Dear National Archives,
I am requesting access to all the available Metropolitan Police files relating to the nude murders: MEPO 2/9895 to MEPO 2/10318 inclusive . I have made an FOI with the Metropolitan Police Service and they do not hold a copy and suggest that I contact TNA.

Yours faithfully,

Chris Clark

Kayleigh Pearson, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your email regarding a request for 421 records held at The
National Archives within the MEPO 2 series.

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders

Within the range that you have specified (MEPO 2/9895 10318 inclusive),
there are 42 records that we know definitely relate to the 'Nude Murders',
because each of these 42 records contains the phrase 'Nude Murders' in the
title.  I have attached to this email a spreadsheet detailing these
records. One of these records is already open - MEPO 26/171, with a closed
extract, MEPO 26/171.

We would be happy to review these 42 records. To do so in an efficient and
effective manner I would like to propose that The National Archives split
these files into seven batches of six. This would mean we would respond to
you regarding the first batch of records in 20 working days time and log
the second batch of files once the first batch has been processed and
completed.

Please let us know if you would be willing for us to proceed in this
manner as soon as possible by emailing
[email address]

Remaining files specified in your request

If you would like to find out whether any of the remaining 379 records
specified in your original request contain any information which is
relevant to your enquiries, you will need to take the following action:

Open records
From a brief initial search, we have ascertained that some of the records
within the range you have specified are already open and available to view
at The National Archives. You can find these records by searching our
online catalogue, Discovery. They will have the following description:

This record is available to order and view     
  
I have included an example of one such record below:
[1]http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk...

You may visit us and review these files yourself, to see whether they
contain information relevant to your request. Alternatively, you can pay
for a search of these records. For more information about paid searches of
open records, please see the following link:

[2]http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-...

Remaining closed records
Once you have worked through your list to identify any documents which are
already open and available to view, you will be left with a list of closed
records. If you would like us to review these in order to ascertain
whether they contain information relevant to your enquiries, we would be
happy to do so. However, we would need to approach this review in a
similar manner to the bulk review of the 42 records discussed above.

Our recommendation
In our experience,  information relating to famous cases such as the Nude
Murders, where details of the case are the focus of the record, tends to
clearly marked and identified; for example, in the 42 identified in the
spreadsheet by their file title.  Based on our experience handling a
number of requests of this nature, we would therefore advise that you
approach your enquiry in three stages:

1.         Identify and eliminate any open records from your original list
using the guidance provided
2.         Proceeding with the batched bulk review of the 42 identified
files
3.         Upon completion, proceeding to consider whether you wish to
undertake any further reviews of closed records which might contain
information you are looking for

We have now placed your request on hold pending confirmation from you of
how you wish to proceed. If you have any further questions at this point,
or if you require further clarification, you can contact us again and we
will be happy to help you.

Kind Regards,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

[3]www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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References

Visible links
1. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk...
2. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-...
3. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

Dear Kayleigh Pearson,

Thank you for your letter of 26 April 2016 ref FOO45614.
Having looked at the 42 file references I have condensed my Request for release of information for you to Review down to 9 files:
MEPO 2/9895. MEPO 2/10292. MEPO 2/1097. MEPO 2/10299. MEPO 2/10301. MEPO 2/10303. MEPO 2/10306. MEPO 2/10309. MEPO 2/10317.

Yours sincerely,

Chris Clark

foienquiry, National Archives

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your email of 11th May 2016 regarding your request for
records held at The National Archives within the MEPO 2 series.

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders
I note that you have condensed your request for release of information to
9 files. I would like to update you with our FOI Request reference for the
handling of these files as follows:-

F0045614 - MEPO 2/9895
F0045800 - MEPO 2/10292
F0045801 - MEPO 2/1097
F0045802 - MEPO 2/10299
F0045803 - MEPO 2/10301
F0045804 - MEPO 2/10303
F0045805 - MEPO 2/10306
F0045806 - MEPO 2/10309
F0045807 - MEPO 2/10317

As this is a bulk request (request for more than five records) we
generally find that the most efficient method for handling is to stagger
the requests.  I would therefore like to propose that The National
Archives split these files into 2 batches, the first being for the first 5
files listed above and the second being for the remaining 4 files. This
would mean we would respond to you regarding the first batch of
records within 20 working days and log the second batch of files once the
first batch has been processed and completed.

This is just one proposed method of handling these requests. However if
you were to agree to this course of action it would be useful if you could
look at the above list of records and see if there is any priority order
that you would like us to work on. This will enable us to process the five
most important cases first and assist you with meeting your research needs
and deadlines.

Please let us know if you would be willing for us to proceed in this
manner as soon as possible by emailing
[email address]

If you do have any questions about this e-mail, please do let me know. I
am more than happy to discuss this and provide you with any further
assistance required. 

While we await your clarification on this matter we will continue to
process your requests as proposed above.

Kind Regards,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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Dear foienquiry,

From: foienquiry
National Archives

18 May 2016

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your email of 11th May 2016 regarding your request for
records held at The National Archives within the MEPO 2 series.

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders
I note that you have condensed your request for release of information to
9 files. I would like to update you with our FOI Request reference for the
handling of these files as follows:-

F0045614 - MEPO 2/9895
F0045800 - MEPO 2/10292
F0045801 - MEPO 2/1097
F0045802 - MEPO 2/10299
F0045803 - MEPO 2/10301
F0045804 - MEPO 2/10303
F0045805 - MEPO 2/10306
F0045806 - MEPO 2/10309
F0045807 - MEPO 2/10317

As this is a bulk request (request for more than five records) we
generally find that the most efficient method for handling is to stagger
the requests. I would therefore like to propose that The National
Archives split these files into 2 batches, the first being for the first 5
files listed above and the second being for the remaining 4 files. This
would mean we would respond to you regarding the first batch of
records within 20 working days and log the second batch of files once the
first batch has been processed and completed.

