Olympic flame policing numbers

Mr Jonathon Proctor made this Freedom of Information request to Northumbria Police

This request has been closed to new correspondence. Contact us if you think it should be reopened.

The request was successful.

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Dear Northumbria Police,

I Request the following information under the freedom of information act

I request to know

How many officers were deployed for the Olympic flame procession coming into Newcastle city center

Who was the commanding officer of the day in charge of the event

Was there any arrests made and if so what for

Was there any other forces used during the event

Was there any Arial units and if so how many

Was there any armed officers deployed for this event

Was there any motorcycle police deployed for this event and if so how many

Yours faithfully,

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Northumbria Police

Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA)

Thank you for your email received today in which you make a request for
information that Northumbria Police may hold.

We are in the process of dealing with your request and expect to revert to
you shortly. A response should be provided by 16/07/12.

Yours sincerely

Jan Mcewan
Disclosure Section

NORTHUMBRIA POLICE PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE

The information contained in this message and any attachment(s) is confidential and intended only for the attention of the named organisation or individual to whom it is addressed. The message may contain information that is covered by legal, professional or other privilege. No mistake in transmission is intended to waive or compromise any such privilege. This message has been sent over public networks and the sender cannot be held responsible for its integrity.

If you are not the intended recipient be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or action taken in reliance of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited, and is contrary to the provisions of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act, 1988 and of the Data Protection Act, 1998.

Any views expressed are those of the sender and, unless specifically stated, do not necessarily represent the view of Northumbria Police.

We cannot accept any liability for any loss or damage sustained as a result of software viruses. It is your responsibility to carry out such virus checking as is necessary.

If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender by e-mail at once and delete the message immediately.

For more information about Northumbria Police please visit our website - http://www.northumbria.police.uk

Northumbria Police

Apologies

The wrong number was given for your request.
Please see correct number above, 511/12 not 509/12

Regards

Jan

From: Freedom of Information Mailbox on 18/06/2012 09:48

Sent by: Jan McEwan

To: Mr Jonathon Proctor <[FOI #119280 email]>
cc:
Subject: Re: Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) Request 509/12 -
Olympic flame policing numbers [NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED] (Document
link: Freedom of Information Mailbox)

Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA)

Thank you for your email received today in which you make a request for
information that Northumbria Police may hold.

We are in the process of dealing with your request and expect to revert to
you shortly. A response should be provided by 16/07/12.

Yours sincerely

Jan Mcewan
Disclosure Section

NORTHUMBRIA POLICE PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE

The information contained in this message and any attachment(s) is confidential and intended only for the attention of the named organisation or individual to whom it is addressed. The message may contain information that is covered by legal, professional or other privilege. No mistake in transmission is intended to waive or compromise any such privilege. This message has been sent over public networks and the sender cannot be held responsible for its integrity.

If you are not the intended recipient be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or action taken in reliance of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited, and is contrary to the provisions of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act, 1988 and of the Data Protection Act, 1998.

Any views expressed are those of the sender and, unless specifically stated, do not necessarily represent the view of Northumbria Police.

We cannot accept any liability for any loss or damage sustained as a result of software viruses. It is your responsibility to carry out such virus checking as is necessary.

If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender by e-mail at once and delete the message immediately.

For more information about Northumbria Police please visit our website - http://www.northumbria.police.uk

Northumbria Police

1 Attachment

Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) Request 511/12 - Olympic Flame
Policing Numbers

Provision of Information held by Northumbria Police under the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the" Act")

With regard to your email in which you make a request for information that
Northumbria Police may hold.

I regret that Northumbria Police will not be able to complete its response
to you by the date originally stated.  We are still researching the
information held and considering whether any exemptions under the Act may
apply.

Specifically in relation to your request Northumbria Police are
considering the exemption as set out in the following parts of the Act:

Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement
Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety

I can now advise you that the new date for the provision of the
information is 13 August 2012.  I can assure that every effort will be
made to ensure that a response will be provided to you within this new
timescale.

Your attention is drawn to the attachment which contains your complaint
rights.

