relation to contemporary or earlier dramatic 
writing; women’s writing and gender and/or sexuality. The best essays showed a wide and, 
also, deep understanding of the authors/fields discussed and showed particular strengths in 
terms of close reading and literary history (e.g. ‘The Battle of the Books’; romance, the rise 
10 
 

of the novel, and amatory fiction; labouring poets against the backdrop of the georgic as a 
genre). 
 
Better work could be done on questions pertaining to drama in terms of distinguishing 
performance from performativity; work on women’s writers, while most welcome, should 
avoid artificially limiting itself to paratextual material and/or plot summaries (notably, in 
relation to Behn). More work on religious politics would have strengthened a number of 
essays, though there were a few that showcased refreshing work in this regard (Dryden; 
Restoration drama; libertinism/libertine culture). Welcome work was done in the fields of 
material culture and book history as well as coterie cultures; more in-depth research would 
have strengthened essays on eighteenth-century literature and empire / postcolonial 
readings of the Enlightenment. 
 
B2: Many of the essays on poetry this year were thought particularly good: some interesting 
and thoughtful work on Burns, Clare, Coleridge, Keats, Smith, Wordsworth. The essays on 
Austen and Gothic tended to follow more predictable tracks, but here there was good work 
when the candidate ventured beyond the usual suspects and thought in ways which made a 
concept (e.g. 'imagination') appear contested rather than straightforward. 
 
Weaker scripts were let down by a dismayingly restricted range (e.g. two short poems) on 
the discussion of which sometimes grand historical generalisations (the "romantic" view of 
this or that) were based; some candidates worked through several paired-off poems with no 
rationale offered or even implied for their pairing; some scripts dashed through numerous 
texts and dropped names at breakneck speed without finding time to say much critically 
engaged about any of them; and quite a few were marred by an imperfect grasp of the 
intellectual history they confidently adduced (the thought of Adam Smith appeared in some 
very odd forms, and Burke was rarely adduced to much purpose other than as a bogeyman). 
The relationship between Christianity and slavery was sometimes under-argued. 
 
Paper 6: Special Options 
1.  Film Criticism   
Thirteen candidates took this option. The quality of the work on film that the students 
produce from only five weeks of teaching is impressive. Most of the essays were about films 
that were not studied on the option and this showed an ability to apply skills and concepts. 
The students engaged with the films analytically and imaginatively. There were a few 
welcome occurrences this year. One was the way the students implicitly set themselves 
critical questions, rather than simply titling with topics
 
 Another was the focus on aesthetic 
qualities
 another was picking up on long 
standing appraisals of certain films or directors and holding them up for renewed scrutiny  
  
 
2.  Others and J. M. Coetzee 
 
Seven candidates took this option. All essays placed Coetzee in literary, cultural, or 
philosophical contexts that were apt, persuasively justified, and in many cases genuinely 
11 
 

imaginative. The very best essays were startlingly ambitious in what they were using 
Coetzee to do—Coetzee becoming a way into a larger theoretical question or historical 
problem--but a conspicuous strength of the full run of essays was the confident maturity 
with which candidates framed their arguments theoretically. There was occasionally a 
tendency to write ‘around’ Coetzee’s novels where more detailed textual analysis would 
only have made the candidate’s claims stronger. 
 
3.  LGBTQIA: Wilde to the Present 
 
Ten candidates took this option. The standard of essays was generally very good, addressing 
a wide range of queer texts and writers from circa 1870 to the present day. The best essays 
felt like discrete research projects, with a particular, narrow focus, a distinct body of 
material that was considered in depth, and a clear set of research questions that it felt, by 
the end, had been answered. Many developed ideas or topics touched on in seminars by 
reading more widely and delving more deeply into that particular question or issue. The 
more middling essays were often less focused, considering a disparate selection of texts 
without providing a sufficient rationale for putting them together; it wasn’t always clear 
what had informed their selection. Weaker essays ranged only marginally beyond the 
reading list for the classes, sticking to the same primary and theoretical texts discussed in 
class, and doing so without sufficient historical contextualization, leading to distorted 
readings of the texts under consideration. More thorough contextualization may also have 
resolved some of the difficulties these essays had in wedding close attention to literary texts 
with a broader theoretical or literary historical argument. Two critical trends are also worth 
noting. First, that there was a worrying tendency not to engage with more recent theoretical 
work; taken in the round, one might get the impression from these essays that little of note 
exists in queer theory that wasn’t written by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, or Leo 
Bersani. Secondly, the conflation of ‘queer’, ‘gay’, ‘homosexual’, and ‘radical’ in many essays 
risked reductive readings of the politics of the texts in question: queer sexuality is linked, 
but not synonymous, with queer politics—nor is queer sexuality identical with radical 
politics. The best work, though, showed impressively how the literariness of texts can 
contribute meaningfully to our understanding of sexuality.  
 
4.  The Avant-Garde 
 
Eleven candidates took this option. The essays for this course encompassed an exciting and 
independent range of topics including Barnes, Beckett, Dada, digital textuality, European 
aesthetics, feminism, Joyce, Loy, The Little Review, Stein, Stieglitz, Wilde, etc. Many made an 
effort to research new material. Most topics were well conceived and delineated. The 
strongest essays used their research to analyse a well-focused topic in depth, focusing 
appropriately on ideas, themes and formal features. The best essays made claims that were 
supported by careful demonstrations of relevant evidence. They also made the stakes of 
their argument evident to readers and didn’t hesitate to state them explicitly. Better essays 
acknowledged critical precursors and engaged with them appropriately. They also went 
beyond simple comparing and contrasting to demonstrate how such an exercise illuminates 
a set of ideas or aesthetics; it is not enough to say that two authors are different and leave it 
at that. Weaker essays remained at a more general, descriptive level; made claims 
unsubstantiated by the evidence provided; suffered from lack of proofreading and often had 
problems with grammar and citation. 
12 
 

 
5.  The Literary Essay 
 
Fifteen candidates took this option. Candidates wrote on material from the earliest English 
essays to contemporary essayists, though the majority of candidates focused on the 
twentieth century or later, and the eighteenth-century and Romantic essayists were 
conspicuous by their absence. The best performances offered original arguments made on 
the basis of substantial research, sometimes uncovering neglected or little-read essayists 
and bringing them into dialogue with the broader issues of the history of the essay. Essays 
which took as their focus a conceptual idea or topic, treated across various essayists or a 
period in the essay’s history, tended to be stronger than those which used a single author as 
the organizing principle. All of the essays reflected on the definitional problems or 
characteristic qualities of the essay as a genre, suggesting that the wider discussions of the 
class, even where directed at material other than that treated in the submissions, fed into 
their gestation. 
 
6.  Writing Feminisms/Feminist Writing 
 
Eight candidates took this option. Essays were particularly strong across the board, and 
addressed texts spanning thousands of years – from Homer to the recently published. They 
explored a wide range of authors and genres, in English and in translation, high and low: the 
Epic, poetry, novels, short stories, plays, life-writing, auto-theory, graphic novels. Essays 
focused on a broad range of topics, including: intersectionality; gender and race; gender and 
postcolonialism; trans and nonbinary identity; fictive and queer kinship; illness and mental 
illness; literary experimentalism; translation. Essays explored a wide spectrum of feminist 
theory and criticism, with a strong interest in intersectional, African-American, black lesbian, 
postcolonial and trans feminisms. Feminist approaches were fruitfully combined with 
poststructuralist, psychoanalytic, phenomenological and existentialist, African-American, 
critical race, postcolonial, queer, transgender and New Materialist theory and criticism. The 
strongest essays demonstrated wide critical reading and combined close readings with 
attentive exploration of relevant feminist theory.  A few of the essays made up for a lack of 
style or clumsy presentation with innovative research into their topics; the best essays 
exhibited beautifully-crafted and lucid prose with original claims backed up by examples 
from the text and engagement with relevant criticism.  Weaker essays tended to let their 
arguments run away with them or did not demonstrate enough knowledge of their subject 
matter. Overall, the essays contributed in fascinating ways to current debates in feminist 
thinking. 
 
7.  Postcolonial Literature 
 
Fourteen candidates took this option. The Postcolonial Literature paper produced a varied 
and generally high quality collection of essays this year. Perhaps the most notable trend is 
that only five out of the fourteen essays focused on primary materials from the set readings. 
The others engaged with the debates of the course by focusing explicitly on the theoretical 
materials that also form part of the core reading for the course, but bringing new primary 
materials into dialogue with it (under the supervision of course tutors in essay 
consultations). On the whole this was a successful strategy, and points to the formative 
influence of the early presentation and writing assignments that encourage students to 
13 
 

engage with the theoretical materials. There is some real scholarly ambition evident in the 
way these essays took on established theoretical texts and debates, and at its best a sense 
of the primary materials as generative spaces for thinking and theorising about the 
postcolonial. On the other hand, essays that read familiar texts within well-established 
critical terms sometimes struggled to find a clear critical voice. 
 
