logs from Olympic torch on 6/4/08

Ganesh Sittampalam made this Freedom of Information request to Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

The request was partially successful.

Ganesh Sittampalam

Dear Sir or Madam,

Please could I have a copy of the log of Commander Broadhurst and any other logs or written notes made on the day by officers involved in policing the Olympic torch and associated events in London on 6th April 2008. If this would be too much information to provide within the usual time limit, then please start from the most senior officer(s) and carry on downwards until you run out of time.

Yours faithfully,

Ganesh Sittampalam

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Sittampalam

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2008040002496
I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 07/04/2008. I note you seek
access to the following information:

* Please could I have a copy of the log of Commander Broadhurst and any
other logs or written notes made on the day by officers involved in
policing the Olympic torch and associated events in London on 6th
April 2008.
* If this would be too much information to provide within the usual time
limit, then please start from the most senior officer(s) and carry on
downwards until you run out of time.

Your request will now be considered in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the Act). You will receive a response within
the statutory timescale of 20 working days as defined by the Act,
subject to the information not being exempt or containing a reference
to a third party. In some circumstances the MPS may be unable to
achieve this deadline. If this is likely you will be informed and
given a revised time-scale at the earliest opportunity.

There may be a fee payable for the retrieval, collation and provision
of the information you request. If this is the case you will be
informed and the 20 working day timescale will be suspended until we
receive payment from you. If you choose not to make payment then your
request will remain unanswered.

Some requests may also require either full or partial transference to
another public authority in order to answer your query in the fullest
possible way. Again, you will be informed if this is the case.

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right
of complaint.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your interest
in the MPS.

Should you have any further inquiries concerning this matter, please
write or contact Shannon Aldridge on telephone number 020 7161 3527
quoting the reference number above.

Yours sincerely

Shannon Aldridge
Support Officer
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think
the decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your
request.

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is
to telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your
decision letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues
and assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision
of the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act)
regarding access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS
to have the decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within three months.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied
with the decision you may make application to the Information
Commissioner for a decision on whether the request for information has
been dealt with in accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information
Commissioner please visit their website at
www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk. Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone: 01625 545 700

show quoted sections

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Sittampalam

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2008040002496

I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 07/04/2008. I note you seek
access to the following information:

· Please could I have a copy of the log of Commander Broadhurst
and any other logs or written notes made on the day by officers involved
in policing the Olympic torch and associated events in London on 6th April
2008. If this would be too much information to provide within the usual
time limit, then please start from the most senior officer(s) and carry on
downwards until you run out of time.

I regret to inform you that the MPS have not been able to complete its
response to your request by the date originally stated due to the high
volume of requests regarding the Beijing Torch relay that we have
received.

I now advise you that the amended date for a response is 30th June 2008. I
can assure you that every effort will be made to ensure an appropriate
response will be made within this new timescale.

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right of
complaint.

May I apologise for any inconvenience caused. Should you wish to discuss
this matter please write or contact Alex Norrie on telephone number 0207
230 3153 quoting the reference number above.

Thank you for your interest in the MPS.

Yours sincerely

Alex Norrie
Information Manager
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within three months.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone: 01625 545 700

show quoted sections

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Sittampalam

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2008040002496

I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 07/04/2008. I note you seek
access to the following information:

· Please could I have a copy of the log of Commander Broadhurst
and any other logs or written notes made on the day by officers involved
in policing the Olympic torch and associated events in London on 6th April
2008.

EXTENT OF SEARCHES TO LOCATE INFORMATION

It is felt appropriate in the circumstances to apologise for the length of
time taken to deal with this request, however, you will be aware that
yours was one of a large number of requests received by the MPS in respect
of the Olympic Torch relay through London on 6 April 2008.

To locate the information relevant to your request searches were conducted
within the Metropolitan Police Public Order Command, Operational Support
Command and the Directorate of Public Affairs.