Yours sincerely

Michael Cleugh
Data Protection and Disclosure Advisor

NORTHUMBRIA POLICE PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE

The information contained in this message and any attachment(s) is
confidential and intended only for the attention of the named organisation
or individual to whom it is addressed.  The message may contain
information that is covered by legal, professional or other privilege.  No
mistake in transmission is intended to waive or compromise any such
privilege.  This message has been sent over public networks and the sender
cannot be held responsible for its integrity.

If you are not the intended recipient be aware that any disclosure,
copying, distribution or action taken in reliance of the information
contained herein is strictly prohibited, and is contrary to the provisions
of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act, 1988 and of the Data Protection
Act, 1998.

Any views expressed are those of the sender and, unless specifically
stated, do not necessarily represent the view of Northumbria Police.

We cannot accept any liability for any loss or damage sustained as a
result of software viruses.  It is your responsibility to carry out such
virus checking as is necessary.

If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender by
e-mail at once and delete the message immediately.

For more information about Northumbria Police please visit our website -
[1]http://www.northumbria.police.uk

References

Visible links
1. http://www.northumbria.police.uk/

Northumbria Police

1 Attachment

Provision of information held by Northumbria Police made under the Freedom
of Information Act 2000 (the 'Act')

Thank you for your email dated 16 June 2012 in which you made a request
for access to certain information which may be held by Northumbria Police.

As you may be aware the purpose of the Act is to allow a general right of
access to information held by a Public Authority (including the Police),
subject to certain limitations and exemptions.
 
You asked:

1.        How many officers were deployed for the Olympic flame procession
coming into Newcastle city center

2.        Who was the commanding officer of the day in charge of the event

3.        Was there any arrests made and if so what for

4.        Was there any other forces used during the event

5.        Was there any Arial units and if so how many

6.        Was there any armed officers deployed for this event

7.        Was there any motorcycle police deployed for this event and if
so how many

In response:

We have now had the opportunity to fully consider your request and I
provide a response for your attention.

Following receipt of your request, searches were conducted with the
Operations Department of Northumbria Police.  I can confirm that the
information you have requested is held by Northumbria Police.

I have decided to disclose the located information to you as follows.

2.        ACC Ashman (Northumbria Police).

3.        No arrests made.

4.        Yes.

With regards to the remainder of your request we shall not be disclosing
and rely on the application of the following exemptions.

Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement
Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety

Both of these exemptions are prejudice and qualified based, which means
that evidence of harm and the public interest test (PIT) needs to be
articulated.  I have set these out below.

Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement
Evidence of Harm
The Olympic Torch Relay is a national operation, one which will not be
complete until after the Opening Ceremony on 27 July.  Key to its
successful delivery is a consistency in approach by all forces as it
travels the country.

While it is a strength to have consistency in command and co-ordination
protocols and in the resources and tactics available, the result is that
one force's approach early in the Relay will likely be significantly
similar to that of a force yet to deliver their operation.  Operational
resource numbers, tactical options (some not in the public domain) and
costs will be very similar for all forces.  Therefore disclosing
information prior to the completion of the Relay could prove harmful to
those forces who have yet to deliver.

Furthermore, the release of information could provide useful intelligence
to anyone who could be planning sabotage or terrorist attacks.  A
knowledge base of the level of protection for individuals bearing the
Torch could be gauged, which would increase the risk of harm to those
individuals and the general public.  For example, the Olympic Torch Relay
was disrupted on the 5 June as dissident republican protestors blocked the
Torch’s planned route near the Guildhall.  This caused ‘scuffles’ which
broke out between the dissidents and the police, which in turn affected
the safety of the Torch bearers and the spectators.  Further evidence to
support the harm includes the disruption in Paris and London during the
2008 Torch Relay where pro-Tibet protestors were intent on distinguishing
the Torch.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ir...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7332942.stm
http://news.sky.com/story/595116/paris-o...

Finally, the Health and Safety Executive have published “A literature
review of the health and safety risks associated with major sporting
events – learning lessons for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic
games.”  This highlights the law enforcement of all public events and the
transference of issues such as law enforcement that need to be considered.
 Further consideration can be found within the Harm/PIT for S38 below.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr8....