8.  Writing Lives   
Fifteen candidates took this option. The course ranged through a vast chronological sweep 
and the submitted essays engaged with texts ranging from the middle ages to the present 
day. All the work was of a very high standard and much of it was outstanding. The best work 
was ambitious in its focus, taking a carefully chosen selection of texts in order to fully 
engage with ideas of what it means to write a life. Candidates engaged with a range of 
critical approaches: narratology and time; relationships between the photographic and 
textual selves; dismantling cultural subjectivity, fragmentation and belatedness, the 
archived self; and the academic self; and what ‘voice’ and ‘origins’ might mean. One 
common challenge faced by some candidates centred on the logic of text selection. 
Candidates who wrote about multiple texts from quite different genres did, on occasion, 
find themselves struggling to find sufficient room in their essays to address how the issue of 
genre played into the complexities of life writing; and also the issue of mediated voices. 
Overall however, the essays showed rich and creative engagement with the subject in every 
sense of that word. 
 
9.  Literature and Science 
 
Eight candidates took this option. Candidates took ‘science’ in a variety of ways and there 
was a pleasing range of approaches in the scripts. Several candidates showed a 
commendable grasp of the theoretical questions raised by cross-disciplinary work in this 
area, and the best showed the students' capacity to read the literary texts closely as well as 
exemplifying bigger arguments. Several scripts showed an excellent depth of knowledge, 
real pieces of scholarship; others were theoretically extremely sophisticated. Weaker scripts 
did not manage to sustain an argument, or treated the literary works they adduced only 
skimpily or schematically. 
 
 
 
10. Fairytales, Folklore and Fantasy 
 
Fifteen candidates took this option. Candidates employed a wide range of primary texts and 
historical periods on this option, with some inter-period work on show. Canon criticism and 
identity issues particularly emerged as themes. Those that met the challenge of this paper 
best showed well-contextualised analysis alongside energised engagement and skilful use of 
appropriate theory (e.g., feminism, genre criticism, etc). In the most successful scripts, the 
examiners noted a confident understanding of relevant critical fields. Examiners rewarded 
choice of materials that allowed depth of analysis, as much as breadth. Weaker scripts were 
characterised by largely un-historicised analysis and arguments that were not embedded in 
close reading. 
 
11. Tragedy 
 
14 
 

Fifteen candidates took this option. This paper encourages comparative work across a great 
variety of periods and genres, from ancient to contemporary, and some of the best essays 
used this freedom to construct commanding arguments which moved with high 
sophistication between texts, developing analysis with a firm theoretical basis combined 
with intelligent close reading. Real originality, literary sensitivity, and flair were on show in 
several essays that made unexpected comparisons between texts, sustaining and justifying 
them with analytical and theoretical precision. Weaker essays drifted into ill-defined areas 
broadly related to the idea of tragedy, or limited themselves to (sometimes merely 
descriptive, or arbitrary) comparisons between two or three texts without a wider sense of 
intertextuality, generic expectations, or influence, which left the argument ungrounded. 
There was some highly fruitful comparison of literature with a variety of visual media, and 
many candidates made good use of the freedom to discuss texts of their own choosing 
beyond the seminar reading list. 
 
 
 
 
12. Texts in Motion: Literary and Material Forms, 1550-1800   
Nine candidates took this option. Written work for this paper was in general of an excellent 
standard, and the very best work was outstanding in its sophistication and ambition. The 
strongest work responded both meticulously and imaginatively to the archival emphasis of 
this paper, and combined research into new print or manuscript texts (or in some cases 
objects) with theoretical reflection and/or literary sensitivity. 
 
 
 Less strong work was still 
characterised by archival industry but was less engaged with the specifics of the texts under 
discussion, and was more inclined towards a survey of finds. Excellent use was made of 
college libraries: it was pleasing to see this relatively off-piste research going on at 
undergraduate level. Presentation and writing was good, often excellent. In general, there 
was a clear sense of the candidates’ responding to the particular intellectual and 
methodological challenges and opportunities of this paper. 
 
13. Literature, Culture and Politics in the 1930s 
Fourteen candidates took this option. The course covered fiction, essays, memoirs, poetry, 
plays and documentary film from the 1930s, exploring topics including ‘home and abroad’, 
documentary culture, class and region, and responses to the coming of war.  Writers 
discussed included Evelyn Waugh, George Orwell, H.D., Stevie Smith, Christopher 
Isherwood, Virginia Woolf and Patrick Hamilton. Essays covered a wide range of topics and 
students showed independence in their choice of topics. Both markers were impressed with 
the way the students worked within the remit of the course but found a diverse range of 
approaches to it. There was a pleasing combination of essays that led from the class 
materials and essays that brought in other texts and authors – e.g. Una Marson, Daphne du 
Maurier, Henry Miller and Walter Greenwood. Beyond that, our general sense of the essays 
was that stronger submissions pursued a distinct topic, which was well-researched, and 
presented with a clear and powerful argument. More middling work tended to resemble an 
extended tutorial essay, with a less discrete research-base and clarity of argumentation.  
 
15 
 

14. Political Reading 
 
Eight candidates took this option. A wide range of topics was attempted, with the idea of 
reading publics in a digital age dominating. Essays examined the internet as a reading public 
and psychoanalytic readings of the digital unconscious. Critical race theory was deployed to 
read Blackness as voice and Black dissidence. Candidates also used the rubric of the course 
(‘political reading’) to dwell on reading politics, including the politics of the intersection of 
postcolonial, feminist, and poststructural theories. There was also engagement in a couple 
of scripts with ideology and ‘interpellation’, as these applied to reading. At best, the 
candidates historically contextualised theoretical and philosophical works while also 
engaging with and rigorously analysing the abstractions of philosophical theory. 
Occasionally, the original insights of a given essay were overwhelmed by the critical 
interpretation of the theoretical or critical works. Candidates will do well to mark their 
distance and difference from the works they are interpreting closely: the resulting work 
should read like critical dialogue, not descriptive summary. A robust performance overall, 
with many successful interventions in contemporary culture and politics attempted through 
rigorous analyses of reading protocols, the value criteria of reading, and the formation of 
reading publics (and counterpublics). 
 
15. In Defence of Poetry   
Eight candidates took this option. A wide range of periods was represented among the 
essays submitted for this paper, though most students still opted for authors closer to the 
20th-century end of the spectrum. All candidates chose authors whose work was included on 
the syllabus, though this was not strictly required. In the best essays, discussion of how 
poetic theory intersected with poetic practice resulted in genuinely illuminating insights. 
The best essays were well informed as well as imaginative, and they often were willing to 
think critically about theoretical prose texts alongside poems. They made use not only of 
poets’ published prose writings but also their letters, forming an argument about the poetry 
using information within as well as from outside of the poems themselves. Close readings 
were at the heart of the best essays—though such readings always incorporated knowledge 
drawn from contextual materials. The least successful essays were characterized by weak 
arguments, careless interpretation, and untidy presentation. 
 
16. Border Crossings 1350-1645   
Eight candidates took this option. The overall standard of work on this paper was high. All 
the extended essays showed initiative, and demonstrated close critical attention to a wide 
range of medieval and early modern texts. In some cases, candidates carefully engaged with 
primary texts in more than one language. The majority of candidates moved beyond the 
core texts on the paper, while also working with its theoretical readings and approach in 
order to examine borders of various kinds. Nearly all of the candidates included visual 
materials in their essays, including paintings, manuscript illuminations and maps. These 
materials were handled with varying levels of skill and detail, but all showed a good 
awareness of how material culture can help to illuminate literary texts. The strongest essays 
made clear at their outset how borders and acts of ‘border crossing’ related to the primary 
materials under discussion. They engaged and handled theoretical insights from Gloria 
Anzaldua, Hannah Arendt and Etienne Balibar, among others, with care and an admirable 
16 
 

critical awareness of the dangers of anachronism when using modern materials to discuss 
the pre- and early modern. The weaker essays often relied on a more impressionistic or 
loosely defined sense of border or border crossing, and/or failed to make clear their 
principal of selection for their primary texts. Standards of expression and presentation were 
generally very good. 
 
