Dear Care Quality Commission,

I'm writing to obtain the following information:

What are the rankings across England for the hospitals within the NHS
What happens if a Hospital is Deemed inadequate
When do the CQC ratings take place

Yours faithfully,

George Lavery

Information Access, Care Quality Commission

Our Ref: CQC IAT 1819 0502

 

Dear Mr Lavery

 

We acknowledge receipt of your correspondence dated 12 October 2018, in
which you made a request for information.

 

Your request is as follows:

 

“What are the rankings across England for the hospitals within the NHS?

 

What happens if a Hospital is Deemed inadequate?

 

When do the CQC ratings take place?”

 

CQC will consider your request in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (FOIA).

 

CQC will respond as soon as possible, but in any event, within 20 working
days following date of receipt of your correspondence as required by FOIA.

 

You can therefore expect a response no later than the close of business on
09 November 2018. We will write to you if we are unable to meet this
deadline.

 

The information you have requested may be subject to an exemption from the
right to know. Should this occur, we will explain the reasons why when we
respond.

 

Yours Sincerely

 

The Information Access Team

Governance and Legal Services

Customer & Corporate Services Directorate

Care Quality Commission
Citygate

Gallowgate
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 4PA

 

The Care Quality Commission is the independent regulator of health and
adult social care services in England. [1]www.cqc.org.uk. For general
enquiries, call the National Customer Service Centre (NCSC) on 03000
616161 or email [2][email address]

 

Personal data is processed in accordance with the General Data Protection
Regulation (GDPR) and relevant data protection law. Information on the
processing of personal data by CQC can be found at
[3]www.cqc.org.uk/about-us/our-policies/privacy-statement

 

Statutory requests for information made under access to information
legislation such as the Data Protection Act 2018, GDPR and the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 should be sent to: [4][CQC request email]

show quoted sections

References

Visible links
1. http://www.cqc.org.uk/
2. mailto:[email address]
3. http://www.cqc.org.uk/about-us/our-polic...
4. mailto:[CQC request email]

Information Access, Care Quality Commission

Dear Mr Lavery

 

Our Ref: CQC IAT 1819 0502

 

I write in response to your correspondence of 12 October 2018 in which you
asked for the following information:

 

“1) What are the rankings across England for the hospitals within the NHS?

 

2) What happens if a Hospital is Deemed inadequate?

 

3) When do the CQC ratings take place?”

 

CQC have now processed your request for information.  For a request to
fall within the scope of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) it
must be a request for recorded information. You can find out more in the
‘Freedom of Information’ section below.  Where your questions do not fall
within FOIA we have still endeavoured to provide an answer. With this in
mind, I will address each of your questions in turn.

 

1) What are the rankings across England for the hospitals within the NHS?

 

We do not hold this information. CQC do not have hospital rankings.
Instead, we rate NHS England hospital providers according to the quality
of care that they provide. This is assessed in line with our ‘Key lines of
Enquiry’ which result in one of four ratings, based on the inspection
findings: Outstanding, Good, Requires Improvement, or Inadequate. More
information on our inspection method can be found [1]here.

 

Unlike other public service regulators, CQC do not create a table or list
from best to worst. Currently, there are 319 NHS hospitals registered in
England. Of these, 23 are rated as Outstanding, 146 are rated as Good, 139
are rated as Requires Improvement, and 11 are considered Inadequate.

 

For more detailed information about care providers currently registered
with CQC, please see out [2]Care Directory which can be found published on
our website.

 

2) What happens if a Hospital is Deemed inadequate?

 

This is not a valid request in accordance with FOIA because it is not a
request for recorded information. However, we will explain our regulatory
role. We can advise you, outside of FOIA, that The Health and Social Care
Act 2012 provides CQC with certain enforcement powers which can be engaged
if we consider a hospital to be failing to meet the fundamental standards
of care which are outlined [3]here.

 

The action we can take includes:

 

o Using requirement notices or warning notices to set out what
improvements the care provider must make and by when.
o Making changes to a care provider's registration to limit what they
may do, for example by imposing conditions for a given time.
o Placing a provider in special measures, where we closely supervise the
quality of care while working with other organisations to help them
improve within set timescales.
o Hold the care provider to account for their failings by:

o issuing simple cautions
o issuing fines
o prosecuting cases where people are harmed or placed in danger of harm.

 

Special Measures

 

We want to ensure that services found to be providing inadequate care do
not continue to do so. We have therefore introduced special measures.

