This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Examiners Reports 2023'.


 
 
 
 
 
FACULTY OF MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES 
HONOUR SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES 2021-22 
STATISTICS 
CHAIR’S REPORT 
EXAMINERS’ REPORTS 
TRINITY TERM 2022 
 
 


 
REPORT ON THE FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES 2022 
 
Part I 
 
A. STATISTICS (1) Numbers and percentages in each class/category 
 
TABLE 1 :   Total Entries, Main School (DMLA) 
 

 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
Total Entry 
165 
187 
195 
190 
199 
211 
201 
Withdrawals 







Sat Exam 
161 
182 
192 
182 
194 
202 
195 
 
 
TABLE 2 : 
Total Entries by language, Main School 
 
Language 
 
or 
2021-22  2020-21  2019-20  2018-19  2017/18  2016/17  2015/16 
Equivalent 
French 
110 
106 
125 
116 
123 
138 
138 
German 
57 
53 
65 
52 
56 
59 
52 
Spanish 
55 
52 
51 
54 
61 
56 
48 
Italian 
33 
36 
30 
35 
33 
39 
27 
Russian 
21 
23 
17 
24 
25 
23 
24 
Linguistics 
25 
27 
30 
19 
21 
20 
25 
Portuguese 
12 
13 
16 
16 
15 
13 
16 
Czech w 





 

Slovak 
Modern 
 
 



 

Greek 

Polish 
 
 



   
Celtic 
 
 
 


   
Grand Total 
185 
182 
192 
182 
194 
202 
195 
 
 

 
This table show the number of main school language students who have taken a particular unit. 
 
 



 
TABLE 3 : 
Main School entries by language / course / combination (Joint Schools 
separately below
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 




 
TABLE 4 :   Joint School entries by language combination 
 

 
 
 
 
TABLE 5 :   Numbers and Percentages in each class, Main School (rounded to 

nearest decimal place
 
 
 
 


 
(2) 
Vivas: there are no vivas in Modern Languages or joint schools with Modern 
Languages. 
 

(3) 
Marking of scripts: All scripts are double-marked. 
 
 
B. 

NEW EXAMINING METHODS AND PROCEDURES 
 
1.  Examination Conventions. 
These again followed the model developed in 2016, 
updated to reflect small changes in 2017, 2018, and 2019. In 2020 the conventions were 
extensively adapted to reflect the changed nature of the examinations in response to the 
Covid pandemic. They were significantly amended again in 2021, also as a consequence 
of and in attempt to mitigate for Covid (see the Chair’s Report for 2021 for details), and 
further alterations and refinements were introduced in 2022, set out below. 
 
Examinations and Conventions 2022 
 
Papers I-III 
(language papers) returned to their customary, 3hr in-person format. 
 
Papers IV-XI 
took the form of 8hr online, open-book examinations, submitted via 
Inspera.  This year Papers VI-XI were sat in ‘Typed Mode’ (meaning that answers were 
typed directly into Inspera) and Papers IV and V (the Linguistics papers) in ‘Mixed Mode’ 
(uploaded as PDFs), to accommodate for the specific technical demands of those 
papers. 
 
Papers XII and XIV 
were again submitted electronically, but via Inspera rather than 
Weblearn.  Exceptions were ‘Structure and History of a Language: Polish’ (XIIA) (8hr, 
online open-book, mixed mode) and ‘Russian Drama’ (XIIA) (8hr, online, open-book, 
typed mode). 
 
The Oral Examination, cancelled due to Covid strictions in both 2019 and 2020, was 
reintroduced in a modified form (see Part IIA 12 below for a full report). 
 
The Student Impact Statement, introduced in relation to Papers XII and XIV in 2021 
(when lockdown restrictions meant that libraries, archives etc. were closed and/or 
inaccessible to students working away from Oxford), was discontinued, though (in late 
February) Faculties were given the option of retaining it.   After careful consideration, it 
was felt that, given the changed circumstances, it was no longer necessary. 
 
In general, no extra time was granted to candidates sitting the 8hr papers.  Exceptional 
alternative arrangements (where candidates were given a 32hr submission window to 
avoid having to work through the night) were allowed in a very small number of cases. 
 
The marks safeguard (compulsory for cohorts of 30 or more), introduced as a specific, 
Covid-related mitigation in 2021, was removed. 
 
Turnitin was again used routinely, and the use of the ‘Typed’ mode on Inspera for most 
of the papers meant that they were put through Turnitin automatically.  This constituted a 
significant improvement on 2021, when the use of ‘Mixed’ mode for all Modern 
Languages examinations meant that scripts had to uploaded and then put through 
Turnitin independently, which significantly increased the already excessive workload of 
the Examinations Officer, despite welcome assistance from the Division. 
 
2.  Borderline criteria. The definition and treatment of borderlines was maintained this year 
across Modern Languages and all Joint Schools. 


 
 
3.  Comments Sheets. 
These were used as in previous years.  External Examiners again 
pointed out that the amount and usefulness of the information provided varied 
considerably, and that some papers were almost entirely formulaic in this respect.  
Further consideration needs to be given to this issue, and to the role that 
descriptors might play in providing a benchmark for comments
 
 
4.  Withdrawals. 4 candidates withdrew and 3 had to be classified outside of the main DMLA 
board.  There were 165 candidates in the Main School. 
 
5.  Nomination of Examiners and Assessors. This was again done electronically.  The 
EAP system again proved to be slow, at least initially.  Approving the payment for 
examiners and assessors in the Oral Examination proved to be especially problematic, 
and it took several days (and countless attempts) to get the system to work.  At the time 
of writing, it appears to be functioning more smoothly. 
 
6.  Proof-reading. 
The relaxing of Covid restrictions meant that proof-reading could, in 
principle, be conducted in-person this year, with groups of examiners going through 
papers together using hard copies.  As is customary, the Chair and Vice Chair then read 
through all the papers.  Most contained only minor errors, many relating to formatting, but 
others required significant correction/alteration.  As previous Chairs have pointed out, it 
is the (crucial) role of the Senior Examiner in each language to scrutinize papers 
thoroughly, because often only they will be able to identify language-specific errors.  
 
C. 

Please list any changes in examining methods, procedures and conventions 
which the examiners would wish the faculty/department and the divisional board to 
consider. 

 
 
FAO Educational Policy and Support, Proctors 
 

1. 
This is the third consecutive year in which the nature and conduct of examinations in 
Modern Languages has, unavoidably, changed, and changed radically.  There are due to 
be further modifications in 2022-23, when Linguistics Papers IV and V will return to being in-
person exams, whilst Papers VI-XI will remain online.  Some faculties (such as Classics and 
Philosophy) returned to full, in-person exams in 2022, whilst others, such as English, 
continued to operate entirely online.  The previous Chair noted in their report that, in the 
light of these fundamental alterations, ‘There should be a high-level discussion about 
what we think examinations should be and how they might relate to formative work 
in Oxford’ 
(p.4).  This clearly remains the case, and indeed is all the more urgent given the 
number of different new modes of examining currently in operation both within individual 
faculties and across faculties. 
 
2. 
Timing of Examinations.  The implementation of the new, 8hr format for Papers IV-XI had 
a number of consequences for timetabling and marking.  As it was no longer possible for 
candidates to sit two papers on the same day, the exam period was inevitably extended, 
running wel  into Week 8. At least one ‘big’ paper (Spanish VIII, with a cohort of 57) was sat 
on the Tuesday of that week, leaving markers relatively little time (within an already very 
tight schedule) to get through the scripts and agree marks. 
 
3. 
Initial student response to the new format has been mixed, and ought to be gauged more 
formally by a detailed survey
.  Although it had been stressed repeatedly throughout the 
year that it was not expected that students should spend the entire 8hrs writing, many 
clearly (and perhaps understandably) did, and this proved particularly exhausting when they 
had papers on two or sometimes three consecutive days.  Even some of those who used 


 
the 8hr window as advised noted that an intense sense of ‘exam pressure’ persisted 
throughout the entire period, even after completion of the paper, making the experience 
more tiring/psychologically draining than traditional, 3hr papers had been. 
 
4. 
Mitigating Circumstances Notices to Examiners (MCEs). As in 2021, the consideration 
and banding of MCEs was devolved to Exam Boards.  Candidates were again allowed to 
submit MCEs directly, without supporting medical or other contextual evidence and without 
the formal approval of their college.  Whilst fewer MCEs where received than in 2021, the 
process was just as problematic and unsatisfactory.  Some MCEs were irrelevant (a 
number of candidates were clearly unaware of what an MCE is) whilst others were 
inappropriate in a variety of ways (some included private correspondence with college 
tutors and other college officers, others named particular individuals etc.).  Attempting 
properly and fairly to judge and band them was a long, complex and sometimes distressing 
process.   
 
The recommendation from three years ago (strongly reiterated in 2021) to involve 
professional practitioners as members of an independent panel for the scrutiny and 
assessment of MCEs had still not been put into place.  As the previous Chair noted, with 
every passing year the medical evidence in particular is becoming more abundant, more 
acute and more technical, and non-experts are simply not professionally qualified to assess 
it and act upon on it where appropriate. Some other universities have (and have long had) 
the type of panel mentioned above, involving a medical practitioner, a disability expert and a 
mental health/pastoral expert who are able to band cases accurately and recommend 
specific mitigations. Consequently, it is once again recommended that the Division 
urgently consider adopting this kind of model. 
 
There are two further recommendations relating to MCEs: 
 
i. 
That a deadline for submission (of, perhaps, five days after a candidate’s final 
exam) be introduced.  There were cases where sometimes complex MCEs were still 
reaching the board not only on the day of the Final Board Meeting, but during the 
meeting itself, and that is clearly unacceptable. 
ii. 
That, even in the absence of medical evidence (which is understandable, given the 
appalling pressures under which GPs are now operating) MCEs must be formally 
approved by colleges prior to their submission
.  That would in principle help to 
eliminate or at least significantly reduce the amount of irrelevant and inappropriate 
material submitted. 
 
5. 
Reporting of Decisions on MCEs. Here there is a modest but still problematic 
improvement on 2021 to report.  Formerly, when the Examination Board considered an 
MCE but was unable to raise a candidate’s class on account of it, the report received by a 
candidate on e-vision read simply ‘No action taken’.  That understandably proved 
distressing to those candidates who had documented extremely difficult personal 
circumstances, and perhaps also helped create the entirely false impression that MCEs are 
not taken sufficiently seriously, when in reality they are subject to the most meticulous and 
sensitive consideration and every effort is made to consider what concrete mitigations might 
be possible in any given case.  As was indicated in the previous Chair’s report, there was a 
potential reputational risk here, as the practice was beginning to generate significant 
negative comment on social media.  The wording has now been changed to:  
 
‘Impact of circumstances considered, no appropriate adjustment could be made.’ 
 
The choice of the word ‘appropriate’ here is unfortunate, since appropriate adjustments 
(such as waiving a paper seriously affected by acute illness, where this affects a 


 
candidate’s class) are always made.  So, whilst the change is in principle a welcome one, 
more thought needs to be given to the wording and it should be modified again for 
2023

 
6. 
Issues of Plagiarism and Poor Academic Practice. As in 2021, dealing with these 
matters was devolved to Exam Boards, so that some of the issues highlighted in last year’s 
report (p.5) remain.  This year the automatic use of Turnitin, which resulted from the switch 
to ‘Typed’ mode on Inspera, made the scanning process itself considerably less 
burdensome, but Turnitin itself remains an imperfect tool, unable to identify less reputable 
online sources (such as, but by no means limited to, unofficial cribs or guides to literary 
texts).  Examiners and assessors were therefore asked to remain alert to possible instances 
of potential plagiarism/poor academic practice, and a number were identified, but some 
surely eluded even the most conscientious scrutiny.  In terms of protocol, any 
answers/scripts which seemed problematic led to the Chair’s scrutinizing the Turnitin 
reports for al  that candidate’s papers.  Where irregularities were discovered, they were 
considered in detail with the relevant Senior Examiner.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Given that at least some Modern Languages examinations are likely to be conducted online 
in 2022-23 and perhaps over the (much) longer term, it is imperative that concrete ways of 
curbing these practices be explored and, where possible, implemented in time for the 
next round of FHS examinations.  Re-visiting the possibility of introducing some 
form of remote invigilation is recommended. 
 

7. 
Cut and Paste. This was a significant issue in 2021, as noted in the Chair’s report (p.5).  
However, the longer examining window of 8hrs appears to have alleviated, though not 
eliminated, the problem, as in the considerable extra time available most candidates appear 
to have been able to select, marshal, deploy and (crucially) reference material more 
effectively and appropriately.  Those scripts which manifestly consisted of a collage of 
lecture notes and/or paragraphs extracted from more generic tutorial essays again tended 
to suffer from irrelevance and were penalized accordingly.  As ever, there were also 
instances in which candidates had clearly reproduced tutorial essays almost verbatim, a 
process obviously facilitated/exacerbated by the format.  This often seemed to occur where 
candidates had prepared a minimum number of topics and found themselves more or less 
obliged to answer an unexpected question using pre-selected material.  A number of 
candidates still included a bibliography at the end of each answer, despite the instruction 
not to do so. 
 
A new issue to arise this year, essential y another mode of ‘cut and paste’, was the 
unacknowledged incorporation of sometimes large amounts of recorded material.  It is now 
possible for candidates to listen to and draw significantly on recorded lectures during the 
examination itself, and it was evident that this was occasionally occurring without reference 
to the source.  Should we continue to use recorded material, we may need to consider 
including formal protocol relating to this specific practice in the conventions. 

 
8. 
Open book Examinations. As noted above, this year the 3hr, open-book format was 
extended to 8hrs for Papers IV-XI, in line with the practice of certain other Sub-faculties 
(notably English) and the Chair’s recommendation in the 2021 report that alternative models 
be essayed (p.13).  It was generally considered to have worked well, with most Internal and 
External Examiners suggesting that it produced both more detailed and nuanced answers 
and a greater consistency in the quality of answers, with fewer instances of the ‘rushed third 
answer’ which is often a feature of in-person, handwritten exams.  Others, though, still 


 
perceived a diminution in quality, if not in length, of the final answer – a possible 
consequence, it was suggested, of the fatigue that necessarily accumulates over the 8hrs, 
even if not all that time is spent writing. 
 
Both last year and this English reported that the gap in attainment between genders had 
been eliminated, suggesting that this might be attributable to the introduction of the new, 8hr 
format.  Whilst the elimination of the gender gap is obviously to be welcomed, at least some 
caution should be exercised here, as the new format has only been in place for two 
(exceptional) years, making any statistics unreliable at this stage.  Nevertheless, if online 
exams continue, this should clearly be monitored over the longer term and other possible 
causes also considered.  If a pattern emerges, it would also be important to try to ascertain 
precisely why the change in format has produced the change in outcome, always taking into 
account the peculiar composition of the Modern Languages cohort (now routinely about 
80% woman to 20% men). 
 
9. 
Word-processing. Again, this generally proved welcome to candidates and examiners 
alike.  In particular, the latter can now mark simultaneously, making the exceptionally tight 
deadlines more manageable.  Illegibility of scripts is also no longer an issue. 
 
10. 
Inspera. Last year’s Chair’s report highlighted a number of important concerns/teething 
troubles relating to Inspera, then in its first year (pp.6-8, i – xiii).  These were largely 
resolved via the switch from ‘Mixed Mode’ to ‘Typed Mode’ (see above), and whilst ‘Mixed 
Mode’ was stil  used on Papers IV and V, so that students sitting those papers were in 
principle again able to retain some of their answers (see 11(x) on last year’s report), no 
problems were reported.  These papers are due to be sat in person in 2023, so this will no 
longer be an issue. 
 
An online drop-in session relating the use of Inspera was organized for all Modern 
Languages students on January 25 but was poorly attended.  Additionally, students were 
given the opportunity to practice using both modes two weeks before the start of the 
examinations. 
 
Throughout the year, in all the material circulated to students detailing procedures for sitting 
online examinations, it was stressed that, in order to avoid all risk of technical glitches 
(computers crashing etc.), candidates should type directly into the answer box on Inspera, 
where material is automatically saved, and not cut and paste answers prepared in Word or 
similar.  Nevertheless, one candidate waited until the last minute to transfer their answers 
and then encountered a technical problem which meant that they were unable to do so.  As 
a consequence, a mark of 0 was recorded.   
 
 
FAO Faculty of MML 
 

11. 
Attendance at examinations. There is no longer a requirement that the Chair, Vice 
Chair, setter or examiner/assessor be present during in-person examinations. 
 
12. 
Format of Papers. At the Final Board, several Externals again raised the issue of the 
(further) diversification of modes of assessment, which might be facilitated by the move 
to online examining.  These included more papers examined by assessment rather than 
examination and papers sent to the students in advance but then sat online in the 8hr 
window.  As ever, when considering these suggestions, careful attention will need to be 
paid to the possible knock-on effects on the (flexibility of the) Oxford syllabus as a whole, 
the ways in which it is taught and the terms during which particular papers are covered.  
For example, there is already considerable anecdotal evidence that students 
(understandably) prioritize coursework over tutorial work in their final year. 
10 

 
 
13. 
Paper XIV (optional Extended Essay). This was the last year in which the Extended 
Essay functioned in its accustomed way (i.e. by replacing the lowest mark over 50 in a 
content paper) before it becomes a conventionally assessed content paper in 2023 (XIV 
Dissertation).  A number of External Examiners expressed regret at this change, which 
reduces the diversity in Oxford’s modes of assessment (see previous section) and 
inquired as to why it was being implemented.  It is in response to a suggestion made by 
an External Examiner in 2018.   
 
At least two candidates gained 20+ marks as a consequence of submitting an Extended 
Essay and moved from the 2:1 into the 1st Class as a result.  A number of others had 
their overall percentage increased, albeit only modestly in some cases.  About 54% of 
the 39 candidates who offered the paper achieveda 1st Class mark. As ever, poor 
performance on this paper had no consequence for a candidate’s overall profile, but that 
will no longer be the case from next year. 
 
14. 
Varying rubrics and understandings between languages. Last year’s report (16 (i) – 
(v), p.10) highlighted a number of differences and/or apparent discrepancies between 
languages and associated ambiguities that came to light during the scrutiny of draft 
papers.  In fact, a number of these are language-specific and should not be problematic, 
provided all those teaching and studying certain papers are aware of the rubric.  
For example, for Papers X and/or XI some languages (German, Italian) do not allow 
students to write an essay on the same prescribed text on which they have written a 
commentary, but others (Spanish) do.  The rubric is clear in every case and there are 
sound reasons for it. 
 
Pace Barthes, the perennial problem of the confusion between ‘work’ and ‘text’ persists, 
especially in relation to collections of short stories.  Candidates frequently ask whether 
each component story constitutes a work in its own right, or whether is it only the 
collection as a whole to which that term should apply. 
 
This matter might be reconsidered by the DUS and Undergraduate Committee 
before the FHS Conventions for 2023 are approved.  Individual Sub-faculties might 
also consider re-addressing the issue, where pertinent. 
 
A question was also raised regarding what appeared to be the varying number of first-
class marks required for the alternative route to a 1st across the various Joint Schools.  In 
fact, any discrepancy is apparent only, as four such marks are required by candidates 
sitting eight papers
, and five by those sitting nine.  The key threshold in each case is 
50% of the overall number of papers sat. 
 
15. 
Short-weight scripts. These were again dealt with according to recommendations to 
ensure uniformity and fairness of treatment originally made in 2018 and subsequently 
included in the FHS Conventions. As ever, it is vital that all examiners and assessors 
familiarize themselves with the relevant procedures
, and that Senior Examiners 
take a lead role in ensuring that this happens. 
 

16. 
Re-reading and Raising Marks. Clear instructions relating to these crucial practices, 
formerly the source of some confusion, are now routinely included in the material sent to 
examiners, assessors and Externals.  It is again the responsibility of the Senior 
Examiner
 in each language to draw the attention of examiners/assessors to the relevant 
rubric. 
 
It should be recalled that markers are not obliged to settle on an average of the two 
raw marks
, and indeed that there may be sound reasons for their not doing so.  
11 

 
 
 
 
 
Cases in which raw marks differ significantly (there was at least one this year 
involving a discrepancy of more than twenty marks) should, in the first instance, be 
referred by the Senior Examiner to an External (rather than a third Internal 
Examiner/Assessor) for re-reading/confirmation, even when a mark has been agreed. 
 
For candidates sitting papers over two or more academic years, re-reading may only 
take place for the papers sat in in that particular year, and not retrospectively.  To ensure 
parity of treatment, Externals might be asked to read all the scripts submitted by 
such candidates in the year in which they are taken, paying especial attention to 
any borderline marks and/or instances of significant discrepancy between the raw 
marks on any particular paper.
 
 
17. 
Irrelevant work. There still seems to be a sometimes significant degree of confusion 
when it comes to the grading of irrelevant work, and this is perhaps partly attributable to 
the vagueness or even the internal contradictoriness of the descriptors.  The notes 
indicate that ‘Essays which give a good answer to the wrong question’ may fall into the 
2:2 class, but do not indicate what this actually means.  At the same time, essays which 
are considered to have ‘missed the point of the question’ and ‘contain irrelevant material’ 
are deemed to merit a 3rd class mark, those which are ‘largely irrelevant’ to merit a ‘Pass’, 
whilst those that are ‘almost totally irrelevant’ should, according to the descriptors, be 
failed.  Yet how can ‘a good answer to the wrong question’ be anything other than 
completely irrelevant?  There is surely room for further clarification here, and indeed 
this is of especial importance now that excellent tutorial essays on one question can 
rapidly be cut and pasted in response to another (a ‘wrong’ one) to which they bear little 
or no relevance.  There were many instances of this, but the marks awarded seemed to 
vary significantly. 
 
 
 
D. 

Please describe how candidates are made aware of the examination 
conventions to be followed by the examiners 
 
The Updated Trinity Term Examination Conventions for 2022 are attached. They, along with 
a special document outlining FAQs, were circulated to all candidates and advertised on the 
Modern Languages Canvas site from Hilary Term 2022.  Two letters from the Chair to 
candidates containing links to the university website and detailed university guidance for 
Inspera, were also made available on Canvas. It is recommended that the FAQs be 
updated for use once again in 2022-23.
 
 
 
Part II 
 
A. 

GENERAL COMMENTS ON THE EXAMINATION 
 
1.  Vice-Chair. 
The Vice-Chair, 
, is to be thanked for his help and support 
throughout the year, particularly when it came to proof-reading multiple exam papers, 
considering numerous and complex MCEs, and scrutinizing borderline cases. 
 
2.  Examination Schools. 
 team were as competent and professional 
as ever in dealing with the complex issues of timetabling and (for the first time since 2019) 
invigilating in-person examinations, and we owe them a great deal.   
12 

 
 
3.  Conduct of Written Examinations. These generally ran smoothly, and no sub-cohort 
mitigations were required.  A number of particular issues might be noted: 
 
i.  Extra Time in Language Papers. A number of candidates who were allowed 
extra time in Language Papers reported (sometimes via MCEs) instances in which 
invigilators seemed to be unaware of this and ended exams a few minutes early.  
All such cases were considered carefully by the Chair and Vice-Chair and there 
was no discernible negative impact on performance.  It is perhaps understandable 
that, after a three-year break from in-person exams, an incident of this sort should 
have occurred but, even so, extra care needs to be taken in 2023 to ensure 
that it is not repeated.
 
 
ii.  Spanish IV. A number of candidates claimed (
 
) that this paper was significantly out of line in certain respects with 
papers set in previous years.  The paper had been scrutinized by all three Internal 
Examiners, a Spanish External and an examiner from Linguistics, and deemed to 
be appropriate.  The spread of marks for the paper was comfortably within the 
normal range (indeed, the median had increased slightly from 2021) and none of 
the candidates who objected appeared to have been adversely affected (again, 
the profiles were meticulously scrutinized).  It may perhaps worth reminding 
prospective candidates via some appropriate channel that, whilst the core 
rubric of papers must be scrupulously respected from year to year, it is 
normal and proper that the range, tone and focus of questions may vary 
somewhat over time.
  
 
iii.  Length of Answers. The imposition of word limits was largely successful, though 
a number of candidates still produced scripts which considerably exceeded the 
upper limit of 2,000 words per answer.  Given that online papers may become a 
standard part of Oxford examining, this might be an appropriate moment to 
revisit the FHS conventions and consider the precise wording/protocol 
associated with word limits for 8hr online exams and the specific penalties 
that may be imposed for disregarding them.  
 
 
Given the considerable pressures on markers (exacerbated by the introduction of 
8hr papers and the consequent extension of the exam period), consideration 
should also be given to lowering the upper limit to 1,500 words, bringing 
Modern Languages into line with other faculties.  By way of illustration, this year 
that lower limit would have reduced the marking load for French VIII (the biggest 
paper) by something in the order 150,000 words. 
 
4.  Complaints. No complaints were received in Modern and Medieval Languages.  
 
5.  MCEs. (See also C.3 and C.4 above).  97 submissions were received across Modern 
Languages and the associated Joint Schools (2021: 132; 2020: 118).  In light of the 
sometimes very sensitive information they revealed, MCEs were considered carefully in a 
three-stage process; at a meeting of the Chair, Vice Chair and Examinations Officer, 
where they were banded; at the Pre-final Board on 4th July, with Senior Examiners and 
three External Examiners; and at the various Final Boards with all Examiners and 
External Examiners.   The MCEs were treated with the strictest confidentiality and no 
concrete details of individual MCEs were revealed at either the Pre-final Board or the 
Final Board.  Where there were serious issues on the MCE the available options for 
mitigation (see EAF framework) were tested to see if the class of the candidate affected 
could be raised. A course of action was agreed for each candidate, with an eye to fairness 
both for the individual and across the cohort. At the final meeting all those candidates who 
13 

 
had submitted an MCE were flagged, but there was no further discussion of the MCEs 
themselves. It was again noted that, as in previous years, a relatively high proportion of 
those who submitted MCEs had achieved a First Class on raw classification, so no action 
needed be taken. 
 
Two matters relating to MCEs might be given further consideration: 
 
i.  Traditionally, where due consideration of an MCE cannot raise a candidate’s 
class, the existing mark is not raised.  However, as a number of Examiners and 
Externals at all the Final Board meetings pointed out, we may wish to revisit this 
policy, especially in relation to candidates who have already achieved a 1st 
Class degree but for whom even a slight increase in numerical average 
might make a considerable difference if they are applying for funding for or 
simply admission to a graduate degree programme.
 
ii.  It is clear than many candidates remain unclear as to precisely what MCEs are 
and how they may be used by examiners.  Indeed, in many cases there seems to 
be an assumption that if an MCE is submitted it will necessarily have a substantive 
effect on a candidate’s profile (this may be a hangover from GCSE and/or A-level, 
where appeals tend to have such an effect).  Aside from the steps indicated above 
(C.3, i + ii) to try to limit the number of inappropriate MCEs received, 
consideration should perhaps be given to the inclusion in the material 
circulated to candidates throughout the year of more detailed information 
regarding the nature and function MCEs.
 
 
6.  Range of marks. Whilst it was felt that the extant guidelines on marking are appropriate
at the Final Board meeting a number of Externals suggested that consideration should be 
given to changing the term ‘original’ in the descriptors relating to 1st Class work. 
 
7.  Exam Boards. This year, for the first time since 2020 and the onset of the pandemic, the 
Pre-Final and Final Boards for the Main School were held in person.  All the Joint School 
Boards took place via Teams.  The combination proved effective, as it meant in particular 
that Externals who had already spent a number of days in Oxford moderating scripts and 
attending meetings could leave earlier and participate remotely.  Whereas the long and 
often complex Main School meetings clearly benefit from the in-person format, the Joints 
Schools involve far fewer candidates and business can be easily and efficiently 
transacted remotely.  It is therefore recommended that we continue with this ‘mixed’ 
model.
 
 
8.  External Examiners. The Chair is immensely grateful to all the External Examiners for 
their generous participation in the examining process throughout another very challenging 
year, and in particular for their meticulousness and judiciousness when it came to 
moderating scripts, for their careful consideration of problem cases and their sage and 
humane advice when it came to deciding how to respond to complex MCEs etc.  Their 
professionalism throughout was exemplary.  Particular thanks go to 
 
 as they 
come to the end of terms served impeccably during the most difficult of times. 
 
9.  Congratulatory Firsts. These are awarded to candidates who have an overall average of 
75 or above or who achieve a complete run of 1st class marks.  There were 8 in total 
(including Joint Schools, noted in the relevant reports), including the following in the Main 
School: 
14 

 
 
These candidates received a letter of congratulation from the FHS Chair. 
 
10. Appeals. There has to date been one appeal which, as noted above, was predicated on a 
faulty assumption.  It was received several weeks after the final exam board, meaning 
that the Chair and Examinations Officer had to work on it well into August. It is still 
possible that others will follow. 
 
 
 
15 

 
11. Prizes 
PRIZE 
NAME 
ARTEAGA PRIZE  
Best performance in Spanish FHS 
 
DAVID GIBBS PRIZES 
Best performance in Modern Languages 
 
 
DAVID GIBBS PRIZES 
Best performance in Joint Schools with Modern 
Languages 
 

 
 
DAVID GIBBS PRIZES 
Best  performance  in  Modern  Languages  for 
best submitted work in Special Subject  Paper 
XII and Extended Essay Paper XIV 
 
DAVID GIBBS PRIZES [New for 2022] 
Best  performance  in  Modern  Languages  in  a 
Medieval Paper (across all languages: 
(Czech IX; French VI, IX; German VI, IX; Italian 
VI,  IX;  Modern  Greek  VII,  IX;  Portuguese  VII, 
IX; Russian VII, IX; Spanish VI, IX 

DAVID GIBBS PRIZES 
Best  performance in the Linguistics Papers in 
Modern Languages and Linguistics  

DAVID  MCLINTOCK  PRIZE  IN  GERMANIC 
PHILOLOGY 
Best performance in German Philology (V(i) or 
XII) 

 
 
16 

 
DOLORES ORIA MERINO PRIZE IN 
WRITTEN SPANISH 
Best performance in Spanish Prose (Paper I) 
FRED HODCROFT PRIZE  
Best FHS performance: History of Spanish 
Language or Spanish dialects
 
GERARD DAVIS PRIZE  
Best extended essay in French literary studies 
PHILIPPA OF LANCASTER PORTUGUESE 
PRIZE 
Best FHS performance in Portuguese 
RAMÓN SILVA MEMORIAL PRIZE 
Best performance in Spanish Orals (not to be  Not available in 2022 
awarded to a native or bilingual speaker) 

THOMAS BLOMEFIELD PRIZE 
Best FHS performance in French 
LIDL PRIZE 
Best performance by a non-German sole 
candidate, including Joint Schools 
(considering only German Papers) 

LIDL PRIZE 
Best performance in German sole 
LIDL PRIZE 
Best performance in German for best 
submitted work in FHS Paper XII and Paper 
XIV 

PAGET TOYNBEE PRIZE 
Best performance in French Paper VI 
PAGET TOYNBEE PRIZE 
Best performance in Italian Paper IX 
PAUL MCCLEAN PRIZE 
Best performance in French sole 
JAMES NAUGHTON PRIZE [New for 2022] 
Best performance in Czech (with Slovak)
 
DIVERSITY PRIZE I [New for 2022] 
Best performance in an extended essay, 
portfolio of essays, or linguistics project that 
engages with issues of race and racialization 

17 

 
DIVERSITY PRIZE II [New for 2022] 
Best performance in an extended essay, 
portfolio of essays, or linguistics project that 
engages with diversity and intersectional 
approaches 

 
 
12. Detailed Report on the Oral Examination 
 
i.  Format. This year, to mitigate the disruptive effect of Covid 19 on the Year Abroad 
in 2020-21, and to attempt to accommodate for any further Covid-related 
disruptions in 2021-22, the traditional format of the Oral Examination was 
modified.  Specifically, the Listening Comprehension was suspended and a 
process of certification introduced.  The latter depended on candidates’ 
attendance at a stipulated number of designated Language Classes in 
Michaelmas and Hilary Terms and the successful completion of a ‘light touch’ 
discourse and conversation exercise (henceforth ‘discourse exercise’) in each 
language offered.  No numerical mark was given for this exercise and 
consequently it did not contribute towards candidates’ final classification (the Oral 
normally counts as half a paper).  Instead, the only marks awarded were ‘Pass’, 
‘Fail’ and ‘Distinction’, which were decided on according to the usual descriptors.  
It remained the case that a ‘Fail’ mark in the Oral would mean that a candidate 
would fail the FHS as a whole. 
The discourse exercises took place in Weeks a 6 and 7 of Hilary Term in lieu of 
regular language classes.  Slots were kept free in Week 8 for any candidates who, 
because of illness or certain other issues, were unable to complete the exercise in 
those initially designated.  All the exercises were recorded and the recordings 
uploaded onto Secure SharePoint.  They were conducted by Language Teachers 
and subsequently listened to and moderated by Examiners, with care being taken 
to ensure that no Examiner should moderate the recordings of their own students.  
Both other internal Examiners and Externals were invited to consider borderline 
Distinction/Pass and Pass/Fail cases, and Externals were also given access to all 
the recordings so that these could be sampled and checked for consistency. 
 
ii.  Timetabling. This is always a challenging task, but it was made considerably 
more so this year, as the single, centralized timetable that is usually generated 
had to be replaced by a whole series of separate timetables, both for and within 
the seven languages examined.  These then had to be checked against each 
other for possible clashes.  This required a very large amount of extra work for all 
involved, but especially for 
, the Examinations Officer, and for 
the Senior Examiner in each language.  The Senior French Examiner in particular 
had to oversee the putting together of multiple timetables for more than 150 
candidates. 
iii.  Special Cases. The usual extra preparation time was allowed for candidates with 
special needs dispensations, but no other special cases arose prior to or during 
the process. 
 

iv.  Mitigating Circumstances Notice (MCEs). None had been received at the time 
of compiling this report. 
 