17. Early Modern Literature & Crime 
 
Fifteen candidates took this option. The submitted essays showed that candidates had 
engaged closely with a range of primary texts and had an understanding of the option’s core 
themes, and there was substantial evidence of excellent work. The range of topics covered 
by the essays was impressive, and demonstrated a clear enthusiasm for the opportunities 
this option gives to read non-canonical texts, examine early modern print culture, and read 
non-canonical texts. Topics included witchcraft, religious dissent, representations of 
executions, criminal biographies, and London as a ‘criminal’ space, with a recurrent interest 
in gender. Methodological interests – e.g., legal, narratological, social, theological, and 
theoretical – supported the submitted work intelligently, and close readings were thorough 
and insightful. Scrutiny both of the ‘criminal’ body and of the internal rhetorical strategies 
within pamphlets, ballads, novels, etc., was undertaken, and most of the essays were well 
structured and clearly argued. 
 
18. Hit and Myth: Re-Inventing the Medieval for the Modern Age 
 
Eight candidates took this option. As in previous years, it was pleasing to see students 
tackling an impressive range of material, fruitfully exploring modern adaptations of Anglo-
Saxon, Norse, Celtic and Arthurian texts through the lens of later literary and cultural 
movements such as romanticism, national philology, modernism and the Celtic Revival. All 
the written work was of a high standard, with some highly original and imaginative research. 
The strongest submissions demonstrated a deep grasp of critical issues such as periodicity, 
medievalism and translation theory, as well as taking appropriate care over presentation, 
scholarly apparatus and formatting. 
 
19. Contemporary Drama on the British Stage   
Fifteen candidates took this option. The standard of essays was impressively high, with 
students addressing a wide range of issues and topics in relation a host of different plays 
and performances. Issues addressed included race and representation, sexuality and affect, 
verbatim plays and the concept of political ‘truth’, gender and identity formation, audience 
expectations and the dynamics of reception, ecology and responsibility. The strongest 
essays combined an attentive and closely attuned analysis of the precise dynamics of 
performance, with a wider grasp of political, social and theatrical resonances, and a clear 
engagement with critical debates and theories. Creative and effect use was made of 
detailed knowledge of the particularities of production and reception, and there was 
impressive evidence of original and imaginative thinking about the mechanisms of theatrical 
production and its communicative potential. Some candidates drew intelligently and 
effectively on reviews, blogs and interviews to discuss reception and audience location, but 
some weaker essays tended to assert or assume audience responses without grounding 
them in evidence. Venue, economics, design, audience composition, and acting styles were 
17 
 

brought to bear on questions of meaning and affect in a number of deeply researched and 
clearly argued essays.  
 
20. The Good Life: Morality, Film, Literature 
Twelve candidates took this option. Candidates for this paper wrote on a gratifyingly wide 
range of subjects, and according to a broad diversity of methodological frames. The overall 
standard was high. A number of extended essays took as their subject an author or theme 
from the seminar classes (e.g., Iris Murdoch, or animal rights), but always with a new point 
of view or approach than anything we had considered in class. A number of entirely new 
topics (particularly in film or race studies) were also introduced. Particularly strong work 
made formal claims about the formal differences in moral thinking across different genres 
 
 attention to which was part of the explicit aims of the course. Weaker papers 
tended to be ones that took an entirely new topic, but failed to bring to it enough of the 
explicit themes of aesthetics, ethics and morality, or which touched on them only in passing. 
 
Paper 7:  Dissertation  
The best dissertations were characterised by the following features: 
• 
clarity of research method; 
• 
work based on a particular and focused research question; 
• 
coherent and sophisticated argument, rather than mere assemblage of material; 
• 
clarity not only about what the work was setting out to achieve, but why, 
critically speaking, it was worth achieving; 
• 
careful justification of the selection of material to be covered: which may be as 
focused as a single author, or as wide as a topic or question considered in 
transhistorical perspective through multiple comparisons – the key is that the 
choice of material and approach is justified intellectually, and appropriate to the 
length of a dissertation; 
• 
awareness of the wider significance of particular issues discussed, though what 
counts as breadth varied according to topic: in one essay it might mean 
demonstrating a command of a particular author’s works, in another it means 
covering several texts that are thematically or formally related; 
• 
full awareness of context, both historical and literary, remembering that modern 
and contemporary literature is as much in need of contextualisation as the 
writing of any other period; 
• 
close and attentive textual analysis and detailed reading; 
• 
care in defining terms;  
• 
meticulous attention to documentation and bibliography. 
Candidates should bear in mind that the best comparative work clearly addresses the 
method employed, taking care to justify why particular authors or texts were set alongside 
one another, and to what end. 
 
As in previous years, it was extremely pleasing to see a number of candidates show such 
confidence in their undertaking of original archival research. Since digital archives are 
18 
 

becoming increasingly prevalent, it is hoped that this will, in future, make available to all 
students online resources that currently involve in-person archival visits.  
 
Excellent work was produced across a range of critical modes, and the range of topics and 
approaches chosen was impressively wide, including all forms and genres (poetry, prose, 
drama, essays, fiction and non-fiction, and the paraliterary and hybrid), across the full 
chronological range from Old English to the present, with a great deal of work in American 
and world literature, and some substantial interdisciplinary work addressing relationships 
between literature and other media (music, art, film, podcasts, video games, and other 
hybrid genres). The key in each case was to attend to the specific formal and stylistic 
features of the objects under analysis, such that the particular way the text, image, or 
narrative was constructed contributed to the author’s claims for its significance, however 
that significance was couched (and here too there was variety, with some students making 
arguments about intellectual history, others offering symptomatic readings, and still others 
insisting on the philosophical importance of literary techniques). Work on the history of the 
book and material text studies appeared in all periods, as did some impressive archival and 
manuscript work. 
 
A number of dissertations concerned critically marginal figures. Weaker dissertations used 
this starting-point to view authors in isolation, or to short-circuit abruptly between texts and 
broadly-conceived historical contexts. Stronger work showed how the writing of critically 
marginal authors can be illuminated when brought into contact with existing critical fields, 
while at the same time challenging the assumptions and boundaries of those very same 
critical fields. 
 
However, the essays were overwhelmingly about white authors, and showed little 
awareness of critical and theoretical discussions of how race has shaped literary fields. 
Better attention was paid to gender and sexuality, and to how these function within a 
complex dynamic between literature and culture more broadly. In general, candidates who 
considered the ways that the social positioning of texts and authors contributes to their 
form and meaning produced more sophisticated analyses. 
 
Course II 
Paper A: Literature in English, 650-1100 (see above, CI Paper A1, for 1350-1550) 
The standard of work for this paper was generally very good, marked by high levels of 
ambition and independence of argument. The range of material considered and the variety 
of critical approaches taken were very impressive. Candidates for this paper seem to have 
responded extremely well to the unique circumstances of the examination, which perhaps 
brought to the fore topics and texts with which the candidates were particularly engaged. 
There were very few well-worn arguments or familiar combinations of texts on display. The 
strongest essays engaged directly and precisely with the relevant questions, making 
judicious and critical use of primary and secondary texts. Some essays would, however, have 
benefitted from more attention to argumentation. Verse texts proved, as usual, more 
popular than prose: there was plenty of attention to major hagiographical narrative poems 
(such as EleneAndreas, and Guthlac A), but also some excellent work on less frequently 
studied poems such as The Husband’s MessageSeasons for Fasting, and The Rune Poem
19 
 

The Exeter Book riddles were less prominent than in recent years and there was relatively 
little direct engagement with Beowulf (or heroic literature more generally). Attention to Old 
English prose focused mainly upon the ‘Alfredian’ canon. With some notable exceptions, 
homiletic material did not feature very heavily this year. It was pleasing to see that, once 
again, candidates were engaging in a sophisticated fashion with Anglo-Latin texts and 
authors as part of the early medieval literary tradition. 
 
Paper 2: Lyric 
The responses to the first examination for this new paper ranged from very good to 
excellent. Clearly this new paper is generating exciting work and students are working to a 
very high standard across languages, cultures and different modes within what might be 
called ‘lyric’.  Candidates answered a wide range of questions from the paper. Alongside 
Early and Late Middle English, there was excellent coverage of Persian, Irish, Welsh, French 
and Latin. Knowledge of literary heritage and intertextuality was scholarly and precise. 
Those candidates who wrote on manuscript context and the materiality of lyrics did so with 
aplomb. There was excellent attention to rubrication, textual transmission and variant 
readings; not just in English but across other languages too.  
 
Candidates showed fine literary sensibility in their analysis of tropes, meaning and verse 
forms. They enriched this close reading with assured understanding of context: political; 
cultural, and theological. There was deft work on performance, spirituality, the natural and 
musical notation. 
 