This is just one proposed method of handling these requests. However if
you were to agree to this course of action it would be useful if you could
look at the above list of records and see if there is any priority order
that you would like us to work on. This will enable us to process the five
most important cases first and assist you with meeting your research needs
and deadlines.

Please let us know if you would be willing for us to proceed in this
manner as soon as possible by emailing
[email address]

If you do have any questions about this e-mail, please do let me know. I
am more than happy to discuss this and provide you with any further
assistance required.

While we await your clarification on this matter we will continue to
process your requests as proposed above.

Kind Regards,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Dear FOI Assessor I am happy for you to split the nine files into 5 and 4 respectively.

Yours sincerely,

Chris Clark

foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045614

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 25th April 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/9895 - Unsolved murder of Elizabeth FIGG, found dead at Chiswick on
17 June 1959 part of Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude
Murders

We are handling your request under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

We have not yet decided if this document can be opened.  We will respond
to you by 23rd June 2016.

The National Archives has to consult other government departments in
relation to this request.  

The FOI Act allows us an extra 10 working days to do so. See section 4(2)
in the following link for details of this extension.
[1]http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/...

Ideally we would wish to respond to FOI requests within 20 working days
but in this case it was not possible.

We will update you regarding the remainder of the first batch of files by
15th June 2016, which is 20 working days from the date of my email dated
11th May 2016 regarding the handling of this bulk request.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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References

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1. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/...

foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045800, F0045801, F0045802,
F0045803

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your enquiry of 11th May 2016 regarding a review of:

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders

F0045800 - MEPO 2/10292
F0045801 - MEPO 2/10297
F0045802 - MEPO 2/10299
F0045803 - MEPO 2/10301

We are handling your request under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

We have not yet decided if this document can be opened.  We will respond
to you by 29th June 2016.

The National Archives has to consult other government departments in
relation to this request.  

The FOI Act allows us an extra 10 working days to do so. See section 4(2)
in the following link for details of this extension.
[1]http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/...

Ideally we would wish to respond to FOI requests within 20 working days
but in this case it was not possible.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045800, F0045801,
F0045802, F0045803
 in any correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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References

Visible links
1. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/...

foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045614

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your enquiry of 25th April 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/9895 - Unsolved murder of Elizabeth FIGG, found dead at Chiswick on
17 June 1959 part of Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude
Murders

I am writing to inform you that we are required to conduct a public
interest test in relation to your request and we will let you know the
result of this by 21st July 2016.

This is because some of the information which you are looking for is
covered by sections 31and 38 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

The FOI Act gives you the right to know whether we hold the information
you want and to have it communicated to you, subject to any exemptions
which may apply.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

When these exemptions apply we are required to consider whether it is in
the public interest to release the information.  However, if it is decided
that the public interest would not be served by releasing the information
we will explain the reasons for this.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

We will let you know the outcome of the public interest test as explained
above.  In the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email
please do not hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference
number above in any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

Sue Browne

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045800, F0045801, F0045802,
F0045803

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your enquiry of 11th May 2016 regarding a review of:

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders

F0045800 - MEPO 2/10292
F0045801 - MEPO 2/10297
F0045802 - MEPO 2/10299
F0045803 - MEPO 2/10301

I am writing to inform you that we are required to conduct a public
interest test in relation to your request and we will let you know the
result of this by 27th July 2016.

This is because some of the information which you are looking for is
covered by sections 31 and 38 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

The FOI Act gives you the right to know whether we hold the information
you want and to have it communicated to you, subject to any exemptions
which may apply.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

When these exemptions apply we are required to consider whether it is in
the public interest to release the information.  However, if it is decided
that the public interest would not be served by releasing the information
we will explain the reasons for this.

Some of the information within the documents is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

We will let you know the outcome of the public interest test as explained
above.  In the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email
please do not hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference
number above in any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Information Management and Practice Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045800, F0045801,
F0045802, F0045803 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045803

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 17th May 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/10301: The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Helen Catherine
BARTHELEMY, found dead at Brentford on 24 April 1964 with photographic
negatives

Having considered the public interest test we have decided that this
information should be withheld.  I regret to say this means we cannot make
the documents open to you or to the public in general.

I explained that all of the information in the documents is covered by
sections 31 and 38 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000.  

Section 31 of the Act exempts information from release if its disclosure
under the Act would or would be likely to, prejudice; the prevention and
detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

A public interest test was conducted in consultation with the Metropolitan
Police Service which concluded the following:

Arguments made in favour of the release of the information requested:
Disclosure of the information contained within this record would
demonstrate how the police go about investigating serious crime, in this
instance the murder of several young women in West London during the mid
1960s, attributed to one serial killer.

The police service is accountable to the public it serves and it is in the
common interest that information that demonstrates how it performs across
the range of its duties is made available. However, this comes with the
following caveats; such disclosures of information must not impede the
police from discharging their lawful duties to detect and prevent crime,
and identify, apprehend and bring offenders to justice; nor should
disclosure infringe the rights of individuals.

The murder of several women apparently by the same perpetrator would have
been the source of considerable public anxiety.  Disclosure of information
which indicates the efforts of the authorities to identify the
individual(s) responsible, even if the case ultimately remains unsolved,
could act to reassure the public and engender a sense confidence in the
police, which would be in the public interest.