18 

 
v.  Conduct of the Examination. Given the complexity of the exercise and the very 
trying conditions in which it took place, very few problems arose – thanks largely 
to the immense professionalism, dedication and forbearance of all those involved: 
a.  22 discourse exercises were re-scheduled because of clashes (the principal 
reason) or illness. 
b.  One recording in French was accidentally deleted but the session was re-
recorded and moderated by two French Examiners. The External Examiners 
were consulted and the process did not adversely affect the mark initially 
awarded. 
c.  A possible discrepancy between the number of ‘Distinction’s awarded by 
different Assessors in Russian was resolved by both Examiners listening to all 
the recordings and subsequently referring six cases deemed borderline to the 
External for adjudication. 
 
vi.  Results. Given the significantly revised format, the removal of the numerical 
marking scale and the exceptional circumstances under which the exercise was 
conducted, it was thought imprudent to attempt to draw any firm conclusions 
concerning the outcomes, although it was generally agreed that the standard 
across the board was pleasingly high and the percentage of ‘Distinction’s awarded 
was (with the partial exception of German, which recorded 25% after years of 
41.5% [2019]), 43.8% [2018] and 37.8% [2017]) in no way out of line with that of 
previous, ‘non-Covid’ years.  No ‘Fail’ marks were recorded. 
 

vii.  Other Matters. Although it is very much hoped that this year’s exercise wil  prove 
to be a ‘one off’, several procedural and related issues arose, some of which it 
may be helpful to record in case alternative arrangements for the Orals do need to 
be put in place on a future occasion. 
a.  Whilst it is fully recognized that it is the role of the Exam Board to implement 
policy relating to examinations rather than to formulate it, given the 
extraordinary circumstances obtaining this year some informal preliminary 
consultation regarding the proposed new format might have helped to 
anticipate and address at least some of the problems detailed below. 
b.  As indicated above, the process was described to the Board as being ‘light 
touch’, but in practice it involved a great deal more work than would be 
required in a normal year, even though it did not count substantively towards 
candidates’ final classification.  It was never made clear why, in the context of 
Covid safety, the Orals in particular could not be held in the customary manner 
in Examination Schools, given that in-person exams involving much larger 
groups, congregated for significantly longer periods, were to be allowed both in 
Modern Languages itself and many other subjects, and indeed such 
gatherings (in the form of lectures, seminars etc.) were held routinely 
throughout the academic year.  Moreover, the conditions under which the 
discourse exercise eventual y took place were often less ‘Covid safe’ than they 
might have been in the large, airy rooms of Examination Schools, where 
significant distancing is also possible.  It was the resulting decentralization of 
the process that meant that multiple timetables had to be drawn up, many 
college and central language classes had to be repurposed etc., all of which 
proved extremely time-consuming. 
It also remained the case that, as in any other year, a ‘Fail’ mark in the Oral 
would lead to a candidate’s failing FHS as a whole, so that, whilst the process 
was described to the Board as an ‘exercise’ rather than an examination 
proper, and however rare ‘Fail’ marks might be in practice, all the usual 
19 

 
protocols and levels of scrutiny had to remain in place (indeed, at least one 
Pass/Fail borderline case had to be adjudicated by an External).  This too 
belied the designation of the substitute format as ‘light touch’.  The 
scrupulousness of all involved was exemplary, and the Externals are to be 
thanked for their input here and their judiciousness in helping monitor the 
whole process. 
c.  It seemed to many members of the Board that the welcome decision to 
attempt to mitigate the often severe disruptions and disparities caused by 
Covid during the Year Abroad in 2020-21, by minimizing the contribution of the 
Oral to the final FHS profile, was effectively overridden, at least in some 
measure, by the maintaining of a ‘Distinction’ mark, which might benefit those 
candidates whose year had been least affected.  Removing the ‘Distinction’ 
category, it was suggested, would have helped create a more level playing 
field. 
d.  The substitute format did not work equally well across the board.  In particular, 
it proved problematic in the two ‘big’ languages (French and German) in which 
language classes are still taught in colleges by Lecteurs etc., rather than 
centrally.  There was a general concern that college(-paid) teaching hours 
were effectively being used for Faculty examining.  Furthermore, it had been 
anticipated that no more time would be required for the discourse sessions 
than had been timetabled for the classes that the former would replace, but in 
practice that did not prove to be the case (more time was required for 
Language Teachers to get to grips with the recording devices, to familiarize 
themselves with the articles used in the exercise and devise related questions, 
and to reschedule and conduct sessions when problems occurred).  The 
Faculty offered an honorarium to all college-based Language Teachers 
involved in the process, but that did not resolve a number of ‘local’ issues.  For 
example, some colleges decided to pay their Language Teachers extra for 
their contribution to the exercise, whilst others did not, and this led to one case 
in which a Language Teacher employed by three colleges was offered 
additional payment by one of them but not by the other two.  Understandably, 
they refused to conduct the exercise for the two colleges not offering the 
payment and, as a consequence, the Tutor in the language at those colleges 
had to stand in.  The Faculty, of course, has no jurisdiction over such matters, 
but this nevertheless does not seem to constitute an satisfactory way to 
proceed.  Indeed, and more generally, the reconfigured Oral Examination 
threw into particularly clear relief an issue which has occupied the Faculty for 
some time – namely, the quite different modes and mechanisms via which 
core language teaching is delivered across the Collegiate University. 
As an addendum to the above, concern was also expressed that requiring the 
college Language Teachers to conduct assessments of this sort might 
adversely affect their relationship with their students, whom they would not 
normally examine.   It was therefore decided that final assessing 
responsibilities would lie wholly with the Examiners, who, between them, 
listened to all the recordings.   This solved the problem but again belied the 
notion that the exercise was ‘light touch’. 
 
It should be noted that the Senior Examiners in French and German did 
everything possible to ensure that a complex and challenging process ran as 
smoothly as possible, and they are to be commended for their efforts. 
 
Finally, but perhaps most importantly, warmest thanks must go to the many 
Instructors and other Language Teachers, whether at Faculty or College level, 
20 

 
who put so much work into the entire undertaking.  Their consummate 
professionalism, flexibility, adaptability and diligence helped turn what had 
initially looked like a logistical nightmare into the slickest of operations.  They 
are a vital part of the set-up in Modern Languages, and we should remain 
mindful of and grateful for their huge contribution to the successful running of 
the subject. 
.  
13. Administration. The Faculty continued with its in-house marking programme for both the 
Main School and all Joint Schools, including History for the first time.  It performed in an 
exemplary way.  In particular, it allows for rapid ‘live’ calculation during meetings (whether 
in-person or via Teams), which is essential when it comes to considering borderline 
cases/re-reading and the various possible effects that MCEs might have on the numerical 
average of certain candidates.  The Chair and Examinations Officer are profoundly 
grateful to the Modern Languages IT Team for all their help and in particular to David 
Allen, who performed some invaluable re-programming and troubleshooting. 
 
It has become almost conventional to note that the entire examining operation would 
simply not be able to run without the quite extraordinary expertise and input of the 
Examinations Officer, 
.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
  Now, therefore, might be an apposite moment to take 
a close and concerted look at the entire administrative framework to make sure that 
 is properly supported by a professional team who can share the ever-
increasing burden of work
 
 
FHS Chair of MML and Joint Schools 2022 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21 




 
B.  EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY ISSUES AND BREAKDOWN OF THE RESULTS BY 
GENDER 
 
TABLE 7 : Gender Statistics, Main School 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
22 

 
D. 
COMMENTS ON PAPERS AND INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS 
 
 

FHS EXAMINERS’ REPORTS IN MEDIEVAL AND MODERN LANGUAGES 2020 
 
 
 

•  Czech (with Slovak) 
p. 35   
•  French 
pp. 36 - 43  
•  German 
pp. 44 - 50  
•  Italian 
pp. 50 - 53  
•  Modern Greek 
p. 53  
•  Portuguese 
pp. 54 – 55  
•  Russian 
pp. 55 - 58  
•  Spanish 
pp. 58 - 67  
•  Special Subjects / Paper XII 
pp. 67 - 73   
(A/B/C) 
•  Paper XIV Extended Essay 
p. 73 
•  List of FHS Examiners 
p. 74  
 
 

 
34 

 
FRENCH 
 
French I: Essay in French 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
                  Quartiles 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
38    24.52% 
113  72.90% 
80 – 69 
69 – 66 
66 – 64 
64 - 20 
 
This paper tests both students’ written language and their capacity to formulate an answer to 
a question (or at least to discuss a topic) and provide apposite illustrations. The wide range of 
subjects on offer was fully exploited by the candidates. The most popular topics were the 
ones on literature and on francophonie. 
The essays submitted were, on the whole, competent as the marks show, with some 
very high marks. The best were fluent and lively with original examples presented in 
convincingly structured arguments. The worst were clumsy in their content and formulation 
and/or tended to reframe the essay titles in ways that were significantly distant from their 
original meanings and often the sign of heavy recycling of previously written material. Essays 
written in very good French but heavily reframed or hors sujet were marked down. Overall, it 
is usually not advised to start an essay with a different quote than the actual title as this too 
can signal recycling.  
In several cases candidates could (and should) have eliminated some elementary 
errors by reading through their script and checking e.g. agreements between subject and 
verb. It was quite surprising to see errors in the grammatical gender of very basic nouns such 
as ‘espace’ (masculine) or ‘problématique’ (feminine). The anglicism ‘la narrative’ for ‘le récit’ 
was particularly shocking to find at this stage. One should also note that ‘non seulement’ and 
‘pas seulement’ do not mean the same things in French. 
Some of the examples used to illustrate arguments were extremely original and 
varied, notably when discussing theatre (Q6) or literature (Q5), two very prevalent questions. 
The essays on francophonie (Q7 which was very popular, Q8, and Q10), tended to be quite 
predictable. There were some good responses addressing the relationship between 
Francophonie and France's former colonies on the African continent, or in the Caribbean, 
however it could be interesting for students to also consider French-speaking spaces like 
Belgium, Switzerland or Canada in their answers. Q13, on world crises, was fairly popular 
and elicited a few excellent answers but all too often the word ‘ignorance’ was misunderstood 
and defined as ‘refusal to know’ (as in English) instead of ‘lack of knowledge’, which is its 
actual meaning in French. Similarly ‘en réalité’ in Q5 could be translated as ‘in fact’ rather 
than understood as a statement about the reality. The future tenses used in Q8 (la 
francophonie sera subversive) was sometimes ignored at the candidate’s peril. Some of the 
less answered questions were more philosophical in nature: Q1, Q2, Q4, Q9, Q14, Q15 and 
Q16. 
 
French II 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
26    16.77% 
125    80.65% 
75 – 68 
68 – 65 
65 – 63 
63 - 56 
 
 
 
French IIA: Translation from Modern French 
The passage was taken from Philippe Pujol’s book-length investigative journalism, La 
Fabrique du monstre
, on political corruption, poverty and crime in Marseille. With the return to 
an invigilated closed-book format, the exam once again assessed competence in French 
comprehension and English usage in the absence of dictionaries and electronic aids 
alongside other translation skills, and students rose to these challenges well. One phrase in 
particular revealed weaknesses in many candidates. ‘À coup de clichés et de lieux communs 
balancés pour être prétendument mieux démontés’ (which might translate to ‘with clichés and 
stereotypes bandied about, supposedly the better to debunk them’) showed that many 
36 

 
students are unfamiliar with common colloquialisms like ‘balancer’ and struggle to parse a 
word like ‘démontés’ into its component elements. Both are areas that language study might 
usefully focus on. The passage also demonstrated the importance of accuracy in English 
spel ing, as ‘transporting the heroin from the plains’ is not the same as ‘transporting the 
heroine from the planes’. The best translations had a sensitivity to nuance, perhaps 
translating ‘la notion de “Marseil e bashing”’ as ‘the idea of “le Marseil e bashing”’ to mark that 
the English word is being used in French, and found ways to combine clear comprehension 
with English fluency, such as translating ‘affirmait en riant’ as ‘quipped’ rather than ‘affirmed 
while laughing’. 
 
French IIB: Translation into Modern French 
This year’s passage appeared more difficult than it looked. This was an extract that did not 
pose many tense nor lexical issues, but whose syntax in French could be challenging. 
Students on the whole performed well on this paper. The level of French was strong in some 
scripts and satisfactory in others. The examiners particularly rewarded the appropriate use of 
tenses, accurate conjugation of verbs, and idiomatic constructions providing they were true to 
the original text. In a desire to be idiomatic, the tendency was in certain scripts to overuse 
idiomatic expressions -often colloquial- without sticking to the source text.  
Conditional constructions in 'si' + subjunctive were particularly numerous ('si tu dises'*, 
's'ils puissent'*) instead of the imperfect. Some scripts alternated between the 'passé simple' 
and the 'passé composé' without any consistency. The misuse of prepositions, of gender, the 
non-agreement of adjectives with the feminine and plural forms were also problems found in 
the weakest scripts. It was quite surprising, moreover, that several students did not have the 
appropriate basic vocabulary and reverted to a more colloquial register ('bosser'* instead of 
'travailler'). Some students felt the need to justify their choice of wording by the use of 
footnotes, but this was felt by the assessors to be rather awkward. The concluding expression 
‘like a fox in a henhouse’ opened up to rather imaginary translations that unfortunately bear 
no relation with the text. 
We would strongly recommend revision of tenses and of verb conjugation in general 
as well as the building up of general vocabulary. Some basic mistakes could also have been 
avoided by a more thorough checking. 
 
French III: Translation from pre-modern French 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
                
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
13    50.00% 
10    38.46% 
80 – 75 
74 – 70 
69 – 62 
61 - 57 
 
Questions chosen by candidates: 
1 (15c prose) 11 
2 (16c verse) 7 
3 (17c verse) 8 
4 (18c prose) 26 (i.e. all candidates) 
 
This paper was completed to a very high standard. Most candidates rose to the challenge of 
understanding the difficult syntax of both the fifteenth-century and eighteenth-century 
passages, but some could not quite make clear who was doing what to whom. Particularly 
telling in this respect was the way candidates translated the first sentence of Q.1 and the last 
sentence of Q.4. Generally speaking, lexical difficulties were less common, although some 
candidates did not properly translate ‘soulde’ (Q.1) ‘insigne’ (Q.3), ‘élan’, ‘asservir’ and 
‘forçats’ (Q.4). Some who understood ‘puce’ as ‘child’ in Q.2 had to adapt the passage quite 
radically to make it fit. It may be the appeal of prose texts that meant that fewer candidates 
attempted the two passages in verse from the sixteenth and seventeenth century. Those who 
did attempt these verse passages, however, often produced impressive results, using the 
37 

 
greater range of options available when the need for semantic accuracy is balanced by the 
need for appropriate rhythm or rhyme. 
 
French IV: Linguistic Studies I 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6    30.00% 
10    50.00% 
77 – 72 
71 – 67 
66 – 61 
60 - 53 
 
This year was the first in which candidates sat Paper IV under the revised format. All 
indications were that the vast majority had coped well with the change: many answers were 
of a first-class level and the standard of the commentaries in Section A was especially 
impressive; the best commentaries showed an expert knowledge of the set texts, a breadth of 
knowledge in the domains of historical orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, and 
lexis, and the ability to contextualise why particular features of a text may be significant for a 
linguist. As in previous years, essays on negation, word order, the tense-aspect-mood 
system, and standardization proved particularly popular. 
A small number of answers were disappointing due to a lack of breadth, depth, 
relevant linguistic theory, or a paucity of relevant data. Candidates should keep in mind that 
the best answers for Paper IV will deploy detailed knowledge of the history of French and 
analysis couched in the relevant (historical) linguistic theory, within a clear structure which 
shows an appropriate level of critical-evaluative skill. 
 
French V: Linguistic Studies II 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
Quartiles   
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
5    20.00% 
17    68.00% 
73 – 69 
69 – 66 
65 – 61 
60 - 59 
 
The overall standard of answers for Paper V in 2022 was high, with the very best answers 
analysing a range of material on French and its standard and non-standard varieties to a truly 
impressive standard. The assessors were particularly struck by the originality of some 
candidates' material as well as the level of theoretical sophistication showcased in certain 
answers. Questions on word order, creoles, phonological variation, and the address system 
attracted a large number of answers.  
As in previous years, a common theme in answers attracting low marks was a failure 
to address the question set; candidates should keep in mind that deploying generic material 
or material which was prepared for a similar yet distinct tutorial essay should not be viewed 
as a ‘low-risk’ strategy. Furthermore, candidates should avoid deploying overly basic material 
from lecture notes or introductory textbooks, given the standard expected for the Final 
Honours School. 
 
French VI: Topics in the Period of Literature to 1530 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
  Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6    35.29% 
10    58.82% 
77 – 71 
71 – 68.5 
67.5 – 66 
65.5 – 48.5 
  
The quality of answers was high. While this doubtless reflects the candidates’ calibre, 
performance may also have benefited from ready access to primary and secondary materials 
within an extended time-frame. The examiners noticed that in a few cases the essays 
appeared to be not quite dealing with the question, but could not be sure whether this was 
attributable to recycling of notes or to poor understanding of the question. Some essay 
questions were not attempted at all (i.e. Q5 on performance in early theatre, Q8 on early 
lyrics, Q11 on gendered power dynamic, Q15 on selfhood and subjectivity and Q17 on dits), 
and two questions proved especially popular (Q6 on lais with 9 answers, Q4 on fabliaux with 
7 answers, and Q14 on the framing of late medieval prose narratives). Successful essays 
38 

 
endeavoured to offer relevant definitions for important terms in the titles (e.g. humorous, 
didacticism, narrative). Less successful candidates were less precise in unpacking the essay 
titles and/or failed to offer definitions for important concepts, which consequently muddled 
their argumentation. They might also tend to focus on one text at the expense of others. 
Some strayed too far from the essay title. Regarding the two most popular questions, it is to 
be commended that for Q6, all candidates did envisage at least one lai that was not deemed 
to be composed by Marie de France, and that for Q3 overall, humour in the fabliaux was 
explored and called into question, not only described. For Q16, some candidates equated 
truth with realism, which was a little reductive, but the variety of texts discussed was to be 
commended. The answers on hagiography (Q4) engaged very creatively with the importance 
of the saints’ personality in a wide range of texts and displayed impressive knowledge. The 
variety of texts dealt with was also noticeable and welcome in the answers on farces (Q20). 
 
French VII: Topics in the Period of Literature to 1530 – 1800 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
             Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
23   50.00% 
23   50.00% 
 
82 – 72 
71 – 70 
69 – 67 
67 - 62 
 
The quality of the scripts was impressive and it seemed that the eight-hour window available 
to this year’s candidates did make it possible for everyone to do well, displaying their detailed 
knowledge in well-crafted, well-evidenced and intelligent answers that were a pleasure to 
read. The best scripts were scholarly or original, and even the lower-scoring answers 
contained strong work and were only let down by some relative weakness. There was 
sometimes an imbalance in the treatment of questions containing a quotation and a prompt: 
candidates are advised to try and address both aspects even if they choose to focus 
particularly on one part. There was a wide range of texts and topics examined: in period 
terms the earliest was Rabelais and the closest to the cut-off date of 1800 probably Sade’s 
Philosophie dans le boudoir. Each century is quite well represented – the sixteenth century 
primarily explored through the poètes lyonnais, Marguerite de Navarre, the Pléiade, the travel 
writing of Léry and Thevet, Agrippa d’Aubigné’s epic poetry and Montaigne’s essays; essays 
on the seventeenth century mainly focused on tragedy (Corneille, Rotrou, Racine), comedy 
(Molière), novels (Lafeyette, Scudéry), fairy stories and fables (d’Aulnoy, Perrault, La 
Fontaine), and the moralists (La Rochefoucauld, Mme de Sablé, La Bruyère). Answers on 
eighteenth-century writing mainly engaged with dramatists Marivaux and Beaumarchais, the 
novels of Prévost, Montesquieu, Graffigny, not excluding Voltaire (some contes, the Lettres 
philosophiques
), Rousseau (primarily the Rêveries du promeneur solitaire and the Nouvelle 
Héloïse
), with a few mentions of Diderot’s Lettre sur les aveugles. Rosset, d’Aubignac, 
Cyrano, Descartes, Pascal, Fontenelle, Fénelon, Vivant Denon, Charrière, and Sade were 
also referenced. In terms of genre, essays, short stories, satire, prose narrative, poetry (from 
epic to sonnet), drama (comic, tragic, tragi-comic), dialogue, the epistolary form, the essay, 
maxim, and thought were all covered; some essays focused on a tightly-defined time period, 
others compared works across the centuries. Women’s writing, the self, imitation, rules and 
transgression, moral behaviour or self-interrogation, sexual violence, testimony, the 
experience of the spectator or reader, exploitation and power relations, animals, the 
fantastical, even recipes for marmalade, were all addressed one way or another. There were 
thirty questions of which all but two (9 and 29) were answered, and there was a good spread, 
the remaining 28 questions garnering between one and 11 essays. Of the thematic list 
question (15), ‘bodily sensation’, ‘discovery, ‘didacticism’ and ‘gôut’ were answered, with 
‘didacticism’ the most popular (7 answers). ‘Interior space’ and ‘natural landscape’ were left 
aside. 
 
 

 
39 

 
French VIII: Topics in the Period of Literature to 1715 to the Present 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 Quartiles 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
2:2 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
38  33.63% 
67   59.29% 
7    6.19% 
80 – 70 
70 – 67 
67 – 64 
64 - 0 
 
 
This was the last year of ancien régime Paper VIII, so some of the remarks in this 
examiners’ report wil  feel dated.   
 The paper had 42 questions, and while it followed the old template, the questions 
were tilted towards the open but not unmanageably free-range,  in ways intended to 
anticipate the new format. There were some more limited topic-, author-, or theme-specific 
questions, but these too were intended to enable students rather than to hem them in.   
 The examiners were generally impressed by the quality of the scripts,  and reflected 
on how the open-book situation had liberated candidates from the reflexes and the anxieties 
of the memory-test element of Finals, freeing them up to be more ambitious and connective in 
their answers. Word-limits were also a bonus, for examiners as well as candidates.  The best 
of the scripts – and some were really excellent, receiving marks in the 80s – were able to 
manage very different kinds of material (in terms of genre, period, etc) to produce essays that 
were fizzing with ideas – imaginative while remaining focused and rigorous. At the lower end 
of the spectrum, candidates tried to yoke together disparate ideas without any attempt to 
argue for their connections. It was felt, however, that there was less downloading of prepared 
essays than usual – perhaps because the open-book format and the time-window allowed 
candidates to feel more in control of their material and better able to deploy it.   
 The paper’s hardy perennials were much in evidence – Zola ‘and’ Naturalism (ie. 
Zola), Sartre/Camus, Beckett/Ionesco, but new areas are emerging that may themselves 
become tomorrow’s hardy perennials. The new format wil , it is hoped, break down the 
tendency to Indenti-Kit answers on popular topics, and encourage students to be more 
enterprising in their thinking.  
 By and large, and as usual, answers were clustered around a small number of 
questions – as well as Zola, Theatre of the ‘Absurd’, Existentialism, women’s writing, life-
writing and Francophone writing received large volumes of answers, often on the same 
authors. Several questions remained untouched: as well as most of the wide-open ones (1-9), 
several of the later questions (with quotations by Despentes, Debord, Vaneigem, Triolet, 
Magritte) attracted no answers. Question 42, offering discussion of the media, digital 
technology or virtual reality, also had no takers.   
 Overall, 2022’s exam bodes well for the new format, which wil  both free up 
candidates to write different kind of essays, and put an end to Paper VIII’s annual question-
surfeit.   
 Examiners were also grateful to be reading typed text. 
 
French IX: Medieval Prescribed Texts 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
  Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6    18.75% 
24    75.00% 
75.5 – 69 
69 – 66.5 
66 – 64.5 
64.5 - 50 
 
The quality of answers was high but less so than in the previous year when candidates had 
more time to access their books and notes and could therefore more readily draw on 
interesting quotes from the primary texts or use more references to secondary readings – and 
more effectively so. In particular, the commentaries overall were less compelling than last 
year but still of a stronger nature than in the old-style 3h-examinations: candidates were able 
to go into more detail more systematically and to demonstrate a more synthesized and 
contextualised interpretation of the excerpts; however, many still had a tendency to 
accumulate a number of disconnected formal or thematic comments rather than seamlessly 
combining them and presenting a general overview and understanding of the excerpt and 
how it fitted with the rest of the text. 
40 

 
This year the commentaries on Roland were less popular; some discussed in more 
general (and unduly polarised) terms the relationship between Roland and Olivier instead of 
exploring the nuanced dynamic of that relationship in the particular passage and how it was 
expressed. There were a good number of commentaries on Tristan and many offered 
insightful points about the exercise of authority in the excerpt and the narrator’s mediating 
role in the portrayal of characters’ thinking. There were more commentaries on Vil on than 
last year. The best ones did not restrict themselves to identifying a focus on poverty and old 
age but also explored in detail how these themes were presented and the significant 
transition from discussing an old man to talking about old women; less successful 
commentaries seemed to run out of time/steam on the second half of the passage and so 
omitted to discuss that transition. As always with Villon, one must be wary of falling into the 
trap of writing an essay instead of a commentary. Nine candidates wrote two commentaries.  
All essay questions were answered, but the question on the Tristan as fragment was 
less popular (Q5b). For the Roland essays, some answers to Q4a focused too much on the 
didactic side of things, underprivileging the dramatic; additionally, it is important to remember 
that the line ‘Paien unt tort e crestiens unt dreit’ is both uttered by Roland at a specific 
moment, not by the narrator as a general statement, and asserts an opposition between right 
and wrong, not good and bad. Q4b on Olivier elicited some excellent answers which, rather 
than merely comparing Olivier to Roland, emphasised their companionship, the tragic feel of 
their parting, and interrogated the idea of ‘shock’. Regarding Béroul, Q5a on morality was 
often chosen but answers should not have focused solely on what is and is not moral in the 
tale (a topic often recycled from tutorial essays); stronger essays explored specifically who 
speaks about it and does/does not impose it, and why. It was paramount to make a distinction 
between author and narrator here. Q5b, on the pertinence of thinking about Béroul’s Tristan 
as a fragment, received some original answers on the fragmentation of both the narrative and 
its narration. Essays on Q6a on knowledge, and especially self-knowledge in Villon, needed 
to avoid implicitly blurring ‘knowledge’ with more general ‘meaning’, and to consider 
knowledge as a process in, as well as a product of, the text. There was occasional confusion 
about the status of the Ballade des menus propos, which is included in the Poésies diverses
not in the Testament. Finally, Q6b on the audience as co-creator in Villon, required attention 
to be paid to references to, and invocations of, audience and readers within the text itself, 
including but not limited to the scribe Fremin. 
 
French X: Modern Prescribed Authors (i) 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
      Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
33    44.59% 
38    51.35% 
79 – 72 
72 – 69 
69 – 65 
65 - 56 
 
The performance of candidates on this paper was generally very pleasing; only a very few 
candidates were marked below a 2.1, and many more produced outstanding first-class work. 
It was clear that almost all candidates knew their texts well and understood equally well the 
various matters raised by the essay questions set. The open-book format seems to have had 
a number of beneficial consequences: candidates used secondary criticism much more 
effectively and accurately (very few seemed to rely on it at the expense of their own ideas), 
they referred more extensively to primary texts, and they wrote more fluently and 
persuasively. Essays often resembled good tutorial work rather than rushed work produced 
under the constraints of in-person exams. Only in a few cases did the open-book format 
seem to expose weaknesses: a few answers were written in an over-wrought style and were 
not sufficiently engaged with the primary texts, and some others appeared to be the product 
of a significant amount of research during the 8 hours which did not necessarily make the 
response to the question more persuasive. In a handful of cases (4), it is possible that 
excessive time spent on researching the first two questions subsequently led to a shortish 
third essay being (less than 1.5 pages) – proof that time management still matters even when 
pressure of time appears less.   
41 

 
All but three questions were attempted: 10 (Pascal), 21 (Racine) and 24 (Lafayette). 
The choice of commentary answers was as follows: Montaigne and Molière (11), 
Lafayette and Voltaire (10), Racine (9), Rabelais and Diderot (8), Pascal (6).  
 
Rabelais: Candidates were keen to show their erudition, both on the commentary passage 
and in the essays. The best commentaries showed a deft handling of the verbal and physical 
aggression, proposing multi-layered readings of the passage (from Gargantua). It is likely, 
also, that the format of the open-book exam allowed candidates to comment more accurately 
on certain linguistic, cultural and historical matters such as the litany of insults in the passage. 
The best essays went well beyond the standard episodes discussed in lectures, and were 
able to deliver nuanced answers to the questions without simply rehearsing standard critical 
positions (especially on question 4). 
 
Montaigne: Essays and commentaries were generally done to a high standard. The best 
commentaries were able to show the self-deprecating tone of the passage (from ‘Du repentir’) 
as it emerges through a series of oppositions that eventually give way to one of Montaigne's 
most celebrated claims about the conformity of book and self. The best essays were those 
which engaged holistically with the question, showing sophistication in their command of 
primary material and secondary literature. Questions 7 and 8 drew some rather shallow 
answers about Montaigne's religion and scepticism (for qn 8 on scepticism, only two 
candidates mentioned Montaigne’s Apologie de Rémond Sebond). 
 
Pascal: The uptake on Pascal this year was pleasingly high, and almost all candidates 
acquitted themselves very well. The commentary, drawn from ‘De l’art de persuader’ 
produced a number of subtle readings, unpacking the passage's alternating logic without 
relying on Pascalian commonplaces about orders of knowledge. The essays showed a good 
grasp of Pascal’s theology and literary style, not just in the Pensées but also in the Lettres 
provinciales
; and question 11 elicited responses showing excellent knowledge of his 
intellectual opponents. Q.10 was unattempted. 
 
Molière: many candidates made excellent reference in their essays to contemporary context 
such as the Commedia dell’arte, literary sources, social and political controversies, or to 
modern productions in France and elsewhere. Almost all candidates made reference to a 
sufficiently varied range of Molière’s plays, and they were generally good at taking into 
account Molière’s œuvre in general in order to explain specific aspects of one play or 
another. They balanced well the properly theatrical, literary and thematic aspects of the plays. 
There was a tendency, however, not to pay sufficient attention to the precise requirements of 
the essay question, such as Q.14 which needed some attention to the notion of ‘doctrine’ 
rather than immediate interpretation in terms of the well-trodden debate concerning the role of 
raisonneurs’. In the commentary exercise, it was also surprising that quite a few candidates 
did not comment on the reasons why Sganarelle’s responses to Dom Juan was comic, and 
instead interpreted his role more seriously. In addition, more candidates should have 
commented on the division in the passage between two acts. 
 
Racine: In the commentary, most candidates interpreted Agamemnon’s character and 
dramatic situation very convincingly, but surprisingly few referred to the mythological 
‘backstory’ which contributes so much to spectator’s perception of the play. Again in the 
commentary, most candidates could have referred more, and more accurately, to the 
versification, but the same is true to some extent also in the essay responses, for example in 
Q.19 where they could have explored more fully how the term ‘poetry’ should be interpreted. 
 
Lafayette: The commentary passage was a popular choice (bearing in mind the small number 
of candidates studying Lafayette), and was done very well, candidates often bringing out 
thought-provoking aesthetic and socio-cultural matters beyond a narrow reading of the style 
42 

 
and content. The essays draw on a pleasing range of the author’s works and made useful 
reference to the contemporary historical context. 
 
Voltaire: most candidates referred effectively to a good range of texts, but there was 
nevertheless a strong tendency to favour the contes; in many cases, reference to the Lettres 
philosophiques
 or theatre, for example, would have helped. The level of understanding of 
Voltaire’s works in themselves was often impressively high, but this may have led some 
candidates to consider texts too much in isolation from their contemporary context. For 
example, some candidates plainly do not understand the nature of toleration (in its socio-
cultural and political sense), and found unconvincing reasons to argue that Voltaire was 
‘intolerant’. Candidates could do more to explain the importance of satire as well as the way it 
functions; many candidates more or less ignored the subject in Q. 8, discussing laughter 
instead. 
 
Diderot: Candidates referred to a good range of primary texts, often in pleasingly original 
ways. The commentary passage was particularly well handled, with many candidates 
handling very successfully the relationship between pantomime, philosophical dialogue and 
fictional characters. As in the case of certain other questions on the paper which touched on 
well-debated issues, Q. 31 attracted some responses which were not sufficiently tailored to 
the exact requirements of the question which involved a distinction between ‘vision’ and 
‘visualization’. 
 
French XI: Modern Prescribed Authors (ii) 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
      Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
22    34.92% 
40    63.49% 
82 – 70 
70 – 68 
68 – 66 
66 - 59 
 
This paper was sat as an open-book online examination with an 8-hour window and a 2000-
word maximum for essays. Candidates wrote on all eight of the commentary passages and 
answered all of the essay questions apart from Questions 4, 6, 8, 17, 19, and 28. There were 
some excellent essays and commentaries that pursued adventurous lines of arguments whilst 
working closely with the primary texts. In general, the presentation of the work was very good 
and the scripts were clear and coherent.  The first-class commentaries were those that 
retained a tight focus on the form and content of the passage, whilst also forging meaningful 
links with the rest of the book and the writer’s work in general. These candidates brought 
pertinent ideas to bear on the passage that allowed it to be read in fresh and stimulating 
ways. Certain passages required knowledge of historical events. The best analyses of such 
passages did not simply describe the historical background but wove their understanding of 
the historical context into the analysis. In the essays, most candidates were conscious of the 
need, given the open book format, to demonstrate they were producing a fresh essay rather 
than re-heating a previously written tutorial piece, by engaging closely with the specifics of the 
question set. Where the question contained several key terms, for instance, like a question on 
the ‘uncodified, enchanted, and intractable’ in Barthes, the best essays took care to engage 
with each term individually, sometimes making use of them as a structuring device for the 
essay. The best answers were able to combine close engagement with primary texts 
(including texts beyond those set for principal study) with a broader overview of the author’s 
oeuvre, set within its historical or cultural context and with judicious engagement with relevant 
debates in literary criticism or critical theory. Students should be advised that longer answers 
are not necessarily better answers. In the eight-hour timeframe, they should avoid the 
temptation to keep appending more points to their argument. Many of the very best essays 
this year were well structured and concise: the question was addressed in a precise way and 
examples were used efficiently. This made these essays energetic and persuasive to read. 
 
