Name displayed on Birth Certificate linked with benefits & tax?

Matthew made this Freedom of Information request to General Register Office

This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

The request was successful.

Dear General Register Office,
I would like to respectfully request that my questions be looked at.

1.) If Birth Certificate itself states that it is “Not Proof of Identity”, then how important is this document, if the document is not admissible as evidence of the individual’s personal identity?

Having a Passport or UK Drivers Licence is a legally required form of personal identification, and in-order to apply for these, one must have a Birth Certificate. When a person is applying for a National Insurance Number they are informed to contact the Department for Work and Pensions. Citizens Advice state in their online advice guide that during the application process, a person is required to attend an interview at the Jobcentre where they have to use their original copy of their Birth Certificate for proof of identification. Wouldn’t this fact alone contradict the very words on the document itself? That it is not “Proof of Identity”.

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/Global... [Page 2.]

All documents which bear the individuals full forename and surname stated on the Birth Certificate, such as some job applications require you to use your exact National Insurance Number, which is designed to “make sure your NI contributions and tax are recorded against your name only.”, Under HMRC’s own admission, this tax identification number refers to your name, implying the one that appears on the original Birth Certificate. Therefore, is it safe too say that the Birth Certificate can be considered unique identification tool just like the NI number because HMRC base your identity on the name and date stated on the original Birth Certificate.

2.) The Birth Certificate may also be requested by employers when potential employees are making applications. Does the Register Office have the authority to require an employer to provide or deny employment to anyone who refuses to disclose this information?

This question might seem a little strange, however, on two separate occasions, employers have requested that I use my Birth Certificate as identification. One was rather specific in that I use it and aggressive in terms of making sure I used the exact name featured on the original birth certificate when filling-in contractual documentation on induction. While the other stated they weren’t using it as ID but “in-conjunction with your Passport” for the appropriate paperwork. It stands to reason that this name featured on the Birth Certificate is the name used for making contracts with other persons. I’m under the assumption that without a UK Birth Certificate you cannot enter into any contract with anybody at anytime. Can’t apply for a Passport, open a bank account, receive state benefits, such as education, child maintenance, social security and NHS healthcare. Making it incredibly hard to operate in modern day society without one. But obviously not everybody legally born in Britain has an officially documented Birth, and registered Certificate, such as Gypsies and travellers, who operate legally under the common law within their small communities nationwide.

3.) Would the argument be valid to say that this “Certificate” is the first “official” document assigned to a person at birth? And technically, under this, wouldn’t the travelling Gypsies be denied not only to apply for a British Passport, but not even have an identity as an Englishman, despite having been born within whatever geographical boundaries of England, thus be not subject to naturalisation citizenship, just for not possessing a registered birth certificate?

Wouldn’t the fact that the registered individual on the birth certificate database, just as on the HMRC National Insurance Number register, show that some important government records on citizens are kept on file according to the date of birth. And naturally the Birth Certificate equal the first formal, contractually binding agreement between the states register (the retainer of the information) and the individual themselves (….) as they are now subject to this data share.

4.) Is it possible to de-register yourself from the General Register Office database?
Using for example private internet tech companies, Such as requesting to be removed from private data retention systems.

5.) Where is all this information kept? At the District Registrar of Births, Marriages and Deaths building, where is the geographical boundaries that the information resides and do they keep physical copies of the registrations from the 1990’s? Or is has it all been handed over to digital storage. And finally, what is the purpose for keeping such information and what was the responsibility for doing so.

6.) Does the newly filed Birth Certificate in the Register, not only help with the census, but act accordingly to the appointment of the individuals National Insurance number?

Thank you, I hope to hear back
Yours faithfully,

Matthew

FOI, General Register Office

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FOI, General Register Office

Dear Matthew

Thank you for your email below. Your request is being handled as a request for information under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

We will aim to send you a full response by 25 February 2020, which is twenty working days from the date when we received your request.

Yours sincerely

Her Majesty’s Passport Office

show quoted sections

Jackson Diane,

Good afternoon,

 

Thank you for your Freedom of Information (FOI) request which cannot be
dealt with under the formal FOI process as it is a general enquiry, rather
than requesting access to information held, which is a requirement of the
scheme.  The General Register Office (GRO), which forms part of Her
Majesty’s Passport Office, administers civil registration in England and
Wales.  I have been asked to reply.