Arguments made against the release of the information requested:
The information within this record relates to an unsolved
murder.  Disclosure into the public domain could prejudice an
investigation or prosecution.
This record also contains information, which, if put into the public
domain, could cause substantial distress to the immediate, surviving
families of the victims.

Outcome of the public interest test:
The information contained in this record is directly relevant to the
investigation of a series of murders as yet unsolved, there remains a
possibility that these murders could still be investigated and that a
suspect could be identified, charged, brought to trial and convicted.

It is not possible to identify particular information that might be
released into the public domain without the risk of compromising any
future police actions; information that appears innocuous may have
significance to an experienced investigator that is not immediately
obvious to the lay reader; or may assume a new significance in the light
of newly discovered evidence or developments in forensic or investigative
techniques.  The evolution of new scientific techniques, especially the
technology of DNA, means that cases hitherto considered unsolvable, are
being examined afresh.  Increasingly police services throughout the
country are setting up cold case teams to review their case files on
unsolved murders; in some instances these unsolved murders date back to
the 1940s.

The premature release of this record into the public domain might,
therefore, be detrimental to any future investigation and subsequent
prosecution.

This record meets the criteria that indicate that it is likely to be
investigated in the future: -

This murder, and the others attributed to the same perpetrator, remain
unsolved
The crime is of a seriousness that means it would merit further
investigation
This and the associated crimes are of such a magnitude that the police
would have a clear duty to pursue any new investigative opportunity even
after the passage of 50 years
The perpetrator may still be living
This, and other murders attributed to the same perpetrator, were stranger
attacks.  The murders have the characteristics of what are popularly known
as serial murders.  The victims were female, vulnerable and engaged in an
activity which regularly exposed them to violence and mistreatment
A perpetrator capable of such violence against a particular group is a
significant threat to public safety
In recent years experienced investigators have spent considerable time
reviewing this and associated case papers in an effort to find a new lines
of investigation

This record should remain closed citing s.31. This is because disclosure
of the information contained therein could be prejudicial a future
investigation and prosecution with the result that a suspect may evade
apprehension.  Such an outcome would not be in the public interest.
This record contains information of a graphic and disturbing nature, the
disclosure of which is likely to cause substantial distress to the victims
family to the point where their welfare could be significantly harmed.
Closure of the record is sought for the lifetime of the victims family
citing s.38.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

In this case the exemption applies because the document contains the
personal and the sensitive personal information of a number of identified
individuals assumed to be still living. These individuals would have no
expectation that this information would be made available in the public
domain during their lifetimes; to do so would be unfair and would risk
causing damage and distress, which would contravene the first data
protection principle.

If you are dissatisfied with the handling of your request or the decision
which has been reached, you have the right to ask for an internal
review.  Internal review requests must be submitted within two months of
the date of this response and should be addressed to:

Quality Manager
Public Services Development Unit
The National Archives
Kew
Richmond
Surrey
TW9 4DU
[email address]

Please mark your complaint clearly.  You have the right to ask the
Information Commissioner (ICO) to investigate any aspect of your
complaint.  However, please note that the ICO is likely to expect internal
complaints procedures to have been exhausted before beginning his
investigation.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045803 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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Dear National Archives,

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of National Archives's handling of my FOI request 'Hammersmith Nudes Murder Files aka Jack The Stripper Murders'.
With Regards to S31.
1. David Seabrook Author of "Jack of Jumps" had access to the files over a four month period at Hendon Police College and extracted everything evidential from them, including pathologist reports and witness statements.
2. With regard in particular to the MPS and DPP Irene Lockwood Murder files withheld. The Central Criminal Court file on Irene Lockwood/Kenneth Archibald which holds pathologist report, post mortem photographs and witness statements is a public released document.

3. The likely perpetrator from my investigation was one Reginald Short who died in 1975 and therefore that brings the investigation to a closure.

With regards to S38 and S40 the challenge is that the family members:

1. Have been with consent publicly identified in Neil Milkins book "Who Was Jack The Stripper?"
Steven Sloman Son of Hannah Tailford.
Charles Thomson Brother of Helene Barthelemy.
2. Request that they see the files and work investigation carried out by the MPS.

A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address: https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/h...

Yours faithfully,

Chris Clark

foienquiry, National Archives

Dear Mr Clark

I am contacting you to acknowledge receipt of your request dated 8th July
2016, for a review of an access decision made by The National Archives
under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Your request has been forwarded to Helen Potter, Head of Freedom of
Information Centre, who will review and respond in writing to your request
within 20 working days from the date of receipt. Your request has been
allocated the reference number F0046331, should you need to contact us in
the meantime.

If you are still dissatisfied, having followed all the stages of our
internal complaints system, you should contact:

The Information Commissioner

Wycliff House

Water Lane

Wilmslow

Cheshire

SK9 5AF

Yours sincerely,

Sheila Gopaulen
Quality Manager
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

show quoted sections

foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045614

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 25th April 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/9895 - Unsolved murder of Elizabeth FIGG, found dead at Chiswick on
17 June 1959 part of Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude
Murders

We wrote to you on 22nd June 2016 to inform you that all of the
information in this document is covered by a qualified exemption under the
Freedom of Information Act 2000.  This requires us to carry out a public
interest test to determine whether the information can be released.

The test is still being considered and we hope to have reached a decision
by 18th August 2016.

We hoped it would have been completed by this time but unfortunately a
decision has not yet been reached.  Under the FOI Act we are allowed a
reasonable period of time to conduct the test, and where a case raises
complex public interest considerations we are permitted to extend the time
allowed to reach a decision.