Public interest Test

Considerations favouring disclosure:
Where information relates to how the Olympic Command Team and individual
police forces fulfil their roles and functions there is an interest in
disclosure to encourage openness and transparency.  In this case,
publication of any details in relation to resources for the Olympic Torch
would hold them to account for the level of protection afforded to the
Torch bearers and show that deployment of officers is appropriate and
proportionate.  It would also demonstrate in more detail the costs
incurred in providing protection for the police, the Torch bearers and the
spectators.
Considerations favouring non-disclosure:
Any disclosure of information that would allow extremists to gauge the
level of protection would provide anyone intent on committing acts of
terrorism with vital intelligence as to the level of police and or
security resistance that they may encounter.  This would hinder the
ability of the law enforcement bodies to perform their public protection
role and would clearly not be in the public interest.

All UK police forces have a duty to protect the safety of any high profile
public events  (such as football matches, concerts and sporting events)
and the disclosure of information that would increase the likelihood of
terrorism or any other criminal act targeting the Olympic Torch Relay
would increase the risk to the public, as well as members of the law
enforcement bodies and VIPs.

Balance Test

When considering the disclosure of  the resources required for the Olympic
Torch Relay, it has to be considered that there is a real public interest
in holding the Olympic Command Team, Police Service and other bodies to
account for its actions in the area of public protection and the
disbursement of public funds, against the public interest in safeguarding
the ability of those bodies to fulfil their public protection duties and
preventing an increased risk to individual and public safety.

The main issue is whether the public interest in knowing how much public
money is spent is outweighed by the public interest in safeguarding the
ability of the police to prevent crime, and to prevent an increased risk
of attacks being made during public order events, and the resulting
increased risk to public safety in general.

As Torch bearers include high profile VIPs, the named individuals face a
number of potential threats.  The current threat of international
terrorism, together with the history of terrorist acts in this country
over recent years, remains the most significant concern.  In addition,
threats are posed by fixated individuals, criminal elements and from
certain single interest groups.  The threat picture to Torch bearers takes
into account the levels of protection provided, and the integrity of that
protection.  This necessitates a stance of caution when considering
whether information relating to the levels of protection afforded to
individuals should be published.  While it is accepted that the public
should have a right to know how public money is being spent, the public
also expects the police to provide protection from these threats and to
ensure that protection arrangements are effective.

In this case, the value of the information in terms of allowing
individuals to assess the level of protection afforded to these
individuals would lead to a mosaic effect being created whereby other
information disclosed would lead to comparisons of the levels of
protection afforded to other VIPs and similar public order events.  Such
comparisons would also be carried across to other public figures of
equivalent status who might be expected to receive protection.  It is
against the public interest to publish information that would provide
intelligence to extremists’ intent on committing criminal acts aimed at
targeting the Torch Relay.

Although transparency of nationally and locally significant operations
such as the Olympic Torch is of paramount importance to all forces and the
Olympic organisers, disclosure would jeopardize the Relay through other
force areas.

Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety

Evidence of Harm

The release of the information requested would endanger the physical
health of the police providing support, the Torch bearers and the
spectators.  If police forces provided details on the resources required,
it would compromise safety arrangements.  There is also the possibility of
a mosaic effect being established whereby disclosed information could be
matched with unofficial information to form comparisons with other events
or public figures that may or may not be in receipt of protective security
arrangements.

The release of information will also reveal policing tactics on the levels
of protection afforded to others not subject to this request.  The release
of this information would therefore be to the detriment of another who may
not be in receipt of similar levels of protection.

To reveal information which exposes levels of protection to those intent
on causing harm would increase the risk of harm to those individuals and
to others who may be caught up in an attack, such as VIP’s staff and
members of the public.

Public interest Test

Considerations favouring disclosure:

The release of such information would provide an insight into the Olympic
Command Team and the Police Service and enable the public to have better
understanding of the effectiveness of the police.  Disclosure could allow
the public to make informed decisions about police and protection
procedures and the money spent in this business area.  This would greatly
assist in the quality and accuracy of public debate, which is otherwise
likely to be based on speculation and conjecture.

Disclosure would also inform public awareness and debate into the Torch
Relay and encourage debate in this nationally and locally significant
event.  It could also reassure people about the safety of the event for
the police officers at the event, the Torch bearers and the spectators.