It was a genuine pleasure to read the essays on this paper. 
 
Paper 4: History of the English Language to c.1800 
The quality of the papers this year (submitted in 2019) was generally very good indeed, with 
candidates performing well across both the essay and commentary sections of the paper. 
There was a welcome diversity of topics, including strong work on the Great Vowel Shift, the 
language of the Peterborough Chronicle, and dictionaries and the construction speech 
communities. Candidates who rooted their work firmly within a historical sociolinguistic 
framework tended to produce more stimulating analysis in both parts of the paper. The best 
answers to part one had a firm grounding in linguistic theory and made use of judicious 
examples to illustrate their argument. The stronger commentaries showed very good 
analytical command across all levels of the language, while weaker answers tended to 
comment on linguistic features in a more arbitrary and impressionistic manner. There is a 
general tendency for candidates to gravitate towards the late Middle English and Early/Late 
Modern periods at the expense of Old and Early Middle English. Overall, however, this was a 
very strong set of papers. 
 
E. 
COMMENTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF IDENTIFIABLE INDIVIDUALS AND OTHER 
MATERIAL WHICH WOULD USUALLY BE TREATED AS RESERVED BUSINESS 
[Moved to reserved section] 
 
F. 

NAMES OF MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
20 
 

21 
 


Part III: EXTERNAL EXAMINERS’ REPORTS (UG) 
 
 
External examiner name:  
 
External examiner home institution: 
 
Course examined:  
FHS English Exam Board 
Level: (please delete as appropriate 
Undergraduate 
Postgraduate 
 
Please complete both Parts A and B.  

Part A 
Please () as applicable*   Yes  
No 
N/A /  
Other 

A1.   Are the academic standards and the achievements of students  X 
 
 
comparable  with  those  in  other  UK  higher  education 
institutions of which you have experience? 
A2.  Do  the  threshold  standards  for  the  programme  appropriately  X 
 
 
reflect the frameworks for higher education qualifications and 
any  applicable  subject  benchmark statement? [Please refer to 
paragraph 6 of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports]. 
 
A3.   Does the assessment process measure student achievement  X 
 
 
rigorously  and  fairly  against  the  intended  outcomes  of  the 
programme(s)? 
A4.  Is  the  assessment  process  conducted  in  line  with  the  X 
 
 
University's policies and regulations? 
A5.   Did you receive sufficient information and evidence in a timely  X 
 
 
manner to be able to carry out the role of External Examiner 
effectively? 
A6.  Did you receive a written response to your previous report? 
 
 

A7.  Are you satisfied that comments in your previous report have   
 

been properly considered, and where applicable, acted upon?  
*  If  you  answer  “No”  to  any  question,  you  should  provide  further  comments  when  you 
complete Part B.
 Further comments may also be given in Part B, if desired, if you answer “Yes” or 
“N/A / Other”. 
 
 
 
 
22 
 

Part B 
 
B1. Academic standards 
 

a.  How  do  academic  standards  achieved  by  the  students  compare  with  those 
achieved by students at other higher education institutions of which you have 
experience? 

 
I was asked to review work of 4 candidates whose final overall mark lay in the high 2.1 or 
first class categories - this work was very good to highly impressive. All of the students 
engaged enthusiastically with the chosen questions (across their papers/portfolios - ), and 
the dissertations were a particular pleasure to read. The changes to the format of some 
exams (due to COVID-19) meant that it was difficult at times to tell whether students had 
fully honoured the exam code (treating it as if it were an exam taken in normal exam 
conditions), but this was handled well in the discussion at the Board. 
 
b.  Please comment on student performance and achievement across the relevant 
programmes or parts of programmes and with reference to academic standards 
and  student  performance  of  other  higher  education  institutions  of  which  you 
have  experience  (those  examining  in  joint  schools  are  particularly  asked  to 
comment on their subject in relation to the whole award). 

 
Since I was asked to read the runs of scripts for students with strong marks overall, I can 
only comment on work that already received very good marks (rather than on the quality 
across the whole spectrum of marks). I can confirm that these marks reflected the high 
quality of the work. The work is comparable to, at times stronger than, that produced at other 
institutions at which I have undertaken the role of external examiner (as well as at my own - 
all Russell Group institutions). 
 
B2. Rigour and conduct of the assessment process 
 
Please comment on the rigour and conduct of the assessment process, including whether it 
ensures equity of treatment for students, and whether it has been conducted fairly and within 
the University’s regulations and guidance. 
 
This was an unusual and difficult year for everyone involved - students, examiners, 
administrators and externals. I would like to commend 
director of the 
exam board, for her thorough, rigorous and careful handling of the whole process. Involving 
externals at the MCE meeting was particularly helpful, as we could see how the impact of 
the lockdown was being handled, and what measures had been put into place to ensure 
both rigour and fairness. It was evident that a lot of thought had been given to mitigation 
(where needed), and the rules established were applied across the board, with great 
sensitivity. 
 
B3. Issues 
 
Are there any issues which you feel should be brought to the attention of supervising 
committees in the faculty/department, division or wider University? 
 
 
B4. Good practice and enhancement opportunities 
 
Please comment/provide recommendations on any good practice and innovation relating 
to learning, teaching and assessment
, and any opportunities to enhance the quality of 

23 
 


the learning opportunities provided to students that should be noted and disseminated 
more widely as appropriate. 
 
There was not much diversity in assessment format - it might be worth thinking about 
expanding types of assessment. If the point of assessments is to enable students to do their 
best work - as well as to test a range of abilities - then a more varied mix of assessment 
types would do this better (and perhaps more fairly). 
 
Good practice: it made a big difference when raw as well as agreed marks were noted on 
both markers’ sheets, and where there was a clear explanation for how an agreed mark had 
been reached. 
 
 
B5. Any other comments 
 
Please provide any other comments you may have about any aspect of the examination 
process. Please also use this space to address any issues specifically required by any 
applicable professional body. If your term of office is now concluded, please provide an 
overview here. 
 
•  It would be useful for all marksheets to record ‘raw’ as well as ‘agreed’ marks (the 
absence of this information made the job particularly tricky when everything is being 
looked at online). 
•  Some agreed marks were not recorded on either marksheet, so it was necessary to 
contact the administrator for clarification, or to consult the Board’s rankings 
document. 
•  It could be made clearer (in some instances) why a piece of work was thought to 
belong into a particular grade band - this was especially true in relation to the three 
separate bands available for a first-class mark. In some instances the feedback 
suggested a mark from a different band to that which was then awarded. Basically - 
matching the comments to the marking criteria more closely. 
•  The process of how an agreed mark was reached was not always clear (there were 
also instances of exemplarity clarity and transparency). It should always be clear - 
even if there is no huge difference between the two ‘raw’ marks - not least because 
this can become very important for a candidate whose overall result ends up being a 
borderline result. 
 
 
Signed: 
 
28 July 2020 
Date: 
 
 
Please ensure you have completed parts A & B, and email your completed form to: 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx and copy it to the applicable divisional contact 
set out in the guidelines. 
 

 
24 
 


EXTERNAL EXAMINER REPORT FORM 2019-20 
 
 
External examiner name:  
Professor 
 
External examiner home institution: 
Course examined:  
English Final Honours Schools 
Level: (please delete as appropriate 
Undergraduate 
 
 
Please complete both Parts A and B.  

Part A 
Please () as applicable*   Yes  
No 
N/A /  
Other 

A1.   Are the academic standards and the achievements of students  ✓ 
 
 
comparable  with  those  in  other  UK  higher  education 
institutions of which you have experience? 
A2.  Do  the  threshold  standards  for  the  programme  appropriately  ✓ 
 
 
reflect the frameworks for higher education qualifications and 
any  applicable  subject  benchmark statement? [Please refer to 
paragraph 6 of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports]. 
 
A3.   Does the assessment process measure student achievement  ✓ 
 
 
rigorously  and  fairly  against  the  intended  outcomes  of  the 
programme(s)? 
A4.  Is  the  assessment  process  conducted  in  line  with  the  ✓ 
 
 
University's policies and regulations? 
A5.   Did you receive sufficient information and evidence in a timely  ✓ 
 
 
manner to be able to carry out the role of External Examiner 
effectively? 
A6.  Did you receive a written response to your previous report? 
✓ 
 
 
A7.  Are you satisfied that comments in your previous report have  ✓ 
 
 
been properly considered, and where applicable, acted upon?  
*  If  you  answer  “No”  to  any  question,  you  should  provide  further  comments  when  you 
complete Part B.
 Further comments may also be given in Part B, if desired, if you answer “Yes” or 
“N/A / Other”. 
 
