Police Response to Falsification of medical records

Alan Edwards made this Freedom of Information request to Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

This request has been closed to new correspondence. Contact us if you think it should be reopened.

The request was partially successful.

Dear Metropolitan Police Service (MPS),

My understanding is that NHS Medical Records are protected by the Computer Misuse Act 1990. That if NHS Medical Records are accessed unlawfully or altered unlawfully this would constitute a crime.

1. If a member of the Public suspects that their Medical Records have been falsified what course of action should they take?

2. If the Police are approached about unauthorised access or falsification of NHS Medical Records what course of action should they take?

Yours faithfully,

Alan Edwards

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Edwards

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2012100000136
I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 29/09/2012.  I note you seek
access to the following information

My understanding is that NHS Medical Records are protected by the Computer
Misuse Act 1990. That if NHS Medical Records are accessed unlawfully or
altered unlawfully this would constitute a crime.    

1. If a member of the Public suspects that their Medical Records have been
falsified what course of action should they take?    
2. If the Police are approached about unauthorised access or falsification
of NHS Medical Records what course of action should they take?

Your request will now be considered in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the Act).  You will receive a response within the
statutory timescale of 20 working days as defined by the Act, subject to
the information not being exempt or containing a reference to a third
party.  In some circumstances the MPS may be unable to achieve this
deadline.  If this is likely you will be informed and given a revised
time-scale at the earliest opportunity.

Some requests may also require either full or partial transference to
another public authority in order to answer your query in the fullest
possible way. Again, you will be informed if this is the case.

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet, which details your right of
complaint.

Should you have any further enquiries concerning this matter, please email
or contact me on telephone number 020 7230 2003 quoting the reference
number above.

Yours sincerely

Andrew Beaumont
SC&O Information Manager
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.  

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF
[email address]

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
 Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone:  01625 545 700

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk
Twitter: @metpoliceuk

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Edwards,

Can you please provide a contact telephone number so that I can contact
you direct and deal with your request outside of the Act as business as
usual.

Kind regards

Deborah Solomon
Information Manager
Territorial Policing

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk

Twitter: @metpoliceuk

Dear Metropolitan Police Service (MPS),

I would be grateful if you can provide a response within the act, this is an issue of utmost importance and for which I would be entirely grateful and would others.

If you are unclear to the question or how it should be responded within the act please respond on this site I will respond quickly and thoroughly.

Yours faithfully,

Alan Edwards

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Edwards

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2012100000136

I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 29/09/2012. I note you seek
access to the following information:

"1. If a member of the Public suspects that their Medical Records have
been falsified what course of action should they take?    

2. If the Police are approached about unauthorised access or falsification
of NHS Medical Records what course of action should they take?"

EXTENT OF SEARCHES TO LOCATE INFORMATION

To locate the information relevant to your request searches were conducted
at the Territorial Policing Command - TP Crime Policy Unit.

DECISION

Please note that in response to your request I have been unable to locate
any recorded information relevant to your request, therefore the
information is not held by the MPS. However, in order to assist a written
response has been produced which I hope answers your questions.

Please find below information pursuant to your request above.

Questions 1 and 2

If a member of the public believes that a criminal offence has been
committed, then they should report the matter to police either at a police
station, over the phone or direct to a police officer.

The police will then record the criminal allegation onto a CRIS report and
the matter will be assessed to ascertain whether a criminal offence has
taken place or not. Once this assessment takes place and it is clear that
a criminal offence has taken place, then the CRIS report would be passed
to an investigating officer to review the evidence and take the
investigation forward.

There are numerous offences that can be committed depending on the
circumstances alleged. Therefore full details would be required from the
victim or informant before the police could ascertain what offence, if
any, has been committed.  

Section 16 - Advice and Assistance

Section 16 of the Act places a duty upon a public authority to provide
advice and assistance, so far as it would be reasonable to expect the
authority to do so.

I would like to take this opportunity to advise you that requests for
information under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) are for
recorded information 'held' at the time a request is made. Section 84(c)
FOIA interprets information as 'information means information recorded in
any form'. Therefore a public authority is not required to create
information in order to respond to a request under the Act, unless that
information is already recorded in documents or other form.

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right of
complaint.

Should you have any further enquiries concerning this matter, please write
or contact Deborah Solomon on telephone number 0207 161 4291 quoting the
reference number above.

Yours sincerely

Detective Superintendent Curtis
TP Crime, Performance and Capability
Territorial Policing Command
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.  

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF
[email address]

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
 Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone:  01625 545 700

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk

Twitter: @metpoliceuk

Dear Metropolitan Police Service (MPS),

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)'s handling of my FOI request 'Police Response to Falsification of medical records'.

