Mary Moss Files ( Boxes )

Martin Walkerdine made this Freedom of Information request to Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

The request was refused by Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

Dear Metropolitan Police Service (MPS),

Hello I am seeking what did happen to the 49 boxes that were seized by The Met Police at Mary Moss address and neighbouring garden shed suggesting names she obtained by Carole Kasir saying that VIP's were involved in child abuse at Elms Guest House in Barnes from 1978 to 1982 the raid took place sometime in 2013 near St Pancras area of London.

How many people were questioned as suspects.

How many people were questioned as witnesses.

How many files went to the CPS for them to decide on charges.

Has The Met returned the boxes to Mary Moss.

What was the name of police operation or operations linked to the Mary Moss files.

Is the operation or operations still ongoing or is this line of enquiry finished.

How many officers have dealt with the Mary Moss case and how much money was spent on it.

Can you name the lead officer in charge and the police station that dealt with this.

Yours faithfully,

Martin Walkerdine

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Walkerdine

 

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2016110001112

 

I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 25/11/2016.  I note you seek
access to the following information:

Hello I am seeking what did happen to the 49 boxes that were seized by The
Met Police at Mary Moss address and neighbouring garden shed suggesting
names she obtained by Carole Kasir saying that VIP's were involved in
child abuse at Elms Guest House in Barnes from 1978 to 1982 the raid took
place sometime in 2013 near St Pancras area of London. How many people
were questioned as suspects. How many people were questioned as witnesses.
How many files went to the CPS for them to decide on charges. Has The Met
returned the boxes to Mary Moss. What was the name of police operation or
operations linked to the Mary Moss files. Is the operation or operations
still ongoing or is this line of enquiry finished. How many officers have
dealt with the Mary Moss case and how much money was spent on it. Can you
name the lead officer in charge and the police station that dealt with
this.

 

Your request will now be considered in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the Act).  You will receive a response within the
statutory timescale of 20 working days as defined by the Act.   

 

If you have any further enquiries concerning this matter, please contact
us at [email address] or on the phone at 0207 161 3500, quoting the
reference number above. Should your enquiry relate to the logging or
allocations process we will be able to assist you directly and where your
enquiry relates to other matters (such as the status of the request) we
will be able to pass on a message and/or advise you of the relevant
contact details.

 

Yours sincerely

 

 

 

Peter Deja

Support Officer - Freedom of Information Triage Team

  

 

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

 

 

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

 

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

 

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome to discuss the
response with the case officer who dealt with your request.   

 

Complaint

 

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

 

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

 

FOI Complaint

Information Rights Unit

PO Box 57192

London

SW6 1SF

[email address]

 

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.

 

The Information Commissioner

 

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

 

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.ico.org.uk.  Alternatively, write to or
phone:

 

Information Commissioner's Office

Wycliffe House

Water Lane

Wilmslow

Cheshire

SK9 5AF

Phone: 0303 123 1113

 

 

Peter Deja | Support Officer - Freedom of Information Triage Team
STRATEGY & GOVERNANCE, MetHQ
Metropolitan Police Service

MetPhone 783640 | Telephone 020 7161 3640 | [email address] |
Address - Information Rights Unit, PO Box 57192, London SW6 1SF
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NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED

 

Recipients of this email should be aware that all communications within
and to and from the Metropolitan Police Service are subject to
consideration for release under the Data Protection Act, Freedom of
Information Act and Environmental Information Regulations. The MPS will
consider information for release unless there is are valid and
proportionate public interest reasons not to, therefore, sensitive
information not for public disclosure must be highlighted as such. Further
advice can be obtained from the Information Rights Unit - 0207 161 3500.

 

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk

Twitter: @metpoliceuk

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Walkerdine

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2016110001112

I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 25/11/2016.  I note you seek
access to the following information:

* Hello I am seeking what did happen to the 49 boxes that were seized by
The Met Police at Mary Moss address and neighbouring garden shed
suggesting names she obtained by Carole Kasir saying that VIP's were
involved in child abuse at Elms Guest House in Barnes from 1978 to
1982 the raid took place sometime in 2013 near St Pancras area of
London. How many people were questioned as suspects. How many people
were questioned as witnesses. How many files went to the CPS for them
to decide on charges. Has The Met returned the boxes to Mary Moss.
What was the name of police operation or operations linked to the Mary
Moss files. Is the operation or operations still ongoing or is this
line of enquiry finished. How many officers have dealt with the Mary
Moss case and how much money was spent on it. Can you name the lead
officer in charge and the police station that dealt with this.