 
 
43 

 
GERMAN 
 
General comment on format: 
The ‘content papers’, with the exception of Papers XII and XIV, were all examined by an 
eight-hour open-book format. Candidates seemed, despite the advice offered before the 
exam, confused about what this implied. Standards of presentation varied, with some scripts 
footnoted in detail, others not referenced at all. Essays also varied in length, but quite a few 
were evidently over the suggested word count. There was quite a lot of evidence of cutting 
and pasting, with the mistakes and omissions that that can entail. One upside was that most 
scripts included three full answers (the problem of the thin third question was not much in 
evidence). However, there were also signs of exhaustion. Some candidates (e.g. for German 
sole) had four eight-hour exams on four consecutive days, and over a fleeting analysis of the 
relevant marks profiles suggests that this made unreasonable demands on them. 
Nonetheless, the medieval Assessors, although they favour retaining III as an in-person 
examination, support the continued use of open-book online formats for VI and IX (with the 
proviso that IX consist of only three elements, i.e. commentary plus two essays, as the 
availability of printed as well as online translations meant that there was very little to 
distinguish between responses to the translation question). 
A variety of formats is probably a good thing, but on the whole this year’s Examiners would 
favour the retention of the open-book online format for only a small number of Papers, 
preferably in a shorter, possibly five-hour format, and would recommend that other Papers be 
examined by dissertation/portfolio or by a traditional in-person three-hour exam. 
 
German I: Translation into German and Essay in German 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
        
Quartiles   
 
 
1st 
2:1 
2:2 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
18    25.71% 
43   1.43% 
8   1.43% 
83 – 70 
69 – 66 
66 – 61 
61 - 43 
   
1: Translation into German 
The passage for translation into German was taken from a short story by Jhumpa Lahiri in the 
collection Interpreter of Maladies. Candidates generally coped well with the passage, which 
consisted almost exclusively of narrative in the first person.  
The vocabulary was relatively straightforward, though a number of candidates had difficulty 
with ‘flag’, which resulted in words such as ‘Flag’. The idiom ‘I always make a point of’ proved 
tricky, with candidates occasionally producing a word for word rendering. The solution 
‘absichtlich’ came very close but did not quite capture the nuance of ‘legte ich immer Wert 
drauf’, which was more suitable in the context. The idiom ‘seek his fortune’ was often 
rendered with a purely financial interpretation of the noun, where ‘sein Glück suchen’ would 
have been more appropriate. The only piece of dialogue was ‘“Remember?”’, which might 
most appropriately have been rendered as ‘“Weißt du noch?”’ or ‘“Erinnerst du dich (noch)?”’ 
but often yielded unidiomatic translations or renderings marred by the omission or 
inappropriate use of a pronoun. 
In some cases candidates made mistakes in verb constructions and especially use of tense. 
In the penultimate sentence, the most appropriate choice of tense was the perfect, as in the 
original, but candidates often used the simple past. The syntax was not overly complex and 
most candidates handled it well, though mistakes with word order marred a number of 
translations, Where the sentence structure became more challenging, as in ‘things we 
sometimes worry he wil  no longer do after we die’, they tended to have recourse to solutions 
that were too close to the English structure, resulting in unidiomatic German versions. More 
thought and experimentation might have yielded a simpler but more idiomatic German 
rendering.  
A number of candidates produced translations that admirably captured the spirit and tone of 
the original.  
 
44 

 
2: Essay 
Candidates had a choice of 19 questions, of which 16 generated responses. The most 
popular question was ‘Das Studium der Literatur macht uns zu moralisch besseren 
Menschen’, which often tended to elicit rather disappointingly simplistic essays, though 
candidates did offer some engaging examples. The question ‘Bei der Interpretation eines 
Kunstwerks sollte es egal sein, wer es erschaffen hat’, the quality tended to be higher, with 
more focused arguments and more critical engagement with the examples. The topic 
‘Sprachwandel ist ein natürlicher Prozess, den man nicht aktiv beeinflussen sollte’ generated 
some intellectually substantial essays that drew on such areas as history of the language, 
dialect and social media usage, backing up the argument in each case with persuasive 
examples.  
Generally, candidates showed themselves well able to engage in German with material they 
had studied, and used it to good effect in supporting their argument. 
 
Most candidates handled register and the phrasing of introductions and conclusions 
well, but there were some surprisingly unidiomatic introductions, for example ‘ich werde mein 
Argument in zwei Teile zerlegen’ or ‘zuerst … zuzweit’, and the introduction of a new point 
with the phrase ‘Darauf abbauend …’. Typos included such basic mistakes as ‘eine Spräche’, 
‘anfängen’ and the pronoun ‘mann’. 
 
German II 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
      Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
2:2 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
17   24.64% 
38   55.07% 
14    20.29% 
 
76 – 69 
69 – 65 
65 – 61 
60 - 53 
 
German IIA: Translation from Modern German 
This passage proved extremely challenging and the scripts revealed frequent comprehension 
problems. Nobody really felt confident enough about their understanding of the German to 
attempt a fluent literary translation; instead most of the versions were halting or literal – even 
if they were not simply wrong. Amongst the relatively common vocabulary that caused 
difficulties were especially the verbs: überragen, ablenken, aufwiegen, meiden, weichen; also 
der Aufenthalt (almost exclusively associated with residence permits or holidays), das Heer, 
der Hügel, derb, rauh, die Kost, das Fernrohr (wild guesses, often ‘TV’, or ‘distant roar’), 
Gestalten und Vorgänge (‘curtains‘, ‘plots‘). The more genuinely obscure vocabulary, the 
military terms (including the more obvious exerzieren and Demobilisierung) and adverbs like 
ohnedies and zuweilen were almost invariably mistranslated. Most candidates also misread 
the structure of at least one or two of the sentences in the piece. While hardly anyone 
recognised, or guessed, that Heiligenstadt and the Wienerwald were names of geographical 
places and could be treated as proper nouns, it was more surprising that a great many 
candidates appeared unfamiliar with ‘die zwanziger Jahre’. Perhaps most concerning, 
however, was how often English words were misspelt: storey, resistible, bourgeois; or 
invented: ‘revere’ (for Revier), ‘idyl icness’, ‘butterbread’. Altogether a disappointing 
performance, suggesting that the majority of our students could not read a text like this even 
with occasional recourse to a dictionary. 
 
German IIB: Translation from Modern German 
The passage was a tough but useful test. A handful of candidates failed to make any sense of 
it at all, most got the general gist and just went astray over this or that sentence, this or that 
vocabulary, but several gave us fluent and intelligent renderings with altogether few flaws. 
The relatively abstract vocabulary caused fewer problems than the more concrete world of 
IIA, perhaps largely because it was easier to guess. Indeed, here again it was the world of 
things that tripped up many candidates, who thought that Gräben were graves or cemeteries, 
or that Kolonnen were colonies or colonels. Some of the vocabulary of mental processes also 
provided tricky: Scharfsinn, Voraussetzung, Anschauung, Einschätzung, Auffassung (in 
Auffassungsgabe), Annahme, Eindruck. These are words our students should know more 
45 

 
securely than they evidently do, as they should also, surely, know that Geist can mean ‘mind’ 
as well as ‘spirit’. Amongst the more elementary vocabulary: a lot of people didn’t know 
allmählich or Mut; although the King was named on the first line, a large number of 
candidates insisted on translating Fürst as ‘duke’ or ‘count’; surprising too how many people 
translated rasch as ‘rash’; and an extraordinary number misread ‘kleine Flüsse’ as ‘keine 
Flüsse’. Al  the same, in the really tricky phrases they could make an intelligent guess and at 
least get half way home. For many, the greatest problem, even if they had achieved a decent 
level of comprehension, was turning the text into a stylistically satisfactory version in an 
appropriate register. As in IIA there were several instances of inappropriate – and indeed bad 
– English style (‘like as how’, ‘based off of’, that sort of stuff) and a lot of illiterate spelling 
(‘equipt’ ‘disappated’, ‘dettached’, ‘emergance’, ‘erronious’, ‘french’ and ‘german’ in lower 
case, and so on), for which scripts were marked down. 
 
German III: Translation from Pre-Modern German 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
4      25.00% 
12    75.00% 
 
75 – 70 
69 – 68 
67 – 66 
66 - 60 
 
All passages were attempted, and candidates were on the whole reasonably prepared. As 
often, some candidates who opted for the early modern passages underestimated the 
chal enges of syntax and vocabulary. The best of the translations, especially those on ‘Phyllis 
and Aristoteles’, were resourceful and displayed an awareness of appropriate register. 
 
German IV: Linguistic Studies I 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
10   62.50% 
5   31.25% 
76 – 72 
72 – 71 
70 – 69 
68 - 50 
 
This was a strong cohort which particularly excelled in the more sociolinguistic side of the 
paper; there were some outstanding, original answers on the language of totalitarianism and 
also in response to the provocative Yoko Tawada quotation that “a soldier who is addressed 
as “DU” wil  not kil ”. The most popular topic proved to be the question on linguistic purism 
which showed that the students had engaged well with the additional lectures recorded with a 
number of specialists during the pandemic. Surprisingly, the weakest point tended to be the 
translation from the set text despite the Open Book format, which allowed students access to 
specialist resources. The commentary tended to be better than the translation; it showed that 
students had trained well in commentary classes. 
 
German V (i): Linguistic Studies I / Part I: Old High German with Prescribed Texts 
 
Class profile 
 
German V (ii): Linguistic Studies II / Part 2: Descriptive analysis of German as spoken 
and written at the Present Day 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6   33.33% 
10   55.56% 
72 – 70 
70 – 67 
65 – 62 
61 - 57 
 
46 

 
Eighteen candidates sat this (eight-hour) open-book online paper. The candidates attempted 
a good spread of questions: eleven of the fifteen questions attracted answers, with Questions 
7 (syntactic head movement in the analysis of German clauses), 2 (analysis of and 
commentary on the phonetic transcription of a German non-standard variety), and 4 
(morphological analysis) proving the three most popular.  
On the whole, candidates demonstrated convincing knowledge of core concepts in 
linguistics and offered accurate and frequently detailed analyses of German language data. 
Many candidates managed to show very good familiarity with relevant models of formal 
linguistic description. More generally, first-class work was characterised by good organisation, 
clarity in writing, and appropriate use of both linguistic terminology and empirical evidence in 
support of a well-rounded argument.  
It was also pleasing to see that the majority of candidates sought (successfully) to 
engage with the questions that they had chosen to answer. However, there were also 
answers at the lower end of the mark range that used ‘recycled’ tutorial and lecture material, 
ignoring almost wholly the question asked. Sadly, notwithstanding the open-book nature of 
the exam, some scripts contained a range of ungrammatical German, provided to serve as 
(grammatical) examples.  
As in previous years, future candidates are advised that very good Paper V/ii answers 
are as much about the ‘how’ as about the ‘what’: arguments (and sub-arguments) need to be 
supported by empirical evidence, with essays spelling out the consequences of the 
theoretical moves taken and contemplating the merits of alternative analyses. 
 
German VI: Medieval German Culture (to 1450): Texts, Contexts, and Issues 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
             Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
7   63.64% 
4   36.36% 
 
75 – 70 
70 – 70 
67 – 63 
62 - 60 
 
Candidates answered a total of 18 different questions on works ranging from early MHG to 
late medieval prose romances. Weaker scripts had a tendency to offer pre-prepared material 
without quite addressing the question – e.g. offering an essay on ‘othering’ to a question 
about race – and were penalised accordingly. In a few cases, candidates had not read the 
rubric and therefore answered both parts of an ‘either/or’ question or made different works by 
the same author the subject of two questions. Some candidates attempted comparisons; 
these worked best where answers showed an awareness of differences in genre and 
chronology and took these into account. Overall, candidates knew the material well; the best 
answers gave evidence of independent engagement. 
 
German VII: Early Modern German Culture (1450 – 1730): Texts, Contexts, and Issues 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
72 – 70 
69 – 69 
68 – 68 
67 - 67 
 
The cohort displayed a good understanding of the primary literature with a wide range of 
examples and the ability to argue well (even if in a couple of cases the examples became 
slightly off-topic) and a competent grasp of secondary literature. There was only occasionally 
outstanding work but also no answer that went widely off-topic or fell short of a solid display of 
knowledge. By far the most popular topic was the question on Grimmelshausen; this very 
broad question (to discuss whether any of the works could be considered allegorical) proved 
productive even though the same examples drawn upon by most of the essays showed that 
the students mainly relied on lecture material, and none of the answers went beyond a 
superficial definition of what is meant by ‘allegorical’. All of the other questions were picked up 
just a couple of times, with drama questions leading in terms of genre. For the Reformation 
period, two students each picked the printing question and the Sendbrief question. There was 
little appetite for poetry, questions of genre, Goethe, and visual culture. 
47 

 
German VIII: Modern German Literature (1730 to the Present): Texts, Contexts, and 
Issues 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
  Quartiles 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
24     37.50% 
37     57.81% 
85 – 72 
72 – 68 
68 – 65 
64 - 40 
 
The paper was set as an open-book exam and was taken by 65 candidates. The overall 
standard was high, and almost all candidates produced three fully developed essays. Of the 
63 questions (13 tied), 50 attracted answers. Most popular, with 14 responses in each case, 
were a question on the means by which social hierarchy is depicted (Q25, section 1825-
1890), the approach to the past in literature and/or film (Q42, section post-1945) and the 
means by which works of literature and/or film evoke trauma (Q47b, section post-1945). 
There were 44 responses to questions in the General Section, many of which demonstrated a 
pleasingly focused engagement with the specifics of the question. Some enterprising essays 
ranged widely over texts from different parts of the period, offering engaging and well-
conceived comparisons. While the sections 1770–1825 and 1825–1890 each attracted just 
under 30 responses, there were 39 responses to the section 1890–1945 and 52 responses to 
the post-1945 section.  
A high proportion of questions involved quotations which demanded specific 
engagement with an individual position on a topic. There were many impressive essays in 
which candidates responded with lively, pertinent analysis and well-chosen examples, 
engaging directly and explicitly with the terms of the question. This was particularly important 
given the open-book format, and candidates were rewarded for answers that demonstrated 
independent thought and detailed, thoughtful engagement with the question on the basis of 
directly relevant texts. Conversely, there were some poor responses which failed to address 
the terms of the question or did so only in a generic way of the kind that is often typical of 
essays which have been compiled from prepared material. 
The range of authors discussed was pleasing, with a number of recent authors 
featuring in interesting ways that also demonstrated increasing diversification of the syllabus. 
They included Felicitas Hoppe, Stefanie Sargnagel, Yoko Tawada, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, 
Terézia Mora, Noah Sow and Olivia Wenzel. Film was less prominent. 
Candidates did not always follow the advice concerning length, with some essays 
being somewhat short and lacking in substance while others were excessively long. On the 
whole, though, candidates coped well with the open-book format and produced work of a high 
standard. Many candidates were also surprisingly careless with the accuracy of quotations, 
despite the open book format. Even titles not infrequently contained mistakes. 
 
German IX: Medieval Prescribed Texts 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6   31.58% 
13   68.42% 
 
76 – 70 
70 – 67 
66 – 63 
63 - 60 
 
All passages for translation and commentary were chosen by at least two candidates. 
Unusually, the passage from Parzival was most popular for translation, no doubt due to the 
availability of online and printed translations; the Morungen song was the most popular 
commentary choice. Weaker commentaries drew on lecture and tutorial notes without 
responding to the set passage or song, or treating it merely as an illustration of general 
tendencies, though the best showed awareness of literary form and appreciation of register. 
In the essays, the most popular questions were on gender roles in the Nibelungenlied and 
Parzival. Most candidates knew the texts, but only the best answers addressed the question 
as set. 
 
 

 
48 

 
German X: Modern Prescribed Authors 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
                
Quartiles   
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
15   33.33% 
28    62.22% 
79 – 71 
71 – 66 
66 – 64 
64 - 57 
 
On the whole there was an encouraging range of lively writing which showed a very good 
knowledge of and engagement with the works of the various authors. The commentaries 
were often disappointing in their failure to talk about the stylistic and formal fundamentals of 
the passage in question. Time and again, we had decent readings of the situation, the 
thematics and the character motivation in the passage, but little (if anything at all) on style 
and rhetoric. We had commentaries that failed to mention narrative perspective (the 
extraordinary interior monologue of the Wolf passage, for example), or to discuss the use of 
direct speech (striking in both the Mann and Kafka passages), or to make any allusion to 
scene and gesture in the passages from plays (kneeling in Kleist!), or to comment on the 
verse form (in the verse plays or even the Heine extract). Students should never suppose, 
because they think these things are obvious, or characteristic of the entire text, that they 
therefore deserve no comment. The essays generally attempted to address the terms of the 
question, and occasionally they were stunningly good. However, there were also candidates 
who misread and twisted the questions, in perhaps predictable but still disappointing ways: 
reading ‘imposters’ (in Mann) as artists or outsiders; or ‘animal narrators’ (in Kafka) simply as 
animals. All the same, there were very few marks below 60. 
The open book format offered the candidates no real advantages, certainly not for the 
commentary exercise (except perhaps in the case of the Rilke poem). Some candidates even 
disdained the opportunity to find the passage in its context, and omitted to make appropriate 
comment about its place in the work. Candidates were still very capable of misquoting the 
works they were writing about, even getting the titles wrong. There were, however, frequent 
signs of cutting and pasting from tutorial essays. Often this practice was clearly to the 
disadvantage of the candidates, whose (sometimes overlong) essays were derailed by 
irrelevant inclusions and digressions. The examination format is also tough on the examiners. 
Although it is good to have legible scripts, it is not good to work with a software that allows for 
as little manipulation as Inspera. 
Given that there were 45 candidates and a paper of 90 questions and the 
commentaries, it is unsurprising that some questions remained unused. Nobody attempted 
the commentaries on Schiller and Hoffmann. There was altogether only one answer on 
Schiller, two on Müller, and four on each of Heine, Brecht and Bernhard. The most popular 
authors were Kafka and Mann, followed by Wolf, Jelinek, Kleist and Rilke. Given all this, the 
spread was good, with at least four different questions essayed for all authors who attracted 
more than seven answers overall. 
 
German XI: Goethe 
 
Class profile 
 
 all produced good or very good performances, no doubt 
a result of this paper attracting a particularly interested and motivated subsection of the 
cohort. The questions attempted were limited to Goethe’s dramas (questions 8, 9, and 19 
from the general Section E) and novels (questions 11, 12 and13); neither the 
autobiographical and scientific writing (Section D) nor, perhaps most surprisingly, the poetry 
(Section A) attracted any responses. Of the topics and texts covered by far the most popular 
were Faust and Werther (3 responses each), followed by Iphigenie and Wilhelm Meisters 
Lehrjahre
 (2 responses each). The limited appetite for a greater range of primary works 
49 

 
seems to support the decision to move from a stand-alone Goethe paper to having him 
represented as a Special Author on Paper X in the future. 
 
 
 
ITALIAN 
 
Italian I: Essay in Italian 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
            Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
14    38.89% 
11    61.11% 
 
85 – 72 
72 – 67 
67 – 64 
63 - 55 
 
The exam consisted of 12 questions on all the set topics and broader issues, giving 
candidates ample choice on which to write an essay. There were 36 scripts. Results are very 
good: 14 scripts (39%) were awarded a First (ranging 70-82), and 22 scripts (61%) were 
awarded a 2:1 (ranging 60-69). 
In terms of content, scripts in the higher class showed a good breadth of relevant 
material, and succeeded in developing a persuasive, well-structured, coherently developed 
essay. In the 2:1 class, and especially at the lower end, scripts tended to be more 
fragmentary, with paragraphs less cohesively linked together, with the argument suffering 
from lack of coherence, or losing focus on the question. 
Linguistically, scripts showed a good range of abilities, from sophisticated style 
sustained by accurate phrasing an excellent range of structures, allowing for the expression 
of nuances in the argument, to solid grasp of grammar and linguistic structures with some or 
few errors. 
Though not all scripts fulfilled the aims of the exercise at the highest level, scripts 
overwhelmingly demonstrated on the awareness of the requirements of the exercise, in terms 
of sophistication of content, necessity of relevant material to support the argument, argument 
development, structural devices, and linguistic precision. 
 
Italian II  
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
Quartiles   
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
9    25.00% 
24    66.67% 
72.5 – 70.5 
67.5 – 65.5 
65.5 – 61 
61 - 55 
 
36 students sat this paper. This exam consists of two translations: one from Italian into   
English (IIA), the other from English into Italian (IIB). 
 
Italian IIA: Translation from Italian 
The Italian passage – an excerpt from Valeria Parrella – included some challenging syntax 
(including long sentences with subordinate clauses) but presented relatively few lexical 
complexities. On the whole, candidates demonstrated a sound understanding of the passage, 
although there were a couple of sentences that only a few candidates were able to render 
accurately (those relating to ‘mantello’ and ‘conchiglia’ proved especially elusive). Marks at 
the lower end reflected awkward syntactical phrasing in English or a lack of precision in 
translation; marks at the higher end were achieved where there were fluent and idiomatic 
renderings in English that were also sensitive to the style of the piece. Several candidates in 
the middle range were also able to come up with some creative solutions in translation. 
 
Italian IIB: Translation into Italian 
The selected passage was an adapted version of the final paragraphs of Virginia Woolf’s 
novel To the Lighthouse (1927). Overall, candidates did well, with only five of them dropping 
below a borderline 2.2/2.1 mark. At the same time, nine entered the First class range and this 
is a sign that this year’s cohort had achieved a high level of expertise but only a minority 
50 

 
displayed that extra finesse expected for the highest band. The passage was challenging in 
this respect at the level of both syntactical complexity and lexical choice. A couple of 
sentences describing the protagonist’s visionary perception of the event gave candidates a 
chance to show their translating skills and talent. At the other end of the spectrum, the few 2.2 
marks were registered by candidates who made the odd grammatical mistake or lacked the 
full lexical spectrum. In a couple of cases this led to the misunderstanding of key expressions 
– such as “canvas” or “brush” - which reverberated throughout the passage.  
 
Italian IV: Linguistic Studies I 
 
Class profile 
 
Italian V: Linguistic Studies II 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
72 – 70 
70 – 70 
69 – 69 
64 - 64 
 
The overall standard of the scripts was very good this year. The assessors were impressed 
by the structure and focus of the answers, with each question being addressed directly and 
answered by an intelligent use of data/examples and interesting connections. The assessors 
felt that the format of the examination allowed for more thought-through and reflective 
responses, and the access to resources also encouraged an engagement with the questions 
that went beyond the content-level, enabling intelligent and significant links. 
 
Italian VI: Period of Literature (i): 1220-1430 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
75 – 72 
70 – 70 
67 – 67 
66 - 66 
 
 
 Dante’s Vita Nova, Petrarch, and Boccaccio proved popular topics, but 
there was also a pleasing range of responses on the Dolce stil novo, comic poetry, and the 
Sicilians. The highest marks were awarded to candidates who engaged in a focused and 
nuanced way with the material and were able to demonstrate an excellent range of relevant 
knowledge to support their arguments. Overall, a strong year for this paper.  
 
Italian VII: Period of Literature (ii): 1430-1635 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
            Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6    60.00% 
4    40.00% 
 
73 – 71 
70 – 70 
70 – 66 
64 - 64 
 
Ten candidates took the paper with marks falling in a range from first class to high II.1. Most 
fell in the first class range, and there was a median mark of 70. A relatively broad selection of 
questions were attempted by candidates (Poliziano, Castiglione, Machiavelli, Ariosto, 
Michelangelo, Tasso, questione della lingua, female writing, Renaissance comedy, 
Renaissance novella). The majority of candidates answered the questions on Poliziano, 
Castiglione, Michelangelo, and Ariosto, though several also answered on a range of other 
topics, including Renaissance comedy, the novella, and the pastoral. Nearly all the answers 
demonstrated an ability to write accurately and often fluently, to organize and marshal 
relevant points and examples, to engage in both contextual and literary analysis, and - with 
varying degrees of accomplishment - to engage critically with the question and a range of 
critical positions. The marks falling in the lower II.1 band tended towards a degree of 
51 

 
generalization or overgeneralization at times. The best work showed detailed textual 
knowledge as well as an appreciation of the relationship between literary works and (where 
appropriate) critical writings, as well as of other relevant contexts. The best answers were 
able to analyse with strong critical awareness literary and narrative practices and broader 
cultural categories or topics of discussion (e.g. Petrarchism, the status of women, theories of 
imitation). 
 
Italian VIII: Period of Literature (iii): Modern Italian Literature (1750 to the Present) and 
Cinema 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
5    23.81% 
15    71.43% 
79 – 69 
69 – 68 
66 – 65 
64 - 59 
 
What is remarkable about this year’s performance in this paper is the enormous 
concentration of marks around the 2nd and 3rd quartile. Almost two thirds of students 
received a mark between 65 and 69. On the one hand, this shows a high level of preparation 
and competence on the part of the vast majority. On the other it is tempting to think of it as a 
result of the 8-hour open-book format adopted this year. There is little doubt that this format 
allows students better control and to make use of their preparatory work. At the same time 
there is a sense that this somehow causes a flattening of students’ individual performances. It 
will be interesting to see whether this phenomenon has occurred in other papers. 
As for the content of the 21 scripts, when it comes to 19th century authors, students 
concentrated overwhelmingly on three names: Leopardi, Manzoni and Verga. This, however, 
was counterbalanced by a much more varied approach to 20th century authors, the only 
exception being the recurrence of Pirandello. It was also remarkable that 7 out of 21 students 
opted to write on cinema, which is one of the highest percentages in recent years. 
Finally, both examiners were positively struck by the ease with which they could tackle 
typewritten scripts as opposed to the handwritten ones of pre-Covid years. Typed scripts 
within a normal 3-hour close-book set up should be considered as a possible format in future 
years. 
  
Italian IX: Medieval Prescribed Texts 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
            Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
11    35.48% 
20    64.52% 
 
74 – 70 
70 – 68 
68 – 65 
65 - 60 
 
Thirty-one candidates sat the exam. There were eleven first class marks, and twenty marks in 
II.1 range, with many in the high II.1 (67-69). Overall, this was a very strong year for paper IX, 
with several candidates exploring questions on the whole Commedia, on the Paradiso and 
even the ‘other works’. Al  candidates showed knowledge of a great range of material, critical 
acumen, and great close reading skills. The highest marks were awarded for originality, 
focus, and sophistication of argument. 
 
Italian X: Modern Prescribed Authors (i) 
 
Class profile 
 
 
52 

 
Italian XI: Modern Prescribed Authors (ii) 
 
Class profile 
 
 
MEDIEVAL AND MODERN GREEK  
 

 
 
 

 
53 

 
SPANISH 
 
Spanish I: Translation into Spanish and Essay in Spanish 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
             Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
14   20.59% 
54    79.41% 
 
76 – 67 
67 – 66 
66 – 65 
65 - 63 
 
58 

 
Sixty-nine candidates took Paper I this year. The first part of the paper consisted of a 
prose translation into modern Spanish of an extract from Tanzanian-born British writer 
Abdulrazak Gurnah’s novel, Paradise.  
The passage described a landscape seen by the protagonist from a train and the 
arrival at a station. Thus, the prose contained a number of words for which candidates 
needed to choose a contextually-appropriate translation. From the outset, one common 
difficulty was the accurate translation of ‘window’ not as its most obvious equivalent ‘ventana,’ 
but as ‘ventanil a,’ i.e., the appropriate equivalent in Spanish within a means of transportation. 
Many students failed to see the importance of meaning in verbs at the beginning of 
the passage and did not translate constructions such as ‘searching the countryside,’ or ‘the 
train was labouring,’ as ‘escudriñando el campo,’ and ‘por la que circulaba el tren,’ 
respectively, but in a more literal way, ‘buscando,’ ‘laborando,’ which neither conveyed the 
meaning of the original nor sounded idiomatic. Because most of the passage was a depiction 
of a landscape, verbs acquired specific meanings that contributed to the portrayal of a 
number of actions, sensations and feelings. Therefore, it is important always to bear in mind 
that in any literary text, and more so in descriptive passages, all verbs and adjectives are 
artfully chosen by the author—a task that needs to be emulated in any translation. 
Errors with gender, in the use of colours, were also frequent, with ‘Mauve and purple 
petals’ often not rendered correctly as ‘Los pétalos de color malva y púrpura.’ One conclusion 
is that candidates should always remember gender and number agreement with colours in 
Spanish can be problematic as those colours ending in ‘-a’ (such as the ones above) are 
invariable. Colours do appear a lot in literary passages and students should always 
remember that it is very likely that they will need to deal with this problem in a translation.  
Another set of challenges related to literary descriptions of elements of nature. Many 
candidates were aware of the importance of knowing this type of word well. The strongest 
candidates did a good job in approximating to the best terms or providing adequate 
equivalents, for instance, translating ‘twilight’ as ‘crepúsculo’ or ‘countryside’ as 
‘campo/campiña.’ Many were also able to translate accurately other related words, rendering 
‘plain’ as ‘l anura,’ ‘snowcapped mountain’ as ‘montaña cubierta de nieve,’ ‘outcrops’ as 
‘afloramiento,’ and ‘savannahs,’ as ‘sabana’ (not sábana, with an accent, which occurred in 
some scripts and means ‘bed sheets’).  
Despite the stumbling blocks mentioned above, a large number of candidates did a 
fine job at translating the passage while maintaining an adequate style. One conclusion to be 
drawn from this exercise is that candidates should devote some time to re-reading the 
passage, making sure that they are able to imagine the scene narrated and therefore provide 
a comparable translation of the text which is equivalent from an aesthetic point of view. 
Thinking first about several synonyms in English, before rushing into translating, is a 
technique that can help students find the right words in Spanish. 
There were some excellent essays in the second part of the paper. Many candidates 
produced work that was thoughtful and internally coherent—two important features of a 
strong expository/argumentative essay. Convincing arguments and originality were rewarded 
by the examiners. Many essays displayed an excellent grammatical and stylistic command of 
the language, including a wide range of idiomatic phrases, which made the main arguments 
more compelling. The use of syntax was generally varied and attempts at creativity with the 
Spanish language were highly valued. The most popular topics were: ‘El próximo referéndum 
en el que me gustaría votar’ (Q2j), ‘El individualismo es peor que cualquier virus’ (Q2b), and 
‘La conversación, casi siempre, es más una cuestión de estilos que de pensamientos’ 
(Cristina Peri Rossi) (Q2a). Some candidates answered on less popular topics, such as ‘Es 
posible erradicar la pobreza en un país como el Reino Unido’ (Q2D) or ‘Mucho ruido y pocas 
nueces’ (Q2f), which led to original and persuasive essays. The use of textual markers was 
appropriate and strategic usage of journalistic expressions and metaphors was helpful to 
many candidates in defending their theses effectively. 
 
 
 

59 

 
Spanish II 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
2:2 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
11    16.18% 
45    66.18% 
12    17.65% 
 
77 – 68 
68 – 65 
65 – 61 
61 - 55 
 
Spanish IIA: Translation from Modern Spanish 
Spanish IIB: Translation from Modern Spanish 
Sixty-eight candidates sat papers IIA and IIB this year with 11 achieving first class marks 
across the two unseen translations; there were 45 upper second class marks and 12 lower 
second. The passage for IIA came from Adelaida García Morales’s short story ‘El encuentro’, 
Sur Express, 3 in 1987. The passage for IIB was a mainly descriptive moment of wistful day-
dreaming in an everyday setting taken from Ignacio Peyró’s diaries, Ya sentarás cabeza, of 
2020. 
The passage from ‘El encuentro’, written in the first person, began with a descriptive 
paragraph featuring a beggar on a rather unattractive street corner and proceeded with the 
narrator’s entry into an office building and reception by a company’s director, who seems 
anything but pleased with the newcomer’s arrival in search of work. Their encounter contains 
some snatches of direct speech.  Most candidates were able to follow the narrative 
reasonably well and tended to be tripped up only by individual words or phrases in the 
Spanish. The examiners were a little disappointed overall – in both papers, in fact – with 
candidates’ conservatism in their English versions. Too much concern was shown with 
following and including, one-by-one, all elements of the original, at the expense of imaginative 
solutions or bolder equivalents that were idiomatic, though not necessarily close to the 
original Spanish lexis. This can lead to stilted, unnatural English that sounds translated. 
Examples of common vocabulary that was not known by a number of candidates 
were, inter aliadespachodesprecioangostomendicanteesquinacéntricomenudencias; 
ademanes
. This last word, meaning ‘gestures’ was frequently translated as ‘goodbyes’, ‘see 
you tomorrows’ or ‘see you soons’, possibly influenced by French, but the subsequent pues 
me observaba…
 should have made this solution unconvincing. Some candidates were 
unaware that se detuvo is a preterite form of detenerse and contuve of contener and even the 
opening words of the passage, Nos hallábamos caused a few problems, occasionally 
rendered as ‘We found one another’ rather than ‘We found ourselves’. As ever, there were a 
good number of very competent versions of the passage with a few outstanding ones. These 
combined close to full comprehension of the Spanish with attention to nuance and even 
narrative voice, with the narrator’s annoyance at his reception being well rendered with 
appropriate English equivalents, e.g. ¡De ningún modo! as ‘Not a chance!’ or ‘You must be 
joking!’ and menudencias a ‘bits and pieces’. 
Paper IIB also produced some fine examples of unseen translating with the mood and 
tone of the Spanish recognised and nicely rendered in English. Nevertheless, few candidates 
really excelled on a passage that was not hard to comprehend. One indicative challenge of 
this piece might be how one deals with el perro que pasaba por ahí in the first sentence: 
almost all candidates translated this accurately enough with versions such as ‘the dog which 
was passing by’ (not ‘used to pass by’ in this context) but few took the English to the next 
(idiomatic) stage, coming up with something like ‘the dog which was pottering / padding 
about’, versions which may have some drawbacks but which constitute a more idiomatic 
attempt to paint a dreamy picture in the same manner as the Spanish author had. 
While it is understandable that some candidates will not have come across hipoteca 
(with ‘horse-riding instructor’ being an ingenious stab) and perhaps andamio (‘scaffolding’, 
used figuratively here), it is surprising that poner el arrozhe ahímansoafectivoarmario, or 
copa caused problems. This suggests that a more rigorous approach to the learning of 
vocabulary throughout the degree would be useful. Though it is easy to find instant 
translations for Spanish words one comes across by using modern technologies on the go, 
there is no substitute for committing vocabulary to memory when learning a language. 
60 

 
Candidates are reminded not to include footnotes explaining the rationale for their 
translation decisions. 
 