You have merely issue general advice about the response to any criminal complaint and ignored the substance of the request.

Please answer the very well defined and specific question of how the Police should respond when electronic medical records are falsified or illegally accessed. Please refer to procedures such as APCO guidance that shiuld be followed.

A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address:
http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/po...

Yours faithfully,

Alan Edwards

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Edwards

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2013020001873

I write in connection with your request for a review of the original MPS
decision relating to 2012100000136 which was received by the Metropolitan
Police Service (MPS) on 17/02/2013.  

Your request for a review will now be considered in accordance with the
Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act).  You will receive a response to
your request for a review of the original MPS case within a timescale of
20 working days.  In some circumstances the MPS may be unable to achieve
this deadline.  If this is likely you will be informed and given a revised
time-scale at the earliest opportunity.

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet, which details your right of
complaint.

Yours sincerely

R. Loizou
Administration Team Officer
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.  

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF
[email address]

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
 Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone:  01625 545 700

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk
Twitter: @metpoliceuk

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr. Edwards

Freedom of information request reference number: 2013020001873

I write in connection with your correspondence dated  17th February 2013
requesting that the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) review its response
to your request for information (ref: 2012100000136).  The request was as
follows:

Original request - received 29th September 2012

My understanding is that NHS Medical Records are protected by the Computer
Misuse Act 1990. That if NHS Medical records are accessed unlawfully or
altered unlawfully this would constitute a crime.

1. If a member of the Public suspects that their Medical records have been
falsified what course of action should they take?

2. If the Police are approached about unauthorised access or falsification
of NHS Medical records what course of action should they take.

Initial MPS Response - sent 23rd October 2012

Please note that in response to your request I have been unable to locate
any recorded information relevant to your request, therefore the
information is not held by the MPS. However, in order to assist a written
response has been produced which I hope answers your questions.

Please find below information pursuant to your request above.

Questions 1 and 2

If a member of the public believes that a criminal offence has been
committed, then they should report the matter to police either at a police
station, over the phone or direct to a police officer.

The police will then record the criminal allegation onto a CRIS report and
the matter will be assessed to ascertain whether a criminal offence has
taken place or not. Once this assessment takes place and it is clear that
a criminal offence has taken place, then the CRIS report would be passed
to an investigating officer to review the evidence and take the
investigation forward.

There are numerous offences that can be committed depending on the
circumstances alleged. Therefore full details would be required from the
victim or informant before the police could ascertain what offence, if
any, has been committed.  

Request for MPS Review - received 17th February 2013

You have merely issue general advice about the response to any criminal
complaint and ignored the substance of the request.

Please answer the very well defined and specific question of how the
Police should respond when electronic medical records are falsified or
illegally accessed. Please refer to procedures such as APCO guidance that
shiuld be followed.

DECISION

The Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) has completed its review and has
decided to uphold the original decision that information pertinent to your
request is not held and acknowledges the provision of advice and
assistance under section 16 Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FoIA).    

Reason for decision

The review gives attention to your comment ‘You have merely issue general
advice about the response to any criminal complaint and ignored the
substance of the request.’ For this reason the review has returned to your
original request which included the comment ‘My understanding is that NHS
Medical Records are protected by the Computer Misuse Act 1990. That if NHS
Medical records are accessed unlawfully or altered unlawfully this would
constitute a crime...’ in this regard the review can advise you of the
relevant legislation in regards to the Computer Misuse Act 1990, which
states

Section 1 ‘A person is guilty of an offence if—

(a)he causes a computer to perform any function with intent to secure
access to any program or data held in any computer [F1, or to enable any
such access to be secured]F1 ;

(b)the access he intends to secure [F2, or to enable to be secured,]F2 is
unauthorised; and

(c)he knows at the time when he causes the computer to perform the
function that that is the case.

(2)The intent a person has to have to commit an offence under this section
need not be directed at—

(a)any particular program or data;

(b)a program or data of any particular kind; or

(c)a program or data held in any particular computer.’

Section 2 ‘Unauthorised access with intent to commit or facilitate
commission of further offences.(1)A person is guilty of an offence under
this section if he commits an offence under section 1 above (“the
unauthorised access offence”) with intent—

(a)to commit an offence to which this section applies; or

(b)to facilitate the commission of such an offence (whether by himself or
by any other person);
and the offence he intends to commit or facilitate is referred to below in
this section as the further offence.

(2)This section applies to offences—

(a)for which the sentence is fixed by law; or

(b)for which a person who has attained the age of twenty-one years
(eighteen in relation to England and Wales) and has no previous
convictions may be sentenced to imprisonment for a term of five years (or,
in England and Wales, might be so sentenced but for the restrictions
imposed by section 33 of the M1Magistrates’ Courts Act 1980).