1. Please could I have a copy of the log of Commander Broadhurst

DECISION

Having located and considered the relevant information, I am afraid that I
am not required by statute to release the information requested. This
letter serves as a Refusal Notice under Section 17 of the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the Act).

REASONS FOR DECISION

Section 17 of the Act provides:

(1) A public authority which, in relation to any request for information,
is to any extent relying on a claim that any provision in part II relating
to the duty to confirm or deny is relevant to the request or on a claim
that information is exempt information must, within the time for complying
with section 1(1), give the applicant a notice which-

(a) states the fact,
(b) specifies the exemption in question, and
(c) states (if that would not otherwise be apparent) why the exemption
applies.

In considering your request, I have found that the following exemption
applies to the information requested

MPS Public Order Log

Completed by Gold Commander

Log commenced 5 June 2007 and completed 6 April 2008

Restricted Document containing original written notes concerning
operational decisions taken for the policing of the Olympic Torch Relay in
London.

Section 31 (1) (a),(b) and Section 40 (2)(a)(b) (3)(a)(i)

Section 31 (1) (a),(b) Qualified & Prejudiced based

HARM

The disclosure of this document would be likely to compromise police
tactics and methodology in the effective policing of public order events
in London. In this specific case the decisions taken by the senior officer
in charge of the event are recorded at the time they were taken in respect
of the planning, organising and actual policing of the Olympic Torch
Relay. It is contended that disclosure would be likely to inhibit an
officers ability to have a free and frank exchange of views with
stakeholders during the decision making process, and whilst it would be in
the mind of the person recording those decisions and accompanying
rationale, that disclosure could be an eventuality in respect of a Court
hearing or Public enquiry, such matters would not be generally considered
for wider public scrutiny under Freedom of Information legislation. It is
considered that such a belief could be likely to inhibit that decision
making / recording processes.

The overriding harm of general disclosure in this area of policing would
be a reduction in the effective provision of public service delivery
through the gradual erosion and awareness of public order tactics and
policing considerations in event policing. The 'knock on' from wider
disclosure would also be the use of such information by those having the
necessary intent to effectively pre-empt and or disrupt the policing of
any pre planned or spontaneous event.

P.I.T.

The concept of Public Interest is NOT what the public finds interesting
but what would be of tangible benefit to the public as a whole.

Favouring Disclosure

Accountability: Disclosure would evidence those decisions taken in
the course of Planning and policing this event were recorded correctly and
that the police were being open and transparent in respect of any
decision making process.

Human Rights: In this particular case, Human Rights issues were to
the forefront of protesters minds given the political climate in China. To
disclose the decision making process would show an open and transparent
decision making process without bias.

Actions of Public This area again would show an unbiased, open and
transparent decision making process.
Officials

Public Awareness Disclosure in this area could reduce public
speculation over the policing of this particular event.

Favouring
Non-Disclosure

Effective Conduct The disclosure of Public Order Logs in respect of
public Of Police Service order events would compromise of Police Service
police effectiveness in events of this nature in the future.
Disclosure under FOIA legislation would allow those with the necessary
intent to put in place measures to disrupt or compete with the police's
ability to maintain the peace in such events.

Flow of Information The fact that the information contains the
decision making process of senior officers, decisions are based upon
information received. The general disclosure of such logs would
both impinge upon the flow of information in the future and also provide
evidence as to who provided the information, in some cases, in confidence.

Public Safety The disclosure of Public Order logs, could as
previously described, be used by those intent on disrupting police
efforts in future demonstrations. This would have a direct impact
on Public Safety if such police measures were compromised in any way.

Timing of the The Public Order logs are a vital tool in the
planning of future events and as such form part of any structured debrief
with stakeholders. Request In this case a formal debrief has yet
to take place. Any disclosure of this document could prejudice that
debrief and therefore future event planning.

Balancing Test

This is not about comparing the number of factors either in favour of
disclosure against that of withholding, but by comparing the most
persuasive arguments.