To remind you, the exemptions being considered are sections 31 and 38.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

I would like to thank you for your continued patience in this matter.  In
the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email please do not
hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference number above in
any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Information Management and Practice Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 11th May 2016 regarding a review of:

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders

F0045800 - MEPO 2/10292
F0045801 - MEPO 2/10297
F0045802 - MEPO 2/10299

We wrote to you on 29th June 2016 to inform you that some of the
information in this document is covered by a qualified exemption under the
Freedom of Information Act 2000.  This requires us to carry out a public
interest test to determine whether the information can be released.

The test is still being considered and we hope to have reached a decision
by 24 August 2016.

We hoped it would have been completed by this time but unfortunately a
decision has not yet been reached.  Under the FOI Act we are allowed a
reasonable period of time to conduct the test, and where a case raises
complex public interest considerations we are permitted to extend the time
allowed to reach a decision.

To remind you, the exemptions being considered are sections 31 and 38.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

I would like to thank you for your continued patience in this matter.  In
the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email please do not
hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference number above in
any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:
via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045800 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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foienquiry, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Please find attached your completed Internal Review response for the following file as part of the review of case F0045803:

MEPO 2/10301: The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Helen Catherine BARTHELEMY, found dead at Brentford on 24 April 1964 with photographic negatives

Yours sincerely,

FOI Manager
FOI Centre
Transfer and Access Department
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0046331 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.
Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045614

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 25th April 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/9895 - Unsolved murder of Elizabeth FIGG, found dead at Chiswick on
17 June 1959 part of Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude
Murders

We wrote to you on 21st July 2016 to inform you that some of the
information in this document is covered by a qualified exemption under the
Freedom of Information Act 2000.  This requires us to carry out a public
interest test to determine whether the information can be released.

The test is still being considered and we hope to have reached a decision
by 16th September 2016.

We hoped it would have been completed by this time but unfortunately a
decision has not yet been reached.  Under the FOI Act we are allowed a
reasonable period of time to conduct the test, and where a case raises
complex public interest considerations we are permitted to extend the time
allowed to reach a decision. Owing to how this procedure works, it can
sometimes be a lengthy process to finalise such cases. The National
Archives has worked hard to be transparent about the time taken for FOIA
requests for historical information and we have published the lifecycle of
our processes on line. You can look at them here:
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/foi/requests....

Unfortunately on occasions, despite our best efforts this process can go
beyond the initial 20 or indeed 40 day extension. We fully understand that
this can be frustrating for requesters and apologise for any inconvenience
that results from this delay.

To remind you, the exemptions being considered are sections 31 and 38.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

I would like to thank you for your continued patience in this matter.  In
the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email please do not
hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference number above in
any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045800, F0045801, F0045802

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 11th May 2016 regarding a review of:

Bulk review of files definitely relating to the Nude Murders

F0045800 - MEPO 2/10292
F0045801 - MEPO 2/10297
F0045802 - MEPO 2/10299

We wrote to you on 27th July 2016 to inform you that some of the
information in this document is covered by a qualified exemption under the
Freedom of Information Act 2000.  This requires us to carry out a public
interest test to determine whether the information can be released.

The test is still being considered and we hope to have reached a decision
by 22 September 2016.

We hoped it would have been completed by this time but unfortunately a
decision has not yet been reached.  Under the FOI Act we are allowed a
reasonable period of time to conduct the test, and where a case raises
complex public interest considerations we are permitted to extend the time
allowed to reach a decision. Owing to how this procedure works, it can
sometimes be a lengthy process to finalise such cases. The National
Archives has worked hard to be transparent about the time taken for FOIA
requests for historical information and we have published the lifecycle of
our processes on line. You can look at them here:
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/foi/requests....

Unfortunately on occasions, despite our best efforts this process can go
beyond the initial 20 or indeed 40 day extension. We fully understand that
this can be frustrating for requesters and apologise for any inconvenience
that results from this delay.

To remind you, the exemptions being considered are sections 31 and 38.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

I would like to thank you for your continued patience in this matter.  In
the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email please do not
hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference number above in
any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045800, F0045801,
F0045802 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045614, F0045800, F0045801,
F0045802

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your enquiry of 25th April 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/9895: Unsolved murder of Elizabeth FIGG, found dead at Chiswick on
17 June 1959

MEPO 2/10292: The 'Nude Murders'. Death of Tina SMART, alias Gwyneth REES,
whose remains were found at Barnes on 8 November 1963: report and
statements with photographic negatives

MEPO 2/10297: The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Hannah TAILFORD,
found dead at Hammersmith on 2 February 1964

MEPO 2/10299: The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Irene LOCKWOOD, found
dead at Chiswick on 8 April 1964
We are unable to open these documents because all of the information is
exempt under sections 31 and 38 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. I
regret to say this means that we cannot make the documents open to you or
to the public in general.

The FOI Act gives you the right to know whether we hold the information
you want and to have it communicated to you, subject to any exemptions
which may apply.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information from release if its disclosure
under the Act would or would be likely to, prejudice; the prevention and
detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

A public interest test was conducted in consultation with the Metropolitan
Police Service which concluded the following:

Arguments made in favour of the release of the information requested:
Disclosure of the information contained within these records would
demonstrate how the police go about investigating serious crime, in this
case a serial killer who claimed the lives of several young women in West
London during the mid-1960s.

The police service is accountable to the public it serves and it is in the
common interest that information that demonstrates how it performs across
the range of its duties is made available. However, this comes with the
following caveats; such disclosures of information must not impede the
police from discharging their lawful duties to detect and prevent crime,
and identify, apprehend and bring offenders to justice; nor should
disclosure infringe the rights of individuals.

