How can I be free

Mrs Wright made this Freedom of Information request to House of Commons

This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

House of Commons did not have the information requested.

Dear House of Commons,
Please could you please tell me if you have to be a member of society in the UK?
To clarify this, is it legal to be free by living a peaceful and lawful excitence without having to adhere to statute law?
Would it be possible for me to hunt, fish and provide fuel for my dwelling and live on common land without breaking statute law?
As it is my wish to not be a part of this society as I believe it is corrupt, could you please advise me if it is possible to opt out?

Yours faithfully,

Mrs Wright

Nicholas Taylor left an annotation ()

I would be interested in seeing the answer to this.

The only logical answer has to be yes. Surely any refusal by any Government (or agency thereof) would be slavery/servitude.
This would break their own rules, namely the Human Rights Act 1998 (c. 42) which states:

SCHEDULE 1 - Article 4
Prohibition of slavery and forced labour

1. No one shall be held in slavery or servitude.

FOICOMMONS, House of Commons

Dear Mrs Wright

Thank you for your email copied below.

This information is not held by the House of Commons. These are all good questions but they can not be answered by reference to information held by the House of Commons for the purposes of the FOI Act.

You may, if dissatisfied with the treatment of your request, ask the House of Commons to conduct an internal review of this decision. Requests for internal review should be addressed to: Freedom of Information Officer, Department of Resources, House of Commons London SW1 OAA or [House of Commons request email]. Please ensure that you specify the nature of your complaint and any arguments or points that you wish to make.

If you remain dissatisfied, you may appeal to the Information Commissioner at Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AF.

Yours sincerely

Bob Castle

Head of Information Rights and Information Security

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Dear House of Commons,

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of House of Commons's handling of my FOI request 'How can I be free'.

I believe one of the most fundamental parts of existence is to be free and live a virtuous life.

My FOI request is clear and concise and i believe should be easy to answer. If i can not get an answer or be directed or guided to the appropriate government department for an answer, i can only assume the answer to my questions is yes.

A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address:
http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/ho...

Yours faithfully,

Mrs Wright

FOICOMMONS, House of Commons

Dear Mrs Wright,

Thank you for your email.

The Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA) entitles individuals to request access to information that is held by a public authority. In response to such requests, public authorities are obliged to confirm or deny whether that information is held (section 1, FOIA). If the information is held, the public authority must disclose that information, unless exemptions apply (section 2, FOIA). Your question calls for a speculative response based on opinion rather than by reference to recorded information held by a public authority and this is outside of the scope of the Act. Therefore as stated in my original response, for the purposes of the Freedom of Information Act, no information is held by the House of Commons regarding the question, "How can I be free". While we would of course otherwise seek to point you towards another public authority, we simply do not know which one to suggest.

For the reasons stated above, it therefore unclear what aspect of your request you are asking us to review. But, if you could suggest what sort of recorded information might provide an insight into this intriguing question we could look again.

I am sorry that we have not been able to help you as you would have liked, but I do hope that we have been able to give you some clarification on this matter.

Yours sincerely,

Bob Castle
Head of Information Rights and Information Security

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Nicholas Taylor left an annotation ()

I am hoping your response got mixed in with a differing question.

I cannot comprehend how the House of Commons can claim:
"Your question calls for a speculative response based on opinion rather than by reference to recorded information held by a public authority and this is outside of the scope of the Act."

The House of Commons is the place where Statute Law is enacted.

Mrs Wright's question is not asking for speculative opinions, i'm not even sure how it could be interpreted that way.

"Please could you please tell me if you have to be a member of
society in the UK?"

It is a very simple lawful question asked of our government.

Surely this is a fundamental question for any democratically elected government irrespective of country.

I can't believe the government is trying to hide behind the "we don't hold this information" adage on this question.

Dear FOICOMMONS,
Thank you for your response.

I am absolutely staggered that this question has not been answered, and by your response.

The question was clear and concise and should have been easy to answer. A simple yes or no would have sufficed.

It is intriguing, to say the least, that a simple question regarding ones freedom cannot be answered.

It certainly raises the question, why ?

In my last post, it should have read

"If i can not get an answer or be directed or guided to the appropriate government department for an answer, i can only assume
the answer to my questions is no".
(i inadvetaintly put yes)

Therefore would i be right to assume, that as you do not have any recorded information regarding my question, that you do not have to be a member of society ?

This would of course mean, that you do not have to adhere to statute law, so would not need any licences, would not be subject to fines, taxes or any other statutes that would apply to a member of society.

Could you please clarify that my assumptions are correct.

Yours sincerely,

Mrs Wright

FOICOMMONS, House of Commons

Dear Mrs Wright
I am sorry that you are not satisfied with this response but there really is no more we can add to our previous responses. If you wish to take this further you might consider exercising your right under the FOI law to make a complaint to the Information Commissioner about our handling of your request.
You should address your complaint to the Information Commissioner at Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AF.
Yours sincerely
Bob Castle

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Keith left an annotation ()

If it helps I can offer a perspective to this question.

You do NOT have to be a member of society. However, in exercising free will trying to leave you will meet violent resistance and quickly come to the realisation that you are in fact NOT FREE TO and this is clearly a master / slave relationship.

The idea that we can't leave is put in our minds and "normalised" from a very young age and, being unconditionally trusting of our elders we tend not to question it. Society is a concept of the mind and so in effect DOES NOT EXIST. Governments (a concept) use "legal THEORY" another concept of the mind, to justify the use of REAL HUMAN FORCE to "persuade" the people that society (a concept) is anything other than an illusion and that it cannot be escaped (for the good of everyone of course ... ouch).

Along the same lines, you may be interested in this: http://thesecretpeople.wordpress.com/201...

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