Spanish III: Translation into Spanish and Translation from Pre-Modern Spanish 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6    85.71% 
68 – 67 
67 – 63 
63 – 61 
56 - 56 
 
Seven sole Spanish students sat Paper III this year. The first part of the paper consisted of a 
prose translation into modern Spanish of an extract from Hold by Michael Donkor. The 
passage contained detailed descriptions of a young housemaid’s thoughts about the situation 
she finds herself in and the responsibility she feels towards an even younger housemaid. The 
passage presented a number of challenges regarding the use of past tenses: in particular, the 
description of the bedroom in the early hours of the morning and daily routines which require 
the use of the imperfect, and actions and decisions made by the protagonist in the past which 
require the use of the preterite. The passage also presented challenges regarding 
vocabulary, e.g., ‘fidgeted’ gave rise to ‘jugueteaba’, ‘se agitó’, ‘toqueteaba’ and ‘se agitaba’, 
with three candidates opting for the transitive form ‘movía’ instead of the pronominal form ‘se 
movía’. The phrase ‘the dimness’ was translated in various creative ways, e.g., ‘la débil luz’, 
‘la penumbra’ and ‘en la oscuridad’. The phrase ‘the Imam’s rising warble summoned the 
town’s Muslims to prayer’ was nicely translated by one student as ‘la canción matinal del 
Imán l amaba a los musulmanes del pueblo a rezar’. It is interesting that no candidate 
rendered ‘the plumping of Aunty and Uncle’s tasselly cushions’ as ‘ahuecar los cojines’, the 
closest translation being ‘arreglando los cojines’, while one candidate translated it as 
‘emplumar los cojines’. There were a number of innovative attempts at this difficult section. 
However, a number of specific words tripped students up: for example, ‘the whistling snore’ 
was translated as ‘*roncidos’, ‘silbatos’, ‘ruidos’ and ‘sonidos de silba’, with only one 
candidate offering the more convincing option ‘ronquidos’. Similarly, ‘plait’ was rendered as 
‘flequil o’ and ‘sección de cabello’ where ‘trenza’ would have been better. There was some 
confusion over how to translate ‘sleeping so close to someone who was not Mother’, since in 
Spanish the use of the pronoun ‘su’ is compulsory in order to indicate that the mother in 
question is the protagonist’s mother; the lack of the pronoun in Spanish gives rise to a 
change of meaning, implying ‘to sleep with someone who was not a mother (‘dormir con 
alguien que no fuera su madre’ vs ‘dormir con alguien que no fuera madre’). A number of 
candidates also missed this common use of the subjunctive, erroneously opting for the 
indicative ‘era’. 
Overall, the examiners felt that students would benefit from some more targeted 
vocabulary learning and from paying more attention to verb formation, the use of pronouns 
and the use of prepositions. 
All candidates chose the medieval passage for translation into English rather than the 
Golden Age one. The text set, by Gutierre Díez de Games, was about the attributes of a true 
‘cavallero’. While all versions were competent, with some being good overall, a very small 
number genuinely attempted to mimic the register of the medieval Spanish in their use of 
English, the writer’s confident espousal of his views and grandiloquent style. There was little 
attempt to convey the archaism of the original: instead candidates seemed to want to 
emphasise to the examiners their comprehension of the passage, and thus most versions 
needed another critical read-through to ensure that the English sounded plausible. Repetition 
of words in English is not a problem if they are repeated in Spanish, as with ‘cavalgar’, 
cavallo’ and ‘cavalgadura’ for example. Given the medieval context, ‘knight’ was a better 
option than ‘gentleman’, which was chosen by some candidates. As with most language 
exercises, practice is important in this medieval / early-modern translation. 
 
 

 
61 

 
Spanish IV: Linguistic Studies I 
 
Class Profile 
 
  Quartiles 
 
 
 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
5    83.33% 
69 – 69 
68 – 68 
68 – 63 
59 - 59 
 
 
 Three students answered questions on sections A (To 
1250) and B (1250 to 1500) and three on sections B and C (1500 to 1700). All except one did 
a linguistic commentary. The students chose essay questions concerning the palatal glide, 
the evolution of F-, and morphological changes in Golden Age Spanish. Other essays 
covered the standardization of Spanish at the court of Alfonso X, Nebrija’s grammar, Juan de 
Valdés’s Diálogo as a sociolinguistic treatise, Andalusian, and habla de negros. The rest of 
the questions went unanswered.  
The candidates demonstrated very good knowledge and understanding of both 
historical linguistics and the cultural and political contexts that determined the evolution of the 
Spanish language. In their commentaries, the students pinned down salient phonological, 
morphosyntactic, and lexical features and successfully situated them in a chronological 
timeline, thus illuminating the meaning and production of the fragment under consideration. 
There were a few misunderstandings resulting from erroneous etymological assumptions 
prompted by familiar spellings, but overall the commentaries were excellent. In future, closer 
attention to morphological matters, especially in relation to the verbal paradigm, would be 
desirable. The essays provided thorough overviews of a topic. There were just a few minor 
misconceptions and omissions. The most compelling essays were all-encompassing and 
balanced as they wove together several aspects of a topic (phonological, morphosyntactic, 
lexical, historical…) and a range of scholarly perspectives. 
 
Spanish V: Linguistic Studies II 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
                
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
76 – 75 
70 – 65 
63 – 61 
58 - 58 
 
 
 The candidates did well overall, offering essays 
and exercises that showed a good knowledge of the subject. 
The paper comprised twenty-five questions (three of them producing two options). 
The most popular question (six candidates) was the phonetic transcription followed by the 
sociolinguistic questions (four candidates) and the morphological analysis of three words 
(three candidates). A lot of were not tackled by any candidate. 
The phonetic transcriptions were in general really accurate, and supported by very 
detailed comments. Some of them were really remarkable, including a comprehensive 
description with relevant comments on dialectal variation. Some recurrent sources of issues 
were stress, approximantization and, especially, external sandhi: candidates should pay close 
attention to synaloepha and resyllabification. Candidates should also pay attention to the 
differences between phones and phonemes.   
Regarding the morphological analysis, the results were good overall, and some of 
them were outstanding. Candidates demonstrated a very good knowledge of the literature 
and provided an excellent summary of different theoretical approaches.  
Answers on Sociolinguistic studies were also good overall, some of them offering solid 
and well-marshalled arguments. Some candidates provided essays recycling previous 
knowledge without engaging in depth in their analysis. As always, the best answers do not 
only show acquaintance with references provided (and go beyond them), but also engage 
with them critically. Candidates should always use a plan to help keep their structure clear. 
 
 

62 

 
Spanish VI: Period of Literature (i): to 1499 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
             Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
71 – 67 
67 – 67 
66 – 66 
65 - 65 
 
 
. Candidates answered on a reasonable range of questions across Sections B-D, but 
nobody tackled Section A. The most popular questions were on Jorge Manrique’s Coplas 
(four responses) and early lyric (three responses); other authors and topics chosen included: 
Don Juan Manuel, sentimental fiction, Pero López de Ayala, cancionero poetry, the 
romancero, the epic, and the Libro del cauallero Zifar. Responses were largely well focussed 
and backed by judiciously chosen textual evidence. Candidates did answer the questions set, 
exploring their wording and nuances, but in some scripts focus and accuracy fell short, 
particularly in the final essay of the three. The best performances demonstrated mastery of 
the primary material, organised and persuasive arguments, and highly perceptive and 
eloquent content. 
 
Spanish VII: Period of Literature (ii): 1543-1695 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
       Quartiles 
 
 
 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
10    66.67% 
75 – 69 
69 – 66 
65 – 63 
61 - 58 
 
 
 Eighteen of the twenty-eight questions were answered 
with the most popular in each section being A1 (‘deleitar o/y enseñar’), B15 (on the sonnet, 
and usual y on the ‘formal innovation’ option), and C21 (on the role of women in Cervantes’s 
Novelas ejemplares). Nobody attempted the critical commentary and there were no answers 
this year to specific questions on censorship and the Inquisition, Fray Luis, the ballads, 
Gracián or Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Nevertheless, the examiners were delighted with the 
variety of the texts covered and the depth and breadth of students’ knowledge of the period’s 
literature and culture more generally. There was an impressive engagement with this early 
modern period of literature in the Hispanic world. 
Particular highlights were some of the answers on neo-Stoicism, Quevedo, the 
mystics and Cervantes, with candidates demonstrating not just knowledge of a fine range of 
texts and authors but the critical acumen to answer the question asked thoughtfully and with 
a range of evidence, carefully analysed. Perhaps the most prickly question on the paper was 
C26 – Congreve’s view on courtship as a witty prologue and marriage as a dul  play – and 
this was interpreted in a variety of fashions, leading to some bright and thoughtful answers.  
The open-book format helped candidates to locate pertinent passages for analysis 
and often this was helpful in building an argument with a degree of confidence. However, in 
some cases individual, personal responses to texts or ideas were rather drowned out by the 
extent of quotation from primary and secondary sources. Access to so much material in the 
exam can be a blessing or a curse: examiners do not expect essays to contain lengthy 
quotation, dates of authors’ births and deaths or of works’ publication (unless relevant) or 
extensive details of critical works used. A premium is stil  placed by examiners on candidates’ 
ability to maintain focus in an answer, to develop an argument as a specific response to the 
question or quotation in the essay title and to detailed exemplification from texts studied, 
which can involve (usually brief) direct quotation or close reference. 
 
Spanish VIII: The Literature of Spain and of Spanish America: 1811 to the Present 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
2:2 
 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
10    17.54% 
41    71.93% 
6    10.53% 
  
80 – 68 
67 – 65 
65 – 61 
61 - 50 
 
63 

 
This year an unprecedented number of students – fifty-seven – sat this paper. Forty-five 
scripts included one or more Latin-American questions and thirty-six one or more Peninsular 
ones, with twenty-two offering a combination of the two sections. There were a few 
outstanding performances, but a majority stayed within their comfort zone, covering material 
from the lectures and established views, rather than engaging with and expanding on 
secondary sources. The poorest performances were those who tried to shoe-horn a tutorial 
essay into the question without proper attention to the specific issues raised by it. This bad 
habit is easily detected and was particularly in evidence in those questions that required a 
balanced view of two different aspects, as in the dynamics between tradition and modernity 
present in the theatre of Lorca and Valle, which were tilted towards the former without proper 
justification. 
While on the Peninsular side there was a good spread of responses – seventeen out 
of twenty-two questions were addressed – there were no essays on modernist poetry nor on 
the poets of 1927, even though there were some judicious responses on the arguably less 
enticing poetry under Franco. Among the most popular in this section was a question on the 
novels in the Franco period (12a) which offered students a chance to comment on their own 
reading experience. While the strategies that generate uncertainty in the reader were 
identified and discussed, students were reluctant to move away from a historicist reading and 
as a result had difficulties in accounting for the alleged pleasure afforded by the texts. Those 
who chose to write on the questions posed by writers of 1898 produced strong answers with 
reference to a representative range of texts and displayed a firm command of both the 
problematics of the period and the concerns of the individual writers. Likewise showing good 
skills were those who opted to write on the poetics of the essay form which required proper 
understanding of the writers’ individual style. Those students who wrote on novels of the 
democratic period were generally attentive to the specificities of the individual authors, even 
though, in one case, a conflation of narrator and author led to some unexamined and rather 
baffling conclusions, On the other hand, one adventurous candidate took up the question 
about Romantic irony, with flair, solid preparation and a display of scholarship, making a plea 
in passing for the study of their immediate precursors in C18th Spain. Also, this year, a 
number of students attempted the general topics at the end of the section with varied results, 
lack of cohesion and a tendency to list being two prevalent flaws. However, two performances 
stood out: one of them with a perceptive discussion of Unamuno’s French intertexts 
capitalizing on their knowledge of the novels of Balzac and Flaubert, and shedding light on 
the transformative process of recasting literary sources. The other featured an examination of 
social class in Delibes’s fiction, revealing how this concern was used as a foil for political 
commentary. Both were a pleasure to read.  
The answers on Spanish American topics this year were, by and large, disappointing, 
despite the opportunities allegedly afforded by the new, 8hr open-book format.  As was the 
case in 2021, relevance was a major issue, and there was clear evidence of the cutting and 
pasting of significant quantities of prepared material (such as tutorial essays, lecture notes 
etc.) which often had little to do with the question asked.  
An additional, though related, hazard this year arose from the newly acquired capacity to 
consult recorded material during the examination itself. Several answers were little more than 
ragged tapestries of (unacknowledged) quotations from online lectures, cobbled together with 
scant regard for the particular question. 
Candidates also struggled with questions that required them to think on their feet. 
Q.30 (on Neruda, via a very famous quotation from Eliot) in particular caused problems, 
though there was plenty of time to consider its implications (i.e. that the sense of subjectivity 
and emotion in/generated by a poem might not be those of its creator, simply transcribed). 
There was some dispiriting evidence too that candidates had not read the books about which 
they were writing, relying instead on summaries in lectures and/or sometimes inaccurate 
tutorial notes. For example, there were references in answers to Q.25 (on the Mexican 
Revolution) to a ‘battle of Salaia/Salaya’, replacing the better-known Battle of Celaya 
(mentioned in just about every novel of the Mexican Revolution). This is disappointing in a 
64 

 
context where the books themselves (even if unread prior to the exam), as well as the 
Internet are available for consultation.   
Despite tutors’ best efforts, some candidates are getting as far as FHS with little or no 
understanding of some basic literary-critical terms. ‘Fantasy’, ‘the fantastical’ and ‘the 
fantastic’ were often used interchangeably in response to Q.32 (on magical realism), despite 
the painstaking efforts of generations of critics to distinguish between them, while free indirect 
discourse remained an elusive narrative style despite its being explained and exemplified in 
the Prelim lectures on La fiesta del Chivo. The overall standard of English expression (syntax, 
grammar, spelling) was decidedly uneven. 
And yet, despite the above, there was the usual array ‒ from candidates who had 
attended the same lectures, seminars and tutorials ‒ of well-informed, detailed, attentive, and 
eloquent answers, many of which were a pleasure to read.  And, as ever, when candidates 
were faced with an unexpected question on a topic they had prepared, but tried as best they 
could to think about and answer it (rather than simply cutting and pasting a generic 
response), they were rewarded by the examiners, often with 1st Class marks, even if their 
responses were not always perfectly polished. Thoughtfulness and substance, even 
awkwardly conveyed, win out over voluble gloss every time.  
 
Spanish IX: Medieval Prescribed Texts 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
              Quartiles 
 
 
 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
6    75.00% 
73 – 72 
68 – 68 
68 – 66 
66 - 62 
 
 
 
 
 The standard of 
translations was high, and it was pleasing to see candidates produce work that was not just 
lexically and grammatically accurate but also showed flair and attention to context and idiom, 
where relevant. In one or two cases, overtranslation and convoluted English equivalents 
lowered the mark. Commentaries were generally well done; at the higher end they were 
thorough, perceptive, and focussed whereas less accomplished commentaries tended 
towards excessive breadth and a lack of focus. The essays made for compelling reading in 
many cases. 
The most popular essay chosen (five times) was question 3(a) on a possible 
‘gendered division of labour’ in the Poema de Mio Cid. The best responses to this particular 
question demonstrated originality as well as superb textual examples relating to the 
representation of male and female characters. There was a good range of responses to the 
essay questions, and most of them were tackled, with the exception of 3(c) and 4(d), which 
were both more technical questions on assonance and metre, and 5(d) on the representation 
of time in La Celestina. The open-book format lent itself to responses that were closely 
engaged with the set texts, thoughtful and mostly well focussed. 
 
Spanish X: Modern Prescribed Authors (i) 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
5    33.33% 
9    60.00% 
72 – 71 
70 – 66 
66 – 63 
63 - 58 
 
There were fifteen candidates for Paper X. Once again, the most popular authors 
were Calderón (11) and Cervantes (10), followed, this year, by Sor Juana (4), Garcilaso (2), 
Quevedo (2), and Góngora (1). (NB: Sor Juana was examined for the first time, following her 
recent addition to the paper.) Four of the six commentary passages were attempted: six 
candidates chose the interplay between Serafina and Álvaro in El pintor de su deshonra; five 
opted for the exchange between Quixote and Sancho on Altisidora and the nature of love; 
65 

 
two examined the stanzas from Nemoroso’s lament in Eclogue i; and the remaining two 
tackled the lines from Primero sueño. There were no takers for either octaves 5–8 from 
Polifemo or, once again, Quevedo (on this occasion, an excerpt from ‘El mundo por de 
dentro’). Of the essay questions, the most popular, perhaps predictably, were 7(a), on 
comedy in Don Quijote (6 takers), and 22, on the ending of Vida (7). Answers on the other 
four authors covered subjects ranging from friendship in Garcilaso and form/content in 
Polifemo to the role of paradox in Quevedo and gender neutrality in Sor Juana. 
Overall, the standard of commentaries was higher than usual, many candidates 
clearly benefitting from having longer to digest material under this year’s eight-hour format. 
There were some particularly strong performances on Cervantes and Calderón. Several 
candidates offered precise and sophisticated analysis of their chosen passage, 
demonstrating good coverage, fine sensitivity to matters of language and style, and 
appropriate balance between close reading and wider comment. On Calderón, for example, 
most candidates wrote accurately and persuasively on Serafina’s natural metaphors and 
Álvaro’s counter. That said, one or two stil  struggled with aspects of comprehension, notably 
in the final four lines of the passage, and even the best said little or nothing about some more 
challenging elements of vocabulary (e.g. ábrego, l. 24). In the passage from Don Quijote, 
ii.58, first-class scripts began with detailed dissection of Sancho’s language in the opening 
lines; again, weaker efforts were characterised by uncertainty over less straightforward 
vocabulary (rapaz ceguezuelo, lagañoso, etc.). On the two other authors tackled in this 
section, answers on Garcilaso were more convincing than on Sor Juana, with candidates for 
the latter tending towards essay-style meditation on the figure of Phaethon at the expense of 
close examination of the lines under the microscope. 
There were some excellent answers in several of the other sections. Again, many of 
the strongest essays were on Cervantes and Calderón, but there was a standout 
performance on Sor Juana in the form of a strikingly detailed yet tight examination of the first-
person voice in Primero sueño. Despite the eight-hour window, however, poor engagement 
with the specific questions set was still a problem. On Don Quijote, for example, several 
candidates chose to replay previously formulated arguments on comedy vs. tragedy rather 
than wrestling with the terms of the quotation. (Most worrying was the one answer to 7(a) that 
appeared to be on an entirely different question.) On Vida, some calderonistas paid little 
attention to the Aubrun contention that was the springboard for the essay, focusing too 
heavily on perspectives on the ‘rebel soldier’ debate. Elsewhere, on Sor Juana, ‘gender 
neutrality’ was read as ‘gender’. Once more, future candidates should avoid twisting or 
disregarding questions. 
 
Spanish XI: Modern Prescribed Authors (ii) 
 
Class Profile 
 
 
 
 
     Quartiles 
 
 
 
1st 
2:1 
2:2 
  
1st Q 
2nd Q 
3rd Q 
4th Q 
13    25.49% 
32    62.75% 
6    11.76% 
  
78 – 70 
69 – 65 
65 – 62 
62 - 56 
 
This year fifty-one students sat Paper XI; this represents a record (for comparison, 
thirty-two students sat this exam in Trinity Term 2021). The distribution of students per author 
this year was the following: Borges (18 students), Cortázar (16), Lorca (15), Neruda (12), 
Vargas Llosa (11), Valle-Inclán (9), García Márquez (8), Galdós (7), Darío (5), Alas (1).     
Students tried their hand at most of the questions: all the commentary passages, save 
for the Alas, were covered; and thirty-three out of the fifty essay questions offered were 
answered, though some, like questions 30 (Borges), 32 (Cortázar), and 44 (Vargas Llosa), 
were favoured over others.  
 
Commentaries 
There were some very impressive commentaries that demonstrated sophisticated 
understanding of the text, and the significance of the passage or poem to the wider work or 
collection. At their best, commentaries made intelligent connections between form and theme, 
66 

 
and produced a coherent reading of the passage guided by an overall sense of its major 
concerns. It was pleasing to see scripts in which students took care to analyse passages in 
full, without avoiding more challenging sections. Commentaries became woolly where 
candidates did not sufficiently grasp the significance of the passage in question, or could not 
comment in detail on its formal and thematic features, or failed to distinguish between issues 
of greater or lesser importance. In a handful of cases, students misunderstood the thematic 
content of passages in front of them (noting erroneously in the Borges passage, for example, 
that Emma Zunz’s father had been abusive toward her mother) or produced erroneous 
translations of lines (e.g., the ‘dedos partidos’ of the Jesus figure in the Lorca poem as ‘parted 
fingers’). It was surprising to encounter confusion over the meaning of some words in the 
context of an open-book exam, and it would have been better if students had made sure they 
had a very clear understanding of the language before launching into an analysis of the text. 
That said, the majority showed a good understanding of the purpose of the commentary 
exercise. When writing commentaries on poetry in particular, candidates are advised to keep 
any comments on alliteration plausible and precise, and, more generally, to resist the 
temptation to revert to the language of English GCSE (‘semantic field’).  
 
Essays 
Essays were generally more fully focused on the question than in the 3-hour format, 
suggesting candidates are using the additional time well, and not simply copying and pasting 
tutorial work. There were some instances of rehearsed, tangential, or irrelevant material, but 
generally where essays did lose focus it tended to be because candidates had not sufficiently 
grasped the implications of the question or had not developed a convincing argument in 
response to it. Many essays and commentaries contained spelling mistakes – particularly 
when students were quoting from Spanish. Students should be mindful of this and review 
their work before submitting.  
The open-book format allowed candidates to quote extensively from primary and 
secondary sources, and many candidates did this judiciously, though lengthy quotations were 
generally redundant. Candidates are advised not to quote the prescribed authors in English, 
and not to use translations of primary texts unless it is to comment critically on their 
interpretations (this applies to commentary passages also). 
At the top end, essays were creative, with some originality of approach, detailed, 
knowledgeable and in firm control of the material. The weakest essays were limited in scope 
or developed implausible or unconvincing arguments. In some cases, students had difficulty 
laying out a clear, coherent, and well-structured argument from the beginning of their essays 
and this led to trouble down the line. It was pleasing to see that most essays were well 
structured, often with strong introductions and conclusions, though some relied too heavily on 
description, plot summary, or the listing of not always relevant examples. In some cases, 
candidates took too long to address the specific terms of the question, drifting too far from its 
central premise or relying too heavily on contextual information in the elaboration of a 
response. There were several cases in which students resorted to rather vague formulations 
(e.g., ‘the society at the time’) without offering sufficiently solid detail and context to describe 
those concepts more fully. In addition, students need to be mindful that Latin America is a 
region that contains many national and ethnic entities; they should therefore avoid making 
broad generalizations that lump these entities together unnecessarily. 
 
 
 
67 

 
F.  NAMES OF MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
 
CHAIR:  

 
VICE-CHAIR:  
 
Czech 

French 
 
German  
 
Italian Examiners 
 
Modern Greek 
 
Portuguese  
 
Russian 
 
Spanish 

 
74 

FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL OF 
PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS AND ECONOMICS (PPE) 
INTERNAL EXAMINERS’ REPORT 
2022  
(Unreserved Version)  
 
This report has two sections: part A (statistics) and part B (Chair’s comments). For comments on 
individual papers, refer to the Philosophy or Politics or Economics examiners’ report. All statistics are 
based on results at 25 September 2022. Changes to results after that point (because of late 
mitigating circumstances notices or appeals) are not included.   
 
PART A: Statistics 
 
1. Class distribution  
 
Class 
2022  2021  2020  2019  2018  2017  2016 
1st 
62 
56 
104 
56 
39 
54 
38 
28% 
24% 
40% 
23% 
17% 
23% 
16% 
2.1 
151 
164 
148 
173 
178 
170 
178 
67% 
72% 
58% 
72% 
77% 
71% 
77% 
2.2 
3rd 
Honours Pass 
DDH 
Fail 
Incomplete 
Total 
224 
229 
257 
240 
229 
238 
232 
 
 
 
Page 1 of 13 
 

2. Statistics by gender and ethnicity 
 
a. Class distribution by gender  
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
Class 










1st 
16 
46 
18 
38 
32 
72 
12 
44 
 
 
17%  36% 
20% 
26% 
34% 
44% 
17% 
26% 
17% 
17% 
2.1 
73 
78 
66 
98 
61 
87 
55 
118 
 
 
76%  61% 
75% 
68% 
66% 
53% 
77% 
70% 
82% 
75% 
2.2 
3rd 
Pass 
DDH 
Fail 
Incom. 
Total 
96 
128 
88 
144 
93 
164 
71 
169 
79 
151 
 
 
b. Average mark and standard deviation by gender 
 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
 








Average 
65.0 
66.4 
65.6 
68.5 
65.2 
66.3 
64.6 
66.1 
St. Dev.  
6.9 
5.9 
5.3 
7.0 
5.7 
6.6 
6.0 
6.1 
 
 
 
Page 2 of 13 
 

c. Class distribution by ethnicity 
These statistics are taken from the Specialism Report in the Annual Programme Statistics. Unlike in 
other tables in this report, the year refers to the year in which students commenced study, not the 
year in which the exams were taken. Most students take Finals in the third year after commencing 
study, but some students will take Finals earlier (for example, if they are Senior Status students who 
do a two-year degree) and others later (for example, if they suspend during the course). 
 
2018/19 
2017/18 
2016/17 
Class 
White 
BME 
Unknown  White 
BME 
Unknown  White 
BME 
Unknown 
1st 
31 
15 

72 
27 

50 
11 

22% 
27% 
42% 
40% 
42% 
25% 
29% 
22% 
17% 
2.1 
109 
36 

105 
37 

120 
36 
10 
76% 
64% 
50% 
59% 
57% 
75% 
69% 
72% 
83% 
2.2 
3rd 
Pass 
Total 
143 
56 
12 
178 
65 

174 
50 
12 
 
 
 
Page 3 of 13 
 

3. Statistics by Paper  
No statistics are given for papers taken by 2 candidates or fewer. Only the mean and standard deviation are given for papers taken by 5 candidates or 
fewer.  
 
Paper 
Cands  >=70  >=60  >=50  >=40  >=30  <30  Q1  Median  Q3  Mean  St. Dev  Max  Min 
Advanced Paper in Theories of Justice 
19 

12 



0  66 
68  71 
66.9 
5.9 
74 
48 
Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Criticism 






0  59 
62  69 
63.7 
4.8 
70 
58 
Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics (in translation) 
23 

12 



0  61 
66  70 
66.4 
4.9 
75 
59 
Behavioural and Experimental Economics 






0  65 
69  72 
69.4 
4.7 
76 
61 
British Politics and Government since 1900 
57 
15 
30 



0  61 
66  70 
65.5 
7.8 
81 
40 
Comparative Demographic Systems 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
72.0 
1.4 
   
Comparative Government 
61 
13 
43 



0  63 
65  68 
65.3 
6.4 
78 
30 
Comparative Political Economy 
35 

26 



0  65 
67  70 
67.1 
3.3 
73 
60 
Development of the World Economy since 1800 
44 
14 
28 



0  65 
67  70 
66.8 
4.7 
80 
46 
Early Modern Philosophy 
19 

17 



0  62 
64  66 
63.3 
2.7 
68 
58 
Econometrics 
37 
13 
16 



0  62 
67  72 
67.5 
7.9 
81 
55 
Economics of Developing Countries 
15 

10 



0  64 
66  69 
66.6 
3.8 
73 
60 
Economics of Industry 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ethics 
123 
25 
67 
25 


0  60 
65  68 
64.4 
6.2 
81 
49 
Finance 






0  60 
66  70 
66.6 
6.9 
78 
58 
Finance (old syllabus) 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Game Theory 
17 





1  60 
67  70 
64.9 
13.2 
87 
36 
Government and Politics of the US 
13 





0  65 
66  70 
67.0 
2.7 
71 
62 
International Economics 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
71.0 
2.9 
   
International Relations 
121 
30 
82 



0  64 
66  69 
66.3 
4.5 
79 
53 
International Relations (old syllabus) 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IR in the Era of the Cold War 
20 

13 



0  60 
66  69 
65.9 
4.9 
76 
58 
IR in the Era of Two World Wars 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
66.0 
4.4 
   
Jurisprudence (Combined) 
13 





0  61 
65  66 
63.8 
5.1 
72 
56 
Jurisprudence (Essay) 
13 





0  63 
67  70 
65.8 
5.0 
73 
53 
Jurisprudence (Exam) 
13 





0  58 
62  66 
61.2 
7.2 
72 
49 
Page 4 of 13 
 

Knowledge and Reality 
46 
12 
23 
10 


0  60 
64  70 
64.0 
6.6 
78 
49 
Knowl. and Scep. in Hellen. Phil. (in trans.) 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Labour Economics and Inequality 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Logic 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Macroeconomics 
129 
23 
89 
13 


0  62 
65  68 
64.8 
5.4 
76 
41 
Macroeconomics (old syllabus) 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marx and Marxism 
20 

13 



0  65 
68  71 
67.5 
4.7 
76 
59 
Microeconomic Analysis 
20 

11 



0  62 
66  69 
65.3 
7.5 
82 
48 
Microeconomics 
152 
47 
58 
40 


0  58 
65  70 
64.3 
8.1 
85 
30 
Modern British Government and Politics 
19 

16 



0  64 
65  68 
65.9 
2.7 
72 
62 
Money and Banking 
21 

11 



0  63 
65  70 
66.1 
4.7 
74 
58 
Philosophical Logic 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
58.3 
4.0 
   
Philosophy of Mathematics 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Philosophy of Mind 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
68.4 
5.2 
   
Philosophy of Religion 






0  67 
69  70 
68.4 
2.7 
72 
63 
Philosophy of Science and Social Science 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
67.3 
4.1 
   
Plato on Knowl., Lang., & Reality… 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plato: Republic (in translation) 
36 

27 



0  61 
64  66 
64.1 
4.0 
72 
56 
Political Sociology 
72 
16 
46 
10 


0  63 
66  69 
65.7 
5.0 
78 
55 
Political Thought: Bentham to Weber 
10 





0  68 
68  69 
68.9 
3.2 
75 
63 
Political Thought: Plato to Rousseau 
12 





0  65 
67  68 
67.6 
4.1 
76 
61 
Politics in China 
18 

12 



0  62 
65  69 
65.1 
4.0 
71 
56 
Politics in Europe 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
67.8 
2.9 
   
Politics in Latin America 
12 

10 



0  64 
66  66 
65.2 
2.7 
70 
58 
Politics in Russia and the FSU 






0  67 
70  72 
69.6 
2.7 
73 
66 
Politics in South Asia 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
67.5 
1.8 
   
Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa 
14 





0  66 
67  70 
67.7 
2.2 
71 
64 
Politics in the Middle East 
33 
11 
20 



0  65 
68  70 
67.2 
3.3 
73 
58 
Post-Kantian Philosophy 
23 

18 



0  65 
67  69 
67.0 
3.1 
75 
62 
Practical Ethics 
29 

17 



0  60 
66  69 
65.7 
6.8 
78 
49 
Public Economics 
22 
11 
11 



0  66 
70  70 
68.3 
3.4 
75 
60 
Page 5 of 13 
 

Quantitative Economics 
119 
44 
52 
16 


0  61 
66  71 
66.1 
7.6 
83 
46 
Set Theory 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Social Policy 
26 

18 



0  61 
64  67 
64.5 
4.4 
76 
58 
Sociological Theory 






0  67 
67  70 
68.3 
2.8 
73 
64 
Special Subject in Economics: Environ. Econ.  
12 





0  66 
68  71 
68.2 
3.4 
74 
63 
Special Subject in Phil.: Feminist Theory 
19 

10 



0  66 
69  70 
68.6 
3.5 
76 
60 
Special Subject in Phil.: Indian Phil. (Essay 1) 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Special Subject in Phil.: Indian Phil. (Essay 2) 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Special Subject in Politics: Feminist Theory 
12 





0  68 
70  71 
69.5 
3.1 
76 
65 
Special Subject in Politics: ISC 
45 

35 



0  65 
66  68 
66.7 
3.5 
77 
58 
The Ethics of AI and Digital Technology 






0  64 
69  71 
66.8 
5.1 
72 
58 
The Philosophy of Kant 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
72.3 
3.3 
   
The Philosophy of Logic and Language 






0  65 
67  69 
66.7 
2.2 
69 
64 
The Philosophy of Wittgenstein 






0  67 
68  70 
68.3 
2.4 
72 
65 
The Politics of the European Union 






0  69 
71  73 
70.6 
3.1 
75 
65 
Theory of Politics 
102 
30 
59 



0  63 
66  70 
66.6 
4.8 
77 
55 
Thesis in Economics 

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thesis in Philosophy 






0  67 
72  75 
71.4 
7.8 
85 
59 
Thesis in Politics 
12 





0  65 
70  73 
70.4 
4.8 
78 
62 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 6 of 13 
 