 
 
 
25 
 

Part B 
 
B1. Academic standards 
 

a.  How  do  academic  standards  achieved  by  the  students  compare  with  those 
achieved by students at other higher education institutions of which you have 
experience? 

 
Standards achieved by students are on the whole very high indeed, meeting or exceeding 
those of my own institution and its predecessor, and of the other English programme for 
which I have been external examiner. 
 
b.  Please comment on student performance and achievement across the relevant 
programmes or parts of programmes and with reference to academic standards 
and  student  performance  of  other  higher  education  institutions  of  which  you 
have  experience  (those  examining  in  joint  schools  are  particularly  asked  to 
comment on their subject in relation to the whole award). 

 
I saw evidence of high student performance and achievement throughout. As before, 
students demonstrate not only tremendous range, but do so in multiple dimensions: in 
historical period, genre, theoretical and methodological approaches. A high, or even less 
high-performing run of scripts can contain work on a very wide range of literary texts indeed. 
The very best students write with the most extraordinary fluency, maturity, scholarship, and, 
indeed, deftness. Texts from the historical canon in particular are clearly taught as well here 
as they are in any English Department in the world. 
 
B2. Rigour and conduct of the assessment process 
 
Please comment on the rigour and conduct of the assessment process, including whether it 
ensures equity of treatment for students, and whether it has been conducted fairly and within 
the University’s regulations and guidance. 
 
The whole process of the assessment process was conducted with the utmost rigour. The 
small number of cases of (clear) plagiarism were dealt with efficiently, judiciously and 
sympathetically – and not at all lightly. I was very impressed indeed with how swiftly and 
effectively the Board of Examiners seemed to have internalised the new examination 
procedures necessary for this year of all years: there was no, that I saw, flapping or 
‘working-through’ from the remembered usual processes to the emergency ones required 
this year – this was tremendously impressive. Administrative staff operated indefatigably and 
willingly, and the Chair had clearly sacrificed a tremendous amount of time outside of normal 
working hours to make sure that when the Board met, information was as up to date as 
possible. The presentation of MCEs was remarkably lucid: it was very easy to cross-
reference information with candidate number when a judgement needed to be made; the 
careful and empathetic contribution of the Deputy Chair and MCE sub-panel should also be 
acknowledged. 
 
I have full confidence in the Board’s final awarding of classes, in this difficult year. Very 
careful judgement indeed was exercised at borderlines and in the lower class bands; in 
every case, 
 
 it was clear that justice was done and a lucid rationale informed and could be 
seen from the Board’s actions. I may have departed a little on individual marks where I felt 
more generosity might have been shown to otherwise engaging work not presented as 
carefully as it might have been, for example, or to a (one might imagine) twenty-one year 
old’s encounter with a particular theoretical school for the first time - but in no case would I 
26 
 

depart from a classification overall; and on the whole examiners’ comments corresponded 
with the marks more transparently than in a few cases I have seen in previous years. 
 
B3. Issues 
 
Are there any issues which you feel should be brought to the attention of supervising 
committees in the faculty/department, division or wider University? 
 
Perhaps understandably, given the much higher level of risk present in what students saw in 
the fair and transparent assessment of their performance and abilities, we did see this time a 
few more cases of over-reporting of adverse circumstances. Some Oxford students 
completed their assessment in the most difficult, indeed heartbreaking to read, in some 
cases, environments; some might have been seen as pushing their luck somewhat in the 
narratives presented. More substantively (and, I hope here, helpfully) – I can imagine it must 
have been difficult to say, abandon study of a unique fourteenth-century manuscript then to 
complete one’s dissertation at home - but an awareness of electronic resources available 
seemed to be lacking, in a few cases. No criticism is implied here, as students usually living 
within walking distance of one of the greatest libraries of the world and much more besides 
should indeed to be encouraged to make full use thereof – but as some form of further 
lockdown looks likely again at the time of writing, more schooling in the use of such 
resources might be borne in mind by Oxford tutors and librarians in the near future. 
 
The purpose of involving the Proctors in cases of plagiarism and academic irregularity is not 
always wholly clear to a non-Oxford academic. Proctors may have a great deal or very little 
knowledge of the subject being examined – surely the closer to the Faculty such judgements 
are made, the more robust and accurate they are likely to be
 
 
 The weblearn site was not updated, and guidelines for the report were not, as you 
acknowledge, sent until September. Completely understandable in the circumstances, but 
since you ask…. 
 
B4. Good practice and enhancement opportunities 
 
Please comment/provide recommendations on any good practice and innovation relating 
to learning, teaching and assessment
, and any opportunities to enhance the quality of 
the learning opportunities 
provided to students that should be noted and disseminated 
more widely as appropriate. 
 
The 2019-20 externals did discuss with that year’s Board the virtues of period papers having 
set texts that give opportunity for sustained engagement with a text. Students on this 
programme can, conceivably, do quite well with flashy and impressive if rather superficial 
brief exam essays which replicate the performance of flashy and impressive if rather 
superficial tutorial essays. These can still be rather good – and the very best work 
demonstrates depth and gravity alongside other virtues – but I’d encourage the Faculty to 
continue to reflect on its dependence on the third-year unseen three-hour examination as its 
predominant model of assessment, and the relationship between the modes of teaching 
delivery, and the means by which they are assessed.  
 
(I’ve said this before, so no reply is expected: I’d just suggest keep on thinking…..) 
 
B5. Any other comments 
 
Please provide any other comments you may have about any aspect of the examination 
process. Please also use this space to address any issues specifically required by any 
applicable professional body. If your term of office is now concluded, please provide an 

27 
 


overview here. 
 
It has been a pleasure and a privilege to be an external examiner for four years on this 
programme and I am grateful to all I have worked with, in particular the administrative staff 
and the three Chairs. 
 
Signed: 
23.9.2020 
Date: 
 
 
Please ensure you have completed parts A & B, and email your completed form to: 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx and copy it to the applicable divisional contact 
set out in the guidelines. 
 

 
28 
 


 
7 July 2020 
External examiner’s report, FHS English 2020 
 
Overview of examining: 
The care with which the Faculty examination board administered and assessed the work of 
students during the exceptional circumstances of the pandemic has been very impressive and 
confident. The submitted and examined work was of reassuringly high quality, and the way in 
which examiners read and commented on it was attentive, incisive, and illuminating. I am 
very confident that they conducted the process rigorously, fairly, and sympathetically and I 
especially thank 
(Chair of Examiners), 
and 
as well 
as the many members of the board with collective experience of past years’ examining. The 
externals were asked to read across the work of candidates at the top of the list and at 
borderlines; they also attended the MCE meeting (with, this year, an unsurprisingly 
substantial agenda), as well as the two statutory exam board meetings and one extraordinary 
one that preceded them. 
 
Quality of work: 
I was asked to read across some low firsts and some 2.1/1 borderline candidates. I found the 
work to be of sometimes exceptional quality – this is typical of candidates at this level, who 
have some first-class work showing even if it is not consistently maintained. The range of 
works covered and of critical and historical contexts addressed was wonderful: I read 
splendid work on everything from Gawain to experimental British novels, often from the 
same candidate, often learned and imaginatively analytical. I noted with pleasure that the 
writing itself was almost always strong, even elegant, and often very striking. There were 
occasional difficulties with citational practice, mainly (I think) explained by the candidates’ 
remoteness from their libraries and even in some cases from their own books and notes. 
Given the extreme difficulties of working, as most students did, without access to normal 
facilities and materials, the work was remarkably fine and trouble-free. All this suggests a 
thriving scholarly and pedagogical culture within the School: powerful teaching and guidance 
has obviously helped promising students to become outstanding ones. I am therefore in no 
doubt that the manner in which the FHS has been conducted more than meets the standard of 
a ‘normal’ year, and indeed of the other universities for which I have externalled. The quality 
of student work was at or above that being produced in those other universities. 
 
Marking: 
In nearly every case I agreed wholly with the comments of the markers but I was 
often surprised that their sturdy-to-high praise was often not matched by their marks. It may 
be that I am a softer touch, but I do think it was sometimes difficult to detect how a set of 
very complimentary remarks on the fulfilment of all the stated criteria yielded a respectable 
2.1 mark rather than something higher. If students see these remarks they will be often 
bemused by the discrepancy, as I was. The hybrid papers necessarily yoked quite different 
29 
 

periods and specialisms, and using a team of representative specialists to mark them has 
much merit; it meant, however, that no one marker had read any whole script, and that may 
have had the effect of eliminating credit for very good across-the-range writing in favour of 
strong performances and high marks in individual essays. In other words, I wonder whether, 
in cases where my sense of the overall quality was higher than the final agreed mark, I was 
responding to the total performance, and whether it would be useful in a future iteration of 
these hybrid exams to have examiners read the whole script. The marking range itself was 
properly used within the scripts and submissions I read: having just externalled at another 
collegiate university last week and having been given their top firsts to read, I am happy to 
confirm that this lower range of firsts I read for Oxford was appropriately ranked. 
 