The Health and Safety Executive have additionally published the risks
expected of the Olympics:

“Although the 2012 Games present an unprecedented scale of event for GB
(and HSE), the Olympics are held in different countries every four years
and other major sporting events have been hosted by Britain in recent
years.  There is therefore an important opportunity to draw lessons from
the prior experience of others.”

These have included the following areas where law enforcement is impacted:

Road Traffic Accidents - “As might be expected with increased volumes of
people, road accidents tend to increase during major events, particularly
with international visitors.”

Crowd Safety  - Crowd management at sporting events is critical and “is
particularly important in areas where pedestrian volumes increase
quickly”.  The report then goes on to cite numerous examples where
fatalities occurred during large crowds at organised events, such as
Hilsborough.  

Fires -  “Incidents involving fires were noted at previous Olympic events.
 These involved structural fires and small-scale fires, such as litterbin
fires.”

The management of risks such as these rely on effective planning and
organisation and any disclosure of the steps taken to mitigate them by the
police could impact on their effectiveness.

Considerations favouring non-disclosure:

By disclosing details on the resources required for the Olympic Torch
Relay, such as the costs or numbers of officers present, there is the
strong possibility that if costs varied between forces then this would
increase the risk of targeting one of the forces who has yet to receive
the Torch.

Revealing this information would also increase the risk to those
protecting the Torch bearers as collateral damage in the event of an
attack on those carrying the Torch.  The majority of the public would not
wish to place the Torch bearers, police and spectators in a more hazardous
position by publishing information that would enable harm to be brought to
them.  The threat to safety is not just to the Torch bearer but also to
others attending events, or those near to a person receiving protection.
 Any attempt to threaten the life of one of these individuals would also
threaten the health and safety of those in the vicinity.

All people are entitled to live and work without a threat of violence
directed against them.  It is not in the public interest for unprotected
members of the public to be placed in position of vulnerability by
disclosing details around police protection resources.

Balance Test

After weighing up the competing interests I confirm that the disclosure of
the above information would not be in the public interest.  The benefit
that would result from the information being disclosed does not outweigh
the harm arising from disclosing information relating to the resources
required for policing the Olympic Torch Relay.
You may be interested to know that Northumbria Police routinely publish
information that has been disclosed by Northumbria Police in response to
requests made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 via the Disclosure
Log.  The aim of the Disclosure Log is to promote openness and
transparency by voluntarily placing information into the public arena.

Whilst it is not possible to publish all responses we will endeavour to
publish those where we feel that the information disclosed is in the
public interest.  The Disclosure Log will be updated once responses have
been sent to the requester.  I have provided the relevant link below:-

[1]http://www.northumbria.police.uk/foi/dis...

The information we have supplied to you is likely to contain intellectual
property rights of Northumbria Police.  Your use of the information must
be strictly in accordance with the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988
(as amended) or such other applicable legislation.  In particular, you
must not re-use this information for any commercial purpose.

How to complain

If you are unhappy with our decision or do not consider that we have
handled your request properly and we are unable to resolve this issue
informally, you are entitled to make a formal complaint to us under our
complaints procedure which is attached.

If you are still unhappy after we have investigated your complaint and
reported to you the outcome, you may complain directly to the Information
Commissioner’s Office and request that they investigate to ascertain
whether we have dealt with your request in accordance with the Act.

Yours sincerely

Michael Cleugh
Data Protection and Disclosure Advisor
Direct Dial:  0191 2956941
[NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED]

NORTHUMBRIA POLICE PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE

The information contained in this message and any attachment(s) is
confidential and intended only for the attention of the named organisation
or individual to whom it is addressed.  The message may contain
information that is covered by legal, professional or other privilege.  No
mistake in transmission is intended to waive or compromise any such
privilege.  This message has been sent over public networks and the sender
cannot be held responsible for its integrity.

If you are not the intended recipient be aware that any disclosure,
copying, distribution or action taken in reliance of the information
contained herein is strictly prohibited, and is contrary to the provisions
of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act, 1988 and of the Data Protection
Act, 1998.

Any views expressed are those of the sender and, unless specifically
stated, do not necessarily represent the view of Northumbria Police.

We cannot accept any liability for any loss or damage sustained as a
result of software viruses.  It is your responsibility to carry out such
virus checking as is necessary.