In this case we are discussing the disclosure of the Public Order Log. On
this event, The Olympic Torch Relay, there was widespread media coverage,
particularly over China's role in proceedings. However, the fundamental
piece at present rests with the exposure of police decision making in
respect of the planning, organising and managing public order events, to
disclose such information would seriously impinge upon the police's
effectiveness in managing future events of this type, particularly those
where public disorder is anticipated to some degree. Disclosing such
information could enable those wishing to confront or disrupt policing to
do just that, and this would directly effect public safety, something
which is paramount when carrying out police operations of this nature and
one aspect that cannot be compromised. On this occasion the decision is
not to disclose the information requested.

Section 40 (2)(a)(b) (3)(a)(i)

Under Section 40(2) and (3) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000, Public
Authorities are able to withhold data where its release would, or would be
likely to, identify any living individual and would breach the principles
of the Data Protection Act 1998.

I have applied this exemption as you have requested information that
contains references to of third party individuals. To release this
information would breach the principles of the Data Protection Act 1998.

Under principle one and principle six of the Data Protection Act 1998,
personal data must be processed by an organisation fairly and in
accordance with the rights of the data subject. Under principle two,
personal data must be obtained for specified and lawful purposes and must
not be processed in any way that is not compatible with those purposes.

To release the personal data of third party individuals would be in breach
of the agreed use of that information.

This exemption is both absolute and class based. I am, therefore, not
required to complete a Public Interest Test (PIT) in applying this
exemption.

2. Any other logs or written notes made on the day by officers involved in
policing the Olympic torch and associated events in London on 6th April
2008.
Refusal Notice

Section 17 of the Act provides:
17(5) A public authority which, in relation to any request for
information, is relying on a claim that section 12 or section 14 applies
must, within the time for complying with section 1(1), give the applicant
a notice stating that fact.
Section 12 of the Act provides:
12(1) Section 1(1) does not oblige a public authority to comply with a
request for information if the authority estimates that the cost of
complying with this part of the request would exceed the appropriate
limit.
In accordance with Section 12 of the Act, the cost of providing you with
the information requested is above the amount to which we are legally
required to respond. i.e the cost of locating and retrieving the
information exceeds the 'appropriate level' as stated in the Freedom of
Information (Fees and Appropriate Limit) Regulations 2004. It is
estimated that it would take over 18 hours of work and cost in excess of
£450 to comply with this part of the request.

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right of
complaint.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your interest in
the MPS.

Should you have any further inquiries concerning this matter, please write
or contact Alex Norrie on telephone number 0207 230 3153 quoting the
reference number above.

Yours sincerely

Alex Norrie
Information Manager
In complying with their statutory duty under sections 1 and 11 of the
Freedom of Information Act 2000 to release the enclosed information, the
Metropolitan Police Service will not breach the Copyright, Designs and
Patents Act 1988. However, the rights of the copyright owner of the
enclosed information will continue to be protected by law. Applications
for the copyright owner's written permission to reproduce any part of the
attached information should be addressed to MPS Directorate of Legal
Services, Room 613, Wellington House, 67-73 Buckingham Gate, London, SW1E
6BE
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within three months.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone: 01625 545 700

show quoted sections

Ganesh Sittampalam

Dear Alex Norrie,

Thanks for the clearly thought out consideration of the public interest test. It compares very favourably with responses I have seen from other public authorities.

The things I was most interested in finding out about with this request are as follows:

- What specific decisions were made under s14 of the Public Order Act 1986 to impose conditions on assemblies, and when and by whom those decisions were made (just their rank in the case of officers whose identities would not be disclosable). I am also interested in why some individuals in a given area were subjected to restrictions that others were not.

- What communication was had with BOCOG during the day and what impact that had on decision making (this are of special interest because Commander Broadhurst was later quoted in the press as saying that BOCOG were making important decisions, or words to that effect)

Would it be possible to redact the log to provide some or all of this information, and/or are there any other documents available that might help? I've already read those in http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/po... so there is no need to redisclose them.