Some observations and suggestions: 
The attempt to replicate written exams remotely was commendable, and it was one solution 
to the sudden logistical crisis of the pandemic. However, I wonder if this mode might be 
reconsidered if current conditions persist in the coming academic year. I read a total of 24 
timed essays produced remotely as elements of Paper A (1350-1550) and Paper B (1660-
1830). Not a single one bore any relation to a typical one-hour written essay produced under 
exam conditions that I have ever marked. Open-book exams will of course have a texture of 
quotation and argument that’s distinct from closed-book exams, but all those that I read were 
structured and instantiated like submitted portfolio essays and it was essentially incredible 
that they could have been produced in exam-fashion. There was no way of monitoring these 
exams remotely in any meaningful way: based on the MCE applications, it’s clear that some 
students had to leave Oxford hurriedly, without their books and notes, or had an awful 
domestic environment in which to do the exams; by contrast many others must have been 
very well-equipped and situated. Some students may have adhered to the honour code and 
written from scratch within the confines of the one-hour essay (and may have suffered for 
their honesty); others may have strategically prepared in ways that allowed them to shape 
material they already had to hand. Some very few may simply be brilliant and able to marshal 
fluent and shapely arguments in such short order. In short, I had no idea what kind of work I 
was actually reading, and no sense of how it might be fairly marked. I would, in other words, 
eliminate the examined aspect of the FHS if next year’s iteration is similarly constrained: it is 
unworkable, in my view, as a mode of examination (either to sit or to mark with consistency), 
and it is bound to accentuate the many inequities that already exist among the student cohort. 
This was made disturbingly clear by the quantity and kinds of MCE application received, 
which were submitted by well over 50% of that cohort and were believable even though 
unverifiable. Submitted work does not do away with those inequities but they flatten out the 
disparities considerably.  
 
Timing and other processes: 
Everything was very clearly explained and arranged by 
Professor 
with 
and 
who were unfailingly helpful in all 
aspects of the system and process. I would only suggest that the turnaround for externals – 
about a day and a half on either side of a weekend – was not ideal. I was able to give the 
entire interval to the task, but many with childcare and other domestic duties would have 
found this fairly tricky. The remaining difficulties I observed were entirely the responsibility 
of the University rather than the Faculty.  
 
1.  Turnitin should be fully adopted by the University, and along the lines of most other 
universities, where students themselves submit all their work via that portal. This 
saves time, aids markers, and reminds student that they are on their mettle to behave 
30 
 

with honour. At present examiners can only with tremendous difficulty consult the 
Turnitin results.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3.  Students complained in their MCE submissions, in some cases with some acerbity, 
about the mixed and confused communications from the University authorities in the 
period leading up to submission of work and to examinations. The current crisis has 
naturally created all sorts of unforeseen stresses and complications, but compared to 
my own university and to the one for which I am also currently externalling, decisions 
and procedures here seem to have been devised either too late or inconsistently. 
4.  There were a number of silences and miscues affecting examiners: for some time it 
was unclear whether externals would be engaged at all; and I was particularly alarmed 
about the safety net, specifically devised to support borderline students who may have 
experienced severe difficulties during the pandemic. We carefully discussed this in a 
number of cases, at length, and mitigations were scrupulously applied. However, 
following the first examiners’ meeting, the Chair was belatedly informed that, despite 
her attempts in previous months to nail down exactly how it was to be used and 
logged, the safety-net could not after all be registered by the University. The Chair 
now undertakes to write to these students after their results are delivered, to tell them 
that they received the benefit of the safety net. This is a troubling and needless failure 
on the part of the University bodies that make such arrangements. It wasted much 
time for the examiners and most of all for Professor 
  
 
These are just a few examples of mismanagement, and they may be owing to the sudden 
onset of the pandemic and subsequent lockdown. Still, it is to be hoped that nothing of the 
same sort will occur next spring if remote examining remains in place. 
 
 
 
With best wishes, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
31 
 

FHS Appendix: Communications to students regarding exam conventions and 
other arrangements 

Guidance for Candidates for English FHS, 2020 
 
From: 
Chair of English FHS Examining Board  
This document includes details of the changes made to examining this year, listed as 
documented in the FHS Handbook, 2018-20, and to be used alongside it. Overall the written 
examination has been shortened and (slightly altered) to make it more manageable: fewer 
essays are required, you may have notes and books with you, there will be no commentary 
or translation, and you will be given more time than in the usual examination format (and 
students with standing arrangements for extra time will have that on top). In English Course 
I, the four period papers are represented by TWO examinations, giving a total of six essays; 
candidates will write either ONE or TWO essays for each of the periods. There are 
corresponding reductions in Course II and joint schools’ papers (see details below). We are 
all absolutely committed to mitigating the impact of the pandemic on academic 
performance as much as we can, giving full consideration to your individual circumstances 
and particularly your mental and physical needs, following the University’s guidance on 
remote examinations.  
 
Handbook changes/additions  
 
2.6.2-5 FHS papers 2, 3, 4, 5: Changes to examination structure in Course I 
New FHS Paper A: FHS papers 2 (1350-1550) and 3 (1550-1660) will be examined 
together in a four-hour timed remote examination. Candidates will be asked to answer 
three questions, including at least one from Section 1 (1350-1550) and at least one from 
Section 2 (1550-1660). There will be no reduction in the number and choice of questions 
offered in each period. All questions are equally weighted. There will be no commentary 
exercise in Section 1, and Troilus & Criseyde may be used in any answer in Section 1. 
New FHS Paper B: FHS papers 4 (1660-1760) and 5 (1760-1830) will be examined 
together in a four-hour timed remote examination. Candidates will be asked to answer 
three questions, including at least one from Section 1 (1660-1760) and at least one from 
Section 2 (1760-1830). There will be no reduction in the number and choice of questions 
offered in each period. All questions are equally weighted.  
 
2.6.6 Other FHS written papers (paper 6, joint schools options): Changes to examination 
structure 
 
Joint schools candidates taking one or two written period papers on the English side will 
take shortened versions as follows: FHS papers 2 (CII.3) (1350-1550), 3 (1550-1660), 4 
(1660-1760) and 5 (1760-1830) will each be examined in a two hours and forty minutes’ 
timed remote examination. Candidates will be asked to answer two questions, equally 
weighted. There will be no reduction in the number and choice of essay questions offered in 
each paper. There will be no commentary exercise in Paper 2, and Troilus & Criseyde may be 
used in any answer in Paper 2. Candidates taking two papers which have been combined in 
the main school (either BOTH papers 2 and 3, or BOTH papers 4 and 5) will take the main 
school’s new combined Paper A or B, as detailed above. Joint schools candidates taking the 
Course II paper  
32 
 

Medieval and Related Literatures 1066-1550 (Lyric) will take the new shortened version as 
detailed below. 
Candidates taking the written Paper 6 options (Medieval Welsh for Beginners; Old & Middle 
Irish for beginners) will be examined in a two hours and forty minutes’ timed remote 
examination. Candidates will be asked to answer two questions, equally weighted. There 
will be no translation exercise. 
 
2.7.1-3 CII FHS papers 1, 2, 3: Changes to examination structure in Course II 
New Course II Paper A: 
CII FHS papers 1 (650-1100) and 3 (1350-1550) will be examined 
together in a four-hour timed remote examination. Candidates will be asked to answer 
three questions, including at least one from Section 1 (650-1100) and at least one from 
Section 2 (1350-1550). There will be no reduction in the number and choice of questions 
offered in each period. All questions are equally weighted. There will be no commentary 
exercise in Section 2, and Troilus & Criseyde may be used in any answer in Section 2. 
Adapted Course II Paper 2: CII FHS paper 2 (Medieval and Related Literatures, 1066-
1550: Lyric) will be examined in a two-hour timed remote examination. Candidates will be 
asked to answer one question. There will be no reduction in the number and choice of 
questions offered. Joint schools candidates for this paper will take the same version. 
 