(3)It is immaterial for the purposes of this section whether the further
offence is to be committed on the same occasion as the unauthorised access
offence or on any future occasion.

(4)A person may be guilty of an offence under this section even though the
facts are such that the commission of the further offence is impossible.’

Further reference to the Computer Misuse Act 1990 can be found by way of
this link: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990...

I can also advise you that the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is
responsible for prosecuting criminal cases investigated by the police in
England and Wales. As mentioned on the CPS website ‘The police and other
investigators are responsible for conducting enquiries into any alleged
crime and for deciding how to deploy their resources. This includes
decisions to start or continue an investigation and on the scope of the
investigation. Prosecutors often advise the police and other investigators
about possible lines of inquiry and evidential requirements, and assist
with pre-charge procedures.’ Further reference can be found by way of this
link to the Code for Crown Prosecutors
http://www.cps.gov.uk/publications/docs/...

Further reference in relation to offences under the Computer Misuse Act
1990 can also be found on the CPS website by way of this link:
http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/a_to_c/compu...

The review acknowledges your comment ‘Please answer the very well defined
and specific question of how the Police should respond when electronic
medical records are falsified or illegally accessed.’ In this regard I
have reviewed your initial request for information held by the MPS.

In your first question you have asked ‘If a member of the Public suspects
that their Medical records have been falsified what course of action
should they take?’  As mentioned above, offences under the Computer Misuse
Act 1990 are deemed a criminal offence and therefore the advice remains
the same as that provided in the initial MPS response, namely ‘If a member
of the public believes that a criminal offence has been committed, then
they should report the matter to police either at a police station, over
the phone or direct to a police officer.’

I can also confirm that similar advice is shown on the MPS website which
states ‘There are various ways you can report a crime to the MPS. In an
emergency, always dial 999, or for non-emergencies call 101. You can also
report crimes online, in police stations, or call Crimestoppers.’ Further
advice on reporting a crime to police can be found by way of the following
MPS links:

http://content.met.police.uk/Site/report...

http://content.met.police.uk/Article/How...

http://content.met.police.uk/Site/tvcwha...

In your second question you have asked ‘If the Police are approached about
unauthorised access or falsification of NHS Medical records what course of
action should they take.’ The review again takes account of the advice
provided to you under section 16 FoIA, which states ‘The police will then
record the criminal allegation onto a CRIS report and the matter will be
assessed to ascertain whether a criminal offence has taken place or not.
Once this assessment takes place and it is clear that a criminal offence
has taken place, then the CRIS report would be passed to an investigating
officer to review the evidence and take the investigation forward.’
Further advice on the investigation process can be found by way of this
MPS link
http://content.met.police.uk/Article/Wha...

The review acknowledges your comment ‘Please refer to procedures…’ and can
further advise you of the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the
Primary and Secondary investigation of crime. This SOP sets generic
minimum standards for the primary investigation of crime. Compliance with
the SOP also ensures a corporate approach to primary investigations.
 Further reference can be found by way of this link in response to a
previous freedom of information request concerning the investigation of
crime.
http://www.met.police.uk/foi/pdfs/disclo...

Conclusion

I hope the explanation provided clarifies why on this occasion the MPS is
satisfied that you have been correctly advised that no information is held
pertinent to your specific request surrounding ‘…what course of action
should they take’ and that you were provided with advice and assistance
under section 16 FoIA in the prepared written response.

I hope you find the additional links and information useful.

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right of
complaint.   Should you have any further enquiries concerning this matter,
please contact Mike Lyng on 0207 161 3605 or write quoting the reference
number above.

Yours sincerely

Mike Lyng
FoIA Quality and Assurance Advisor
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.  

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF
[email address]

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
 Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone:  01625 545 700

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk

Twitter: @metpoliceuk

[Name Removed] (Account suspended) left an annotation ()

...What a lot of wriggling around by the police to avoid answering this request.

Trying to get the request offline and then seemingly totally unaware what laws apply to medical records.

Why?

Since the police are responsible for investigations into illegal medical file ' editing' , you would think that they would have something on their own files to enable them to detect this now pervasive crime.

gerry left an annotation ()

The situation is a common one. It has happened to me and the police have deliberately refused to do anything about it. They are not answering the question as they aid and abett same. The crime is quite clear . The dealing with it is not at all properly dealt with it. Medical records are routinely falsified by NHS staff to suit its purpose, usually spite, fraud and the like.
Please view
www.medicalcorruption.webs.com
to see the corruption within the NHS. The Met police cannot police such activity as they are very much at the mercy of the NHS.The general way that the people above dealt with the request is nothing more than to assuage public accountability.
The police merely cover up. The falsifying of medical records is totally common within the medical field and is rife.
http://www.tsogpss.co.uk.gridhosted.co.u...