Your request will now be considered in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the Act).  You will receive a response within the
statutory timescale of 20 working days as defined by the Act.  

If you have any further enquiries concerning this matter, please contact
us at [email address] or on the phone at 0207 161 3500, quoting the
reference number above. Should your enquiry relate to the logging or
allocations process we will be able to assist you directly and where your
enquiry relates to other matters (such as the status of the request) we
will be able to pass on a message and/or advise you of the relevant
contact details.

Yours sincerely

Peter Deja
Support Officer - Freedom of Information Triage Team
 
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome to discuss the
response with the case officer who dealt with your request.  

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Information Rights Unit
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF
[email address]

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.

The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.ico.org.uk.  Alternatively, write to or
phone:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone: 0303 123 1113

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk
Twitter: @metpoliceuk

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Walkerdine

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2016110001112

I respond in connection with your request for information which was
received by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 25/11/2016.  I note
you seek access to the following information:

Hello I am seeking what did happen to the 49 boxes that were seized by The
Met Police at Mary Moss address and neighbouring garden shed suggesting
names she obtained by Carole Kasir saying that VIP's were involved in
child abuse at Elms Guest House in Barnes from 1978 to 1982 the raid took
place sometime in 2013 near St Pancras area of London.

 1. How many people were questioned as suspects.
 2. How many people were questioned as witnesses.
 3. How many files went to the CPS for them to decide on charges.
 4. Has The Met returned the boxes to Mary Moss.
 5. What was the name of police operation or operations linked to the Mary
Moss files.
 6. Is the operation or operations still ongoing or is this line of
enquiry finished.
 7. How many officers have dealt with the Mary Moss case and
 8. how much money was spent on it.
 9. Can you name the lead officer in charge and the police station that
dealt with this. .

DECISION

In accordance with the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) this
response represents a Refusal Notice for this particular request under
Section 17(1).

Before I explain the decisions I have made in relation your request, I
thought that it would be helpful to outline the parameters set out by the
Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) within which a request for
information can be answered.
 
The Act creates a statutory right of access to information held by public
authorities. A public authority in receipt of a request must, if
permitted, state under Section 1(a) of the Act, whether it holds the
requested information and, if held, then communicate that information to
the applicant under Section 1(b) of the Act.
 
The right of access to information is not without exception and is subject
to a number of exemptions which are designed to enable public authorities
to withhold information that is unsuitable for release. Importantly, the
Act is designed to place information into the public domain, that is, once
access to information is granted to one person under the Act, it is then
considered public information and must be communicated to any individual
should a request be received.

REASON FOR DECISION

You have asked for information relating to what happened to the 49 boxes
that were seized by The Met Police at Mary Moss address and neighbouring
garden shed suggesting names she obtained by Carole Kasir saying that
VIP's were involved in child abuse at Elms Guest House in Barnes from 1978
to 1982. The MPS can neither confirm nor deny that it holds any
information relating to this request by virtue of the following
exemptions:
 
Section 23(5) Information Supplied by or concerning certain Security
Bodies
Section 30(3) Criminal Investigations
Section 31(3) Law enforcement
Section 40(5) Personal Information
 
Should it be held, constituents of this information would attract Section
23, others Section 30, others Section 31 and other constituents would
attract Section 40 of the Act.
 
It should not be surmised that should the information be held by the MPS
that we would be applying Sections 23, 30, 31 and 40 to the same pieces of
information.
 
Please see the legal annex for the sections of the Act that are referred
to in this response.
 
Section 23 is a class based absolute exemption and there is no requirement
to consider the public interest in this area.    
 
Section 30 Investigations and proceedings conducted by public authorities
Section 30 is a class based qualified exemption and consideration of the
public interest must be given as to whether neither confirming nor denying
the information exists is the appropriate response.
 