The murder of several women apparently by the same perpetrator would have
been the source of considerable anxiety within the community, which would
rightly wish to know what steps the authorities were taking to apprehend
the perpetrator.  Disclosure of information which indicates the efforts of
the authorities to identify the individual(s) responsible, even if the
case ultimately remains unsolved, could act to reassure the public and
engender a sense of confidence in the police, which would be in the public
interest.

Arguments made against the release of the information requested:
The information within these records relates to several linked unsolved
murders.  Disclosure into the public domain could prejudice an
investigation or prosecution.
These records also contains information, which, if put into the public
domain, could cause substantial distress to the immediate, surviving
families of the victims.

Outcome of the public interest test:
The information contained in these records is directly relevant to the
investigation of murders that were part of a series of murders as yet
unsolved.  As such there remains a possibility that these murders could
still be investigated and that a suspect could be identified, charged,
brought to trial and convicted.

These cases meet the criteria that indicates that they would be
investigated in the future, if new evidence was adduced or a confession
forthcoming: -

These murders remain unsolved
The crimes are of such a serious nature that they would merit further
investigation should the opportunity arise
In recent years the police have sought opportunities to continue the
investigations
There is no age limit on the prosecution of persons suspected of murder
The suspect(s) may still be living
These cases of homicide appear to have been stranger attacks. The murders
have the characteristics of what are popularly known as serial
murders.  The victims were female, vulnerable and engaged in an activity
which regularly exposed them to violence and mistreatment
These homicides are attributed to a serial killer who claimed the lives of
several young women in West London during the mid-1960s. The murder of
several women apparently by the same perpetrator would have been and would
continue to be the source of considerable public concern.  There is  an
expectation amongst the public that the police will continue with the
investigation into these murders, whenever opportunities arise and as long
as there is a possibility that the suspect(s) still lives, regardless how
long ago they were committed

It is not possible to identify particular information that might be
released into the public domain without the risk of compromising any
future police actions; information that appears innocuous may have
significance to an experienced investigator that is not immediately
obvious to the lay reader; or may assume a new significance in the light
of newly discovered evidence or developments in forensic or investigative
techniques.  The evolution of new scientific techniques, especially the
technology of DNA, means that cases hitherto considered unsolvable, are
being examined afresh.  Increasingly police services throughout the
country are setting up cold case teams to review their case files on
unsolved murders; in some instances these unsolved murders date back to
the 1940s. The premature release of these records into the public domain
might, therefore, be detrimental to any future investigation and
subsequent prosecution.

These records should remain closed citing s.31. This is because disclosure
of the information contained therein could be prejudicial to a future
investigation and prosecution with the result that a suspect may evade
apprehension.  Such an outcome would not be in the public interest.
These records contain information of a graphic and disturbing nature, the
disclosure of which is likely to cause substantial distress to the victims
surviving, immediate families to the point where their welfare could be
significantly harmed.  These records should remain closed for the lifetime
of the victims immediate families citing s.38.

Some of the information within the documents is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

In this case the exemption applies because the documents contain the
personal and the sensitive personal information of a number of identified
individuals assumed to be still living. These individuals would have no
expectation that this information would be made available in the public
domain during their lifetimes; to do so would be unfair and would risk
causing damage and distress, which would contravene the first data
protection principle.

If you are dissatisfied with the handling of your request or the decision
which has been reached, you have the right to ask for an internal
review.  Internal review requests must be submitted within two months of
the date of this response and should be addressed to:

Quality Manager
Public Services Development Unit
The National Archives
Kew
Richmond
Surrey
TW9 4DU
[email address]

Please mark your complaint clearly.  You have the right to ask the
Information Commissioner (ICO) to investigate any aspect of your
complaint.  However, please note that the ICO is likely to expect internal
complaints procedures to have been exhausted before beginning his
investigation.

As outlined in my email dated 18th May 2016, now that the first batch of
your bulk request relating to the Nude Murders has been processed and
completed, I will start to review the remaining files that formed part of
your request; MEPO 2/10303, MEPO 2/10306, MEPO 2/10309, MEPO 2/10317
(F0045804, F0045805, F0045806, F0045807).  If for any reason you dont wish
me to proceed in this manner, please email
[email address] as soon as possible, quoting the
above reference numbers.
 
Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045614, F0045800,
F0045801, F0045802 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

show quoted sections

Dear National Archives,

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of National Archives's handling of my FOI request 'Hammersmith Nudes Murder Files aka Jack The Stripper Murders'. Reference number: F0045614, F0045800,
F0045801, F0045802 .
Firstly ALL of these files were searched over a four month period by Author David Seabrook at Hendon Police College prior to the publication of his book "Jack of Jumps" during 2006. This book contains All evidential value gleaned from these files of the method motive and opportunity that each victim was killed and the state each was subsequently found with detail of pathologist's reports, statements from persons finding the corpse and officers dealing with the crime.
Additionally, in the case of Irene Lockwood TNA have publically released the MoJ file of Accused Kenneth Archibald. This file contains all relevant statements, pathologist report, scene of crime and mortuary photographs; this makes a mockery of Irene Lockwood's Police Files being Refused and adds weight to the challenge to S31.
Concerning the Data Protection of Witnesses the latter of which could be redacted to prevent identification outside the body of each document concerned.
As far as S38 is concerned all of the victims close relatives, including children were publically named with their consent in Neil Milkins book "Who was Jack the Stripper?" 2011.
Additionally a son of Hannah Tailford and a son of Helene Barthelemy are working with me to have these files opened.
A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address: https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/h...

Yours faithfully,
Chris Clark

foienquiry, National Archives

Dear Mr Clark

I acknowledge receipt of your requests dated 16th September 2016, for a
review of an access decision made by The National Archives under the
Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Your requests have been forwarded to Helen Potter, Head of Freedom of
Information Centre, who will review and respond in writing to your request
within 20 working days from the date of receipt.