4. Numbers offering each paper  
a. Philosophy  
 
Paper 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
101. Early Modern Philosophy  
19 
21 
34 
42 
34 
43 
38 
49 
102. Knowledge and Reality 
46 
51 
60 
79 
60 
64 
77 
75 
103. Ethics 
123 
128 
160 
152 
134 
151 
145 
154 
104. Philosophy of Mind 

11 
11 
10 
10 

20 
14 
106. Philosophy of Science and Social Science 








107. Philosophy of Religion 

14 
32 
36 
25 
25 
26 
38 
108. Philosophy of Logic and Language 

10 

16 
10 

15 
18 
109. Aesthetics  

19 
23 
24 
12 
26 
26 
17 
110. Medieval Philosophy: Aquinas 








112. The Philosophy of Kant 



12 




113. Post-Kantian Philosophy 
23 

21 
16 

24 
11 
22 
114. Theory of Politics 
18 
21 
30 
21 
28 
37 
31 
34 
115. Plato: Republic 
36 
47 
62 
38 
36 
39 
38 
39 
116. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics  
23 
15 
15 

13 
24 

28 
119. Set Theory, Logic 








120. Intermediate Philosophy of Physics 








122. Philosophy of Mathematics 








124. Philosophy of Science 








125. Philosophy of Cognitive Science 








127. Philosophical Logic 



12 
17 
13 
13 

128. Practical Ethics 
29 
33 
41 
44 
28 



129. The Philosophy of Wittgenstein 








137. Plato on Knowledge, Language and Reality 








138. Aristotle on Nature, Life and Mind (in trans) 








139. Knowledge and Scepticism (in trans) 








150. Jurisprudence 
13 







198. Special Subject: Feminist Theory 
19 
20 
17 





Page 7 of 13 
 

Paper 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
198. Special Subject: Indian Philosophy 








198. Special Subject: The Ethics of AI 








199. Thesis  



12 

12 
10 

 
b. Politics  
 
Paper 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
2016  2015 
201. Comparative Government 
61 
52 
46 
44 
58 
51 
64  
67 
202. British Politics and Government since 1900 
56 
79 
90 
82 
69 
72  
60  
67 
203. Theory of Politics  
84 
96 
102 
119 
85 
93 
95 
98 
204. Modern British Government and Politics  
19 
21 
19 
13 
11 
18 
24 
15 
205. Government and Politics of the United States 
13 
11 
14 
16 
17 
23 
20 
17 
206. Politics in Europe 








207. Politics in Russia and the Former Soviet Union 


14 

12 


12 
208. Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa 
14 
14 
17 
15 
23 
22 
28 
24 
209. Politics in Latin America 
12 
13 





11 
210. Politics in South Asia 


11 





211. Politics in the Middle East 
33 
23 
22 
35 
31 
32 
35 
32 
212. IR in the Era of Two World Wars 

11 
14 
10 
17 


16 
213. IR in the Era of the Cold War 
19 
22 
23 
20 
24 
30 
25 
23 
214. International Relations 
122 
128 
138 
120 
127 
120 
115 
135 
215. Political Thought: Plato to Rousseau 
12 
14 
28 
17 
14 
22 
19 
22 
216. Political Thought: Bentham to Weber 
10 
13 
13 

10 
20 
16 
17 
217. Marx and Marxism 
20 
19 
10 
16 

20 

15 
218. Sociological Theory 

13 



13 
21 
10 
220. Political Sociology 
72 
74 
70 
82 
67 
62 
76 
61 
224. Social Policy 
26 
26 
25 
23 
23 
16 
28 
33 
225. Comparative Demographic Systems 








227. Politics in China 
18 
16 
14 
16 
15 
14 
18 
13 
Page 8 of 13 
 

Paper 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
2016  2015 
228. The Politics of the European Union 

12 





11 
229. Advanced Paper in Theories of Justice  
19 
38 
31 
30 
26 
16 


230. Comparative Political Economy 
35 
18 
22 
24 
18 
10 
19 
21 
297. Special subject: International Security and Conflict  
45 
41 
46 
44 
37 
18 


297. Special subject in Politics: Feminist Theory 
12 







299. Thesis 
12 
20 
11 
11 
16 
21 
23 
15 
 
 
c. Economics  
 
Paper 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
2016 
2015 
300. Quantitative Economics 
118 
106 
150 
134 
144 
143 
138 
150 
301. Macroeconomics 
129 
139 
172 
137 
156 
152 
144 
156 
302. Microeconomics 
152 
152 
170 
135 
154 
154 
146 
157 
303. Microeconomic Analysis 
20 
15 
12 
19 
19 
11 


304. Money and Banking 
21 
16 
18 
15 
13 
15 
11 
10 
305. Public Economics 
22 
20 
17 
15 
20 
20 
16 
21 
306. Economics of Industry 

10 
12 
14 
19 
19 
11 
15 
307. Labour Economics and Industrial Relations 

10 



13 

13 
308. International Economics 







11 
310. Economics of Developing Countries 
14 

19 
21 
18 
34 
29 
23 
311. Development of the World Economy since 1800 
43 
35 
11 
10 




314. Econometrics 
37 
27 
34 
23 
20 
18 
13 
32 
318. Finance 
11 
15 
13 



N/A 
N/A 
319. Game Theory 
17 
29 
25 
17 
14 
13 
12 
25 
320. Behavioural and Experimental Economics 


10 

11 



398. Special Subject: Environmental Economics and Climate Change  12 
11 






399. Thesis  








 
Page 9 of 13 
 

5. Statistics by Branch  
The three separate assessments for Jurisprudence candidates are counted as one Philosophy script. Set Theory and Logic are counted as one Philosophy 
script. ‘Subjects’ comprise scripts, theses, and supervised dissertations. 
 
a. Approximate percentages of subjects in each branch 
 
Branch 
2022 
2021  2020  2019  2018  2017  2016  2015 
Philosophy  23% 
23% 
27% 
28% 
25% 
28% 
28% 
32%  
Politics 
42% 
43% 
40% 
41% 
41% 
40% 
40% 
41% 
Economics  34% 
34% 
33% 
30% 
34% 
32% 
32% 
27%  
 
b. Average mark, standard deviation and total subjects in each branch 
 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
Phil 
Pol  Econ 
All 
Phil 
Pol 
Econ 
All 
Phil 
Pol 
Econ 
All 
Phil 
Pol 
Econ 
All 
Phil 
Pol 
Econ 
All 
Avg. 
65.2  66.5  65.4  65.8  65.2  66.5  65.1 
65.7 
65.3  66.3  65.9 
65.9 
65.3  66.5  64.7 
65.6 
65.1  66.2  63.1 
64.9 
St. D. 
5.7 
4.9 
8.1 
6.4 
5.6 
4.5 
8.6 
6.4 
5.6 
4.9 
7.9 
6.3 
5.4 
5.2 
7.5 
6.1 
4.9 
4.8 
7.6 
6.1 
Total   407 
743 
605  1755  417 
794 
637 
1848 
559 
815 
684 
2058 
543 
789 
578 
1910 
456 
761 
618 
1835 
 
 
 
Page 10 of 13 
 

c. Classifications broken down by routes through PPE 
 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
Class 
Phil-
Pol-
Phil- 
PPE 
Phil-
Pol-
Phil-
PPE 
Phil-
Pol-
Phil-
PPE 
Phil-
Pol-
Phil-
PPE 
Econ 
Econ 
Pol 
Econ 
Econ 
Pol 
Econ 
Econ 
Pol 
Econ 
Econ 
Pol 
1st 
13 
27 
17 


29 
17 

18 
43 
35 


23 
20 

 
34% 
25% 
27% 
29% 
20% 
28% 
23% 
20% 
39% 
43% 
41% 
30% 
25% 
25% 
21% 
21% 
2.1 
24 
73 
44 
10 
20 
74 
56 
14 
28 
53 
49 
18 
24 
64 
71 
14 
 
63% 
69% 
70% 
59% 
67% 
71% 
75% 
70% 
61% 
54% 
58% 
67% 
67% 
70% 
76% 
74% 
2.2 
3rd 
DDH 
Fail 
Incom 
Total 
38 
106 
63 
17 
30 
104 
75 
20 
46 
99 
85 
27 
36 
91 
94 
19 
 
Page 11 of 13 
 

PART B: Chair’s Comments  
 
1. Personnel  
 
Internal Examiners 
 
Philosophy 
 
Politics 
  
Economics 
 
 
External Examiners 
 
Philosophy 
 
Politics 
 
Economics 
 
 
The External Examiners reviewed and commented on draft question papers. They read a selection of 
scripts from different classes. They attended the first meeting on the afternoon of Tuesday 5 July 
and the final meeting on Thursday 7 July 2022. 
 
2. Marking conventions 
The scale of marks used was the same as in the previous year. The classification conventions were 
also the same. 
 
Some other changes to the conventions were made: Philosophy and Politics reverted to closed-book 
in-person exams, while Economics exams remained online and open-book – the conventions were 
updated accordingly. The passage on plagiarism and poor academic practice was updated slightly. 
The penalty for late submission of online open-book exams was changed, following a change to 
University-wide policy.  
 
3. Problems with exam papers 
Two errors were noticed in Economics exams (in Quantitative Economics and Microeconomic 
Analysis), but it was apparent from the scripts that students were not affected. 
 
Several students submitted MCEs alleging a change in format for the Finance exam, and alleging lack 
of communication about this. The board discussed this with those responsible for the Finance paper 
and found that there had been sufficient communication; also, students did well in the exam. 
However, the board recommend that there be clearer communication about the paper in future. 
 
4. General Issues 
The following recommendations were made at the final meeting on 7 July 2022: 
•  The policies and procedures around online exams had been problematic this year. The 
University should move towards having typed, invigilated exams wherever possible. 
•  The PPE Committee should reconsider whether the 0-9 rule in the Conventions was 
appropriate (this is the rule that a candidate fails the whole examination if they receive 0-9 
on any paper). This is a PPE-specific rule and is not in all Conventions across the University. 
•  The last Philosophy exam was two days before the Philosophy marking deadline. More 
thought should be given to the exam schedule so that there is enough time for marking.  
•  Many of the technical Economics exams had been scheduled for the first four days of the 
exam window. Schools had explained that the bunching was unavoidable, because Modern 
Languages had chosen to have 8-hour exams, which had a knock-on effect on PPE (through 
Page 12 of 13 
 

Philosophy which shares a degree with Modern Languages). More thought should be given 
to the impact of new exam formats on timetabling.  
•  The University used to have Saturday exams but no longer did – reintroducing them might 
ease the scheduling problems. 
 
Page 13 of 13 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
Preliminary note 
PART I 
 
STATISTICS  
A. 
  
(1) 
Numbers and percentages in each class/category 
 
(a) 
Classified examinations 
 
FHS Course 1, BA Jurisprudence 
Class 
Number 
Percentage (%) 
 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 

37 
51 
54 
21.89 
25.24 
30.86 
II.I 
120 
147 
120 
71.01 
72.77 
68.57 
II.II 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
 
FHS Course 2, BA Law with Law Studies in Europe 
Class 
Number 
Percentage (%) 
 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
2021/22 
2020/21` 
2019/20 


11 
12 
27.78 
39.28 
6.66 
II.I 
12 
17 
13 
66.67 
60.71 
93.33 
II.II 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
 
 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
FHS Course 1 and 2 combined 
 
 
Class 
Number 
Percentage (%) 
 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 

42 
62 
66 
22.34 
26.96 
30.84 
II.I 
133 
164 
133 
70.74 
71.30 
68.70 
II.II 

4.79 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
 
 
(b) 
Unclassified Examinations  
Diploma in Legal Studies 
Category 
Number 
 
 
Percentage (%) 
 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
Distinction 
10 

11 
30.30 
32 
36.67 
Pass 
22 
17 
19 
66.67 
68 
63.33 
 
(2) 
Vivas 
 
Vivas are no longer used in the Final Honour School. Vivas can be held for students who fail 
a paper on the Diploma in Legal Studies, but none has been held for the last seven years. 
(3) 
Marking of scripts 
 
A rigorous system of second marking is used to ensure the accuracy of marking procedures. 
This second marking occurs in two stages. 
The  first  stage  takes  place  during  initial  marking  that  is  carried  out  prior  to  the  first  marks 
meeting. In subjects with a large number of candidates, marking teams meet shortly after the 
examination concerned to ensure that a similar approach is taken by all markers. Regardless 
of  whether  there  is  a  discrepancy  in  the  marking  profiles  among  members  of  the  team,  a 
sample of scripts is sent for second marking to ensure consistency. This sample comprised at 
least six scripts, or 20% of the scripts, whichever was larger. Further, any scripts where the 
first mark ends with a 9 (e.g., 69, 59, 49) or any mark below 40 were also second marked at 
this stage together with potential prize scripts. In 2021/22, 515 scripts were second marked 
prior to the first marks meeting. 
Page 2 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
Following the first marks meeting additional scripts were sent for second marking in three 
situations. The first concerned scripts that were 4 marks or more below the candidate’s 
average mark. The second was where a script had been marked at 58 and an increase to a 
mark of 60 would result in a First; the third was where a script had been marked at 68 or 67, 
and an increase to a mark of 70 (either in isolation or in conjunction with other 67s and 68s 
in the profile) would result in a First. 
In 2021/22, 283 scripts were second marked following the first marks meeting.  
Following the second marks meeting, additional scripts were sent for second marking (and in 
some instances third marking) where the Examination Board felt that further second marking 
(or third marking) was warranted upon reviewing candidates’ marks profiles.  4 scripts were 
third marked. 
Overall, the level of second marking was broadly similar to the last few years. 
 
Number 
Percentage % 
 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
Total Scripts 
2178 
2162 
1915 
 
 
 
First stage 
515 
571 
395 
23.65 
26.41 
20.62 
Second stage 
283 
173 
188 
12.99 
8.00 
9.81 
All second 
798 
744 
583 
36.64 
34.41 
30.44 
marking 
Jurisprudence Procedure 
As  the  two  elements  of  the  Jurisprudence  assessment  (i.e.  mini-option  essay  and 
examination) are marked separately, a slightly different procedure is used for second marking. 
During  first  and  second  marking,  the  standard  procedure  was  used  for  the  examination 
component (see above). Following the first marks meeting, additional second marking  took 
place. Some scripts were sent for second marking where one or both elements were 4% below 
the candidate’s average. Second marking also occurred where the combined marks left the 
student  on  the  borderline  between  classifications.  36  Jurisprudence  scripts  were  second 
marked after initial profiles were considered. 
 
 
NEW EXAMINING METHODS AND PROCEDURES
 
 
B. 
 
 
1.  Format of exams 
 
Coursework 
 
Three papers (History of English Law, Comparative Private Law and Advanced Criminal Law) 
were assessed by way of essays written over the course of a working week. The assessments 
for Comparative Private Law and Advanced Criminal Law took place in Week 0 of Trinity Term 
and Week 9 of Hilary Term respectively. History of English Law had assessments in both of 
Page 3 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
those weeks in order to accommodate candidates who were also taking Comparative Private 
Law or Advanced Criminal Law as their other options. 
 
Open-book examinations 
 
Candidates  sat  examinations  online  using  the  Inspera  platform.  This  platform  enabled 
students to write answers directly into the system and thus avoided the need for any files to 
be  uploaded  (in  contrast  with  the  Weblearn  platform,  which  had  been  used  previously). 
Candidates were allowed four hours per exam save for Jurisprudence which paper candidates 
were required to answer in three hours. In order to accommodate time zone differences and 
candidates  who  were  permitted  additional  time, each  paper  had to  be  completed  within  25 
hours with the four-hour (or three-hour) period commencing when the candidate opened the 
paper  via  the Inspera  system.  Because  of the  open-book nature  of  the exams,  no material 
was made available to candidates beyond case lists (which were made available via Canvas). 
Candidates  were  forewarned  in  the  Notice  to  Candidates  that  they  themselves  would  be 
expected to ensure that they had access to relevant materials.  
 
 
2.  Operation of Exams and use of ARD Database 
 
The examinations went smoothly and the Inspera system worked well. In the small number of 
instances when problems arose, these were almost all down to incorrect use of the Inspera 
system.  
 
 
3.  Examination Board  
 
Examination  Board  meetings:  The  ARD  Database  worked  efficiently,  and  all  marks  were 
available for the first marks meeting. During the first marks meeting any second marking was 
identified in relation to borderline classifications.  Profiles were then considered at the second 
marks meeting on 12 July 2022. The Examination Board approved the prize list and confirmed 
the final marks by correspondence  and a secure,  private SharePoint site.   candidates still 
have pending grades due to plagiarism concerns. These were returned to the Board by the 
Proctors and the marks will be confirmed via correspondence shortly. 
 
MCEs:  In  2020,  the  University  instituted  an  enhanced  MCE  procedure  which  permitted 
candidates  to  submit  a  student  impact  statement  and  to  submit  MCEs  directly.  The 
Examination Board considered 73 MCEs in total. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
Decisions  made  in  respect  of  individual  cases:  14  candidates  (16  individual  papers)  were 
penalised by the Examination Board for poor academic practice and/ or plagiarism. Penalties 
ranged  from  3  marks  to  10  marks  (the  maximum  marks  an  Exam  Board  can  impose  on  a 
paper).  8  candidates  (28  individual  papers)  were  sent  to  the  Proctors  due  to  plagiarism 
concerns. 12 papers were penalised, 8 being given a mark of 0 and 4 being given between 12 
Page 4 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
and 15 mark penalties. 10 papers were sent back to the Exam Board to impose a penalty for 
poor academic practice and 6 papers were cleared of plagiarism.  
 
4.  Recommendations 
 
ARD  Database
:  It  is  proposed  that  changes  be  made  to  the  Database  to  identify  more 
systematically instances where second marking should be undertaken.  
 
Examination  and  marking  conventions:  The  Board  asked  that  clauses  be  added  to  the 
Examination  Conventions  to  stipulate  penalties  for  extensive  typographical  errors,  and  that 
Undergraduate Studies Committee consider whether more specific rules could be agreed to 
determine when further marking should take place.  
 
5.  Thanks 
 
The  Examination  Board  expresses  its  graduate to  the  external  examiners,  who  contributed 
significantly to the work of the Examination Board.  
 
 
 
 
PART II 
 
A. 

GENERAL COMMENTS ON THE EXAMINATION 
 
The proportion of Firsts awarded is the lowest in three years, and moves to be more in keeping 
with pre-pandemic results. Students were given three hours to sit the examinations (two hours 
for the Jurisprudence exam). Withdrawals and suspensions stayed at the same level as 2021 
(23 withdrawals/suspensions), however this was significantly lower than the figure of 30 for 
2020.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 5 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
B. 

EQUALITY  AND  DIVERSITY  ISSUES/  BREAKDOWN  OF  THE  RESULTS  BY 
GENDER 

 
 
FHS Course 1, BA Jurisprudence 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
 
Female 
Male 
Female 
Male 
Male 
Female 
Male 
Male 
 

No 

No 
No 

No 
No 

No 
No 

No 

No 


14 
13 
32 
24 
23 
31 
28 
23 
31 
28 
23 
31 
28 
29 
15 
15 
II.I 
78 
73 
63 
47 
51 
68 
96 
51 
68 
96 
51 
68 
96 
69 
83 
84 
II.II 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total   
93 
 
75 
75 
 
 
75 
 
 
75 
 
 
 
99 
 
  
FHS Course 2, BA Law with Law Studies in Europe 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 6 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
FHS Course 1 and 2 combined 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
 
Female 
Male 
Female 
Male 
Male 
Female 
Male 
Male 
 
No 

No 

No 

No 
No 

No 
No 

No 

No 


16 
16 
26 
33 
27 
33 
35 
27 
33 
35 
27 
33 
35 
29 
21 
17 
II.I 
77 
79 
52 
65 
54 
66 
110  54 
66 
110  54 
66 
110  69 
98 
82 
II.II 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
98 
 
80 
 
82 
 
148  82 
 
148  82 
 
148   
120 
 
 
 
The imbalance in the number of men and women attaining Firsts has increased since 2021. 
The 17 percent gap for 2022 means there is work to be done.  
 
C. 
DETAILED NUMBERS ON CANDIDATES’ PERFORMANCE IN EACH PART OF 
THE EXAMINATION 

 
Students on the BA programmes take nine papers as part of the FHS examinations. These 
are made up of seven compulsory papers and two optional papers. Students chose from a list 
of 25 option papers for this year’s FHS. The distribution of students across the option papers 
is shown below. 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
Advanced Criminal 
23 
31 
25 
15 


Law 
Civil Dispute 
12 
15 




Resolution 
Commercial Law  
12 
20 

11 
25 
11 
Company Law 

14 
12 
13 

20 
Comparative Private  14 
14 
15 
17 
14 
11 
Law  
Competition Law 

24 
17 
15 

33 
and Policy  
Constitutional Law 






Copyright, Patents 




34 
29 
and Allied Rights  
Copyright, Trade 
16 
31 
16 
15 
18 
13 
Marks & Allied 
Rights 
Criminal Law 






Page 7 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 

 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
Criminology and 
16 
20 
16 
16 
12 
27 
Criminal Justice  
Dissertation 
17 





Environmental Law  
12 
22 
12 
16 


Human Rights Law 
20 
20 
18 
17 
20 
19 
Family Law 
20 
41 
57 
60 
49 
29 
History of English 
14 





Law 
International Trade 

15 
10 
13 


Employment 
13 

13 
15 
21 
15 
(Labour) Law 
Media Law 
41 
23 
30 
28 

20 
Medical Law and 
29 
51 
85 
73 
78 
47 
Ethics 
Moral and Political 
23 
35 
17 
24 
34 
18 
Philosophy 
Personal Property  

16 
12 

17 
13 
Public International 
33 
31 
29 
41 
46 
39 
Law 
Public International 





 
Law (Jessup Moot) 
Roman Law (Delict) 

16 



18 
Taxation Law 
19 
15 
27 
16 
22 
12 
 
Students on the DLS take three papers, and choose from a shortened list of FHS option 
papers. The distribution of DLS students across the core and option papers is as follows: 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
Administrative Law  






Advanced Criminal Law 






Commercial Law 






Civil Dispute Resolution 






Company Law 


12 



Competition Law and Policy 
14 





Constitutional Law 






Contract 
24 
19 
25 
22 
28 
27 
Copyright, Patents and Allied 






Rights 
Page 8 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 

 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
2018 
2017 
Copyright, Trademarks and Allied  4 





Rights 
Criminal Law 






Criminology and Criminal Justice   3 





Environmental Law 






European Union Law  






Family Law 






History of English Law 






Human Rights Law 






Labour Law 






Media Law 






Medical Law and Ethics 






Public International Law 






Roman Law (Delict) 






Taxation Law 






Tort 
15 
23 
17 
23 
23 
22 
Trusts 






 
The distribution below is shown as percentages. Where 0 is shown, less than 0.5% of 
students fell into this range. A blank field indicates that no students fell into this range.
Page 9 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Student 
39 or 
 
75-79  71-74  70 
68-69  65-67  61-64  60 
58-59  50-57  48-49  40-47 
Count 
less 
Administrative Law 
187 
15 
16 
17 
43 
68 

10 
Contract 
185 
11 
29 
12 
25 
59 


23 
European Union Law 
182 
15 
31 
19 
51 
39 
11 

10 
Jurisprudence 
180 
14 
17 
38 
65 
41 

Land Law  
183 

22 
17 
39 
37 
24 

21 
Tort 
184 

31 
30 
53 
45 


Trusts 
183 

18 
17 
31 
59 
23 

15 
Advanced Criminal Law 
23 
 



Civil Dispute Resolution 
12 
Commercial Law 
12 

Company Law 

Comparative Private Law 
14 
Competition Law and Policy 

Constitutional Law 

Copyright, Patents and Allied Rights 

Copyright, Trade Marks and Allied 
15 
Rights 
Criminal Law 

Criminology & Criminal Justice  
16 

Dissertation 
17 
Page 10 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Student 
39 or 
 
75-79  71-74  70 
68-69  65-67  61-64  60 
58-59  50-57  48-49  40-47 
Count 
less 
Environmental Law 
12 
 
Family Law 
20 
 

History of English Law 
14 
 

Human Rights Law 
19 
 
International Trade 

 
Employment (Labour) Law 
12 
 
Media Law 
41 
 

13 
10 
Medical Law and Ethics 
28 
 

15 
Moral and Political Philosophy 
21 
 


Personal Property 

 
Public International Law 
33 
 

11 

PIL Jessup Moot 

 
Roman Law (Delict) 

 
Taxation Law 
19 
 

  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Page 11 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
 
D. 

COMMENTS ON PAPERS AND INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS 
 
 
ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
 
 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The overall standard of scripts was good, and there were very few low marks. But 
outstanding work was rare. Most candidates showed a sound understanding of the law 
and the academic literature. Creative thinking backed up with careful support was 
rewarded with first-class marks. Anyone aiming to do their best on the Administrative Law 
exam should aim very deliberately to make something of the question asked, and not to 
write an essay commenting on the general area of the question. Comments on particular 
questions follow, showing the approximate percentage of candidates who attempted each 
one: 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
1. (~40%) The question asked ‘What is the purpose of administrative law?’, but most 
candidates treated the question as if it asked what was the purpose of judicial review of 
administrative action! Good answers, unsurprisingly, addressed administrative law. Most 
candidates made some attempt at explaining different theoretical models, but there 
seemed to be a lot of copying from tutorial essays. 
2. (~15%) The question asked how s 6 of the HRA has affected administrative law; a 
number of candidates made the mistake of treating it as if it asked what counts as a 
‘public authority’ for the purposes of section 6. Even a good essay on that different 
question provides only a fragment of an answer to the question that was set. 
3. (~15%) There were some very good essays on tribunals; the best explained what would 
count as success for the 2007 reforms. 
4. (~50%) The second part of the question asked perfectly clearly whether courts should 
defer to an administrative authority’s interpretation of its own policies. A number of 
candidates treated the question as if the second part asked, instead, whether a court 
should defer to an administrative authority’s judgment when the court is reviewing its 
discretionary decisions in general. Some misinterpreted this question as being about the 
error of fact/error of law divide. There were, however, some really excellent answers –the 
ones that dealt with the question that was set.  
5. (~80%) A very open question, dealt with very well by some candidates. In tackling a 
general question on a standard topic that is bound to be popular, it is a very good idea not 
to trot out a general tutorial-style essay. 
6. (10%) Well done; it was surprising that relatively few candidates attempted this 
question. 
Page 12 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
7. (~15%) Some candidates attempted this question in spite of not knowing what it was 
asking. Those who understood it gave some excellent discussions of judicial review of 
exercises of prerogative and other powers not conferred by a statute. 
8. (~70) Some candidates unfortunately treated this question as an opportunity to write a 
general essay on legitimate expectations. Good answers pointed out a variety of ways in 
which administrative authorities might act consistently or inconsistently, and made clear 
arguments as to the role that the law ought to have in securing the right forms of 
consistency. 
9. (a) (~15%) A small number of outstanding answers pointed out the radical diversity of 
public authorities’ duties in public law, and showed a sound understanding of the role of 
duties of care in negligence law. 
   (b) (~0%)  
10. (a) (10%) For some reason, some candidates treated this as if it were a question 
about standing. Good answers treated it as what it is: a question concerning the granting 
of ‘relief’ (a question that is related to the grant of permission to bring a claim for judicial 
review). 
      (b) (70%) Very many candidates answered this. An easy question on a popular exam 
topic can be a trap; good answers resisted the temptation to waffle. Very few answers 
actually addressed (1) what was to be lost with the removal of ‘sufficient interest’ and (2) 
how sufficient interest is actually contextualised in the case law. 
 
The moral of the story is, read the question! And then, answer it! 
 
 
ADVANCED CRIMINAL LAW 

General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The essays were, by and large, of a high level. The results were broadly in line with 
students who had worked hard consistently in the year. The standard in a take-home 
exam is appropriately high given the resources available to the candidates. Part A 
contained a compulsory question covering the material across the course. This Part’s 
general question required reference to multiple areas of the course if candidates were to 
do well. It could not be answered well by reference to one or two topics from within Part B, 
nor by material which lightly skated on the surface of more than two of those Parts. While 
the word limit prevented very long engagement with all the specific topics in the course, 
candidates were rewarded for knowing enough, and thinking enough, to select the best 
material to support the argument they were making. Appropriate referencing was not only 
expected, but entirely necessary. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Page 13 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Question 1 concerned what the criminal law does “better” than other areas of law. It was a 
compulsory question. Candidates did better if they explored what criminal law does at all, 
and what other areas of law do, and set standard for what “good” and/or “best” would 
mean in this context. Picking the right examples from across the course was very 
important.  
Question 2 picked up a quote from Coffee, arguing that tort law prices while criminal law 
prohibits. The nature of tort obligations, and the implications of punishment and prices for 
that nature were open to candidates. Better answers tended to look at not just the general 
principles, but how Coffee’s claim would carry through to the content of the rules 
themselves, if at all, and on the conceptual underpinnings of the claim, such as in the law 
and economics literature in the USA. 
Question 3, “What would be the best definition of the offence of rape in England and 
Wales? Why?” was a popular question. Candidates seemed to have engaged well with the 
texts from the course, and a range of preferences for the law and underlying theory were 
argued for, sometimes fiercely. The best answers engaged with the normative claims and 
practical issues with them. There was a lot of material to engage with and produce a 
careful answer, which could be implemented into the law with the least difficulty. 
Question 4, “What, if anything, about terrorism requires a different approach than that 
taken by traditional criminal law? How well does the current law respond to acts of 
terrorism?” Was generally popular as well, requiring a careful exposition of the criminal 
law in its “traditional” form, and the reasons terrorism might be different, as well as an 
assessment of the current law against some criteria for effectiveness. 
Question 5, “What can court orders tell us about the rules being enforced by those 
orders?” This question was not popular. It asks candidates to consider the nature of 
criminal, and perhaps even civil, enforcement, as a means to understand the content of 
the rules being enforced. This corresponded with one set of seminar, lecture and tutorial in 
the course, and required discussion of the various orders through which the criminal law 
can be enforced even aside from the nature of a conviction as a sanction. 
Question 6, “How can criminal law best be deployed in the context of financial 
wrongdoing?” This question was also not popular. It too built on a part of the course, here 
relating to regulation, and including issues like how “credibility chips” should best be used 
within the criminal law. To be answered well it required a standard of what “best” would 
mean in this context. It required analysis of what, if anything, makes financial wrongdoing 
any different to other forms of wrongdoing. 
Question 7, “‘You cannot criminalise hate, only the extra harm that hate does.’ Do you 
agree? How does the law of England and Wales respond to hate and discrimination? This 
was the first question we have had on the course, as the topic was added in 2021-2. The 
question prompted candidates to consider whether hate is only ever an aggravating 
feature or can be the grounds for a discrete offence on its own. The question required 
discussion of what the law could do, and what it does now. Candidates did better if they 
considered carefully what “hate” and “discrimination” could be, and focused their answer 
within the scope of the Advanced Criminal Law Course. 
 
Page 14 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
CIVIL DISPUTE RESOLUTION 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
13 candidates sat the exam including one DLS student. Overall, the examiners were very 
impressed by the standard of answers with 5 first class and a significant number of high 2i 
scripts. All questions were attempted save for the question on history. Questions on fair 
trial rights, judicial impartiality, mediation, costs and legal professional privilege were 
particularly popular. Better candidates demonstrated a strong command of the materials 
on the reading list and thoughtful, nuanced reflections of the issues raised by the primary 
and secondary materials. Weaker scripts tended to answer the question too narrowly, or 
too broadly. 
 
COMMERCIAL LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
There were some very pleasing, but no absolutely outstanding, scripts in Commercial Law 
this year. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Question 1 
This question had surprisingly few takers – nemo dat essay questions are typically quite 
popular. The reason may well be that the question asked not just about the statutory 
exceptions to nemo dat, but also for exceptions in equity. This might have caused many 
candidates to avoid this question – those who opted to answer it unfortunately simply 
ignored the reference to equity, leading to mediocre marks.  
Question 2 
This question also had few takers. Better answers showed awareness of the recent Law 
Commission proposals and engaged with the question whether the suggested reforms 
would also be welcomed if introduced across the board.  
Question 3 
This was a popular question producing some very pleasing answers, showing a thorough 
knowledge of the literature. The best answers took issue with the quote and sought to 
justify undisclosed agency based on commercial expediency.  
Question 4 
This was not a popular question. Those that attempted it tended to focus on the existing 
English rules relating to characterisation, some choosing to concentrate on the 
sale/security, others on the fixed/floating charge distinction. Better answers explained the 
Page 15 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
largely unimplemented reform proposals of the Law Commission and contrasted English 
law with Art. 9 UCC and legal regimes throughout the Commonwealth based on it.  
Question 5 
This was the most popular essay question, rather surprisingly, with some excellent 
answers setting out the reasons why anti-assignment clauses are included in contracts 
and the reasons why these might be a bad thing, before turning to the Regulations and 
how they have attempted to improve the law.  
Question 6 
This question was the most popular problem question. It was not exactly a difficult 
question, and as such it was necessary to get almost everything right in order to achieve a 
first class mark. One common failing was not to consider the arguments that the other side 
might rely on and explain how they might be dealt with. For example, the projector is 
damaged beyond repair by the exploding lamp – of course, it is likely that this will be a 
breach of s. 14(2) SGA, but what about the argument that Ben should not have ignored 
the warning light? Another problem was that many candidates did not stop to think what 
remedies Ben might seek in the different scenarios. Thus, in (a), damages will 
compensate Ben fully, why spend (sometimes a lot of) time discussing rejection and 
acceptance? Under (c), many candidates thought the small print on the website 
constituted an exclusion clause and wrote about incorporation and, worryingly, s. 62 of the 
Consumer Rights Act (even though Ben was clearly not a consumer), when actually the 
question was concerned both with the effect of the pandemic (the projector/lamp had not 
been used) and whether the instructions should have been more prominent (i.e. written on 
the actual projector) in order to make sure that buyers are able to maintain the projector 
properly – lack of easily accessible instructions amounting to a breach of the term implied 
by s. 14(2) SGA. Finally, many candidates simply applied Ritchie in the final scenario, 
without stopping to think what use it would be to Ben to know why precisely a lightbulb 
failed!  
Question 7 
This was the second most popular question and most candidates dealt with it well. The 
main problems were that hardly any considered whether some of the sales might 
constitute consumer transactions – Luke was a ‘collector and dealer’, after all, so this 
requires at least to be discussed. Although the question was primarily about property and 
risk, contractual claims against the seller should not be ignored entirely!  
Question 8 
This was also a popular question. Most candidates handled it well. The very best answers 
saw the point that where it is clear that the agent is acting against the interests of her 
principal there can be no actual or apparent authority. Most candidates thought that the 
promise of the ‘free’ masks could not be enforced for want of consideration; only a few 
argued that entering into the long-term supply contract might well be sufficient 
consideration.  
Question 9 
Only one person answered this question so that it would be inappropriate to comment.  
Page 16 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Question 10 
While this had few takers, it was mostly well done; there was, however, a tendency to opt 
for one solution and to discount others.  
 