3.1.1 Marking and Classification Criteria  
Papers A and B in Course I will count as two of five papers (alongside Paper 6, Shakespeare, 
and the Dissertation), instead of four of seven. Papers A and 2 in Course II will count as two 
of six papers (alongside Paper 4, Paper 6, Shakespeare/Material Text, and the Dissertation), 
instead of three of seven. The written exams will therefore have a lower overall weighting 
in the marks profile and classification: they account for 40% (instead of 57%) of the marks 
profile in Course I, and 33% (instead of 43%) of the marks profile in Course II. (Note to 
candidates taking Medieval Welsh or Irish: the situation is slightly different because you 
have three remote written exams, but classification will be calculated in the same way, as 
below.) 
 
Classification over the total of five 
EITHER: Two marks of 70 or above, an 
Course I or six Course II papers is as 
average mark of 68.5 or greater and no 
follows: First  
mark below 50.  
OR: Three or more marks of 70 or 
above, an average mark of 67.5 or 
greater and no mark below 50. 
II.i 
Two marks of 60 or above, an average 
mark of 59 or greater and no mark 
below 40.  
II.ii  
Two marks of 50 or above, an average 
mark of 49.5 or greater and no mark 
below 30.  
III  
Average mark of 40 or greater and not 
more than one mark below 30. 
Pass  
Average mark of 30 or greater. Not 
more than two marks below 30.  
 
Grade distribution  
As part of the main run of classification, measures will be taken to ensure that the grade 
distribution is in line with recent years (so there are not significantly higher or lower 
33 
 

numbers of Firsts than is usual). These measures may include scaling of whole papers or 
runs of marks.  
 
Individual Student Self-Assessment and MCEs  
A subset of the board will meet to discuss the individual notices given by Student Self-
Assessment and MCEs, banding the seriousness of each notice on a scale of 1-3, with 1 
indicating minor impact, 2 indicating moderate impact, and 3 indicating very serious 
impact. The banding information will be used at the final Board of Examiners meeting to 
adjudicate on the merits of candidates, and in some cases limited action will be taken to 
make adjustments to individual marks and/or to the final classification. Such actions will be 
considered by the Board of Examiners on the basis of both the notice banding information 
and the scripts/submissions and marks. 
Particular attention this year will be paid wherever a candidate’s overall performance in 
remotely administered exams is significantly below the level of achievement indicated by 
their previously submitted work; where that occurs, and the student’s Self-Assessment or 
MCE indicates very serious impact on that student’s performance in the remote written 
examinations, it will be possible for examiners to go beyond the usual limited action at the 
grade borderlines, and deploy the University’s 2020 Safety Net procedure. This works as 
follows: 
• 
The candidate’s highest coursework mark will be counted twice;  
• 
the candidate’s lowest remote written exam mark will be disregarded; 
• 
the result will be averaged.  
 
Classification will then proceed, with the proviso that the double-counted top mark does NOT 
count as two units (i.e., a double-weighted coursework mark of 70+ cannot produce a first in the 
absence of another 70+ mark). 
 
Letter for English Finalists on Classification, 20 April 2020 
 Dear Finalists,  
 
Classification procedures in English FHS 2020  
 
First of all, I hope you and your families are all keeping safe and well in this extremely difficult 
time. I am sorry that we have had to add to your uncertainty during these anxious weeks, and I 
am very grateful for your forbearance and understanding as we have worked toward a solution 
to the various challenges presented by the current situation. We have done so because we 
believe that your hard and serious work over the course of your degree should be properly 
rewarded, with an examination process adapted to these circumstances, and alert to all your 
individual situations, so that you can graduate with a degree that reflects your achievements.  
You will be aware that the University has this morning released its high level proposals for 
classification, including its ‘safety net’ policy. This document is necessarily a little confusing 
because it covers all subjects, at both Finals and MSt level, and as you will anticipate, that means 
a huge degree of variation. The purpose of this letter is therefore to explain exactly how 
classification will work in English Finals, and how we have adapted our assessment and marking 
procedures to these circumstances. At the end you will find the full details set out.  
 
The two most important points to make, in line with University policy across all subjects, are 
that (1) we will award classifications in line with the grade distributions of recent years: that is, 
we will not give substantially higher or lower numbers of firsts, 2.1s, and 2.2s than normal; and 
34 
 

(2) we will attend to the circumstances of each individual candidate, paying particular attention 
where mitigating factors have disproportionately affected candidates’ performance in the 
remote examinations.  
 
To take point (1) first: In English, we have responded to the necessity for remote examinations 
by shortening and/or combining our written papers, reducing the number of assessment units 
required by up to 50%, and reducing the overall weighting of the written exams in the marks 
and classification profile. (Other subjects have taken different routes, such as retaining all 
papers but classifying only on some of them.) We have produced an adapted classification 
regime based on the reduced number of papers, which you can see in full below. On the basis of 
that we will examine the overall marks and classification pattern, and if necessary, we will 
undertake scaling or other adjustment of whole papers or runs of marks, in order to ensure that 
the grade distribution is not out of line with normal expectations. All of these measures have 
been and will be taken across the board, in recognition of the exceptional circumstances which 
will affect each and every one of you, to ensure that our overall grade distribution is fair and 
comparable with previous years.  
 
Secondly, our point (2): individual circumstances. A sub-committee of the Exam Board will meet 
to discuss all candidate Self-Assessments and Mitigating Circumstances statements, and these 
notices will each be graded according to the seriousness of their impact on candidates’ 
performance. As in the usual way, the Board may make small adjustments to candidates’ marks, 
or to their final classification, in the light of these notices. In addition to the usual procedure, 
furthermore, in cases where there was a very serious impact on a candidate’s performance in 
the remote exams, and those marks fall significantly below the level of achievement indicated 
by their previously submitted coursework, it will be possible for examiners to go beyond the 
usual limited action at the grade borderlines, and deploy the University’s 2020 Safety Net 
procedure: details of that can be found below.  
 
Candidates for the joint degrees will be hearing simultaneously from the other Schools involved. 
In each case, joint schools candidates will be taking the shortened and/or combined papers of 
the English main school, for parity with English, while the weighting of the English papers within 
the overall marks profile remains the same; and the overall classification will follow the 
procedures of the other school, for parity with them. Each faculty has devised its own 
procedures to work with their varying paper combinations; but in all cases, a normal proportion 
of firsts will be awarded, and all individual circumstances will be taken into consideration.  
Overall, therefore, between the measures we are taking across the board, and the attention we 
will give to each individual’s circumstances, we are confident that we can assess your 
performance fairly, in order to make sure that you are awarded a degree that reflects your hard 
work and your personal achievements.  
 
I very much hope that you find this reassuring, and that you feel confident in preparing for these 
final assessments. This is not the finals term that any of us expected, and I am very sorry for all 
the disappointment and anxiety you must feel. I wish you all the very best, both in your work, 
and personally; now, and for the future.  
 
Yours sincerely,  
Chair, FHS English 
 
 
35 
 

English FHS 2020 FAQs 
 
 English FHS 2020: Frequently Asked Questions  
How will marks and classification be calculated? *Updated*  
Papers A and B in Course I will count as two of five papers (alongside Paper 6, Shakespeare, 
and the Dissertation), instead of four of seven. Papers A and 2 in Course II will count as two 
of six papers (alongside Paper 4, Paper 6, Shakespeare/Material Text, and the Dissertation), 
instead of three of seven. The written exams will therefore have a lower overall weighting 
in the marks profile and classification: they account for 40% (instead of 57%) of the marks 
profile in Course I, and 33% (instead of 43%) of the marks profile in Course II. (Note to 
candidates taking Medieval Welsh or Irish: the situation is slightly different because you 
have three remote written exams, but classification will be calculated in the same way, as 
below.) 
 
Classification over the total of five 
EITHER: Two marks of 70 or above, an 
Course I or six Course II papers is as 
average mark of 68.5 or greater and no 
follows: First  
mark below 50.  
OR: Three or more marks of 70 or 
above, an average mark of 67.5 or 
greater and no mark below 50. 
II.i 
Two marks of 60 or above, an average 
mark of 59 or greater and no mark 
below 40.  
II.ii  
Two marks of 50 or above, an average 
mark of 49.5 or greater and no mark 
below 30.  
III  
Average mark of 40 or greater and not 
more than one mark below 30. 
Pass  
Average mark of 30 or greater. Not 
more than two marks below 30.  
 
 
 Grade distribution  
As part of the main run of classification, measures will be taken to ensure that the grade 
distribution is in line with recent years (so there are not significantly higher or lower 
numbers of Firsts than is usual). These measures may include scaling of whole papers or 
runs of marks.  
 