Your internal review requests have been assigned reference numbers as
follows. Should you need to contact us, please quote these reference
numbers.

MEPO 2/9895 - F0046981

MEPO 2/10292 - F0046982

MEPO 2/1097 - F0046983

MEPO 2/10299 - F0046984

If you are still dissatisfied, having followed all the stages of our
internal complaints system, you should contact:

The Information Commissioner

Wycliff House

Water Lane

Wilmslow

Cheshire

SK9 5AF

Yours sincerely,

Sheila Gopaulen

Quality Manager

Quality & Excellence Department

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Rory Cook, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your recent request to The National Archives to undertake an internal review relating to your information requests regarding record: MEPO 2/9895. Please find attached the conclusions of this internal review process.

I trust this information is of some use to you and I wish you all the best with your research.

Yours sincerely,

Rory Cook
Freedom of Information Manager
The National Archives, Ruskin Avenue, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0046981 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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Rory Cook, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your recent request to The National Archives to undertake an internal review relating to your information requests regarding record: MEPO 2/10292. Please find attached the conclusions of this internal review process.

I trust this information is of some use to you and I wish you all the best with your research.

Yours sincerely,

Rory Cook
Freedom of Information Manager
The National Archives, Ruskin Avenue, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0046982 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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Rory Cook, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your recent request to The National Archives to undertake an internal review relating to your information requests regarding record: MEPO 2/10299. Please find attached the conclusions of this internal review process.

I trust this information is of some use to you and I wish you all the best with your research.

Yours sincerely,

Rory Cook
Freedom of Information Manager
The National Archives, Ruskin Avenue, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0046984 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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Rory Cook, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your recent request to The National Archives to undertake an internal review relating to your information requests regarding record: MEPO 2/10297. Please find attached the conclusions of this internal review process.

I trust this information is of some use to you and I wish you all the best with your research.

Yours sincerely,

Rory Cook
Freedom of Information Manager
The National Archives, Ruskin Avenue, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0046983 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your enquiry of 17 May 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/10303 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Mary FLEMING found
dead at Chiswick on 14 July 1964
MEPO 2/10306 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Frances BROWN, alias
Margaret McGOWAN, found dead at Kensington on 25 November 1964
MEPO 2/10309 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Bridgette O'HARA,
found dead at Acton on 16 February 1965: papers and statements with
photographic negatives
MEPO 2/10317 - The 'Nude Murders'. Report linking the unsolved murder of
Bridgette O'HARA with those of Hannah TAILFORD, Irene LOCKWOOD, Helen
BARTHELEMY, Mary FLEMING, Margaret McGOWAN, and possibly that of Elizabeth
FIGG, as the 'Nude Murders' (it was later considered that Tina SMART also
was murdered by the same person)

We are handling your request under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

We have not yet decided if this document can be opened.  We will respond
to you by 28 October 2016.

The National Archives has to consult other government departments in
relation to this request.  

The FOI Act allows us an extra 10 working days to do so. See section 4(2)
in the following link for details of this extension.

[1]http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/...

Ideally we would wish to respond to FOI requests within 20 working days
but in this case it was not possible.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045804, 5805, 5806,
5807 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

[2]www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

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References

Visible links
1. http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2004/...
2. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045804, F0045805, F0045806,
F0045807

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 17 May 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/10303 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Mary FLEMING found
dead at Chiswick on 14 July 1964
MEPO 2/10306 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Frances BROWN, alias
Margaret McGOWAN, found dead at Kensington on 25 November 1964
MEPO 2/10309 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Bridgette O'HARA,
found dead at Acton on 16 February 1965: papers and statements with
photographic negatives
MEPO 2/10317 - The 'Nude Murders'. Report linking the unsolved murder of
Bridgette O'HARA with those of Hannah TAILFORD, Irene LOCKWOOD, Helen
BARTHELEMY, Mary FLEMING, Margaret McGOWAN, and possibly that of Elizabeth
FIGG, as the 'Nude Murders' (it was later considered that Tina SMART also
was murdered by the same person)

I am writing to inform you that we are required to conduct a public
interest test in relation to your requests and we will let you know the
result of this by 25 November 2016.

This is because some of the information which you are looking for is
covered by sections 31and 38 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

The FOI Act gives you the right to know whether we hold the information
you want and to have it communicated to you, subject to any exemptions
which may apply.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

When these exemptions apply we are required to consider whether it is in
the public interest to release the information.  However, if it is decided
that the public interest would not be served by releasing the information
we will explain the reasons for this.

Some of the information within the documents is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

We will let you know the outcome of the public interest test as explained
above.  In the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email
please do not hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference
number above in any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045804, F0045805,
F0045806, F0045807 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

show quoted sections

foienquiry, National Archives

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your enquiry of 17 May 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/10303 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Mary FLEMING found
dead at Chiswick on 14 July 1964
MEPO 2/10306 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Frances BROWN, alias
Margaret McGOWAN, found dead at Kensington on 25 November 1964
MEPO 2/10309 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Bridgette O'HARA,
found dead at Acton on 16 February 1965: papers and statements with
photographic negatives
MEPO 2/10317 - The 'Nude Murders'. Report linking the unsolved murder of
Bridgette O'HARA with those of Hannah TAILFORD, Irene LOCKWOOD, Helen
BARTHELEMY, Mary FLEMING, Margaret McGOWAN, and possibly that of Elizabeth
FIGG, as the 'Nude Murders' (it was later considered that Tina SMART also
was murdered by the same person)

We wrote to you on 28th October 2016 to inform you that some of the
information in this document is covered by a qualified exemption under the
Freedom of Information Act 2000.  This requires us to carry out a public
interest test to determine whether the information can be released.