If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender by
e-mail at once and delete the message immediately.

For more information about Northumbria Police please visit our website -
[2]http://www.northumbria.police.uk

References

Visible links
1. http://www.northumbria.police.uk/foi/dis...
2. http://www.northumbria.police.uk/

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Dear Northumbria Police,

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of Northumbria Police's handling of my FOI request 'Olympic flame policing numbers'.

i wish to appeal the use of
Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement
Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety
regarding numbers assainged to protect the olympic flame

The Olympic Torch Relay is a national operation (Passed tence) its over you CAN release the information that i require

how can someone sabatouge something thats allready happend

i wish that an internal review is carried out

A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address:
http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/ol...

Yours faithfully,

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Northumbria Police

We acknowledge receipt of your request for an internal review of the
response you received in relation to the above mentioned Freedom Of
Information request.

We aim to provide a response to you within 20 working days of this
acknowledgement.
Yours sincerely

Helen Robbins

Disclosure Section
[NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED]

NORTHUMBRIA POLICE PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE

The information contained in this message and any attachment(s) is
confidential and intended only for the attention of the named organisation
or individual to whom it is addressed.  The message may contain
information that is covered by legal, professional or other privilege.  No
mistake in transmission is intended to waive or compromise any such
privilege.  This message has been sent over public networks and the sender
cannot be held responsible for its integrity.

If you are not the intended recipient be aware that any disclosure,
copying, distribution or action taken in reliance of the information
contained herein is strictly prohibited, and is contrary to the provisions
of the Copyright Designs and Patents Act, 1988 and of the Data Protection
Act, 1998.

Any views expressed are those of the sender and, unless specifically
stated, do not necessarily represent the view of Northumbria Police.

We cannot accept any liability for any loss or damage sustained as a
result of software viruses.  It is your responsibility to carry out such
virus checking as is necessary.

If you have received this message in error, please notify the sender by
e-mail at once and delete the message immediately.

For more information about Northumbria Police please visit our website -
[1]http://www.northumbria.police.uk

References

Visible links
1. http://www.northumbria.police.uk/

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Dear Northumbria Police,

I Note with much consern northumbria police has STILL not carried out an internal review into my enquirey over the olympic flames

20 working days since july 20th when you accepted recipt of said request would be the 9th august 2012

we are now at the 15th of august and no responce please could you provide me with the answers iv requested

Yours faithfully,

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Northumbria Police

1 Attachment

Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) Request 511/12 - Olympic Flame
Policing Numbers

Dear Mr Proctor

Thank you for your email below.  You requested an Internal Review (IR) of
our response to this request on 20 July 2012, and our IR acknowledgement
advised that "we aim to provide a response to you within 20 working days".
 

In your email below you state that a response should have been provided to
you by 9 August, however this would be 14 working days from receipt of
your IR request.

I have attached ICO Guidance on IR time limits below.  However, it should
be noted that this is guidance only and the 20 working days for IR does
not form part of legislative deadlines under the Act.

Unfortunately I must advise you that on this occasion, the IR response
will not be completed within 20 working days.  As the request was
regarding a national issue (Olympic Torch), we must consider input from
other parties that could potentially be impacted by any disclosure on this
subject.

We will look to provide you a complete response to your request for IR as
soon as possible.

Regards

Helen

From:        Mr Jonathon Proctor
<[FOI #119280 email]> on 15/08/2012 18:11

To:        [Northumbria Police request email]
cc:        
Subject:        Re: Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) Request 511/12
- Olympic Flame Policing Numbers [NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED]

     Dear Northumbria Police,
   
    I Note with much consern northumbria police has STILL not carried
    out an internal review into my enquirey over the olympic flames
   
    20 working days since july 20th when you accepted recipt of said
    request would be the 9th august 2012
   
    we are now at the 15th of august and no responce please could you
    provide me with the answers iv requested
   
    Yours faithfully,
   
    Mr Jonathon Proctor
   
   

show quoted sections

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Dear Northumbria Police,

i miscalculated the dates re 20 days

but i note with MUCH concern that your stating you wont be within the 20 days

Its common practice that the 20 days limit is applicable without good reason now the excuse of "outside Agencies" dont wash Northumbria police seem intent on law breaking *oh the irony* as they seem unwilling to disclose what information we are LAWFULLY entitled to

Yours faithfully,

Mr Jonathon Proctor

Northumbria Police

Provision of information held by Northumbria Police made under the Freedom
of Information Act 2000 (the 'Act')

Thank you for your email dated 19 July 2012 in which you requested a review
of the response to your request for access to certain information which may
be held by Northumbria Police.