Whilst our response has not been dealt with via the Freedom of Information
process, it includes the same detail and content as would otherwise have
been provided.

 

1.) If Birth Certificate itself states that it is “Not Proof of Identity”,
then how important is this document, if the document is not admissible as
evidence of the individual’s personal identity?

 

A birth certificate is a certified copy of an entry in a birth register
i.e. it is a record of an event.  As such, it is not intended to be an
identity document although some organisations request sight of a birth
certificate to confirm date and place of birth or accept it, with other
evidence, presented as a suite of documents.  It is for individual
organisations to determine what evidence they will accept to confirm a
person’s identity.

2.) The Birth Certificate may also be requested by employers when
potential employees are making applications. Does the Register Office have
the authority to require an employer to provide or deny employment to
anyone who refuses to disclose this information?

 

No, the role of the Register Office is to record details of events
supplied by qualified informants and to issue certificates on request.

 

3.) Would the argument be valid to say that this “Certificate” is the
first “official” document assigned to a person at birth? And technically,
under this, wouldn’t the travelling Gypsies be denied not only to apply
for a British Passport, but not even have an identity as an Englishman,
despite having been born within whatever geographical boundaries of
England, thus be not subject to naturalisation citizenship, just for not
possessing a registered birth certificate?

 

A birth certificate is a certified copy of an entry in a birth register
which records details of the birth.

 

You will find more information about applying for a passport and
naturalisation policy here:

[1]https://www.gov.uk/apply-first-adult-pas...

 

[2]https://www.gov.uk/british-citizenship

 

4.) Is it possible to de-register yourself from the General Register
Office database?

Using for example private internet tech companies, Such as requesting to
be removed from private data retention systems.

 

It is not possible to de-register your birth entry.  The law requires
birth registration information to be kept indefinitely.

 

5.) Where is all this information kept? At the District Registrar of
Births, Marriages and Deaths building, where is the geographical
boundaries that the information resides and do they keep physical copies
of the registrations from the 1990’s? Or is has it all been handed over to
digital storage. And finally, what is the purpose for keeping such
information and what was the responsibility for doing so.

 

The registration of births is a statutory process which is set out in the
Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953.  Birth registrations are kept
indefinitely in the district where the birth was registered to provide a
permanent record of the birth and for the purpose of issuing
certificates.  The law requires copies of all registrations to be sent to
the Registrar General for the purpose of maintaining a central record of
registration events and for issuing certificates. There  are currently 173
register offices in England and Wales, the link below may be of interest
to you. 

 

[3]https://www.gov.uk/register-offices

 

Civil registration records date back to 1837, some records held by the
Registrar General are in a digitised format and are available to order
from the GRO website via GOV.UK, link below.

 

[4]https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certi...

 

 

6.) Does the newly filed Birth Certificate in the Register, not only help
with the census, but act accordingly to the appointment of the individuals
National Insurance number?

 

A birth certificate is a certified copy of an entry in a birth register
which records details of the event.  There is no connection between birth
certificates and the census.

 

The government department responsible for issuing National Insurance
numbers determines what information is required in order to issue a
National Insurance number.

A link to more information regarding national insurance numbers is below.

[5]https://www.gov.uk/apply-national-insura...

 

Best wishes,

 

Diane Jackson

Policy Advisor

Civil Registration Policy Team

 

Her Majesty's Passport Office, General Register Office

Room 1, Smedley Hydro, Trafalgar Road, Southport, PR8 2HH

 

T: +44 (0)0151 471 4590 Text Relay Prefix 18001

E: diane.jackson[6]@gro.gov.uk

[7]www.gov.uk

 

Any personal information you provide to us will be handled in accordance
with data protection legislation.  Further information on how we process
your personal information can be found at
[8]https://www.gov.uk/government/publicatio...

 

References

Visible links
1. https://www.gov.uk/apply-first-adult-pas...
2. https://www.gov.uk/british-citizenship
3. https://www.gov.uk/register-offices
4. https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certi...
5. https://www.gov.uk/apply-national-insura...
6. mailto:[email address]
7. http://gro/sites/Communications/GRO%20En...
8. https://www.gov.uk/government/publicatio...

GRO Policy,

Good afternoon,

Thank you for your Freedom of Information (FOI) request which cannot be
dealt with under the formal FOI process as it is a general enquiry, rather
than requesting access to information held, which is a requirement of the
scheme.  The General Register Office (GRO), which forms part of Her
Majesty’s Passport Office, administers civil registration in England and
Wales.  I have been asked to reply.