The test is still being considered and we hope to have reached a decision
by 23rd December 2016.

We hoped it would have been completed by this time but unfortunately a
decision has not yet been reached.  Under the FOI Act we are allowed a
reasonable period of time to conduct the test, and where a case raises
complex public interest considerations we are permitted to extend the time
allowed to reach a decision.

To remind you, the exemptions being considered are sections 31 and 38 of
the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released would,
or would be likely to, prejudice the prevention or detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

Some of the information within the document is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

I would like to thank you for your continued patience in this matter.  In
the meantime if you have any queries regarding this email please do not
hesitate to contact us.  Remember to quote the reference number above in
any future communications.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail or (020 8876 3444)

Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045804 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

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foienquiry, National Archives

Freedom of Information Request: Reference F0045804, F0045805, F0045806,
F0045807

Dear Mr Clark

Thank you for your enquiry of 17 May 2016 regarding a review of:

MEPO 2/10303 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Mary FLEMING found
dead at Chiswick on 14 July 1964

MEPO 2/10306 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Frances BROWN, alias
Margaret McGOWAN, found dead at Kensington on 25 November 1964

MEPO 2/10309 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Bridgette O'HARA,
found dead at Acton on 16 February 1965: papers and statements with
photographic negatives

MEPO 2/10317 - The 'Nude Murders'. Report linking the unsolved murder of
Bridgette O'HARA with those of Hannah TAILFORD, Irene LOCKWOOD, Helen
BARTHELEMY, Mary FLEMING, Margaret McGOWAN, and possibly that of Elizabeth
FIGG, as the 'Nude Murders' (it was later considered that Tina SMART also
was murdered by the same person)

Having considered the public interest test we have decided that this
information should be withheld. I regret to say this means we cannot make
these documents open to you or to the public in general.

The FOI Act gives you the right to know whether we hold the information
you want and to have it communicated to you, subject to any exemptions
which may apply.

 

I explained that some of the information in the documents is covered by
sections 31 and 38 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Section 31 of the Act exempts information from release if its disclosure
under the Act would or would be likely to, prejudice; the prevention and
detection of crime.

Section 38 of the Act exempts information that, if it was released, would
endanger the physical or mental health or safety of any individual.

A public interest test was conducted in consultation with the Metropolitan
Police Service which concluded the following:

Arguments made in favour of the release of the information requested:
Disclosure of the information contained within these records would
demonstrate how the police go about investigating serious crime, in this
instance four victims of a serial killer who is believed to have murdered
several women in West London during the mid-1960s.

The police service is accountable to the public it serves and it is in the
common interest that information that demonstrates how it performs across
the range of its duties is made available. However, this comes with the
following caveats; such disclosures of information must not impede the
police from discharging their lawful duties to detect and prevent crime,
and identify, apprehend and bring offenders to justice; nor should
disclosure infringe the rights of individuals.

The murder of several women apparently by the same perpetrator would have
been the source of considerable public anxiety.  Disclosure of information
which indicates the efforts of the authorities to identify the
individual(s) responsible, even if the case ultimately remains unsolved,
could act to reassure the public and engender a sense confidence in the
police, which would be in the public interest.

Arguments made against the release of the information requested:
The information within these records relates to unsolved murders
attributed to the same perpetrator.  Disclosure into the public domain
could prejudice future investigations or prosecutions.
These records also contain information, which, if put into the public
domain, could cause substantial distress to the immediate, surviving
families of the victims.

Outcome of the public interest test:
Exemption from disclosure of the information in these pieces is sought
because publication may prejudice a future investigation and
prosecution.  These cases meet the criteria that indicates that they would
be investigated in the future, if new evidence was adduced or a confession
forthcoming: -

These murders remains unsolved
These crimes are of a seriousness that means they would merit further
investigation
There is no age limit on the prosecution of persons suspected of murder
The suspect(s) may still be living
These cases of homicide appear to have been a stranger attack with a
sexual motivation
These homicides are attributed to a serial killer who is believed to have
been responsible for the murders of several young women in West London
during the mid-1960s.  Any one capable of a sustained campaign of homicide
would pose a significant threat to public safety
The murder of several women apparently by the same perpetrator would have
been and would continue to be the source of considerable public
concern.  There would be a communal expectation that the police would
investigate these murders, when opportunities present themselves and as
long as there is a possibility that the suspect was still alive,
regardless how long ago they were committed
The victims were sex workers and would now be perceived as vulnerable
The records will document certain key evidence that could be used to
identify alleged offenders or test the veracity of subsequent
evidence/confessions

The information contained in these records is directly relevant to the
investigation of a series of murders as yet unsolved.  As such the
Metropolitan Police Service would desire that the details of the
investigations remain confidential. The rationale for this is that there
remains a possibility that these murders could still be investigated and
that a suspect could be identified, charged, brought to trial and
convicted.

It is not possible to identify particular information that might be
released into the public domain without the risk of compromising any
future police actions; information that appears innocuous may have
significance to an experienced investigator that is not immediately
obvious to the lay reader; or may assume a new significance in the light
of newly discovered evidence or developments in forensic or investigative
techniques.  The evolution of new scientific techniques, especially the
technology of DNA, means that cases hitherto considered unsolvable, are
being examined afresh.  Increasingly police services throughout the
country are setting up cold case teams to review their case files on
unsolved murders; in some instances these unsolved murders date back to
the 1940s.

The premature release of these records into the public domain might,
therefore, be detrimental to any future investigation and subsequent
prosecution.