COMPARATIVE PRIVATE LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Two papers were set for this year’s exam (by extended essay) in “Comparative Private 
Law”. Some candidates sat their paper at the end of Hilary Term, others at the beginning 
of Trinity Term.  
Each of the papers contained three demanding and far-reaching essay questions of a 
comparative nature, two focusing on the law of obligations, namely contract or tort/delict, 
and the third focusing on property law. Candidates were required to answer one of these 
questions by reference to English law, French law, and German law, using the material 
which featured on the reading list. There was a good spread of questions answered, with 
all of them being tackled by at least one or two candidates and the property essays being 
slightly more popular with candidates than the obligations essays.  
The overall quality of the submitted work was remarkably good, with relatively few papers 
displaying significant weaknesses and a considerable number of really outstanding 
contributions. Candidates opted for a range of different approaches and structures for their 
essays, some of which were more successful than others. The best answers were those 
which demonstrated a thorough understanding of the law in each legal system on its own 
terms, while drawing out comparisons and contrasts between the systems and managing 
to weave all this into an elegant, thoughtful and engaging comparative argument. 
Typically, essays which focussed directly and explicitly on the question set achieved 
higher marks than those which resorted to more generic comparative observations. 
Most candidates drew on a wide range of literature from the reading list and many put the 
information thus obtained to good or excellent use in supporting their argument. The 
examiners were particularly impressed by a few scripts whose knowledge of the relevant 
law(s), ability to deal with a wide range of materials, level of engagement, depth of 
analysis and sophistication of argument far exceeded that which one would normally 
except to encounter at an undergraduate level. All in all, the examiners were thus very 
happy with candidates’ performance.  
 
COMPETITION LAW AND POLICY 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The paper comprised eight questions of which four were essay questions and four 
problem questions. Following the successful change of format initiated two years ago, all 
Page 17 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
candidates were asked to answer three (instead of four) questions, including at least one 
problem question, in four hours. 
Essay questions were of a mixed nature, probing the student’s ability to reflect on 
transversal, topical, timeless, and/or very focused elements of the course. 
Twenty-four students were registered to sit the examination, 
 
 Overall, the scripts showed a very good 
command of the subject and good analytical skills. The average mark was 65,5% with 
three students achieving a first class honours. As in previous years, candidates generally 
chose to spread their answers across both essay and problem questions, although there 
was again a clear preference for the latter (ie two, sometimes even three problem 
questions). First class answers generally displayed excellent grasp of the underlying 
material, evidenced by sustained references to case law and commentary, combined with 
robust analytical engagement and creative —sometimes highly innovative— reasoning. 
Weaker answers tended to miss important substantive issues, engage in perfunctory 
analysis and/or misrepresent the relevant case law. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The first essay question required candidates to reflect on a quote drawn from Advocate 
General Rantos’ Opinion in the Servizio Elettrico Nazionale case, which states that Article 
102 TFEU does not prevent the acquisition or maintenance of market dominance on the 
merits. Overall, the seven students who attempted this question performed very strongly. 
The average mark obtained was 66,5%, with one candidate achieving a mark of 70% or 
above. 
The second essay question required students to reflect on a quote by former European 
Commission Director-General for Competition, Alexander Italianer, which essentially dealt 
with the timeless issue of how to distinguish between “by-object” and “by-effect” 
restrictions of competition. Given that this is a staple of the course, it was unsurprising to 
see that sixteen students attempted the question. Three of them achieved a distinction 
mark; the average was 66,5%. 
Question three required candidates to discuss the somewhat provocative statement, 
according to which EU merger control is currently unfit for purpose. This was an unpopular 
question with only two students attempting it with neither of them receiving a mark of 70% 
or above. The average was 63,5%.  
In question four, candidates were given the opportunity to reflect on a topical issue: the 
(in)effectiveness of contemporary competition law in digital markets and the role of 
regulation in safeguarding competition in these markets. This question was similarly 
unpopular as only three students attempted it. While the average mark was 61%, 
performances were very uneven as one student achieved 69% and another 50%. 
Problem questions focused on the application of Article 101 TFEU, Article 102 TFEU, the 
European Merger Regulation and the enforcement of competition law, with significant 
crossover in all four of the questions on offer.  
Question five contained a multitude of issues including whether there was jurisdiction, 
several potential restrictions under Article 102 TFEU (predominantly), and the EUMR, as 
Page 18 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
well as the lawfulness of acts carried out by the European Commission in the context of a 
dawn raid. On the whole, the seven students who attempted this question performed very 
strongly. The average mark obtained was 66,5%, with one candidate achieving a mark of 
70% or above.  
Question six similarly cut across several areas of the course touching on abuses of 
dominance, potential collusive behaviour, and, again, the lawfulness of acts carried out by 
the European Commission in the context of a dawn raid. Students were also tested on 
their ability to properly assess joint ventures (ie full functionality under the EUMR or 
cooperative under Article 101 TFEU). This was a very popular question. Overall, students 
performed to a very high standard, averaging 66,5%. Of the sixteen candidates who 
attempted it, one obtained a mark of 70% or above. 
Question seven essential y probed candidates’ ability to assess, under Article 101 and/or 
102 TFEU, potentially problematic coordination between competitors in a tight oligopolistic 
and multi-sided market where a new player was threatening the incumbents. There was 
also an important merger-related component. The question was not a popular choice with 
only four of the students who submitted a script attempting it. Performance-wise, the 
standard was once again very good with an overall average of nearly 66%. There were no 
marks of 70% or above. 
Question eight mainly touched upon vertical restraints under Article 101 TFEU. There was 
also an important joint venture component to address. Ten students attempted this 
question. The overall average mark was 63%, but performances were quite uneven. No 
candidate obtained a mark of 70% or above.  
 
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The general standard of the FHS constitutional law paper was solid. 7 candidates sat the 
paper this year, with marks ranging from 60 to 68; something which indicates that while all 
candidates were able to show some signs of solid 2:1 ability, few candidates this year 
were able to demonstrate clear first class ability. 
The differences in mark achieved owed a great deal to the amount of focus on the 
particular question attempted. Most candidates were able to write something relevant and 
broadly engaging in response to a question, but some did not demonstrate sufficient focus 
on the particular question that had been asked. Therefore, while there were times when 
candidates would offer cogent arguments, and interesting ideas, examiners weren’t 
always in a position to reward these with higher marks because of  the disconnect 
between a candidate’s answer and the question the examiners had set.  
It is also important to highlight the importance of primary sources. Candidates invariably 
relied heavily on secondary literature to frame their analysis, and found it more 
challenging when pushed to engage with primary sources which had perhaps not yet been 
written about as thoroughly. On one hand, this might indicate an unfamiliarity with the 
sources themselves, suggesting closer scrutiny of these might have been an advantage. 
On the other hand, it may indicate candidates felt less confident applying the concepts 
and principles they’d learnt about without the security of a second opinion to rely on. If the 
Page 19 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
latter, the examiners would encourage candidates to try and embrace such opportunities 
as a chance to show their learning. While examiners do place weight on accuracy, they 
are also often willing to reward intellectually creativity – even where this might introduce 
slight inaccuracies – when that creativity is utilised within the context of an otherwise well-
argued and engaging argument. 
 
 

CONTRACT LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Among the essays, question 5 (Interpretation) and question 6 (Consideration/Privity) were 
most popular, followed by question 2 (Remoteness).  As question 5 invited candidates 
simply to ‘discuss’ a leading dictum from the decision in Wood v Sureterm, the better 
answers imposed a structure, building on the elements identified in Lord Hodge’s dictum, 
such as objectivity, literalism, contextualism and the ‘quality of the drafting’.  Question 6 
was concerned with the relationship between consideration and privity and the effect of 
the 1999 Act.  The weaker answers failed to address this aspect, and the weakest were 
either a general discourse on either consideration, or privity, alone.  Question 2 was 
generally done well, with the best of the answers focused on the relationship between the 
test in Hadley v Baxendale and the ‘assumption of responsibility’ approach advocated in 
The Achilleas, and aware of the recent decision of the Privy Council in the Global Water 
case.  Question 1 (Common Mistake), question 3 (Good Faith), question 4 (Protection of 
Consumers) and question 7 (analysis of either The Law Reform (Frustrated Contracts) Act 
1934, s.1, or the Misrepresentation Act 1967) were attempted by only a handful of 
candidates. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Problem 8 was in three parts.  A surprisingly large number of candidates failed to spot that 
there was a potential penalty in part (a) and, in part (c), very few candidates dealt with the 
distinction between the right to terminate under the general law for ‘repudiatory breach’ 
and the right to terminate under the express provision set out in the contract for ‘serious 
breach’.  In part (b), many candidates failed to detect the potential relevance of an implied 
condition under s.14 of the Sale of Goods Act 1979 and the right to reject for breach. 
Problem 9 was potentially large because of the uncertain status of the claimant as 
consumer, or non-consumer.  The best answers considered both hypotheses, but high 
marks were also awarded to answers which dealt with the question of the claimant’s 
status and then chose to focus primarily on the consumer, or non-consumer outcome.  On 
the whole, the non-consumer law was dealt with better than the consumer law.  A number 
of candidates failed to see the full ramifications of a consumer claim, i.e. that both the 
Consumer Rights Act 2015 and the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 
2008 came into play; and some failed to see that there were possible claims for both 
misrepresentation (‘misleading’ conduct) and breach of contract, notwithstanding the 
inclusion of an express guarantee of performance. 
Page 20 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Problem 10 was also in three parts.  Most candidates saw the potential for frustration in 
part (a), but few considered the question of the construction of the contract (was it for 
‘storage capacity’ or for use of the warehouse destroyed in the fire).  Part (b) was 
concerned with a limitation of liability and, as is often the case, the question of 
incorporation was dealt with better than any question of interpretation or the application of 
the Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977.  Part (c) was quite challenging.  Some candidates 
thought it raised a question of interpretation, but few saw the possible case for an implied 
term (i.e. that the defendant could not move the storage venue) and, as a result, the 
potential relevance of the express term that no terms could be implied. 
Problem 11 raised issues of variation (Roffey, Foakes v Beer etc), duress, privity and 
remedies.  On the whole, the variation and duress issues were dealt with best, though 
some candidates focused almost exclusively on the question of consideration and 
overlooked the potential relevance of promissory estoppel, notwithstanding the obvious 
similarity between one aspect of the problem and the facts of Collier v Wright.  Most 
candidates identified the issue of ‘lawful act duress’ and most were aware of the recent 
decision in Times Travel, with the best answers offering quite a sophisticated analysis of 
the reasoning of the majority.  Quite a number of answers dealt only with privity and 
remedies (third party loss, Panatown etc.) only as an afterthought. 
Problem 12 was a further question divided into three parts.  In part (a) as many candidates 
discussed termination (which was of little practical use to the claimant) as discussed 
specific relief (specific performance, injunction) or a claim to ‘gain-based’ damages 
(account of profits, negotiating damages).  Part (b) on mistaken identity was generally 
done quite well, but some candidates were confused as to the distinction between a void 
and voidable contract.  Part (c) on undue influence and third-party notice was also 
generally done well; weaker answers dealt only with one aspect and not the other, or 
thought that the advice of a solicitor was always sufficient to protect a bank ‘put on 
enquiry’. 
 
COPYRIGHT, TRADE MARKS AND ALLIED RIGHTS 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Q1 invited candidates to evaluate a classic topic of copyright: how to navigate the 
idea/expression dichotomy. Two candidates answered this question and both were of a 
good standard. Both answers focused on subject matters and copyright infringement, but 
the better answer provided a careful and thorough analysis of not only why the courts do 
not provide clear guidance but also why the current state is desirable for different reasons. 
There are several ways to address this question: ideas/expression through the lens of 
subject matter, limitations on copyright to accommodate the public interest, justification, 
and copyright infringement.  
Q2 invited candidates to consider the extent to which new technological developments will 
affect the originality requirement for copyright subsistence. Many candidates successfully 
answered this, considering different tests adopted by the UK (labour, judgment, skills) and 
the EU (author’s intellectual creation) and how the UK should/wil  follow the EU after 
Brexit. Some candidates extended their analysis to AI, but a few were distracted by the 
topic and drifted from the focus of the question. There are several themes to consider: 
Page 21 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Given the proliferation of technology, shall we increase the originality standard to raise the 
bar of copyright subsistence? What would be the outcome if we did so? Is it desirable to 
have more or fewer works protected under the copyright regime? Whether the concept of 
originality needs to be revisited more fundamentally in light of AI? 
Q3 invited candidates to evaluate the role of moral rights within the UK context. This 
question proved the most popular as more than half of the candidates opted for it. Most 
answers stayed in the conventional space, arguing that the UK's moral rights are 
insufficient to protect the author’s rights compared with the civil rights approach such as 
France and the CJEU. Candidates identified the following weaknesses of the UK regime: 
assertation in the right to attribution, the narrow interpretation of derogatory treatment, and 
the potential for waivers. A few took a bold and creative approach to suggest that the 
authors might need to reconsider the significance of moral rights, particularly in the 
internet era. Maybe it is time to move on. Some candidates merely described the law 
(what are moral rights and how are they regulated) answering what they knew rather than 
what the question asked. 
Q4 invited candidates to assess whether current copyright provisions need to add 
fundamental rights as an additional ground of fair use in addition to the express statutory 
exceptions. Only two attempted this question, and the quality varied. In general, both 
answers highlighted the most relevant case from the CJEU (Spiegel Online) and 
examined the ambiguity of the InfoSoc Directive, which in turn affected the UK’s 
implementation. The better answer examined not only the current provisions but also 
explored the link between copyright and fundamental rights. It also analysed the public 
interest defence under the CDPA (s 171(3)). 
Question 5 invited candidates to consider the extent to which UK trade mark law is 
equipped to reconcile conflicting interests in relation to non-traditional marks. As an open-
ended question, the challenge was for candidates to select a line of analysis from within 
the options. The options included: distinctiveness (both inherent and acquired); the extent 
to which precise representation on the register can act as a filter; policy exclusions such 
as substantial value; refining the scope of infringement; supplementing defences and so 
on. Better answers focused on specific categories of marks (e.g. shapes or colours) and 
identified precisely what a balanced system should look like (e.g. facilitating undistorted 
competition). Relevant analysis ranged across categorical exclusions for certain types of 
marks, alternatively the advantages of a case-by-case determination and the need to 
connect registrability to infringement. On the whole, answers were of a high standard. 
By contrast, the responses to Question 6 were more variable. When considering the range 
of functions recognised in trade mark law, weaker answers tended to ramble through the 
expansion of trade marks into brands – via the image and investment functions – debating 
that development in isolation from the question. More closely reasoned analysis 
challenged the definitional clarity of the functions and the conditions under which harm to 
them could be measured or else presumed. Where the harm rationale was unconvincing, 
the best candidates considered alternative rationales to justify the protection of the 
expanded functions. 
Question 7 attracted several good answers to the challenge of addressing the problem of 
registered but unused marks, i.e. clutter. Thoughtful responses began by identifying the 
registration paradigm (as opposed to a use-based system) within which the problem 
arises. They went on to identify the problems caused by clutter and the inadequacies of 
the current approach, including the unsystematic and expensive nature of bad faith 
invalidations and ensuing commercial delays. Some creative answers grappled with the 
Page 22 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
difficulty of objectively identifying subjective intention, at the heart of bad faith. The best 
answers closely engaged with the UKCA’s interpretation of the SkyKick approach and 
whether additional reform mechanisms could supplement bad faith. Unrealistic responses 
advocated entirely abandoning a registration-based system in favour of a use-based one, 
or proposed unworkably expensive or examination-intensive ‘cures’. 
Disappointingly, Question 8, on artificial intelligence and trade mark law, was not 
attempted by any candidate. 
Most candidates correctly identified the key issues in Question 9, such as qualifying 
subject matter, including A Blue Sunday, 2 CDs, and a DVD, fixation/duration/originality of 
these works, and co-authors/joint-authors, particularly in the case of A Blue Sunday. Once 
copyright subsistence was identified, most answers established copyright infringement in 
CD 1 and the DVD. The candidates rightly parsed the different economic rights infringed: 
reproduction, performance, and distribution. The moral rights were the right to paternity to 
Lan’s old works, the right to object to false attribution on CD 2, and the right to the integrity 
of A Blue Sunday. Better answers covered less obvious angles such as attribution rights 
not being applied to performance and whether the band's name is subject to copyright. 
Disappointingly, no candidate identified whether the footage in the new DVD could benefit 
from a review/quotation defence.  
Q10 consisted of two scenarios. The first one required the candidates to apply the law on 
whether Lee’s picture “Press Pause to be Happy” was infringed by Chicca. The majority of 
answers highlighted two important issues: the idea/expression dichotomy of the two 
protected works and substantiality, relating to whether Chicca’s photo is copied from Lee. 
One issue deserving attention was whether the technique used is common/popular? 
Better answers analysed whether Lee’s posting the screenshot of the advertisement on 
the blog is a copyright infringement and if so, whether any defence applied. Regarding the 
dispute between the Oxford Chronicle and Lee, most candidates correctly identified that 
reporting current news/events does not apply to photographs. The second part required 
candidates to consider the nature of the contract between Lee and CK. Is it an assignment 
or license? Who is the author/owner? To what extent does the contract clause affect CK’s 
right to modify the picture? Most candidates identified the moral rights issue as the right to 
integrity, but better answers clarified the contractual provision. 
The problem relating to the chocolate biscuit in Question 11 proved popular, being 
attempted by around half the candidates. The registrability assessment required an 
analysis of distinctiveness, both inherent and acquired as well as whether any of the policy 
exclusions – technical result and substantial value in particular – applied. It was 
disappointing to see several candidates did not develop the inherent distinctiveness test 
(London Taxi) in detail. Most candidates also missed the significance of applying for 
vehicles. This might help with inherent distinctiveness (the shape did not relate to the 
goods) but there was no evidence of any intention to actually use the sign for that class of 
products, suggesting bad faith (SkyKick). Infringement analysis required candidates to 
assess whether the defendant’s use was relevant use as a mark in relation to goods, 
whether confusion (including post-sale confusion) or any of the dilution claims applied and 
if the mark was not successfully registered, whether there might potentially be a passing 
off claim. This question was generally answered competently. 
The hypothetical problem relating to Spotify in Question 12 required: (a) the application of 
the case law on the distinctiveness of slogans in particular; (b) whether the YouTube use 
and the t-shirt use (separately analysed) passed the infringement thresholds (use in the 
course of trade, in relation to goods), whether there was meaningful tarnishment or 
Page 23 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
alternatively due cause and whether there might be any other defence available; and (c) 
composite mark infringement analysis for the SPORTIFY mark, with an emphasis on 
blurring as well as (potentially) unfair advantage. This question was attempted by 6 
candidates and the quality of answers varied across the three parts. 
 
CRIMINAL LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Four candidates sat the exam, one Diploma and three second BAs.  The syllabus for this 
paper  is  not  the  same  as  for  Law  Moderations  exam  and  candidates  should  familiarise 
themselves with its scope.  The examiners decided not to award a prize this year.   
 
CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
This year 19 candidates ultimately took this paper 
. As per 
the instructions, six papers were marked by the second assessor, representing the range 
of marks and including any borderline papers. The agreed marks ranged from 63% (upper 
second class) to 74% (first class). In addition, several further scripts were double marked 
following the first marks meeting. The papers were stronger than in previous years, 
although it is unclear why this might be the case or whether it reflects a more industrious 
cohort this year. In any event, the result was gratifying as teaching on the course had 
been as challenging this year as in the pandemic year. Attendance in person was more 
intermittent, and tutors reported the usual technological challenges with the few online 
sessions. There were several distinction marks achieved, although the highest mark was 
74. The first class answers were well written, critically engaged with the academic 
literature, and showed a good understanding of the theoretical perspectives underpinning 
arguments raised within the literature or by criminal justice professionals. Those papers 
that were awarded an upper second class mark showed attention to detail and a sound 
knowledge of policy, practice and academic debate. The students on this option have 
considerable discretion in responding, choosing four out of 12 questions (three for DLS 
students). The course tutors are considering restricting this degree of choice slightly, from 
12 to 10 questions next year in order to discourage selective preparation for the exam. In 
our view, none of the papers were poor and almost all showed a good appreciation of 
criminal behaviour, and criminal justice policy and practice. As is generally the case on 
this exam, some questions were more popular than others. The sentencing guidelines 
question and the victimization surveys questions proved most popular. The CPS and 
defence advocate questions attracted fewest responses.   
 
 
 
Page 24 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
All questions were answered. Overall, a very solid set of responses. Higher marks went to 
those answers that addressed the question (and not a different question), made excellent 
use of relevant legal material, and did more showing than telling in making arguments. 
 
EU LAW  
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Question 1 was a very popular question, with the majority of candidates selecting it as one 
of the four answers. Unfortunately, quite a few answers reproduced a standard essay on 
the absence of horizontal direct effect of Directives and how the consequences of this 
absence were minimised by broadening the concept of ‘the state’, the duty of consistent 
interpretation and the ‘incidental effect’ of Directives. Better answers explored the tension 
between asking the national courts to take all appropriate measures and accepting limited 
effectiveness of Directives in horizontal cases, and offered insightful criticism or 
justification of that tension. 
Question 2 was also very popular but attracted many answers discussing subsidiarity as a 
stand-alone principle, rather than focusing on its role in the context of Article 114 TFEU. 
The best essays discussed the interpretation of Article 114 focusing on the weaknesses of 
this provision as a review standard and made a connection between the Internal 
Market/harmonisation rationale and the ineffectiveness of the subsidiarity principle.  
Question 3 attracted only a few answers, generally engaging with the question well. Some 
answers discussed only the older case law or related the question only to the issue of 
‘scope of EU law’, rather than seeing horizontality of the Charter as the question that 
follows the issue of EU law’s material scope. 
Question 4 was a fairly popular question. Unfortunately, some answers bore little relation 
to the question in that what was offered was a generic essay on citizenship which did not 
discuss at all ‘the right to lead a normal family life’. Very good answers discussed the 
Citizenship Directive and Mary Carpenter and the Zambrano case law. 
Question 5 was another fairly popular question. Candidates tended to discuss Francovich 
in more general terms, why the principle of state liability was introduced and what 
functions it might perform but not touching on the institutional competence issue, which 
was clearly introduced by the quotation. 
Question 6 was a moderately popular question, attracting many standard answers 
providing a static account of national procedural autonomy as restricted by equivalence 
and effectiveness, without considering why EU law safeguards states’ legislative 
competence in the sphere of remedies and procedures and what this safeguarding would 
have to look like to be more effective. The better answers focused on the reason why 
involvement of the Member States is indispensable and why national regulatory autonomy 
Page 25 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
in this sphere should be respected. 
Question 7 proved to be another fairly popular question that attracted both very good and 
less good answers. Many candidates incorrectly restricted the question to the issue of the 
individual concern test. The better answers correctly identified the consequences, or the 
absence thereof, of classifying an EU act as that of ‘general application’ and reflected on 
the distinctions which Articles 263 and 267 TFEU use to regulate access to judicial review. 
Only very few candidates attempted Question 8. Most candidates gave a generic account 
of the case law on when a national measure constitutes a MEEQR. With the exception of 
a handful of answers, candidates failed to observe that the issue should have been 
discussed along two axes – first, the effect of Article 34 TFEU on national measures which 
had little, if any, effect on trade and those that concern trade but are not affecting cross-
border trade, and second, the interaction between Article 34 TFEU and the justifications in 
producing deregulation. 
Question 9 was another question selected by only very few candidates, which, however, 
attracted many good answers, covering such issues as when someone is considered a 
worked in EU law, what rights non-economically active citizens have in another Member 
State, and what state conduct constitutes a restriction on free movement. 
Question 10 proved the least popular question, attracting answers of all standards. Failure 
to refer the case to the CJEU was the aspect candidates found least challenging. Better 
answers considered the interplay between the duty to disapply incompliant national 
legislation and the complex way in which EU law regulates the remedial measures that 
should follow disapplication. 
 
FAMILY LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
 
 
HISTORY OF ENGLISH LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
There were 15 candidates, including some candidates whose assessment was held over 
from 2020-21. 
Page 26 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
The form of assessment by two extended essays worked well. All candidates showed 
extensive reading and work, and it was pleasing to see polished, erudite and interesting 
essays showing that the historical method had enlarged students’ appreciation of the 
development of the common law as a cultural and political system as well as a structure of 
rules and procedures. Many candidates showed a deep interest in connections between 
law and society, others concentrated on the internal evolution of doctrine; the best 
candidates did some of both. 
The most popular questions embraced development of uses and trusts, the nature of 
leases, the changing doctrine of consideration, and the production of contract law from 
trespass doctrine. Only a few candidates chose questions on precedent, legal estates, or 
nuisance, and none wrote on the forms of action for tort based on cause of harm. In past 
years we have seen reverse preferences, and in any case learning in one area of the 
course can always afforce understanding in different areas, eg estates is a prelude to 
trusts, and trespass a prelude to nuisance and assumpsit. 
The best papers produced a fresh framework of analysis drawing on secondary sources, 
but escaping the standard textbooks, eg Baker, Simpson, Ibbetson, to produce an original 
account founded on close reading of sources. Some candidates drew material from class 
essays too rigidly without close enough attention to the question being asked. For 
example a deep concentration on the run-up to the 1536 Statute of Uses, without a clear 
explanation of inheritance, feudal incidents, mortmain, and conveyancing issues that 
preluded that famous statute, and without scrutiny of the post-1536 evolution of trusts, did 
not do all the necessary work. Similarly in the essays on consideration and emergence of 
assumpsit, it was important to give a well-governed account dealing with the chronology of 
curial experimentation in different courts using different writs to enforce entire promissory 
obligations or alternatively/concurrently damages for defective performances. Some 
candidates who wrote on leases clung too closely to the account given in Sir John Baker’s 
textbook, rather than interrogating it in the light of the chronology of the remedies and of 
the other studies on the reading list, which showed that many perspectives were possible 
in explaining the relationship of obligations to estates. The lease, like the use/trust, slowly 
developed proprietary qualities as social and economic practices changed, as fiscal and 
credit contexts shifted, and as courts competed in new ways for business; the better 
candidates appreciated these subtleties. 
 
HUMAN RIGHTS LAW 
 

General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
22 candidates sat the FHS Human Rights Law paper. 
 
 
The scripts were mostly of a high quality, with stronger answers taking care to reflect on 
the extent to which the operation of specific human rights might be affected by the location 
of their foundation in either or both of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) 
and the common law. Many questions also sought to encourage reflection about the 
respective roles of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and national-level 
courts in protecting relevant rights, and the extent to which different rights diverge in their 
Page 27 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
substantive characters. It was encouraging to see that answers often sought to pursue 
either theme, or indeed both.     
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Question  1:  This  question  aimed  to  encourage  discussion  of  an  over-arching  nature,  in 
particular concerning the extent to which the ECHR could be identified with the notion of 
balance. Stronger answers took care to consider how balance might best be understood in 
this context, and the extent to which a balance of some sort might be seen as inevitable in 
systems of human rights protection.  
Question 2: This question required evaluation of the treatment of the right to a fair hearing 
under both Article 6 of the ECHR and the common law. Given the quantity and complexity 
of relevant case law, candidates were assisted by seeking to impose a clear structure on 
the legal protections and by associating this with the interests and values intended to be 
protected.  
Question 3: This question entailed a comparison between the ECHR margin of appreciation 
and notions of deference at national level. Given how widely the margin has been criticized 
for unpredictability, stronger answers moved beyond this and considered, for example, what 
relevant notions of deference may suggest about the roles and self-perception of the courts 
by which they are applied.   
Question 4: This question encouraged candidates to present a systematic account of what 
– in their view – most clearly explained the uncertainties often associated with the right to 
private  and  family  life.  Apart  from  seeking  to  compare  the  parts  played  by  the  right’s 
underpinning content and judicial interpretative techniques, stronger answers sought to ask 
how far these factors could be neatly separated.  
Question 5: Stronger answers took care to articulate criteria for assessing the appropriate 
degree of protection to be accorded to freedom of expression. Among other possibilities, 
these could have related to the values underpinning the right, to other substantive factors 
concerning its nature, and to the appropriate roles of the ECHR and ECtHR – or to some 
combination of these factors.  
Question 6: Successful responses presented detailed examples relating to one of the rights 
to life and to freedom from torture when measuring the extent to which strong distinctions 
are  possible  between  judicial  approaches  to  ‘qualified’  and  ‘unqualified’  rights.  Stronger 
answers also took care to evaluate the general bases for separating each type of right and 
to evaluate relevant case law in the light of these points.  
Question  7:  Given  that  this  question  expressly  invited  comparisons  between  freedom  of 
religion  and  belief  and  other  rights  when  considering  the  certainty  of  the  subject-matter 
protected, stronger answers sought both to provide bases for measuring un/certainty and 
to consider whether there was anything in the character of the right(s) in issue which might 
be thought to contribute to relevant substantive assessments.   
Question 8: Given the essay’s focus on the term ‘robust’, successful answers took care to 
provide clear criteria for identifying matters as ‘robust’, and then for evaluating the judicial 
scrutiny of ECHR Article 14 in the light of these. Successful treatment of the Protocol 12 
part of the question ideally also involved reference to the current state-of-play in relation to 
the Protocol’s status.        
Question  9:  Stronger  responses  sought  to  consider  how  far  judicial  treatment  of  extra-
territoriality was driven more by the nature of the ECHR generally and how far by the nature 
Page 28 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
of  the  right(s)  in  play  –  and,  as  an  underpinning  point,  whether  these  factors  were 
meaningfully separable. Successful treatment of the factors required careful attention to the 
structure of relevant arguments.   
Question  10:  Differing  emphases  were  possible  in  response  to  this  question.  As  a 
foundational matter, it was necessary to engage with the two quotes so as to present an 
overall evaluation of the roles of the ECtHR and national courts. However, greater discretion 
was possible concerning how far proposals for a ‘British Bil  of Rights’ were to be considered 
in terms of their content (something which has varied over the years) or in more conceptual 
terms by reference to the appropriate roles of the different courts.  
 
 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
There were only five candidates for this paper, but the standard was very high.  The most 
popular essay was question 2 (deviation) which was answered very well, making good use 
of the ‘trade’ case law and also comparing deviation more generally with the doctrine of 
fundamental breach in the general law of contract.   
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Question 1(b) (the ‘autonomy principle’) was also attempted by multiple candidates and a 
high standard was reached by making good use of the case law (The American Accord, 
Montrod) and commentary.  There was one attempt at question 3 (burden of proof under 
the Hague Visby Rules, Volcafe etc) and no attempt at questions 1(a) (the nature of a c.i.f. 
contact), 4 (s.20A of the Sale of Goods Act 1979), or 5 (privity in overseas sales). 
As for the problems, they proved more popular than the essays, as is often the case, 
though there was only one paper which answered only problems.  Question 7 (mainly 
passing of property and risk) and question 9 (mainly remedies (Kwei Tek Chao) and risk 
(Manbre/Groom)) were the most popular.  In what was a high standard overall, a 
weakness in one or two answers to question 9 was the conclusion that the variation in part 
(a) raised the sort of issues seen in the Gill & Duffus case when, in fact, it meant that both 
the goods and the documents were conforming; the issue in fact raised was the possible 
loss of any right to reject (and therefore claim ‘Kwei Tek Chao’ damages) because of the 
‘acceptance’ argument seen in cases like Panchaud Freres.  The very best of the answers 
to question 7 dealt comprehensively with both property and risk and, in relation to the 
latter, considered the possibility of claims both for want of care of the cargo and 
unseaworthiness, and the ramifications thereof. 
Questions 6 (mainly f.o.b. and damages for delayed loading; demurrage), 7 (mainly 
liability/quantum issues for lost or damaged containers) and 10 (mainly risk and deck 
stowage) were less popular, but also done well.  In part (c) of question 6, the potential 
relevance of the decision in the Suisse Atlantique case was not fully explored, but this is a 
minor quibble in what were high quality scripts from all candidates. 
 