Yours sincerely,

Ganesh Sittampalam

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Sittampalam

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2008070004369
I write in connection with your request for information which was received
by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 07/07/2008. I note you seek
access to the following information:

* - What specific decisions were made under s14 of the Public Order Act
1986 to impose conditions on assemblies, and when and by whom those
decisions were made (just their rank in the case of officers whose
identities would not be disclosable). I am also interested in why
some individuals in a given area were subjected to restrictions that
others were not.
* - What communication was had with BOCOG during the day and what
impact that had on decision making (this are of special
interestbecause Commander Broadhurst was later quoted in the press as
saying that BOCOG were making important decisions, or words to that
effect)
* Would it be possible to redact the log to provide some or all of this
information, and/or are there any other documents available that might
help?

Your request will now be considered in accordance with the Freedom of
Information Act 2000 (the Act). You will receive a response within
the statutory timescale of 20 working days as defined by the Act,
subject to the information not being exempt or containing a reference
to a third party. In some circumstances the MPS may be unable to
achieve this deadline. If this is likely you will be informed and
given a revised time-scale at the earliest opportunity.

There may be a fee payable for the retrieval, collation and provision
of the information you request. If this is the case you will be
informed and the 20 working day timescale will be suspended until we
receive payment from you. If you choose not to make payment then your
request will remain unanswered.

Some requests may also require either full or partial transference to
another public authority in order to answer your query in the fullest
possible way. Again, you will be informed if this is the case.

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right
of complaint.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your interest
in the MPS.

Should you have any further inquiries concerning this matter, please
write or contact Alex Norrie on telephone number 0207 230 3153 quoting
the reference number above.

Yours sincerely

Alex Norrie
Information Manager
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think
the decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your
request.

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is
to telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your
decision letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues
and assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision
of the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act)
regarding access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS
to have the decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within three months.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied
with the decision you may make application to the Information
Commissioner for a decision on whether the request for information has
been dealt with in accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information
Commissioner please visit their website at
www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk. Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone: 01625 545 700

show quoted sections

Metropolitan Police Service (MPS)

Dear Mr Sittampalam

Freedom of Information Request Reference No: 2008070004369

I write in connection with your request for information dated which was
received by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) on 07/07/2008. I note
you seek access to the following information:

1. What specific decisions were made under s14 of the Public Order
Act 1986 to impose conditions on assemblies, and when and by whom those
decisions were made (just their rank in the case of officers whose
identities would not be disclosable). I am also interested in why some
individuals in a given area were subjected to restrictions that others
were not.

2. What communication was had with BOCOG during the day and what
impact that had on decision making (this are of special interest because
Commander Broadhurst was later quoted in the press as saying that BOCOG
were making important decisions, or words to that effect)

Following receipt of your request searches were conducted within the MPS
to locate information relevant to your request. I can confirm that the
information you have requested is held by the MPS.

EXTENT OF SEARCHES TO LOCATE INFORMATION

To locate the information relevant to your request searches were conducted
at Public Order and Operational Support.

Q1. What specific decisions were made under s14 of the Public Order
Act 1986 to impose conditions on assemblies, and when and by whom those
decisions were made (just their rank in the case of officers whose
identities would not be disclosable). I am also interested in why some
individuals in a given area were subjected to restrictions that others
were not.

Two such incidences occurred and both were instigated by protestors not
complying with agreements already made by the protest groups. On both
occasions the decisions were made by Chief Inspector Phillip Willis at the
following times

11.35 am Demonstrators were near to Montague Street, it was explained to
them that an area had been organised for them to demonstrate, they were
unwilling to go so we imposed conditions 'under section 14 of the Public
Order Act I require you to go to Bedford Place behind the barrier if you
wish to demonstrate' If you fail to go you will be liable to arrest.