 

The purpose of special measures is to:

 

o Ensure that providers found to be providing inadequate care
significantly improve
o Provide a framework within which we use our enforcement powers in
response to inadequate care, and, working with other organisations,
ensure that services make improvements and are aware of the support
available
o Provide a clear timeframe within which providers must improve the
quality of care. If they do not, we will take action to cancel their
registration.

 

Services rated as inadequate overall will be placed straight into special
measures.

 

Services that are rated as inadequate for a key question or for a
population group will be re-inspected within six months. If there is still
a rating of inadequate for any key question or population group after six
months, the service will be placed into special measures.

 

Once a service is placed in special measures we will re-inspect within six
months to check that it has made sufficient progress to improve. After
this inspection, if we feel the service has made sufficient progress, we
will remove it from special measures.

 

If sufficient progress has not been made when we re-inspect, and we give a
rating of inadequate for any key question, population group or overall, we
will take further action to prevent the service from operating, either by
proposing to cancel its registration or vary the terms of its
registration.

 

There will then be a further inspection, normally within six months. If
sufficient progress has still not been made, and there is a rating of
inadequate for any key question, population group or overall, we are
likely to proceed to cancel the registration or to vary the terms of
registration. This will mean that the provider’s registration will be
cancelled.

 

Special measures does not replace CQC’s existing enforcement powers: we
are likely to take enforcement action at the same time as placing a
provider into special measures. In some cases, we may need to take urgent
action to protect people who use the service or to bring about
improvement, in accordance with our enforcement policy.

 

3) When do the CQC ratings take place?

 

This is not a valid request in accordance with the FOIA, because it is not
a request for recorded information. However, we can advise you, outside of
FOIA that CQC ratings are released as part of the publication of
inspection reports. Inspections can be done on a provider or Trust level.
Therefore, the ratings of each registered provider or trust are released
in due course, upon the publication of inspection reports.

 

We hope this information is of assistance to you.

 

The Freedom of Information Act 2000

 

The purpose of FOIA is to ensure transparency and accountability in the
public sector. It seeks to achieve this by providing anyone, anywhere in
the world, with the right to access recorded information held by, or on
behalf of, a public authority.

 

Recorded information includes printed documents, computer files, letters,
emails, photographs, and sound or video recordings.

 

Public authorities spend money collected from taxpayers, and make
decisions that can significantly affect many people’s lives. Access to
information helps the public make public authorities accountable for their
actions and allows public debate to be better informed and more
productive.

 

The main principle behind FOIA is that people have a right to know about
the activities of public authorities, unless there is a good reason for
them not to.

 

A disclosure under FOIA is described as “applicant blind” meaning that it
is a disclosure into the public domain, not to any one individual.

 

This means that everyone has a right to access official information.
Disclosure should be the default – in other words, information should be
kept private only when there is a good reason and it is permitted by FOIA.

 

An applicant does not need to give a reason for wanting the information.
On the contrary, the public authority must justify refusing the
information.

 

Public authorities are required to treat all requests equally, except
under some limited circumstances. The information someone can access under
FOIA should not be affected by who they are, whether they are journalists,
local residents, public authority employees, or foreign researchers.

 

Feedback

 

CQC will always endeavour to provide high quality responses to requests
for information and seek to be as helpful as possible. We would therefore
appreciate if you can take some time to complete our online feedback form
by visiting the following link:

 

[4]https://webdataforms.cqc.org.uk/Checkbox...

 

Any information you provide will be held securely and only used for the
purposes of improving the Information Rights service that CQC provides.

 

Yours sincerely

 

The Information Access Team

Governance and Legal Services

Customer & Corporate Services Directorate

Care Quality Commission
Citygate

Gallowgate
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 4PA

 

The Care Quality Commission is the independent regulator of health and
adult social care services in England. [5]www.cqc.org.uk. For general
enquiries, call the National Customer Service Centre (NCSC) on 03000
616161 or email [6][email address]

 

Personal data is processed in accordance with the General Data Protection
Regulation (GDPR) and relevant data protection law. Information on the
processing of personal data by CQC can be found at
[7]www.cqc.org.uk/about-us/our-policies/privacy-statement

 

Statutory requests for information made under access to information
legislation such as the Data Protection Act 2018, GDPR and the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 should be sent to: [8][CQC request email]

show quoted sections

References

Visible links
1. https://www.cqc.org.uk/what-we-do/how-we...
2. https://www.cqc.org.uk/file/148450
3. https://www.cqc.org.uk/what-we-do/how-we...
4. https://webdataforms.cqc.org.uk/Checkbox...
5. http://www.cqc.org.uk/
6. mailto:[email address]
7. http://www.cqc.org.uk/about-us/our-polic...
8. mailto:[CQC request email]

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