Page 29 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
JURISPRUDENCE 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The answers to this year’s paper were fairly evenly distributed across questions 1 to 8, 
though questions 2 and 3 were answered less frequently than questions 1 and 4 to 8. Few 
candidates took up question 9 or 10. The clustering of answers around the topics of (i) the 
authority of law/obligation to obey and (ii) the moral limits of the law that has been 
observed in some past papers was not seen this year. Question 7 required candidates to 
relate the question of the obligation to obey the law either to the issue of consent and 
democratic participation or to an individual’s expert knowledge of the area covered by the 
law. Most of the candidates who answered question 7 adequately explored these 
particular issues rather than producing a set answer on the general question of the 
obligation to obey, and were rewarded accordingly. Some candidates took question 5 to 
be a question about the general authority of the law/obligation to obey or forced on answer 
on that topic. Those who correctly read question 5 as concerning the moral limits of the 
law and the legitimacy of the various means (eg, coercive vs non-coercive) the law might 
use to help people lead valuable lives, gave better answers. The answers to question 8 
were generally competent, but it is worth noting that most focussed almost exclusively on 
analysing Hart and his direct critics rather than comparing Hart’s rule of recognition to 
alternative theories such as Kelsen’s basic norm and his hierarchical conception of a legal 
system.  
Overall, the examination scripts reflected a good awareness of the main issues covered in 
the Jurisprudence course, and the candidates wrote essays that largely identified key 
points of contention and produced essays that argumentatively engaged with different 
points of view. Most marks fell within the 2:1 range, though there was a significant 
variation in the quality of argumentation between the top and bottom of that range. The 
number of first-class marks was similar to previous years. The qualities that distinguished 
such scripts were engaging with the precise terms of the question set; demonstrating 
knowledge of the relevant literature as well as the understanding that comes from deep 
rather than superficial reading; and offering an argument that employs critical analysis and 
responds to potential objections to the conclusion. Another feature displayed in some of 
the top scripts was the use of examples, which some candidates did by effectively drawing 
on cases or scenarios from other subjects they studied. 
EMPLOYMENT LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The quality of this year’s examination answers varied widely. The best scripts 
demonstrated excellent knowledge of the legal materials and clear evidence that the 
candidates had given careful thought to the subject’s most complex issues. But there were 
some weaker scripts from candidates who had either failed to grasp the basics of the law 
or produced ‘standard’ answers which did not address the precise question set. Some 
students chose not to attend all of the seminars and tutorials this year, and it is possible 
that this explains the weaker scripts. We would certainly encourage students in future 
years to take full advantage of all the teaching on offer in this paper.  
The most popular questions on the paper were those dealing with the Uber decision, the 
band of reasonable responses test in unfair dismissal law, and the justification test in 
Page 30 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
equality law. On the whole, candidates showed good knowledge of these topics and were 
able to offer critical reflections, though only the very best candidates engaged fully with 
the questions set. For example, not all the Uber essays engaged with the idea of the 
‘death of contract’ in the quotation, and most of the essays discussing the band of 
reasonable responses failed to identify a test that could be used instead.  
 
LAND LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
There was a good spread of answers across the 11 questions on the paper. Whilst only 
very few candidates attempted four problem questions, the remaining scripts were split 
reasonably evenly between those answering one, two and three problem questions. Of the 
essay questions, 1, 3 and 6 attracted the most answers, with 1 the most popular overall. 
As for the problem questions, 9 was the most popular.  
Most candidates seemed to manage well with completing the paper online in three hours 
and there was no noticeable increase in the number of scripts with one or more seemingly 
rushed answers. As with past open book exams, stronger candidates took the opportunity 
to tailor their answers specifically and carefully to the questions set, whereas weaker 
candidates often provided chunks of text which were not inaccurate, but also not on point. 
In relation to Q11, for example, there is absolutely nothing to be said for setting out the 
four re Ellenborough Park requirements in order to consider whether a right of way over 
neighbouring land can count as an easement. Requirements need to be applied to specific 
facts, not merely listed. Further, it seems that in some cases candidates saw the open 
book format as an opportunity to adorn their answers with superficial references to 
materials not on the Faculty’s reading list, without demonstrating the familiarity with such 
materials which would come from having read them. It is important to remember that the 
paper is written with the Faculty’s reading list in mind and deep knowledge of material on 
that list is much more useful than shallow references to material beyond it. Candidates 
should also remember that Sch 3 of the Land Registration Act 2002 can protect the priority 
of, but does not create, property rights. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Q1, the most popular essay question, provided strong candidates the opportunity to link 
their discussion of easements, and of Regency Villas in particular, with the arguments in 
favour of (or against) the numerus clausus principle. Candidates were also given credit for 
discussing other relevant areas of law, such as eg contractual licences. Surprisingly few 
answers dealt expressly with the idea of changes in the law over time indicated by the use 
of the word “weakening” in the question. Candidates who gave us the benefit of their 
thoughts on the means by which easements are acquired, without explaining how these 
were relevant to a question asking about a principle related to the content of property 
rights, did not fare well. Equally, answers on the numerus clausus with only minimal 
references to the law of easements were not successful. Surprisingly few answers dealt 
with Lord Carnwath’s dissent in Regency Vil as. Candidates who produced a pre-prepared 
essay on numerus clausus without addressing the precise question set did not score 
Page 31 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
highly.  
Q2 led to some very good answers, discussing cases such as Cann and Flegg and 
focussing carefully on the specific situation set out in the question. A detailed discussion 
of what counts as actual occupation was not required or expected, but credit was given 
where such discussion was related to the broader overall question of determining when 
third parties should be bound by a pre-existing interest in land. 
Q3 was reasonably popular and some very good answers carefully considered different 
aspects of the law of mortgages and linked them to the specific question asked. 
Fortunately very few candidates treated the question as one solely about clogs and 
fetters.  Strong answers discussed specific ways in which the law might be changed and 
also its operation in practice, drawing on empirical studies encountered in their wider 
reading, such as work by Whitehouse. Strong candidates considered possession and sale 
as well as the formation of the mortgage agreement, and looked carefully at the nature 
and content of the duties owed by a mortgagee in relation to sale, rather than inaccurately 
stating that a mortgagee has a general duty of care to the mortgagor. 
Q4 gave rise to some very good answers, which carefully considered the decision in 
Nasrullah and its implications for the aims of the registration system: the very best 
answers were able to discuss the distinction made by the Court of Appeal between 
fraudulent taking and other forms of fraud. Some answers assumed that Nasrullah was 
simply an attempt to resuscitate Malory and this suggested that some students had not 
read the relevant parts of Rashid as closely as they might have done, or perhaps at all. 
Stronger answers demonstrated the implications of the analysis for the registration system 
as a whole.   
Q5, like all the questions, provided an opportunity for students who were willing to engage 
with the specific question asked. Some very good answers did this, and explored different 
meanings of “proportionate balance” across a number of different land law contexts. It was 
disappointing that many answers equated “principles of English land law” with case-law, 
not considering legislation or regulation. Answers that offered generic summaries of 
human rights questions, even if interesting, did not score highly.  
Q6 similarly required answers to deal with the specific question asked and so it was a 
shame that some answers took the question to be simply one about whether adverse 
possession is a good thing or not. Despite the presence on the core reading list of not only 
re Nisbet and Potts Contract, but also a sub-heading of “Effect on Possessor of Pre-
Existing Property Rights” almost no answers dealt with the priority aspect of the question, 
focussing instead exclusively on registration.  
Q7 required some care in working through the possible acts of severance and their 
consequences, and candidates who showed such care were suitably rewarded, as were 
the few candidates who dealt with the occupation rent point. 
Q8 was relatively straightforward and reasonably popular, but some of the standard 
mistakes that undermine covenants answers were made, such as thinking that the lease 
from H to K somehow turns the repairing covenant made between H and G into a 
leasehold covenant. It was apparent that very few candidates had read Smith and Snipes; 
those few immediately appreciated its relevance where an assignee seeks to enforce a 
positive covenant against the original covenantor. The strongest answers also considered 
the meaning of the term “owners of Walton Farm” and whether it would apply to a party 
such as J who acquired only part of the land retained by G on the sale to H. Perhaps it is 
Page 32 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
not too much to hope that, by the time we reach the centenary of the 1925 Law of 
Property Act, no Finals answers will refer to the role of notice in determining if a third party 
is bound by a restrictive covenant; we are not quite there yet. 
Q9 was the most popular problem question and in general was well answered. As is often 
the case, students were often happy to express views on whether an apparent term was 
or was not a sham (or pretence) without stating what the relevant test is: a number of 
answers expressly claimed that it was simply a matter of fact as to whether a term is a 
sham or not.  In contrast, some answers dealt very well with the difficulties of finding a 
right to exclusive possession in cases of multiple occupation. Surprisingly, several 
candidates thought that N’s moving out would in itself constitute a severance of a joint 
tenancy with M. In relation to P, some answers spent valuable time considering if P had a 
Bruton lease without asking whether that would make any difference at all on the facts 
before them. A number of students seemed to think that a contractual licence is an 
equitable interest, either under Errington or, via an immediate constructive trust, under 
Binions v Evans: this was also a disappointing surprise.  
Q10 exposed, as problem questions do, some misunderstandings about the admittedly 
convoluted rules to be applied following Stack and Kernott but many strong answers 
applied those rules very carefully to the specific facts. Many answers gave a prominent 
place to “fairness” in a general sense, without then reflecting on the relevance of the 
testamentary gift of the shares. The possibility of S claiming the whole interest in the 
house (via survivorship) was under-analysed.  
Q11 proved problematic for the minority of students who decided it must be a question 
about easements and nothing else, and so then mentioned proprietary estoppel only in 
passing, or not at all. Nonetheless, almost all the answers had an appropriate focus on 
proprietary estoppel, even if surprisingly few took the hint in the facts to discuss Crabb v 
Arun DC as well as Cobbe. The possible relevance of overreaching on the sale to Y Ltd 
was almost entirely overlooked, whereas cannier candidates might have asked why the 
scrapyard was co-owned. The facts did not specifically state that Y Ltd had registered its 
title but answers were in no way penalised if they proceeded on the basis that such 
registration had occurred. One answer referred with confidence to what the Supreme 
Court had decided in Guest v Guest, but revision rather than prevision remains the best 
way to prepare for exams. 
MEDIA LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
 
 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
 
Page 33 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
MORAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
The work in this year’s examination was generally of a high standard, though there were 
only a few truly outstanding scripts. As usual, the paper was divided into Part A (moral 
philosophy, 8 questions) and Part B (political philosophy, 4 questions). Candidates had to 
answer at least one question from each part, and the overwhelming majority chose two 
questions from Part A. Answers were spread over all of the questions. As previous reports 
have emphasised, the stronger answers were those that focussed on the specific question 
set, and argued over its merits. Weaker answers provided a general exposition of the topic 
in issue, with only limited attention on the question.  For example question 4 asked if 
Kant’s moral philosophy was too egocentric. Weaker answers simply provided an account 
of Kant’s arguments about the nature of morality. Stronger answers addressed the issue 
of whether the Categorical Imperative resulted in an over-emphasis on the agent’s own 
actions, at the expense of considering how other agents might act. Similarly, question 9 on 
responsibility and freedom of the will invited a careful consideration of both the nature of 
freedom of the will, and what sort of freedom of the will (if any) was required for moral 
responsibility. 
The answers to part B were generally good. To take one instance, question 12 asked if 
justice was best viewed from behind a veil of ignorance. This invited a careful analysis of 
Rawls’ theory of justice, particularly the role of the veil of ignorance in abstracting from 
individual’s particular characteristics and circumstances. Strong answers displayed a good 
familiarity with the details of Rawls’ arguments and the criticisms of his approach. 
 
PERSONAL PROPERTY 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Nine candidates sat the paper. The paper comprised ten questions and candidates were 
required to answer four. The most popular questions were question 1 (on the protection of 
personal property), question 5 (on relativity of title), and question 6 (on the so-called 
exceptions to the nemo dat principle). The standard of answers was, on the whole, high: 
five candidates obtained an overall mark of 70 or above and no candidate received an 
overall mark below 60. The best performing candidates carefully considered the specific 
question posed, drew on their knowledge of Land Law and Trusts to make appropriate 
comparisons with the law of personal property, and combined detailed, accurate, and 
precise discussion of the case law with a sophisticated examination of pertinent 
conceptual and policy issues. 
 
PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW & JESSUP MOOT 
 

General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Page 34 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
The overall performance by students in this paper was excellent, with over 90% of 
students being marked at an  Upper Second or First Class level (about 40% were 
awarded firsts). In general, the scripts reflected a high degree of conceptual clarity and 
understanding. Even the weaker scripts reflected understanding of core concepts, with the 
weaknesses deriving from limited engagement with the specific issues raised by the 
question, lack of structure and flow to the argument, lack of narrative development, and 
scanty use of case law, state practice and academic authority. 
More generally, as in previous years, the weaker answers provided a general description 
of the topic or topics covered by the question without focussing on the specific issues 
raised. And, the best answers to both essay and problem questions made thoughtful use 
of case law and academic authority, thereby providing insightful analysis that 
demonstrably went beyond the basic textbook material.  
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
As in previous years, the paper contained a mixture of problem questions (4) and essay 
questions (6). Although not required to do so, all the 39 candidates who sat the exam 
elected to answer at least one problem question, many chose two, with selections 
focussing on the use of force (Question 6, 25 chose this), dispute settlement (question 8, 
21 chose this), treaties (question 4, 12 chose this) and jurisdiction (question 5(b), 3 chose 
this).  
The use of force problem question, as in previous years, proved one of the most popular, 
and elicited excellent answers from the candidates, with the best among them drawing on 
different scholarly positions and a range of state practice on the use of force against non-
state actors and anticipatory self defence, as well engaging in a forensic analysis of the 
facts in light of the extensive case law. Also popular were the essay questions on custom 
(question 3, 29 chose this) and the problem question on dispute settlement (question 8, 21 
chose this). The essay question on custom attracted strong responses, with the best 
answers going beyond an overview of the challenges in identifying custom, to discuss the 
value of flexibility and dynamism in the evolution of custom. The problem question on 
dispute settlement was also well done, although a few students failed to identify the 
‘indispensable third party’ issue. The cross-cutting essay questions (question 1 that 10 
chose and question 2 that 13 chose) attracted some interesting answers. These question 
gave students the most leeway in terms of constructing their response, and some rose to 
the challenge, using illustrations from across the breadth of international law, and even 
legal theory, to make their point. Less popular were the essay questions on state 
responsibility (5 chose this) and specialized regimes of international law (international 
environmental law, law of the sea, or human rights law, 6 chose this).  
 
ROMAN LAW (DELICT) 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Page 35 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
We had considerably fewer students than in previous years, six, one of them a DLS 
student. The seminars have been more wonderfully intense and it shows: we see very 
impressive results in this exam.  
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
There are too few candidates to comment on the performance individually. Since similar 
marks spread evenly over all questions taken, no question can be identified as 
problematic. 
 
TAXATION LAW 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
As in previous years, there were 8 questions (6 essays and 2 problems), providing 
students with significant choice. Q.4 (essay on tax avoidance) and the problem questions 
(Q.7 and Q.8) all proved very popular, despite there being no obligation to answer a 
problem. Q.6 (evaluating different deductions and exemptions) was the least popular 
question. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Q.1, inspired by the recent Health and Social Care Levy, asked candidates to evaluate a 
hypothecated tax on income from labour. The best answers drew on a wide range of 
literature in their answers. Some students made the mistake of discussing only 
hypothecation or taxing labour and the weakest answers relied on vague and 
unsubstantiated assertions about tax generally. 
Q.2, on the role of Capital Gains Tax, was quite popular. The best answers discussed a 
range of issues with the legislation and demonstrated a nuanced understanding of the 
trade-offs in the design of the tax. Weaker answers either ignored the focus on using CGT 
as a backstop to income tax or relegated their discussion to just a single issue (often the 
rates). 
Q.3, on the capital tax treatment of trusts, invited students to blend the knowledge of the 
quite technical legislation with the wider literature on ‘good tax design’. The strongest 
answers did so effectively, whereas less good answers were very descriptive and offered 
little analysis of the system. 
Q.4 provided a quote from a recent Supreme Court decision in the Ramsay line of cases. 
Overall, students handled this question well, although some made the mistake of providing 
a generic (and likely pre-prepared) discussion of all the cases in the abstract, rather than 
engaging with the issues raised in the question.  
Q.5, on the test for identifying a contract for services, asked students to consider both why 
courts had found the test difficult to apply and what Parliament should do about it. 
Page 36 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Students generally did well with the case law, but weaker answers made the mistake of 
only answering the first part of the question. 
Q.6, a two-part question, asked students to evaluate the rules for deductions from 
employment income and certain exemptions in Inheritance Tax. The best answers 
analysed the policy rationale behind the provisions in determining what was meant by ‘too’ 
restrictive. 
Q.7 raised several issues across employment tax, CGT and trading. Common mistakes 
included insufficient discussion of the cases on the badges of trade and failing to discuss 
the relevance of the overpayment and whether it was taxable as employment income. 
Q.8 largely concerned deductions from trading income, with some employment issues for 
the sake of comparison. Many students were quick to cite Mallalieu v Drummond, but 
made only passing references to it, rather than examining the test in detail. The best 
students recognised the issues surrounding the overly generous salary and the potential 
Marren v Ingles point at the end. 
 
TORT 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Although the overall standard of scripts was reasonably good – the overwhelming majority 
of scripts were in the upper second class – there were few stellar scripts that were clearly 
first class. If there was a general weakness, it was in failing to answer the precise essay 
question set and avoiding direct engagement with the issue or set of issues raised by the 
question. There were some disappointing gaps in knowledge or misunderstandings which 
are addressed below. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Q1. There were some good answers to this question which dealt with more than one of 
the economic torts and considered or could have considered restrictions such as (i) the 
restricted category of unlawfulness in the unlawful means tort, (b) the requirement of 
interference with a third party’s liberty to deal requirement in that tort, (c) the requirement 
of inducing breach rather than causing non-performance of, or detrimental interference 
with, a contract, (d) the nature of the intention requirements in the different torts. 
 
Q2. There were very few if any answers to this question. The question invited discussion 
of whether public interest considerations were distinctively relevant to remedies. Possible 
topics that could have been addressed: (a) role of public interest in determining whether 
damages should be awarded in lieu of an injunction, (b) the conditions of application and 
justification of exemplary damages, (c) limitations on the extent of compensatory 
damages, (d) the justification of disgorgement for torts.  
 
Q3. (a) The better answers dealt with multiple defences in answering the defamation 
question and assessed whether there are other problems with the defences beyond 
vagueness so as to assess whether that is the ‘central’ problem (if it is indeed a problem). 
Page 37 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
(b) This was not a popular question. It invited analysis of the elements of the tort and 
defences thereto and assessment of whether these (i) serve the alleged right in question 
(ii) adequately. 
 
Q4. (a) The better answers were able to distinguish accurately between the different 
possible bases of duties of care in respect of pure omissions, such as assumption of 
responsibility and control, though there was not much treatment of the controversial issues 
surrounding the scope of these concepts. Few analysed the concept of a ‘pure omission’; 
(b) Weaker answers tended to focus on general issues pertaining to duties of care, such 
as whether a general test for the existence of a duty of care is desirable or whether the 
law post-Robinson is satisfactory; there were few successful attempts to engage directly 
with the issue(s) posed by the question. 
 
Q5. There were some strong answers here which zoned in on the central terms of the 
question – ‘creation of risk’, ‘benefit’ – and assessed whether the idea stated in the 
quotation fits with the scope of the current law, by reference to the leading authorities. 
 
Q6. Few attempted this question. A convincing answer needed to say something about 
the concept of ‘an individual right’ and what it would mean for ‘individual rights’ to be the 
central goal of tort law.  
 
Q7. There were some reasonably strong answers to this question. These were able 
accurately to state the law (or uncertainties in the law) after Wilkes. Answers tended to be 
on surer ground in relation to the law on defectiveness than in relation to the s.4(1)(e) 
defence. 
 
Q8. This negligence problem raised issues of breach, factual and legal causation, and 
scope of duty. Most candidates spotted the issues at a general level, but few had precise 
command of the applicable authorities, in particular in relation to the law on factual 
causation in (b). In part (c), there was a tendency not to distinguish, in structuring the 
answer, between potential claims by Dima and Ed against Ben.   
 
Q9. This was not a particularly popular question. It raised potential issues of harassment, 
Wilkinson v Downton, false imprisonment, and battery.  
 
Q.10. Many candidates answered this question reasonably well. It clearly raised issues of 
private nuisance and Rylands. Public nuisance was also sometimes considered, though 
there was little suggestion on the facts that special damage had been suffered by L or M. 
It was also apt to consider whether, if M did not have title to sue in private 
nuisance/Rylands, she could recover in another tort (such as negligence) for the death of 
her dog. Some candidates reasonably assessed whether L’s claim could be barred by the 
illegality defence. 
 
Q.11. This question raised issues of negligence and liability under the Defective Premises 
Act 1972. few candidates considered the effect of the Court of Appeal decision in 
Robinson v PE Jones on the whether a duty of care in respect of pure economic loss 
would be owed by N to M.  
 
Q.12. This popular problem raised issues of Occupiers’ Liability, general negligence, and 
vicarious liability. A significant number of candidates analysed the final part of the question 
under OLA 1957; R’s conduct was not, however, a danger due to the state of the premises 
or things done or omitted to be done on them (s 1(1)), as this has been interpreted in the 
case law.  
Page 38 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
 
Q.13. This problem raised issues of tort claims arising out of death, liability in negligence, 
including duties of care for pure omissions, psychiatric harm, causation, and defences. 
 
 
TRUSTS 
General comments: Please comment on the overall quality of the scripts, the distribution 
of marks and anything else worth noting and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Although the exam was on the whole competently done, there was much evidence of 
candidates using essays prepared.  This was even an issue in problem questions.  
Although doing this is not an examination offence, it has the tendency to mean candidates 
do not focus on the precise question asked.  Indeed, the biggest complaint of the 
examiners this year was a failure to address the issues raised by either the essay title or 
the problem, with candidates simply writing all they knew about the topic.  Of course, there 
were some excellent answers, but those who failed to address the question received little 
credit. 
Comments on individual questions: Please comment on the overall quality of answers, 
notable weaknesses in the answers (and/or question) and anything else worth reporting 
and learning from (including suggested actions). 
Q 1. The main issue here was that most answers did not consider the meaning of the 
phrase ‘equity acts in personam’, with too many students simply writing generic answers 
on the nature of the beneficiary’s interest under a trust.  Those who did address the quote 
were rewarded accordingly. 
 Q 2. Good answers went to the heart of the quote, examining how the principle in 
Rochefoucauld v Boustead might apply in three-party cases, and explaining the tension 
between HHJ Matthew's reasoning and the language of s 53(1)(b), couched as it is in 
terms of admissibility, not enforceability and certainly not validity.  Weaker answers 
included few cases and failed to engage with the quote. 
Q 3. This question was not often answered, but answers were strong. First class answers 
looked not only at Target and AIB, but explained the controversy surrounding the cases 
and commentary and their treatment in later cases.  Good answers differentiated between 
claims for falsification and surcharge, and between claims against trustees and other 
fiduciaries for ‘equitable compensation’. 
Q 4. This question was generally poorly answered. Candidates tended to write general 
answers on purpose trusts, without engaging with the ambiguities surrounding ‘holding’ by 
unincorporated associations and its relationship to trusts. 
Q 5. Strong answers focussed on the question whether the statute itself effected any 
change in the law, with good treatment of the Independent Schools decision and the 
different senses identified therein of ‘public benefit’. Weaker answers were simply 
descriptive of the current position, and failed to engage with the language of 
‘presumption’. 
Page 39 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Q 6. This question was sometimes answered well, with stronger answers making good 
use of reasoning in the cases, rather than simply comparing the views of commentators. 
Many, however, failed to engage with the quote and wrote all they knew about resulting 
trusts, sometimes to the extent of long discussions of presumed resulting trusts when the 
question clearly concerned only automatic resulting trusts.  Such candidates did not score 
well. 
Q 7. This question was not well handled. Strong answers went beyond recognising the link 
between the quote and the reasoning in Twinsectra to engage with the issue of ‘subjective 
intention’. Weak answers, and there were many, simply talked about taxonomy or the 
desirability of Quistclose trusts without properly linking this to the quote.   
Q 8. Very few candidates attempted this question.  
Q 9. A question that produced very mixed responses.  Strong answers went to the heart of 
the question about whether or not knowing receipt involves a real trust, contrasting the 
reasoning in Byers v Samba with Williams v Central Bank of Nigeria, and looking at the 
broader treatment of knowing receipt in the case law. Weaker answers tended to cling to 
the views of one or two commentators, without properly considering the cases, or simply 
set out the requirements of liability in knowing receipt. 
Q 10. Few candidates attempted this question.  
Q 11. A very popular question, attempted by almost all candidates. On (a) and (e), good 
candidates engaged with the question whether the fixed dispositions might be saved, 
while weaker candidates took for granted that the distinction in Re Baden (No 2), between 
evidential and conceptual uncertainty in the context of discretionary trusts, also applied to 
fixed trusts. Some even came up with the bizarre idea that the complete list was satisfied 
where the maximum number of possible members was known, presumably a confusion 
with the rules on certainty of term in leases of land.  On (b), good candidates recognised 
that whilst the certainty of subject-matter rules for testamentary dispositions are different 
to those made inter vivos, that difference could not save the gift in this case.  On (c), the 
main difficulty was candidates thinking that the uncertainty concerned who the trustee 
considered deserving, rather than whether ‘friend’ was certain—and even those who 
recognised this often wrongly cited Re Barlow as authority for the certainty requirements 
for powers of appointment. On (d), many candidates missed the fact that the issue related 
to the extent to which trustee discretions can cure what would otherwise be uncertain 
classes.  
Q 12.  A moderately popular question which was generally well done. Good candidates 
used the facts to discuss the tension between Grey v IRC and Vandervell v IRC; had a 
nuanced discussion of whether the creation of a sub-trust might be characterised as a 
transfer of rights; and recognised that the statements in Oughtred on vendor purchaser 
constructive trusts were part of the minority speeches only.   
Q 13. Another moderately popular question. As regards the Victoria trust, most candidates 
understood the relevance of Re Rose and Mascall, but fewer dealt with (i) the significance 
of the form being handed only to one of the intended trustees, and (ii) whether there was 
any significance in the fact that the imperfectly transferred title was to be held on trust 
rather than outright.  In that respect, there was also a possible complication with s 53(1)(b) 
LPA 1925, missed by most. As regards the Wendy trust, good candidates recognised the 
relevance of Choithram, discussing the ambit of the principle in that case.  
Page 40 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
Q 14.  This question attracted few takers. Strong candidates showed acute awareness of 
the rules regarding mixing between trustee’s and beneficiaries’ funds and were able to 
advise not only on whether the beneficiary could claim any given right as a substitute, but 
whether they should do so. As an aside, many candidates for some reason talked about 
common law tracing—despite the fact the claimant in the question clearly only ever had 
equitable rights.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Page 41 of 45 
 


FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
EXTERNAL EXAMINER REPORT FORM 2022 
 
 
External examiner name:  
External examiner home institution: 
Course(s) examined:  
Final Honours School of Jurisprudence/ Diploma in 
Legal Studies 
Level: (please delete as appropriate 
Undergraduate 
Postgraduate 
 
Please complete both Parts A and B.  
Part A 
Please () as applicable*   Yes  
No 
N/A /  
Other 

A1
Are the academic standards and the achievements of students 
 
 
.  
comparable  with  those  in  other  UK  higher  education 
 
institutions  of  which  you  have  experience?  [Please  refer  to 
paragraph 6 of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports].
 
A2
Do  the  threshold  standards  for  the  programme  appropriately 
 
 

reflect the frameworks for higher education qualifications and 
 
any applicable subject benchmark statement? [Please refer to 
paragraph 7 of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports]. 
 
A3
Does the assessment process measure student achievement 
 
 
.  
rigorously  and  fairly  against  the  intended  outcomes  of  the 
 
programme(s)? 
A4
Is  the  assessment  process  conducted  in  line  with  the 
 
 

University's policies and regulations? 
 
A5
Did you receive sufficient information and evidence in a timely 
 
 
.  
manner to be able to carry out the role of External Examiner 
 
effectively? 
A6
Did you receive a written response to your previous report? 
 
 

 
A7
Are you satisfied that comments in your previous report have 
 
 

been properly considered, and where applicable, acted upon?  
 
Page 42 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
*  If  you  answer  “No”  to  any  question,  you  should  provide  further  comments  when  you 
complete Part B.
  

 
Part B 
In your responses to these questions, please could you include comments on the 
effectiveness of any changes made to the course or processes in response to the COVID-19 
pandemic where appropriate. 
B1. Academic standards 
 
a.  How  do  academic  standards  achieved  by  the  students  compare  with  those 
achieved by students at other higher education institutions of which you have 
experience?
 
 
Comparable or higher. 
 
b.  Please comment on student performance and achievement across the relevant 
programmes or parts of programmes and with reference to academic standards 
and  student  performance  of  other  higher  education  institutions  of  which  you 
have  experience  (those  examining  in  joint  schools  are  particularly  asked  to 
comment on their subject in relation to the whole award).
 

 
Student performance was very good and consistent with previous years.  
 
 
B2. Rigour and conduct of the assessment process 
 
Please  comment  on  the  rigour  and  conduct  of  the  assessment  process,  including 
whether it ensures equity of treatment for students, and whether it has been conducted 
fairly and within the University’s regulations and guidance. 

 
I was satisfied on all counts re the above. Everything was very clearly explained by the Chair 
. The chairing of the meetings and oversight of the assessment process was 
I thought exemplary.    
 
 

B3. Issues 
 
Are there any issues which you feel should be brought to the attention of supervising 
committees in the faculty/department, division or wider University? 
 
None – I am pleased that the Faculty of Law took up my suggestion whether a 5 or 10 point 
scale  for  assessing  the  severity  of  MCQs  would  allow  for  more  fine-grained  judgment  and 
asked the University’s Education Committee be asked to consider introducing a more nuanced 
MCE scale. 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 43 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
B4. Good practice and enhancement opportunities  
 
Please  comment/provide  recommendations  on  any  good  practice  and  innovation 
relating  to  learning,  teaching  and  assessment,  and  any  opportunities  to  enhance  the 
quality  of  the  learning  opportunities
  provided  to  students  that  should  be  noted  and 
disseminated more widely as appropriate

 
I  think  the  guidance  to  Exam  Boards  on  classification  and  taking  account  of  mit  circs  s  in 
‘Annex  E  of  the  Assessment  support  package’  document  is  fairly  helpful.  Overall,  I  was 
satisfied that, as far as is realistically possible, the impact of mit circs was taken into account 
on classification in a way that was fair to the individual affected student but also to those who 
did  not  put  in  mit  circs  or  whose  mit  circs  were  deemed  to  be  incapable  of  affecting  the 
outcome. I thought the Board, did an excellent job at giving proper consideration to the adverse 
impact of mit circs but without succumbing to the temptation of elevating classification out of 
sympathy for students who had suffered difficult circumstances.  
 
B5. Any other comments  
 
Please provide any other comments you may have about any aspect of the examination 
process. Please also use this space to address any issues specifically required by any 
applicable professional body. If your term of office is now concluded, please provide 
an overview here.
 
 
The  final  Exam  Board meeting,  at  which candidates  were  classified,  was extremely  long;  it 
started at 09.30 and ended I think around 18.15 (I had to leave at 17.15 for the school run). 
Apparently, this was a record at eight hours 46 minutes, though we did have a decent break 
for lunch! This does seem excessive to me; from my experience at other Law Schools, these 
meetings normally last between three and five hours. In particular the practice of considering 
appropriate penalties for plagiarism in the full meeting, rather than (as everywhere else I have 
had experience of) by a separate plagiarism panel, which meets before the full Board, struck 
me as curious and possibly unhelpful. I do think consideration should be given to considering 
these cases in a separate sub-panel of the Board, which would have the full documentation of 
the cases before them. This would also save at least some time in the full Board.    
 
Final y I’m sorry to have to add that, at the time of writing this report, having now completed 
three years of external examining at Oxford I have still not been paid; before today my last 
correspondence on this was an email from me on 12th July, asking if the administrators now 
had all the information they needed. While staff in the Law Faculty have been apologetic and 
helpful, and I hope have now done what is necessary to resolve the matter, I have never had 
a reply about it from the External Examiner team at xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx:  they 
were copied to an email by the Quality Assurance team SSD QA <xx@xxxxxx.xx.xx.xx> and 
asked to contact me about on 7 June 2021 and I followed up in emails on 26 Nov 21, 17 Dec 
21, and 18 Jan 22, none of which were replied to from the externals team.  
 
From an email received today from the Law Faculty in response to my latest inquiry, I gather 
payments have now been or are being processed for the years 19-20 and 20-21 and will be 
for the academic year 21-22 once you receive this report. As I explained in some of my emails, 
the issue is not the money (which is  of course modest) but more the seeming discourtesy and 
lack  of  concern  displayed  by  the  University  to  its  external  examiners  who  take  on  this 
additional work out of good wil . I’d be grateful for a proper explanation and apology on this 
matter.  It  has  also  been  somewhat  mortifying  that  I  have  repeatedly  had  to  chase  on  this 
(including again today). I understand that there can be administrative hold-ups and glitches 
but that should not stop staff from ensuring that at least emails are replied to in a timely manner 
Page 44 of 45 
 

FHS Jurisprudence and Diploma in Legal Studies 
Examiners’ Report 2022 
 
 
and matters chased up internally, instead of the external examiner themselves having to do 
so repeatedly. I made this point in an email sent 18 January of this year.   
 
 
 
Signed: 
16 September 2022 
Date: 
 
Please ensure you have completed parts A & B and email your completed form to: 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx and copy it to the applicable divisional contact set 
out in the guidelines.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
E. 

NAMES OF MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
 
 
Page 45 of 45 
 

 
 

FHS 2022 – FINAL  
 
History 
Examiners’ Report 
 
 
 


REPORT OF THE EXAMINERS IN THE FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL 
OF HISTORY 2022 
 
 
A. EXAMINERS’ REPORT
 
Overall Performance 
 
A. EXAMINERS’ REPORT 
 
FHS 2022 saw a return to in-person examining though continuing difficulties for students and staff due to 
recurrent surges of corvid infection.  
 
Overall Performance 
84  candidates, or  40.8%  of the  cohort  were  awarded  Firsts. This  compares  with 50.5%  in  2021, 51.2%  in 
2021, 48.7% in 2019, 45.96% in 2018, 38.7% in 2017, 34.8% in 2016, 29.61% in 2015, 31.44% in 2014, 24.22% 
in 2013, 22.22% in 2012, and 29.4% in 2011. We have seen, therefore, a return to something like the pre-
Covid marks profile. 
 
There were 206 candidates classified, with two remaining to be classified, compared to 224 in 2021.  A total 
of 22 candidates withdrew, compared to 24 in 2021.  
 