As you may be aware the purpose of the Act is to allow a general right of
access to information held by a Public Authority (including the Police),
subject to certain limitations and exemptions.

You asked:

1. How many officers were deployed for the Olympic flame procession coming
into Newcastle city center

2. Who was the commanding officer of the day in charge of the event

3. Was there any arrests made and if so what for

4. Was there any other forces used during the event

5. Was there any Arial units and if so how many

6. Was there any armed officers deployed for this event

7. Was there any motorcycle police deployed for this event and if so how
many.

Our response stated:

We have now had the opportunity to fully consider your request and I
provide a response for your attention.

Following receipt of your request, searches were conducted with the
Operations Department of Northumbria Police. I can confirm that the
information you have requested is held by Northumbria Police.

I have decided to disclose the located information to you as follows.

2. ACC Ashman (Northumbria Police).

3. No arrests made.

4. Yes.

With regards to the remainder of your request we shall not be disclosing
and rely on the application of the following exemptions.

Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement
Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety

Both of these exemptions are prejudice and qualified based, which means
that evidence of harm and the public interest test (PIT) needs to be
articulated. I have set these out below.

Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement

Evidence of Harm

The Olympic Torch Relay is a national operation, one which will not be
complete until after the Opening Ceremony on 27 July. Key to its
successful delivery is a consistency in approach by all forces as it
travels the country.

While it is a strength to have consistency in command and co-ordination
protocols and in the resources and tactics available, the result is that
one force's approach early in the Relay will likely be significantly
similar to that of a force yet to deliver their operation. Operational
resource numbers, tactical options (some not in the public domain) and
costs will be very similar for all forces. Therefore disclosing
information prior to the completion of the Relay could prove harmful to
those forces who have yet to deliver.

Furthermore, the release of information could provide useful intelligence
to anyone who could be planning sabotage or terrorist attacks. A knowledge
base of the level of protection for individuals bearing the Torch could be
gauged, which would increase the risk of harm to those individuals and the
general public. For example, the Olympic Torch Relay was disrupted on the
5 June as dissident republican protestors blocked the Torch’s planned route
near the Guildhall. This caused ‘scuffles’ which broke out between the
dissidents and the police, which in turn affected the safety of the Torch
bearers and the spectators. Further evidence to support the harm includes
the disruption in Paris and London during the 2008 Torch Relay where
pro-Tibet protestors were intent on distinguishing the Torch.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ir...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7332942.stm
http://news.sky.com/story/595116/paris-o...

Finally, the Health and Safety Executive have published “A literature
review of the health and safety risks associated with major sporting events
– learning lessons for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games.” This
highlights the law enforcement of all public events and the transference of
issues such as law enforcement that need to be considered. Further
consideration can be found within the Harm/PIT for S38 below.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr8....

Public interest Test

Considerations favouring disclosure:

Where information relates to how the Olympic Command Team and individual
police forces fulfil their roles and functions there is an interest in
disclosure to encourage openness and transparency. In this case,
publication of any details in relation to resources for the Olympic Torch
would hold them to account for the level of protection afforded to the
Torch bearers and show that deployment of officers is appropriate and
proportionate. It would also demonstrate in more detail the costs incurred
in providing protection for the police, the Torch bearers and the
spectators.

Considerations favouring non-disclosure:

Any disclosure of information that would allow extremists to gauge the
level of protection would provide anyone intent on committing acts of
terrorism with vital intelligence as to the level of police and or security
resistance that they may encounter. This would hinder the ability of the
law enforcement bodies to perform their public protection role and would
clearly not be in the public interest.

All UK police forces have a duty to protect the safety of any high profile
public events (such as football matches, concerts and sporting events) and
the disclosure of information that would increase the likelihood of
terrorism or any other criminal act targeting the Olympic Torch Relay would
increase the risk to the public, as well as members of the law enforcement
bodies and VIPs.