Whilst our response has not been dealt with via the Freedom of Information
process, it includes the same detail and content as would otherwise have
been provided.

 

1.) If Birth Certificate itself states that it is “Not Proof of Identity”,
then how important is this document, if the document is not admissible as
evidence of the individual’s personal identity?

 

A birth certificate is a certified copy of an entry in a birth register
i.e. it is a record of an event.  As such, it is not intended to be an
identity document although some organisations request sight of a birth
certificate to confirm date and place of birth or accept it, with other
evidence, presented as a suite of documents.  It is for individual
organisations to determine what evidence they will accept to confirm a
person’s identity.

2.) The Birth Certificate may also be requested by employers when
potential employees are making applications. Does the Register Office have
the authority to require an employer to provide or deny employment to
anyone who refuses to disclose this information?

 

No, the role of the Register Office is to record details of events
supplied by qualified informants and to issue certificates on request.

 

3.) Would the argument be valid to say that this “Certificate” is the
first “official” document assigned to a person at birth? And technically,
under this, wouldn’t the travelling Gypsies be denied not only to apply
for a British Passport, but not even have an identity as an Englishman,
despite having been born within whatever geographical boundaries of
England, thus be not subject to naturalisation citizenship, just for not
possessing a registered birth certificate?

 

A birth certificate is a certified copy of an entry in a birth register
which records details of the birth.

 

You will find more information about applying for a passport and
naturalisation policy here:

[1]https://www.gov.uk/apply-first-adult-pas...

 

[2]https://www.gov.uk/british-citizenship

 

4.) Is it possible to de-register yourself from the General Register
Office database?

Using for example private internet tech companies, Such as requesting to
be removed from private data retention systems.

 

It is not possible to de-register your birth entry.  The law requires
birth registration information to be kept indefinitely.

 

5.) Where is all this information kept? At the District Registrar of
Births, Marriages and Deaths building, where is the geographical
boundaries that the information resides and do they keep physical copies
of the registrations from the 1990’s? Or is has it all been handed over to
digital storage. And finally, what is the purpose for keeping such
information and what was the responsibility for doing so.

 

The registration of births is a statutory process which is set out in the
Births and Deaths Registration Act 1953.  Birth registrations are kept
indefinitely in the district where the birth was registered to provide a
permanent record of the birth and for the purpose of issuing
certificates.  The law requires copies of all registrations to be sent to
the Registrar General for the purpose of maintaining a central record of
registration events and for issuing certificates. There  are currently 173
register offices in England and Wales, the link below may be of interest
to you. 

 

[3]https://www.gov.uk/register-offices

 

Civil registration records date back to 1837, some records held by the
Registrar General are in a digitised format and are available to order
from the GRO website via GOV.UK, link below.

 

[4]https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certi...

 

 

6.) Does the newly filed Birth Certificate in the Register, not only help
with the census, but act accordingly to the appointment of the individuals
National Insurance number?

 

A birth certificate is a certified copy of an entry in a birth register
which records details of the event.  There is no connection between birth
certificates and the census.

 

The government department responsible for issuing National Insurance
numbers determines what information is required in order to issue a
National Insurance number.

A link to more information regarding national insurance numbers is below.

[5]https://www.gov.uk/apply-national-insura...

Best wishes,

Diane Jackson

Policy Team

Civil Registration Policy Team

 

Her Majesty's Passport Office, General Register Office

Room 1, Smedley Hydro, Trafalgar Road, Southport, PR8 2HH

 

T: +44 (0)0151 471 4590 Text Relay Prefix 18001

E: diane.jackson[6]@gro.gov.uk

[7]www.gov.uk

 

Any personal information you provide to us will be handled in accordance
with data protection legislation.  Further information on how we process
your personal information can be found at
[8]https://www.gov.uk/government/publicatio...

 

 

 

References

Visible links
1. https://www.gov.uk/apply-first-adult-pas...
2. https://www.gov.uk/british-citizenship
3. https://www.gov.uk/register-offices
4. https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certi...
5. https://www.gov.uk/apply-national-insura...
6. mailto:[email address]
7. http://gro/sites/Communications/GRO%20En...
8. https://www.gov.uk/government/publicatio...