Within the last four years these records have been reviewed by police cold
case teams.  The gravity of these offences is such that their significance
to police is likely to remain until any prospect of identifying the
perpetrator is no longer viable.

These records should remain closed under s.31. This is because disclosure
of the information contained therein could be prejudicial a future
investigation and prosecution with the result that a suspect may evade
apprehension.  Such an outcome would not be in the public interest.

Furthermore these records link together a series of prostitute murders in
West London in 1960s.  The records contain information of a graphic and
disturbing nature the disclosure of which is likely to cause substantial
distress to the victims surviving, immediate families to the point where
their welfare could be significantly harmed.  The Metropolitan Police is
satisfied that section 38 is engaged and that the public interest in not
endangering the mental health of the victims remaining family members
substantially outweighs the public interest in disclosure of this
information.

Some of the information within the documents is also covered by the
exemption at section 40 of the Act.  This exempts personal information
about a third party (someone other than the requester), if revealing it
would break the terms of the Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998.  The DPA
prevents personal information from release if it would be unfair or at
odds with the reason why it was collected, or where the subject had
officially served notice that releasing it would cause them damage or
distress.

In this case the exemption applies because the documents contain the
personal and the sensitive personal information of a number of identified
individuals assumed to be still living; including unsubstantiated
allegations, names, addresses and personal family information. These
individuals would have no expectation that this information would be made
available in the public domain during their lifetimes; to do so would be
unfair and would risk causing damage and distress, which would contravene
the first data protection principle.

If you are dissatisfied with the handling of your request or the decision
which has been reached, you have the right to ask for an internal
review.  Internal review requests must be submitted within two months of
the date of this response and should be addressed to:

Quality Manager
Public Services Development Unit
The National Archives
Kew
Richmond
Surrey
TW9 4DU
[email address]

Please mark your complaint clearly.  You have the right to ask the
Information Commissioner (ICO) to investigate any aspect of your
complaint.  However, please note that the ICO is likely to expect internal
complaints procedures to have been exhausted before beginning his
investigation.

Yours sincerely,

FOI Assessor
Freedom of Information Centre
Transfer and Access Department
The National Archives

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0045804, F0045805,
F0045806, F0045807 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

show quoted sections

Dear National Archives,

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of National Archives's handling of my FOI request 'Hammersmith Nudes Murder Files aka Jack The Stripper Murders'.

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of National Archives's handling of my FOI request 'Hammersmith Nudes Murder Files aka Jack The Stripper Murders'.
Firstly ALL of these files were searched over a four month period by Author David Seabrook at Hendon Police College prior to the publication of his book "Jack of Jumps" during 2006. This book contains All evidential value gleaned from these files of the method motive and opportunity that each victim was killed and the state each was subsequently found with detail of pathologist's reports, statements from persons finding the corpse and officers dealing with the crime.
Additionally, in the case of Irene Lockwood TNA have publically released the MoJ file of Accused Kenneth Archibald. This file contains all relevant statements, pathologist report, scene of crime and mortuary photographs; this makes a mockery of Irene Lockwood's Police Files being Refused and adds weight to the challenge to S31.
Concerning the Data Protection of Witnesses the latter of which could be redacted to prevent identification outside the body of each document concerned.
As far as S38 is concerned all of the victims close relatives, including children were publically named with their consent in Neil Milkins book "Who was Jack the Stripper?" 2011.
Additionally a son of Hannah Tailford and a son of Helene Barthelemy are working with me to have these files opened.

A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address: https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/h...

Yours faithfully,

Chris Clark

foienquiry, National Archives

Our Ref: F0047695 (re F0045804-7)

14 December 2016

Dear Mr Clark,

I acknowledge receipt of your request dated 9 December 2016, for a review of an access decision made by The National Archives under the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Your request has been forwarded to Helen Potter, Head of Freedom of Information Centre, who will review and respond in writing to your request within 20 working days from the date of receipt – that is to say, on or before 9 January 2017.

If you are still dissatisfied, having followed all the stages of our internal complaints system, you should contact:

The Information Commissioner

Wycliff House

Water Lane

Wilmslow

Cheshire

SK9 5AF

Yours sincerely,

Martin Willis

Quality Manager

Quality & Excellence Department

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0047695 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

show quoted sections

Rory Cook, National Archives

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Clark,

Thank you for your recent request to The National Archives to undertake an internal review relating to your information requests regarding the following records held at The National Archives:

MEPO 2/10303 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Mary FLEMING found dead at Chiswick on 14 July 1964

MEPO 2/10306 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Frances BROWN, alias Margaret McGOWAN, found dead at Kensington on 25 November 1964

MEPO 2/10309 - The 'Nude Murders'. Unsolved murder of Bridgette O'HARA, found dead at Acton on 16 February 1965: papers and statements with photographic negatives

MEPO 2/10317 - The 'Nude Murders'. Report linking the unsolved murder of Bridgette O'HARA with those of Hannah TAILFORD, Irene LOCKWOOD, Helen BARTHELEMY, Mary FLEMING, Margaret McGOWAN, and possibly that of Elizabeth FIGG, as the 'Nude Murders' (it was later considered that Tina SMART also was murdered by the same person)

Please find attached the conclusions of this internal review process. I trust this information is of some use to you and I wish you all the best with your research.

Yours sincerely,

Rory Cook
Freedom of Information Manager
The National Archives, Ruskin Avenue, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 4DU
www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

If you would like to contact us again regarding
this request, please contact the helpdesk:

via e-mail: By replying to this e-mail
or (020 8876 3444)
Remember to quote your call reference number: F0047695 in any
correspondence, as this will assist us in providing you with a
quick response.

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Please don't print this e-mail unless you really need to.

show quoted sections

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