Balance Test

When considering the disclosure of the resources required for the Olympic
Torch Relay, it has to be considered that there is a real public interest
in holding the Olympic Command Team, Police Service and other bodies to
account for its actions in the area of public protection and the
disbursement of public funds, against the public interest in safeguarding
the ability of those bodies to fulfil their public protection duties and
preventing an increased risk to individual and public safety.

The main issue is whether the public interest in knowing how much public
money is spent is outweighed by the public interest in safeguarding the
ability of the police to prevent crime, and to prevent an increased risk of
attacks being made during public order events, and the resulting increased
risk to public safety in general.

As Torch bearers include high profile VIPs, the named individuals face a
number of potential threats. The current threat of international
terrorism, together with the history of terrorist acts in this country over
recent years, remains the most significant concern. In addition, threats
are posed by fixated individuals, criminal elements and from certain single
interest groups. The threat picture to Torch bearers takes into account
the levels of protection provided, and the integrity of that protection.
This necessitates a stance of caution when considering whether information
relating to the levels of protection afforded to individuals should be
published. While it is accepted that the public should have a right to
know how public money is being spent, the public also expects the police to
provide protection from these threats and to ensure that protection
arrangements are effective.

In this case, the value of the information in terms of allowing individuals
to assess the level of protection afforded to these individuals would lead
to a mosaic effect being created whereby other information disclosed would
lead to comparisons of the levels of protection afforded to other VIPs and
similar public order events. Such comparisons would also be carried across
to other public figures of equivalent status who might be expected to
receive protection. It is against the public interest to publish
information that would provide intelligence to extremists’ intent on
committing criminal acts aimed at targeting the Torch Relay.

Although transparency of nationally and locally significant operations such
as the Olympic Torch is of paramount importance to all forces and the
Olympic organisers, disclosure would jeopardize the Relay through other
force areas.

Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety

Evidence of Harm

The release of the information requested would endanger the physical health
of the police providing support, the Torch bearers and the spectators. If
police forces provided details on the resources required, it would
compromise safety arrangements. There is also the possibility of a mosaic
effect being established whereby disclosed information could be matched
with unofficial information to form comparisons with other events or public
figures that may or may not be in receipt of protective security
arrangements.

The release of information will also reveal policing tactics on the levels
of protection afforded to others not subject to this request. The release
of this information would therefore be to the detriment of another who may
not be in receipt of similar levels of protection.

To reveal information which exposes levels of protection to those intent on
causing harm would increase the risk of harm to those individuals and to
others who may be caught up in an attack, such as VIP’s staff and members
of the public.

Public interest Test

Considerations favouring disclosure:

The release of such information would provide an insight into the Olympic
Command Team and the Police Service and enable the public to have better
understanding of the effectiveness of the police. Disclosure could allow
the public to make informed decisions about police and protection
procedures and the money spent in this business area. This would greatly
assist in the quality and accuracy of public debate, which is otherwise
likely to be based on speculation and conjecture.

Disclosure would also inform public awareness and debate into the Torch
Relay and encourage debate in this nationally and locally significant
event. It could also reassure people about the safety of the event for the
police officers at the event, the Torch bearers and the spectators.

The Health and Safety Executive have additionally published the risks
expected of the Olympics:

“Although the 2012 Games present an unprecedented scale of event for GB
(and HSE), the Olympics are held in different countries every four years
and other major sporting events have been hosted by Britain in recent
years. There is therefore an important opportunity to draw lessons from
the prior experience of others.”

These have included the following areas where law enforcement is impacted:

Road Traffic Accidents - “As might be expected with increased volumes of
people, road accidents tend to increase during major events, particularly
with international visitors.”

Crowd Safety - Crowd management at sporting events is critical and “is
particularly important in areas where pedestrian volumes increase quickly”.
The report then goes on to cite numerous examples where fatalities occurred
during large crowds at organised events, such as Hilsborough.

Fires - “Incidents involving fires were noted at previous Olympic events.
These involved structural fires and small-scale fires, such as litterbin
fires.”

The management of risks such as these rely on effective planning and
organisation and any disclosure of the steps taken to mitigate them by the
police could impact on their effectiveness.