Section 30 Factors against maintaining a neither confirm nor deny stance
To confirm whether or not the MPS holds information relevant to your
request would satisfy the public need to know about Police operations.
This would allow them to exercise their rights to access such material and
would allow the public to be better informed.
The release of such information would provide an insight into the police
service and enable the public to have better understanding of
effectiveness of the police. The release of information could allow the
public to make informed decisions about how police gather intelligence.
This would greatly assist in the quality and accuracy of public debate,
which would otherwise likely be steeped in rumour and speculation.

Section 30 Factors favouring maintaining a neither confirm nor deny stance
By confirming or denying your nine questions relating to what happened to
the 49 boxes that were seized by The Met Police at Mary Moss address
could hinder the prevention or detection of crime. The MPS would not wish
to reveal any details that may or may not have happened at the Mary Moss
address as this would clearly undermine the law enforcement and
investigative process.  
 
During the course of any ongoing criminal investigation, enquires are made
to secure evidence. These enquires are made for the duration of the case
and are based upon proven methods as well as the judgement and experience
of the officer(s) in charge of the investigation.
 
The MPS is reliant upon these techniques to conduct its investigations and
the public release of the operational procedures and investigative
protocols employed during the course of investigations could prejudice the
ability of the MPS to conduct further, similar investigations.

By confirming or not that information is held would in this case disclose
what facts may or may not exist in relation to investigations. If doing so
would harm an investigation, denying justice to the victims or
jeopardising such an investigation from reaching a satisfactory conclusion
then it would not be in the public interest to do so.
 
Balance Test -  Section 30 Investigations
Confirming or denying that information is or is not held in this case
could harm any ongoing investigation, therefore it cannot be in the public
interest to do so. However, this should not be taken as necessarily
indicating that any information that would meet your request exists or
does not exist.
 
Section 31 Law enforcement
This is a qualified exemption for which requires the MPS to articulate the
harm that would be caused in confirming or denying that the information is
held as well as carrying out a public interest test.

Section 31 - Evidence of Harm
In considering whether or not the MPS confirms they hold the information
requested I have considered the potential harm that could be caused by
such a disclosure.
 
Section 31(3) - Law enforcement - Factors favouring confirmation that any
information is held
By confirming or denying whether information is held would enable the
public to have a better understanding of the type of tactics employed by
the MPS in carrying out their law enforcement role.

Better public awareness may reduce crime or lead to more information from
the public as they would be more observant in reporting suspicious
activity.  

Section 31(3)  - Law enforcement - Factors favouring denial that
information is held
By confirming or denying whether information is held would compromise law
enforcement tactics and subsequently hinder the prevention and detection
of crime and the apprehension or prosecution of offenders.
   
This would result in further risks to the public and consequently require
the use of more MPS resources.

Balancing test

The effective delivery of operational law enforcement is of paramount
importance to the MPS in their duty to ensure the prevention and detection
of crime is carried out and the effective apprehension or prosecution of
offenders is maintained.  
 
In addition any disclosure by the MPS that places the security of the
country at risk would undermine any trust or confidence individuals have
in us, therefore it is our opinion that for these issues the balance test
favours neither confirming nor denying that information is held.
 
Section 40(5) - Personal Information / Absolute Exemption
A Freedom of Information Act request is not a private transaction. Both
the request itself, and any information disclosed, are considered suitable
for open publication. This is because, under the Act, any information
disclosed is released into the wider public domain, effectively to the
world, not just to one individual.
 
You have asked for information regarding a specific operation and details
of an operation, including the cost of the operation which may or may not
have taken place. To confirm or deny whether personal information exists
in response to your request could publicly reveal information about an
individual or individuals, thereby breaching the right to privacy afforded
to persons under the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA). When confirming or
denying that information is held would breach an individual's rights under
the DPA, Section 40(5) of the Act becomes an absolute exemption, and there
is no requirement for me to provide evidence of the prejudice that would
occur, or to conduct a public interest test.

The MPS is unable to confirm and unable to deny whether the information in
relation to this request is held.  

To ensure you understand why this response is necessary I have provided
excerpts from the Information commissioner's office (ICO):

The Duty to Confirm or Deny

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) guidance titled 'When to
refuse to confirm or deny information is held'  states:
'In certain circumstances, even confirming or denying that requested
information is held can reveal information...