Individual Student Self-Assessment and MCEs  
A subset of the board will meet to discuss the individual notices given by Student Self-
Assessment and MCEs, banding the seriousness of each notice on a scale of 1-3, with 1 
indicating minor impact, 2 indicating moderate impact, and 3 indicating very serious 
impact. The banding information will be used at the final Board of Examiners meeting to 
adjudicate on the merits of candidates, and in some cases limited action will be taken to 
make adjustments to individual marks and/or to the final classification. Such actions will be 
considered by the Board of Examiners on the basis of both the notice banding information 
and the scripts/submissions and marks. 
 
Particular attention this year will be paid wherever a candidate’s overall performance in 
remotely administered exams is significantly below the level of achievement indicated by 
36 
 

their previously submitted work; where that occurs, and the student’s Self-Assessment or 
MCE indicates very serious impact on that student’s performance in the remote written 
examinations, it will be possible for examiners to go beyond the usual limited action at the 
grade borderlines, and deploy the University’s 2020 Safety Net procedure. This works as 
follows: 
• 
The candidate’s highest coursework mark will be counted twice;  
• 
the candidate’s lowest remote written exam mark will be disregarded; 
• 
the result will be averaged.  
 
Classification will then proceed, with the proviso that the double-counted top mark does 
NOT count as two units (i.e., a double-weighted coursework mark of 70+ cannot produce a 
first in the absence of another 70+ mark). 
 
Will each section of the new combined papers be marked by separate examiners?  
Yes, using the examiners originally assigned to the four period papers, and following an 
adapted marking procedure as follows: 
a) Each question is marked independently by two markers. Markers use a comment sheet to note their 
assessment of each question against the criteria.  
b) An individual raw mark is given for each question, after which the two markers confer in order to 
reach an agreed mark for each question.  
c) The agreed marks for the questions are averaged to produce an overall mark for the paper. The mark 
for each paper is expressed as a whole number, rounding up from 0.5 (e.g. a mark of 39.5 would become 
40).  
d) If agreement is not reached about the mark for any question, a third reader examines the script and 
raw marks and comments, to decide on an agreed mark. Their mark must be within the range identified 
by the initial markers. Where the initial raw marks are at a variance of 15 marks or more, or two classes, 
they are automatically referred for third marking. After third marking, the final agreed mark for each 
question is fed into the average to produce an overall mark for the paper.  
 
Will the combined papers comprise the full standard number of questions for each 
paper? 
Yes: we are reproducing the whole papers as originally set in each section, so there will be 
full choice from all themes. The extra time taken to read through the questions is allowed 
for in the increased examination time; this was deemed preferable to reducing the number 
of themes covered by the questions. 
 
How much breadth and range do we need to show in the combined papers? 
*Updated* 
You need not worry that you should try to show the same range across one or two essays 
that you would have shown across three in the original period paper format. Think of the 
combined papers as a chance to showcase your best work, selected from across the whole 
span of 1350 to 1830.  
 
Can I handwrite my exams?  
The default assumption is that you will type your essays and then upload your script to 
Weblearn; do take advantage of the practice assignments on the Weblearn site to check that 
you are confident in downloading sample question papers and uploading documents, and 
practise typing under timed conditions if you feel this will be difficult for you. If you 
ultimately feel unable to type your exams then there will be an opportunity to register to 
handwrite your answers. Your script will then need to be scanned or photographed, and 
uploaded to Weblearn. Technical help will be available over email.  
 
37 
 

How long should my exam answers be?  
Your answers should be the normal length for a written examination – typically c. 900-1200 
words for each essay. Given that you only have a small amount of extra time, this should not 
be something you need to worry about. 
 
Do I need to give full references for quotations? 
No: the usual expectations for written exams apply, so where necessary you would give just 
the author name or text title, or both, when citing primary or secondary texts.  
 
Should I worry that being open-book means I am supposed to know the provenance 
or context of all the quotations? 
 
No! The questions were all chosen with the limitations of a normal written examination in 
mind, and we are not asking anything extra of you in these adapted circumstances. You are 
free to apply a quotation/question to any author(s) unless specified otherwise, and you are 
not expected to have any extra knowledge about the quotations. 
 
How much should I revise for the new combined papers?  
You are writing half as many essays, so you only need about half as many 
topics/texts/authors. You might want to prepare something like two main areas for each of 
the periods, knowing that in the exam you will write two essays in one period, and one in 
the other, depending on how the questions suit your materials.  
 
How should I revise differently for an open-book exam, or work differently during it? 
You will still need to be absolutely familiar with your chosen texts, and commit a good 
number of quotations to memory, because you will not have time to go hunting through 
your texts and notes during the exam. You can of course organize and arrange your notes 
around you so you can rapidly find the quotation you need, for example, or fill your books 
with bookmarks, but in general, plan to rely more on your memory than finding things on 
the spot. Don’t be tempted to go hunting in your computer’s hard drive for your old essays, 
even to copy & paste quotations – this is dangerous; you’ll end up reading that essay, being 
tempted to use bits of it – and that will take up time, distract you from your answer, and 
knock your confidence. 
 
What constitutes cheating in an open-book exam? 
The honour code you agree to asserts that your answers will be wholly and only your own 
work, produced in the time available, according to the rubric of the examination. That 
means, simply, starting with a blank document, and typing into it. Keep your notes around 
you in hard copy, if possible, and type your quotations out in real time – exactly as you 
would write them out in the examination room. Don’t use the internet except for consulting 
primary texts you can only access that way (and set them up ready; don’t eat up your exam 
time searching for things); don’t copy & paste material from elsewhere on your computer 
(and that would never help you to answer the question, anyway). These exams are remote, 
and cannot be invigilated, so we are relying on your honesty and integrity. 
 
What if I am delayed uploading my answer script? 
 
The times at which you download the exam paper and upload your answer script give us the 
four-hour (or shorter) time of your exam. We expect you to be uploading your script as 
close as possible to that time. If you have difficulty uploading, you can demonstrate the time 
when you finished the paper by emailing it to us. 
 
What if I am worried my home situation will affect my exam timing? *Updated* 
38 
 

Your Self-Assessment will be taken into full consideration as part of the overall 
classification procedure. However, if you fear that circumstances may make it impossible 
for you to begin the exam at the time expected, please alert us to this ahead of time if 
possible. 
 
What will the rubrics say? 
New combined papers:  
• 
Course I Paper A (4hrs): Answer three questions, including at least one from 
Section 1 (1350-1550) and at least one from Section 2 (1550-1660). All questions are 
equally weighted. 
• 
Course I Paper B (4hrs): Answer three questions, including at least one from 
Section 1 (1660-1760) and at least one from Section 2 (1760-1830). All questions are 
equally weighted.  
• 
Course II Paper A (4hrs): Answer three questions, including at least one from 
Section A (650-1100) and at least one from Section B (1350-1550). All questions are equally 
weighted.  
 
Except where specified, themes can be applied to any author or authors of your choice 
within the periods. You should pay careful attention in your answers to the precise terms of 
the quotations and questions. Candidates should not repeat material across different parts 
of the examination. 
 
Shortened papers:  
 
Course II Paper 2 (2hrs): 
Answer one question. You should pay careful attention in your 
answer to the precise terms of the quotation and/or question. Candidates should show ONE 
or BOTH of the following in some part of their essay: (a) knowledge of literature originally 
written in languages other than English; (b) knowledge of texts from the earlier period 
(1000–1350). Candidates should not repeat material across different parts of the 
examination. 
 
• 
Joint Schools papers Literature in English 1350-1550 / 1550-1660 / 1660-
1760 / 1760-1830 (2hrs40): Answer two questions. Except where specified, themes can 
be applied to any author or authors of your choice. You should pay careful attention in your 
answers to the precise terms of the quotations and questions. Candidates should not repeat 
material across different parts of the examination. 
• 
Medieval Welsh for Beginners (2hrs40): Answer two questions. You should pay 
attention in your answers to the precise terms of the question. 
• 
Old and Middle Irish for Beginners (2hrs40): Answer two questions. You should 
pay attention in your answers to the precise terms of the question. 
 
Will there still be prizes awarded for exam performance?  
Yes: once we have full marks profiles for all candidates and have finalized our classification 
procedures for greatest fairness, we will proceed with classification, ranking, and the 
awarding of prizes. We have prizes for the best performance in the Shakespeare portfolio, in 
Paper 6, and in the Dissertation; and for the best overall performance in Course I, and the 
best overall performance in Course II: these will all stand as normal. The usual prize for 
‘best performance in a 3-hour timed examination’ will not be awarded; instead there will be 
39 
 

nine (instead of eight) further prizes for distinguished performance (awarded in order of 
average, excluding existing prize winners). 
 
 
40