Considerations favouring non-disclosure:

By disclosing details on the resources required for the Olympic Torch
Relay, such as the costs or numbers of officers present, there is the
strong possibility that if costs varied between forces then this would
increase the risk of targeting one of the forces who has yet to receive the
Torch.

Revealing this information would also increase the risk to those protecting
the Torch bearers as collateral damage in the event of an attack on those
carrying the Torch. The majority of the public would not wish to place the
Torch bearers, police and spectators in a more hazardous position by
publishing information that would enable harm to be brought to them. The
threat to safety is not just to the Torch bearer but also to others
attending events, or those near to a person receiving protection. Any
attempt to threaten the life of one of these individuals would also
threaten the health and safety of those in the vicinity.

All people are entitled to live and work without a threat of violence
directed against them. It is not in the public interest for unprotected
members of the public to be placed in position of vulnerability by
disclosing details around police protection resources.

Balance Test

After weighing up the competing interests I confirm that the disclosure of
the above information would not be in the public interest. The benefit
that would result from the information being disclosed does not outweigh
the harm arising from disclosing information relating to the resources
required for policing the Olympic Torch Relay.

Your request for review asked:

"Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information
reviews.I am writing to request an internal review of Northumbria Police's
handling of my FOI request 'Olympic flame policing numbers'.i wish to
appeal the use of

Section 31(1)(a)(b) - Law Enforcement
Section 38(1)(a)(b) - Health & Safety

regarding numbers assainged to protect the olympic flameThe Olympic Torch
Relay is a national operation (Passed tence) its over you CAN release the
information that i requirehow can someone sabatouge something thats
allready happend

i wish that an internal review is carried out"

In response:

At the time of your request (16 June) and at the time of the response (19
July), the Olympic Torch Relay was still an ongoing national operation.

Whilst the relay had left the Northumbria area, the operation was
nationally co-ordinated and therefore national implications had to be taken
into account. It was not appropriate to consider the request as a
stand-alone local request as any response could have national implications.
At that time, the relay had not ended. Subsequently the response supplied
had to take into account that this was still a fully ongoing operation.

The timing of the request was a crucial factor in applying the exemptions.
It was explained in the response that the relay was not due for completion
until 27 July. Following completion of the Olympic Games, the Paralympic
Torch Relay was due to begin on the 24th August.

As a national operation, it was explained that the approach of one force
area in its policing of the relay would be likely to be similar to the
approach of other forces across the country. Resource numbers and tactical
options would be similar across the country. It was therefore entirely
appropriate to explain that disclosure of such information whilst the relay
was ongoing would potentially prove harmful to those force areas that had
yet to receive the relay torch.

At the time of the request, the release of the information would have been
a useful piece of information to those intent on carrying out attacks on
the torch relay. In turn the release of such tactical information would
lead to the individuals carrying the torch and the public being put at
risk. Examples were provided to you that showed that the torch relay was a
high profile target and had been subject to disruption in the past from
protestors intent on raising the profile of their cause through the
endangerment of the public and the torch bearers. The exemptions applied
were therefore entirely appropriate at that time.

Where the safety of the public is likely to be put at risk, the public
interest lies securely on the side of withholding such information.

As is explained above, the timing of the request was of paramount
importance when supplying a response to this request. However in the
spirit of the Act and with a duty to aid and assist the requestor as set
out in section 16 of the Act, as the Olympic and Paralympic torch relays
have now completed I can provide the following.
For completeness I have provided a response to all your questions,
including those already responded to in our original response, (questions
2, 3 and 4 refers)

1. 100 with a further 50 in reserve

2. ACC Ashman (Northumbria Police).

3. No arrests made.

4. Yes.

5. Yes - two

6. Yes

7. Yes - 17

This concludes my internal review into your request under the Freedom of
Information Act 2000. I believe that Northumbria Police have now fulfilled
our requirements as per your Freedom of Information request. If you remain
dissatisfied with the outcome of this review then it remains open to you to
refer this matter to the Information Commissioner at the following
address:-

The Information Commissioner’s Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF

Yours sincerely

Hayley Morrison
Disclosure Manager
Legal Department
Northumbria Police
Direct Dial: 0191 2956940
Email: [email address]

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