11.56 am I was at Bedford Place and saw some protestors were spreading out
onto the pavements of Great Russell Street again we explained to the
protestors that they must stand behind the barriers in Bedford Place under
the same S14 condition

At no time were any individuals in a given area subjected to restrictions
that others were not

These conditions were applied for a number of reasons but primarily to
preserve public order as is the purpose of the Public Order Act and one of
the functions of the Metropolitan Police Service. Organisers had notified
the MPS of protests and made agreements and arrangements compliant with
the conditions of the public order act. It jeopardises those agreements
and potentially future protests if groups act beyond the agreements made

Q2. What communication was had with BOCOG during the day and what
impact that had on decision making (this are of special interest because
Commander Broadhurst was later quoted in the press as saying that BOCOG
were making important decisions, or words to that effect)

As it was their event, BOCOG ultimately had the final say on routes
during the planning process; during that STRATEGIC process, Cdr Broadhurst
did not 'communicate' directly at all with BOCOG. The MPS gave advice on
the route, timings, deliverability and any proposed changes.

On the day of the event, 3 such instances occurred with the (TACTICAL
Ground) Command Team within the convoy. These are tactical, not strategic
decisions and have to be made "fast time" often whilst still on the move.
An event commander is responsible for strategic decisions.

1. On the approach to Downing Street, all the convoy members could see
large crowds along Whitehall and a question was asked if it was
safe/appropriate to proceed. It was checked with Silver who checked intel
and camera pictures and agreed it was right to proceed. A call was made
to the rest of convoy and we proceeded. When it slowed and was blocked,
the convoy was led on foot through the crowds to Westminster Bridge. The
route was not deviated from.

2. At the lunch break, the Ambassador and Chinese representatives asked
for a review to be undertaken and consideration as to the safety of the
convoy over the rest of the route. Again, after our own internal
discussions with Gold/Silver, the MPS recommended and then ensured that
the relay resumed and continued on time.

3. At St Paul's, the density of demonstrators was such that all parties
agreed that it was safer to move on than continue with that small part.

Unfortunately we are unable to redact any of Mr Broadhursts log and/or any
documents as stated in previous email due to size and costs

COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Your attention is drawn to the attached sheet which details your right of
complaint.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your interest in
the MPS.

Should you have any further inquiries concerning this matter, please write
or contact Alex Norrie on telephone number 0207 230 3153 quoting the
reference number above.

Yours sincerely

Alex Norrie
Information Manager
In complying with their statutory duty under sections 1 and 11 of the
Freedom of Information Act 2000 to release the enclosed information, the
Metropolitan Police Service will not breach the Copyright, Designs and
Patents Act 1988. However, the rights of the copyright owner of the
enclosed information will continue to be protected by law. Applications
for the copyright owner's written permission to reproduce any part of the
attached information should be addressed to MPS Directorate of Legal
Services, 1st Floor (Victoria Block), New Scotland Yard, Victoria, London,
SW1H 0BG.
COMPLAINT RIGHTS

Are you unhappy with how your request has been handled or do you think the
decision is incorrect?

You have the right to require the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to
review their decision.

Prior to lodging a formal complaint you are welcome and encouraged to
discuss the decision with the case officer that dealt with your request.

Ask to have the decision looked at again –

The quickest and easiest way to have the decision looked at again is to
telephone the case officer that is nominated at the end of your decision
letter.

That person will be able to discuss the decision, explain any issues and
assist with any problems.

Complaint

If you are dissatisfied with the handling procedures or the decision of
the MPS made under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) regarding
access to information you can lodge a complaint with the MPS to have the
decision reviewed.

Complaints should be made in writing and addressed to:

FOI Complaint
Public Access Office
PO Box 57192
London
SW6 1SF

In all possible circumstances the MPS will aim to respond to your
complaint within three months.
The Information Commissioner

After lodging a complaint with the MPS if you are still dissatisfied with
the decision you may make application to the Information Commissioner for
a decision on whether the request for information has been dealt with in
accordance with the requirements of the Act.

For information on how to make application to the Information Commissioner
please visit their website at www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk.
Alternatively, phone or write to:

Information Commissioner's Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF
Phone: 01625 545 700

show quoted sections

Looking for an EU Authority?

You can request documents directly from EU Institutions at our sister site AskTheEU.org . Find out more .

AskTheEU.org