Steven King left an annotation ()

I have a FOI request on here and received an official report here about the falsification and alteration of patients records and non compliance with DPA requirements - one where 30 social workers Whistleblew they were being instructed by senior Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership to alter and ammend patients records - without the patients knowledge or consent - its an official report that then made TV, radio and papers after it was EVENTUALLY released to me here on WDTK - feel free to contact me if you wish to know more about ' developments 'since

This is a nationwide issue - but it would appear ' maybe ' government bodies are behind it , and are instructed to act in this way - as so many public authorities behave in this way nationwide ?

Personally, ive asked the authorities to place a note on my incorrect and falsified data - as they refuse to ammend it again back to how it was.

JT Oakley mentions the ' editing ' of medical records, and following numerous questions asked of the Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership at their board meetings and here on WDTK, it is clear MANY staff of nearly all of the public authorities ive been in contact with, even authorities not involved in healthcare have access to - without patients knowledge or consent - are permitted to edit and ammend the data contained within health records and other sensitive personal data that SHOULD be protected under the provisions of the Data Protection Act.

I have found with a number of public bodies that data and medical records disclosures supplied to me a number of years ago are now ammened and virtually anything seriously damaging to them has been removed - even sentences and paragraphs removed or altered - reports removed - even audio recordings taken at the time - which I have copies of - have been ammended.

I have formed the opinion from the public authorities I am forced to deal with in my area - the system is corrupt - maybe others find the same ?

From my own records I can see where much data damaging to the local authorities or leaving them open to civil or criminal investigation ( although even that isnt accurately recorded by those investigating ,and ive yet to see one criminal prosecution against a public authority member of staff who has maybe been tasked by their employer to remove or ammend potentially damaging data ) .

I have yet to find ONE organisation - such as Police, ICO , CQC or PHSO who will properly investigate and accurately report on such issues - hence the situation continues to get worse.

Still, I have every confidence over the next five years things will only get better ( choking !! ) .

Alan Edwards -I am sorry to see you no longer use WDTK - but hope you are well and your situation was resolved ?

Any sign of a book about your experiences ??

Best wishes,

Steven King left an annotation ()

Thank you for the phone call from one user of WDTK who ive spoken with before.
To clarify I have requested several times that I wish to have a COMPLETE disclosure of all my Health Records and Data CURRENTLY held by AWP - but they refused.
Another carer on behalf of a patient of AWP asked for all of her medical records and data too at the AWP Board - and was told he must return all of the original previous disclosures before they would release another disclosure - the Board cited Caldicott Principles as their reason for denying his request .

I really do not understand their reasoning and cannot find anything in ' Caldicott' that backs up their statement ??

He never did get an up to date disclosure of the data and records now held , nor did I !
Hope this answers your question - and is of assistance to others following this and similar posts.

[Name Removed] (Account suspended) left an annotation ()

Here's the problem..

1. Powys Health Board erroneously provided a file to me ( under FOIA) where an external company was suggesting witholding legally due medical notes because I 'wanted to complain'.( illegally -and covered in Private Eye).

2. The ombudsman upheld my case and called Powys 'evasive' on notes.

3. How do you prove notes are witheld?

I knew they had been, as drugs were stopped without having been prescribed.
A date altered - without signature.

4. A second whistleblower came forward stating that patients had been assaulted and it was standard practice to fiddle the notes.

5 I backed this person by providing evidence and a police investigation was opened.

http://www.the-eye-investigates.uk/bedbo...

6 The whistleblower had reported the patient assaults on to Powys, which had kept them secret by never reporting them to the police, or social services.

7. No Powys employee would verify the account.

8. The usual NHS Delaying tactics meant the patients had died.

9. There was nothing on the Datix - as the whistleblower had never been trained to use it.

10.The whistleblower lost his job.

11. The police drew a blank in that the CPS demands a very high bar of evidence.

12 The police were prevented from investigating properly by the usual delaying strategies., used to tire NHS complainants out. Complaints will know that complaints can run into years.

13 The NHS will continue to neglect patients and withold notes, simply because there is no official body that can do much.

14 The only one that can turn up and demand missing medical files seems to be the Ombudsman.

15. The PHSO has tried once - in late 2015 - to do so.

16. It has no plans to repeat the operation.

17. Patients will continue to die ....and medical notes will continue to be witheld, edited or destroyed.

18. With the police denied a fair investigation as much as NHS complaints are.