It can be important to use a neither confirm nor deny response
consistently, every time a certain type of information is requested,
regardless of whether the information is actually held or not...
 
Within the ICO guidance there is a specific police example:
'…a police force may hold information regarding particular properties they
have under surveillance - it is likely that if a request were made for
information about the surveillance of a certain property, this information
would be exempt under section 30 (investigations and proceedings conducted
by public authorities)...

Furthermore, this would apply even if information was requested about a
property not under surveillance. If a police force only upheld its duty to
confirm or deny where it was not keeping properties under surveillance, an
applicant could reasonably assume that where the police force refused to
confirm or deny, the property named in the request was under
surveillance.'
A public authority could therefore refuse to confirm or deny whether it
holds information about a property under surveillance. ..

This should not be taken as necessarily indicating that any information
that would meet your request exists or does not exist.

Should you have any further enquiries concerning this matter, please
contact me via email at [email address], quoting the reference
number above.

Yours sincerely

Paul Mayger
Information Manager

LEGAL ANNEX

Section 23(5) of the Act provides:
Information Supplied by or concerning certain Security Bodies
(5) The duty to confirm or deny does not arise if, or to the extent that,
compliance with section 1(1)(a) would involve the disclosure of any
information (whether or not already recorded) which was directly or
indirectly supplied to the public authority by, or relates to, any of the
bodies specified in subsection (3).

Section 30(3) of the Act provides:  
Investigations and proceedings conducted by public authorities
(3) The duty to confirm or deny does not arise in relation to information
which is (or if it were held by the public authority would be) exempt
information by virtue of subsection (1) or (2).

Section 31(3) of the Act provides:
Law enforcement
(3) The duty to confirm or deny does not arise if, or to the extent that,
compliance with section 1(1)(a) would, or would be likely to, prejudice
any of the matters mentioned in subsection (1).
 
Section 40(5) of the Act provides:
Personal Information
(5) The duty to confirm or deny-
(a) does not arise in relation to information which is (or if it were held
by the public authority would be) exempt information by virtue of
subsection (1), and
(b) does not arise in relation to other information if or to the extent
that either-
(i) the giving to a member of the public of the confirmation or denial
that would have to be given to comply with section 1(1)(a) would (apart
from this Act) contravene any of the data protection principles or section
10 of the [1998 c. 29.] Data Protection Act 1998 or would do so if the
exemptions in section 33A(1) of that Act were disregarded, or
(ii) by virtue of any provision of Part IV of the [1998 c. 29.] Data
Protection Act 1998 the information is exempt from section 7(1)(a) of that
Act (data subject's right to be informed whether personal data being
processed).

 
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome to discuss the
response with the case officer who dealt with your request.  

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing, within forty (40) working days from
the date of the refusal notice, and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Information Rights Unit
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF
[email address]

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within 20 working days.

The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.ico.org.uk.  Alternatively, write to or
phone:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone:  0303 123 1113

Total Policing is the Met's commitment to be on the streets and in your
communities to catch offenders, prevent crime and support victims. We are
here for London, working with you to make our capital safer.

 

Consider our environment - please do not print this email unless
absolutely necessary.

NOTICE - This email and any attachments may be confidential, subject to
copyright and/or legal privilege and are intended solely for the use of
the intended recipient. If you have received this email in error, please
notify the sender and delete it from your system.  To avoid incurring
legal liabilities, you must not distribute or copy the information in this
email without the permission of the sender. MPS communication systems are
monitored to the extent permitted by law.  Consequently, any email and/or
attachments may be read by monitoring staff. Only specified personnel are
authorised to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of the MPS by
email. The MPS accepts no responsibility for unauthorised agreements
reached with other employees or agents.  The security of this email and
any attachments cannot be guaranteed. Email messages are routinely scanned
but malicious software infection and corruption of content can still occur
during transmission over the Internet. Any views or opinions expressed in
this communication are solely those of the author and do not necessarily
represent those of the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS).

 

Find us at:

Facebook: Facebook.com/metpoliceuk
Twitter: @metpoliceuk