122 candidates, 59.2%, were classified in the Upper Second Class, which compares with 46.9% in 2021, 50.9% 
in 2019, 53.2% in 2018, 61.3% in 2017, and 65.2% in 2016. No 2.2 was awarded, compared to one in 2021 
and  2020.  (None  were  awarded  in  2017  or  2016).  No  third  was  awarded,  compared  to  one  in  2021.  No 
candidate opted to graduate DDH (deemed to have deserved Honours). 
 
MCEs from 74 candidates were considered by the boards. This resulted in remedial action being deemed 
appropriate in 11 cases. 
 
Finals board was aware that while there had been a return to in-person ‘normality’ the candidates had dealt 
with  considerable  pandemic  disruption  throughout  their  degree  and  took  this  into  account.  The  results 
indicate a resilience in the student body and robustness in colleagues’ efforts to fairly mark and scrutinise.   
 
     
B.  REPORTS ON INDIVIDUAL PAPERS  
 

a)   History of the British Isles 
 
BIF 1: The Early Medieval British Isles, 300-1100 
Eleven candidates sat the take-home exam and two candidates submitted portfolios. Marks ranged from 57 
to 77. 
 
. The overall quality was thus good, but with few stellar answers.  
The most popular question (‘Did political expansion and centralization in the tenth and eleventh centuries 
require new modes of government and administration, or the extension of existing ones?’) had five takers. 
Two questions on kingship (Q1, Q6) also attracted five answers in total and the portfolio submissions offered 
three  further  essays  on  English  politics  and  kingship.  The  least  popular  questions  (the  changing  role  of 
women in the church and on the importance of monuments) got one answer each. Remaining questions had 
between two and four responses each: conversion (4), literacy (3), the legacy of Rome (3), princely burials 
(3), the fate of the Picts (3), Scandinavian disruption (3), ethnic identity and language (2) and archaeology 
and political history (2). A total of 17 questions had no takers and these topics included warfare, border 
zones, economy and slavery, the church and land-holding, lords and peasants, towns and the economy, East 
 


Anglian kings, regional differences in kingship, Byzantine influence, the archaeology of the Norman conquest, 
the Domesday book, British history as national history and the suitability of the term ‘Anglo-Saxon’. There 
was thus a clear preference for English kingship and politics, especially West Saxon, Kentish and Mercian; 
questions on East Anglian kingship and regional variation in kingship had no takers. There was very little 
interest  in  the  economy,  towns,  land,  social  structures  and  gender.  Answers  were  overall  Anglo-centric, 
though the question on the Picts got three answers – which were mostly very good – and several candidates 
brought in Pictish, British and Irish elements, though this was rarely as sustained or detailed as the English 
elements.  
The most impressive answers offered original and unexpected arguments, engaged with recent scholarship, 
paid attention to detail and dealt with the complexities and uncertainties of the evidence. Weaker essays 
were marked by a failure to engage fully with the question, either by not dealing with its terms, concepts or 
implications or by answering a slightly different question than the one set, possibly to fit an argument from 
a tutorial essay. This was the case with the most popular question, where several candidates were closer to 
answering a question on changes and continuities across the Norman conquest than one on centralization 
and  expansion  in  the  tenth  and  eleventh  centuries.  Essays  that  received  the  lowest  marks  were  also 
characterized by a lack of chronological and geographical specificity (e.g. making general assertions about 
large spans of time or space or using evidence from different parts of the period indiscriminately). Some did 
not pay much attention to changes and variation, thus appearing to treat the period as static and uniform. 
Mid-ranging answers were sometimes too descriptive and didn’t always engage properly with the question. 
For instance, the relatively popular question on kings as priests (‘Should we think of kings as being more like 
priests  than  secular  leaders?’)  got  competent  answers,  but  most  needed  more  engagement  with  the 
concepts  and  implications  of  the  question  to  avoid  being  mere  descriptions  of  the  religious  aspects  of 
kingship. 
In the future, it would be good to see candidates being ambitious when choosing questions and framing their 
answers, using the extra time afforded by this kind of exam to pursue new lines of thought and not to play 
it safe. 
 
BIF 2: The British Isles in the Central Middle Ages, 1000-1330  
A total of 12 candidates submitted portfolios for this paper. There were 7 marks of 65-70; 4 marks of 60-
64; 
. In general terms, the portfolios attempted a good range of topics across the 
period: social, cultural, political, and economic history were all well represented, and there were also 
several essays focused on Scotland and Wales and one on Ireland. Questions on the conquest, Magna 
Carta, empire, identity and the Jewish community also proved popular choices. 
 
The strongest candidates had clearly developed the topic beyond their tutorial essays by reading more 
deeply in the primary sources and secondary literature. Candidates generally performed very well if they 
wrote densely, making effective use of the 2,000 word limit for each essay to develop as many themes and 
to register as much relevant matter as possible; if they probed the terms of the questions carefully, where 
appropriate challenging their assumptions; if they produced thoughtful answers written with an 
independent voice; if they substantiated densely and precisely, displaying a clear understanding of the 
primary sources and using well-developed case studies to bring specific points and problems into sharp 
focus; and if they tried to conclude with impact, offering a clear and direct answer to the question. 
 
Weaker candidates tended to write overly leisurely introductions lacking direction and focus, appeared to 
be reworking tutorial essays answering a different question, or depended too heavily on material drawn 
from a single lecture. The weaker essays also tended to be substantiated patchily, manifesting a weak 
understanding of the source base; they were prone to error; failed to see that some questions were 
inviting candidates to engage with important contributions in the secondary literature (e.g. Rees Davies on 
empire, and Alice Taylor’s important book on Scotland); and tended to end their essays with summaries 
rather than conclusions. Essays on religious life and the church tended to focus on Anselm and Becket or 
the Cistercians, and would have benefitted from greater diversity and range, recognising that there were 
 


multiple new monastic orders in the British Isles in this period, and looking beyond Anselm and Becket as 
important ecclesiastical figures. 
 
 
BIF 3: The late Medieval British Isles, 1330-1550 
Twenty-five students took the take-home paper in June 2021, in less-than-ideal circumstances caused by 
interruptions to teaching, difficult access to libraries, and all the other challenges of Covid and lockdown. 
The resourcefulness of tutors, but especially of students, in this situation was remarkable. Many found digital 
resources and off-bibliography e-publications that enabled them to approach familiar topics from genuinely 
new  and  surprising  angles.  Several  students  submitted  a  Covid  impact  statement  alongside  their  essays, 
explaining how the circumstances had – in their view – prevented them from submitting their best work. 
However, in no instance did this seem to have been the case. There was no apparent detrimental effect, and 
the  students  are  to  be  congratulated  for  their  determination  and  ingenuity.  They  are  more  resilient  and 
adaptable than they perhaps believe.  
Students  answered  on  a  very  wide  range  of  themes,  but  the  most  popular  were  women’s  agency  (12 
answers), religious dissent (7 answers), popular disorder (7 answers), architecture and collective identities 
(6  answers),  visual  arts  and  social  status  (5  answers);  questions  on  Wales,  France,  kings  and  the  law, 
masculinity, social control, and bastard feudalism all received 3 or 4 answers, while questions on parliament, 
social  bonds,  demographic  change,  models  of  kingship,  the  body,  the  vernacular,  the  classical  past, 
monasteries,  immigration,  national  identity,  Ireland,  the  Wars  of  the  Roses  and  the  Reformation  were 
answered only by one or two students. No-one answered on the economic life of towns, moral beliefs of the 
laity, trade, the nobility. 
The  best  answers  were  marked  by  extensive  and  original  discussions  of  primary  sources  and  a  keen 
awareness of current and older historiographical positions. The weaker essays tended to be based on very 
limited reading, confined to pre-2000 publications. This was disappointing. All students had access to the 
Faculty  bibliography  and  online  lecture  materials,  which  together  indicate  an  extensive  and  up  to  date 
reading list for canonical and marginal topics alike. Tutors may wish to update their reading lists more often, 
but equally there is no excuse for students accepting the sufficiency of a reading list that has not been kept 
up to date by a tutor. For example, rehashing the ‘golden age of women’ debate of the 1990s without any 
reference to the  past 25  years  of  scholarship  ought to ring  alarm bells for  any second  year  student. The 
examiners would like to see more comparison across the British Isles; any student attempting such work is 
likely to be rewarded. 
 
BIF 4: Reformations and Revolutions, 1500-1700 
56 candidates submitted take-home exam scripts for this paper and   candidates who had suspended their 
studies and returned submitted portfolios of tutorial essays of the sort submitted for FHS 2021. While the 
great majority of the questions were attempted, most answers concentrated on the period 1560-1640, on 
England and on politics and religion. However, some candidates tackled social history with great success, not 
just  witchcraft,  but  also marriage  and  race.  Others  were  thankfully not  shy of  wide-ranging  comparisons 
across the islands (for example on the question about Welsh Protestantism), or of questions about inter-
relationships  (above  all  the  question  about  Anglo-Scottish  relations  in  the  seventeenth  century),  or  of 
introducing  Scottish  or  Irish  material  into  thematic  question  such  as  those  on  queenship,  literacy  or  the 
public sphere. A few candidates ventured past 1660 and several past 1685, while the Henrician Reformation 
tempted a few others back before 1547.  
The strongest answers made good use of primary material, though not to the exclusion of wider argument 
based  on  secondary  literature,  and  prioritised  cogent  argument  over  packed  information.  Thoughtful 
comparisons that suggested a wider grasp on the themes of the paper – between Catholics and Puritans, for 
example, or queens and mistresses, or Elizabeth I and her siblings – also featured in such answers even when 
not  demanded  by  the  question.  The  weakest  submissions  rested  on  very  limited  reading,  much  of  it  in 
general textbooks, or largely followed the logic and evidence of a single journal article; some failed to use all 
the  allotted  2,000  words  per  essay,  were  so  unclearly  written  as  to  be  hard  to  understand,  or  repeated 
 


aspects of argument, detail and bibliography from essay to essay. Between these extremes, there were many 
scripts which engaged only in broad and sometimes vague ways with the question set, offering answers that 
were only loosely conceptualized or which failed to see clearly the point and the implications of the question.  
It may be that further thought and reflection on the question itself, and the issues which it raises, would 
have  helped  in  these  cases.  Though  most  candidates  included  relevant  information  and  showed  some 
knowledge of the period, sustained, coherent arguments in response to the questions were rarer; this was 
particularly true with regard to the more conceptual questions.    
Candidates showed admirable sensitivity and empathy in embracing the idea that witchcraft was a ‘rational’ 
belief – it would seem that the days of seeing this phenomenon as primitive superstition are long behind us.  
However, the danger of the rationality of the past being reduced to a dogma was also evident here, as very 
few candidates were brave enough to point out that there was actually some contemporary debate about 
this – not all early moderns did see witch belief as rational, ergo it is perfectly possible to argue in a more 
nuanced  way  here.    This  may  also  point  to  a  more  general  discomfort  with  handling  concepts  with 
confidence.  Terms like ‘post-reformation’, ‘power’, and ‘symbolic’ were often treated in a very linear way 
or left hazily undefined, and few candidates elected to identify hard cases which could be used to test the 
applicability or parameters of a concept.  
Future candidates would do well to think more carefully about how different approaches to asterisked and 
non-asterisked questions might be taken.  While solid nuts-and-bolts competence is always welcome, it is 
also something of a missed opportunity to showcase only this quality for questions which have considerable 
open-ended, creative potential.  Very few candidates chose to answer asterisked questions by comparing 
two  non-contiguous  parts  of the  period for  instance,  and  many contented  themselves  with  writing  fairly 
traditional answers about a single reign.  It was also disappointing – especially given that most candidates 
will have done some Disciplines-Comparisons by this stage – that very little thought was given to justifying 
why a particular part of the period was chosen, or to what a narrower focus could tell us about wider themes 
and debates. As last year, some portfolios of tutorial essays (as opposed to answers to the takeaway exam 
questions)  made  a  virtue  of  the  special  characteristics  of  the  format  to  tackle  questions  that  drew  in 
impressively recent debate and detailed evidence without undue narrowness of focus, whereas others found 
themselves answering very broad questions that were hard to handle in 2,000 words without omission of 
large areas or resort to questionable generalizations.  
The bibliographies deployed for some topics were strikingly dated: essays about the early reformation in 
particular  often  used  little  or  no  material  published  this  century.  Of  course,  some  unusual  features  of 
bibliographies, where for example US doctoral theses available online appeared, but standard biographies 
of individuals under detailed discussion or standard works on a given topic did not, may well have been a 
product of the difficult circumstances in which these examinees studied in their second year and which in 
general they overcame to very good effect.  
 
 
BIF 5:  Liberty, Commerce, and Power, 1685-1830 
Twenty-eight candidates took this paper, which returned to its pre-Covid portfolio format. The overall 
standards were very good, with eight candidates scoring 70/70+, and more than half the field registering a 
mark of 68 or above. Few students recorded marks below mid-2.1 level. Candidates had clearly taken on 
board the exhortations of previous examiners to engage questions with energy and ambition to make the 
most of the permitted 2,000-words. There was a pleasing range of questions attempted, and it was notable 
that students were ready to answer questions on both political and socio-cultural themes. They also 
engaged more directly with British and Irish perspectives, often producing greater clarity of argument 
through instructive comparative analysis. There were few essays which were not well-informed, and the 
bibliographies suggested that the candidates’ interests had been fired by a wide range of scholarly 
approaches. The best essays engaged productively with the relevant historiographies, defined their terms 
precisely, and organised their thoughts to ensure that they covered material efficiently. Although focused, 
weaker scripts were less systematic in their coverage, provided less convincing evidence, and they were 
not able to sustain their argument over the full course of the essay. They could also be too dismissive of 
 


possible counter-arguments, and they could sometimes overlook obvious matters of importance. 
Nonetheless, the examiners would commend the overall performance of the field, and they would hope 
that future cohorts will exhibit the same lively engagement with the rich historiography of the period. 
 
BIF 6: Power, Politics, & People, 1815-1924 
28 portfolios were examined this year – 26 candidates completed the take-home exam and two candidates 
submitted portfolios of tutorial essays. 
Of  the  30  questions  on  the  2022  BIF6  paper,  5  elicited  responses  from  no  candidates.  Aside  from  one 
question which attracted answers from over half the candidates (question 26 on the impact of empire), there 
was a good spread of answers among the remaining 25 questions. Questions 22 (on the impact of the Great 
War); 28 (on opposition to women’s suffrage); and 29 (on religion) were also popular. The questions which 
garnered no responses were questions 4 (on childhood); 5 (on Parliament); 13 (on liberal Toryism); 18 (on 
Gladstone and the Liberal Party); and 27 (on the extent of Anglicisation in Scotland and/or Wales).  
Students  who  answered  on  empire  were  able  to  focus  on  either  the  cultural  or  the  economic  impact  of 
empire on Britain, and the majority chose to focus on cultural impact. The strongest answers here were able 
to develop sophisticated arguments about how empire impacted British life, understood that impacts and 
experiences  differed  according  to  class,  gender,  age  etc,  and  were  able  to  draw  in  considerations  of 
subjectivity  and  identity  formation.  Less  sophisticated  answers  tended  to  list  a  series  of  impacts  or  to 
organise  around  case-studies,  which  hindered  the  development  of  a  coherent  overall  argument.  Few 
candidates  distinguished  the  realm  of  “culture”  as  something  apart  from  the  social,  and  almost  all 
interpreted culture as synonymous with “popular culture” only. Even the strongest answers often failed to 
incorporate any chronology or acknowledge the changing nature of the British Empire over 1815-1924. 
Failure to note change over time was common in responses to other questions, too. Another common issue 
was the failure to note the existence of any debate about the topics under consideration – in some instances, 
historical debate seemed to have concluded on a topic several decades ago. Failure to engage closely with 
the question at hand was also an issue, but this was largely about candidates not sufficiently unpacking the 
implications of the question rather than because they were producing rote or pre-prepared answers. There 
was a broad tendency among candidates to avoid conceptual discussion, or to refer to concepts somewhat 
haphazardly. For instance, while there were many excellent answers on questions of gender, suffrage, and 
sexuality, weaker answers on these topics tended to treat gender as the sole axis of consideration. Weaker 
answers in general also tended to adopt quite schematic and one-sided arguments, reflecting an uncertain 
command of the evidence and inattentiveness to its complexities. Strong answers were able to show good 
logic for selecting material for discussion and conveyed a sense of the British Isles in this period as a dynamic 
place.  
Indeed, the overall standard of this batch of scripts was high – examiners awarded First-class marks to 14 
out of a total 28 scripts, and some of the 14 who did not achieve a First-class mark overall produced individual 
answers that showed great distinction. This demonstrates that students are preparing well for these exams 
but  is no  doubt  also  a  reflection  of  the  opportunity that the 10-day  exam  window  affords  candidates to 
undertake additional targeted reading. Even candidates who did not engage as consistently with the terms 
of the question as they could have produced evidence – including primary evidence – that was relevant to 
the question and elevated the quality of their responses.  
While the effective use of primary evidence is part of the rubric for this paper and candidates were rewarded 
for deploying such evidence judiciously, the examiners wondered whether all candidates were aware that 
this was something they ought to pay some attention to. This mode of assessment is not intended to create 
another research-based piece of assessed work, but rather to reflect the nature of weekly tutorial  essays. 
The examiners recognise that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to writing a good portfolio essay. But 
given that the use of primary evidence is included within the marking criteria for the portfolio exercise, it 
may be helpful if BIF6 reading lists could offer more consistent encouragement to candidates to incorporate 
primary source material into their answers to ensure equity among all candidates. Tutors may also wish to 
offer guidance on how best to incorporate and to reference this material within the context of the portfolio 
assessment. 
 


 
BIF 7: Changing Identities, 1900 to the present 
Sixty candidates submitted portfolios for this paper. It was striking that while most of the questions 
tempted at least one response, a small number proved particularly popular. These included, ’Did 
motherhood disempower women?’ and ‘How much did migrants have in common?’ – indicating an 
appetite for looking at social inequalities linked to sex and race. Questions on social issues such as religion, 
the impact of war on class inequality and sexual morality, also attracted a high number of answers, but so 
too did political questions on Labour’s ideology and the Conservative Party’s appeal to working class 
voters. This year, again, only a very small number of candidates answered the questions on Scotland and 
Northern Ireland, suggesting persistent reluctance to look in depth at different parts of the British Isles. 
The questions on Europe also received limited interest. However, portfolios did show a pleasing range of 
interests and the calibre was generally high. About a third of candidates secured a First-Class mark and a 
little over a sixth gained a very high 2.i. Just over a sixth gained a lower 2.i and nobody got less than 60. 
This means all the candidates got a 2.i or higher, with half getting a top 2.i or First-Class. The less successful 
answers were descriptive rather than analytical in their approach, or they made general assertions without 
referring to specific scholarship and evidence to substantiate their claims. Weaker essays frequently lacked 
an independent perspective, failing to evaluate the secondary scholarship that was used. They also tended 
to lack precision, through ambiguity in their handling of core concepts (for instance concerning class or 
race), or by failing to refer to institutions and processes of change with specificity and depth. Another 
feature of less effective answers was narrowness in their focus. Conversely, over ambitions essays tried to 
cover too much and lacked the depth and rigor of a top-level answer. Some candidates had a tendency to 
load their answers. Bernard Porter's scepticism of the idea that imperialism dominated the public sphere 
was often cited in order to be rather summarily dismissed, but there was rarely evidence that it had really 
been read and understood. Answers of 'race relations' were effective in showing the persistence and 
weight of racism but paid little attention to contrary factors of amelioration and tolerance. There was little 
comparison to the race relations of other European counties. The best essays showed independent and 
imaginative, as well as informed engagement with the precise terms of the set questions. They 
characteristically demonstrated critical assessment of the relevant historiography; indeed, some 
candidates showed really impressive critical reading of relevant recent scholarship and used this judiciously 
to structure their arguments. The most effective answers extended this level of independent 
understanding and judgement to justify focussing the essay on a well-chosen selection of themes, which 
enabled the candidate to balance breadth of coverage with detailed and complex analysis within the 2,000 
word limit. Really successful answers included incisive introductions and conclusions that explained their 
approach, making explicit the conceptual sophistication and originality in their arguments. Another 
feature, which elevated essays, was that some candidates went beyond drawing their evidence from the 
primary sources they encountered in the secondary literature and showed initiative as well as skill in 
analysing primary sources they had researched for themselves, including visual material such as 
advertisements and popular culture such as music lyrics and film, as well as statistical data and political 
documents. This frequently produced lively and original responses to the questions. Finally, while a very 
few portfolios suffered from obvious lack of breadth in their knowledge, with some resorting to writing 
their three essays on overlapping topics, the most compelling portfolios used their choice of essays to 
convey wide-ranging knowledge and understanding of the paper, by including discussion of different 
periods and places as well as political, social and cultural themes. At the end of the day, it was very clear 
when candidates had approached the paper with intellectual curiosity and diligence and this paid off in 
their ability to present an exciting portfolio in the exam.  
(Aurelia Annat and Marc Mulholland) 
 
BIT (a) Bodies of Feelings: gender and sexual identity since c.1500 
There were thirty-one candidates who studied the paper in 2021-2.  Eleven gained first class marks, and 
there were no marks below 60. Twenty-two out of thirty questions were attempted. The most popular 
questions were on sex education (answered by 35 per cent of candidates), sexual desire between women 
 


(answered by 32 per cent of candidates), and motherhood (answered by 29 per cent of candidates). There 
were also three candidates who submitted a portfolio of essays, having studied the paper in 2019-20 
(when it was cancelled). 
The candidates showed encouraging engagement with the paper’s central challenge of thinking about 
continuity and change across more than 500 years. The examiners were impressed by candidates’ ambition 
in connecting knowledge from different time periods. The strongest answers also thought about regional 
variation across the British Isles. This was particularly strong in the answers on homosexuality and on the 
impact of industrial labour on gender inequality. Many answers that relied primarily on cultural evidence 
needed to think more about how ideas were communicated and some focused on imperial experiences 
needed to consider diversity across the British empire. 
Questions often encouraged candidates to draw together a wide variety of evidence. Answers were most 
successful when candidates thought about, and contextualised, the sources they were using. Answers on 
the impact of the Reformation on sexuality and on eighteenth-century understandings of the body 
explored the nature of the fragmentary source material more effectively than many of the answers on the 
modern period. Answers on industrial labour were strongest when candidates were able to analyse 
quantitative data as well as drawing on personal testimony.  
The essays all showed serious, lively, and independent engagement with the paper. First-class answers 
engaged critically with the concepts and methodologies used by historians and suggested by the question. 
Some of the weaker answers used concepts like ‘patriarchy’ or ‘the state’ without interrogating what this 
meant analytically or in specific time periods. The most original answers brought together a large amount 
of reading with relevant primary sources to offer stimulating new perspectives on this scholarship.  
 
 
BIT (b): The Making and Unmaking of the UK, 1603-present 
(suspended in 2021-22
 
b) EUROPEAN AND WORLD HISTORY 
 
EWF 1: The World of Late Antiquity, 250-650 
There were seven candidates. 
 
 Despite the number of candidates the range of questions attempted 
was good. Questions 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 15, 18, 24, 25, 26, and 27 were all attempted. Perhaps understandably, 
because of a surge of interest in pandemics and environmental history, question 25 (on ‘catastrophe’), was 
the most popular question (5 answers), although some candidates framed their answers to that question in 
unexpected ways. Question 18, on the impact of religious change on women, was also popular, attracting 
three answers.  
 
The best essays thought through the semantics of each question; approached the question from a number 
of angles, often imaginatively; organised their arguments clearly; deployed an appropriate range of 
scholarship and sources; and were not afraid to range in space and time. Weaker essays made too many 
assumptions about the drive of questions; sometimes forced those questions in directions which did not 
provide a sufficiently direct answer; and made too limited use of source materials or examples.  
 
The quality overall was very good, and no single answer was given a mark below upper second. In previous 
years there was some anxiety on the part of the assessors that candidates were not sufficiently conversant 
with extra-European societies, but that was far from the case this year. Most candidates included extra-
European perspectives, and it was gratifying to see candidates engaging detailed comparanda from 
Sasanian Iran, the early Islamic Middle East, Central Asia, and China. 
 
EWF 2: The Early Medieval World, 600-1000  

. The exam required 
students to select and answer three essay questions. Issues of planning and time management clearly 
 


emerged 
 This is 
something that might be addressed in guidance to future cohorts. The strongest paper also had the three 
highest single marks, with no drop in performance, with 72, 68, 74. Perhaps more interestingly, no two 
students answered the same question, which is evidence of a broad range of interest in and engagement 
with the material and themes introduced.  
 
In terms of the strongest and weakest responses, the best essays managed to demonstrate a depth of 
thought and reading across a wide range of relevant examples, also evidencing an ability to find points of 
contact across period and space. In contrast, the less successful essays were limited in their engagement 
with both primary and secondary material and failed to really draw out the significance of their case 
studies. Again, for two of the candidates this possibly had something to do with poor planning, given that 
each managed to produce a 68 for their first response. 
 
Overall this an impressive result, with no mark lower than a (marginal 2:1). Most impressive is the range of 
cases discussed, from Charlemagne and the Vikings to the Mongols and Bulgars. The spread of essay 
questions selected is also evidence that students are not being guided towards or gravitating towards a 
narrow range of more traditional examples but are applying their knowledge to diverse and novel subjects. 
 
EWF 3: The Central Middle Ages, 500-1500  
Nine candidates sat this paper in TT2022, 
. Approximately half of the 
questions on the paper were attempted by at least one candidate. The most popular question (six answers) 
concerned ruling elites and how they secured their subjects’ loyalty. Four candidates answered on the preference of 
institutions for ‘reform’ rather than ‘change’, while three wrote on heresy. All other questions that were answered 
were answered either by one or by two candidates. This suggests a pleasing spread of interest across the paper’s 
broad concerns. Candidates tackled a broad geographical range in their answers, navigating quite well the broadly 
framed questions. It is important to remember that because this is a double-badged paper, the questions are written 
in such a way as to enable candidates to draw on any relevant examples that they please. This does not mean that 
answers should be framed in a vague or general way, but that a good explanation should be offered at the outset for 
why the candidate thinks the question is usefully illuminated by the specific material that they intend to use in their 
answer. On the whole this was done well, but it bears repeating as a fundamental element of how this paper is 
taught and examined. The expansiveness of this paper is designed to allow students to focus on different topics and 
regions, but they should still do so with the usual clear and detailed sense of historiographical considerations and 
primary sources for their different example. 
(Amanda Power) 
 
EWF 4: The Global Middle Ages, 500-1500 
This was the third year in which this course was examined. There were 14 takers, of whom 7 achieved a 
first-class result, and 7 a 2:1 grade. Popular questions included those on disease, landscape as archive, 
maritime connections, nomads, writing, zomias and trade. This year’s markers were very encouraged by 
the cohort’s performance. Not only did more students take the paper than in the first two years of its 
existence, but the standard of overall performance was, with rare exceptions, very high, particularly so for 
a paper with such broad chronological, geographical and thematic parameters. Candidates with the 
strongest marks deployed a variety of strategies astutely: subtle critique of specialist historiography; the 
integration of carefully selected and relevant case studies; and direct interpretation of primary sources 
(material as well as written). As ever, to do well it was important for candidates to answer the question set 
as opposed to that which they had tackled in a tutorial essay. The standard of performance suggests that 
this paper is offering very bright students the opportunity to engage with complex and demanding 
historical concepts while also allowing them to become familiar with geographical regions and evidence 
bases which are not at the heart of the other EWF papers. The Global Middle Ages is an idea and a period 
still in its infancy as a subject of historical enquiry; it was very cheering to see so many takers of the paper 
rising to its challenges and developing insightful and in some cases original arguments under examination 
conditions. 
 


 
EWF 5: The Late Medieval World, 1300-1525 
Twelve students took the paper this year. The exam questions were almost all framed permissively in terms 
of geography and precise chronological focus. Students took advantage of this to discuss everything from 
the  early-fourteenth  to  the  mid-sixteenth  century,  deploying  material  relating  to  Western  Europe,  the 
Ottoman Empire, Ming China and the Islamic World. There was episodic use of case studies from Japan and 
Africa  (though  nothing  south  of  the  Mediterranean  coast),  but  no  mention  of  the  Americas  or  –  more 
surprisingly  –  Eastern  Europe  (bar  the  Hussites)  and  the  Orthodox  Christian  world.  The  paper  is  open  to 
geographical diversity, and students can feel confident that any regional focus will be accommodated by the 
paper.  The  most  popular  questions  were  those  on  the  regional  effects  of  epidemic  disease  (9  answers), 
popular  rebellions  (7  answers),  empires  (four  answers)  and  religious  belief  (four  answers).  Questions  on 
political ideas, learning and education, gender identity, architecture, slavery, religion and warfare, race, and 
women’s lives all received at least one answer. In general, the answers to less popular questions were better, 
the students seeming to be more capable of flexible thinking and more up to date in their reading. Students 
tackling canonical topics ought to make sure they are prepared for questions other than the one they wrote 
on  for  a  tutorial  essay,  and  that  they  have  used  their  own  initiative  to  find  good  secondary  literature. 
Students struggled in particular to come up with regional comparisons when discussing the effects of the 
Black Death, and a surprising number of answers on rebellions did not engage with the secondary literature 
on  popular  politics  as  dialogue.  There  were  no  answers  on  political  persuasion,  death,  cities,  trade, 
aristocracies,  art,  discovery,  the  military  state,  literature,  elite  women,  nomads,  confederations,  or  the 
princely court. Given that the evidence suggests better results for students following a more personal suite 
of interests, we hope that others will take up this opportunity in future. 
 
 
 
EWF 6: Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700 
Twenty-three candidates sat this paper in 2022, and four gained first-class results, the rest achieving 2i’s – 
a mark profile not significantly different from the two previous years of ‘open book’ exams.  Ten of the 
thirty topics were not answered by any candidate, though some of the topics neglected had been 
answered by numbers of candidates in previous years.  For example, a question on Poland-Lithuania which 
had no takers this year offers an instructive case of the role of lectures in this EWF course, since in previous 
years when a relevant lecture has been scheduled, questions on P-L attracted 3-4 answers, some of high 
quality.  
 
The most popular questions were on the Catholic Reformation (10 answers), women’s status and the 
household (8), Spain’s greatness/decline (8), violence in the French Wars of Religion (6), Protestantism (5), 
and visual arts/material culture (5).  There were 4 answers each on witch persecution, princely courts, 
popular revolts, and European attitudes to indigenous peoples.  All of these questions were framed by the 
examiners in specific terms, and the besetting weakness of many of the answers was a reluctance to 
engage with this specificity.  This was especially egregious in answers to the Catholic Reformation question, 
where the majority of candidates had seemingly not considered that lay elites (beyond rulers) might have 
any engagement with the reformation process, apparently entirely driven by the religious orders and a 
better-educated clergy.  Numbers of low 2i and 2ii marks were given out for essays on the ‘Catholic 
Reformation’ which simply ignored any detail – or even the implications – of lay involvement.  Similar 
problems were evident in the essays which discussed women’s status in broad political, social and 
economic terms, but hardly bothered to consider the household as a forum for influence and status.  Given 
the number of scripts tackling these questions, those candidates who did engage fully with the question 
not only gained far higher marks, but ensured that the deficiencies of weaker essays were especially 
apparent.    Even when candidates were deploying substantial factual and historiographical knowledge, 
they often failed to demonstrate rigorous focus on the precise terms of the question which would have 
 
10 

gained them first-class marks.  Six candidates fell just short of  a first with marks of 68/69, and in most of 
these cases stronger direct engagement with the question would have taken them over the line. 
 
EWF 7: Eurasian Empires. 1450-1800 
Twenty-seven students sat the paper this year. Only five candidates achieved overall marks of 70 or above. 
This is a significant drop when compared to the previous years and may partially depend on the fact that 
most of these finalists did not sit exams in Prelims. Candidates attempted all questions from Section A 
(States and regions), except for q. 4 on West and Central Africa, q. 11 on Early British India, and q. 13 on 
Mainland Southeast Asia. There was a general preference for the so-called Islamic empires in Asia, with 8 
answers to the question about the Mughals, 5 to that about the Heirs of Tamerlane, 3 for the Ottomans 
and 3 for the Safavids. The Iberian world also proved attractive, with both q. 1 on the Portuguese empire 
and q. 2 on the Incas, the Aztecs and the Spanish in the Americas being attempted by four candidates each. 
The remaining topics (the Dutch empire; Japan; Muscovy and the Russian empire) got two answers each, 
while only one student addressed q. 9 about Ming and Qing China. It can be hoped that the decline of 
interest in this topic is just fortuitous. Meanwhile, it should be noticed that while the rubric requires 
students to answer at least one question from Section B (Themes), candidates showed a strong preference 
for the second part of the exam paper, with c. 75% of them who opted for two questions from Section B 
(one candidate answered three questions from this section). This may perhaps indicate a shift of interest 
from the study of empires in isolation to that of processes and dynamics which occurred across them. If 
confirmed in the future, this shift may perhaps encourage tutors to rethink the balance between the 
typology of topics they teach and even slightly to update the lecture circus so to include more themes. Be 
that as it may, most of the answers to questions from Section B related to a limited set of topics, namely 
Gender and sexuality (7); Global early modernity (6); the Expansion of Christianity and Islam (6); Astrology, 
astronomy and millenarianism (6); and Cultural encounters, commensurability and early ethnography (4). 
Popularity, however, was not synonym for better preparation, as was demonstrated by the rather low 
quality of most of the answers to the question on Gender and sexuality. Three of the remaining topics from 
Section B (State responses to religious pluralism and changes; Imperial mentality and legitimacy; and 
Economic growth) were attempted by 3 candidates, while q. 21 about Ethnicity, patriotism and anti-
imperial rebellions got 2 answers. All other questions had 1 answer each, except for those about Trading 
networks and violence in the Indian Ocean and Early modern consciousness, which found no answers. 
 
EWF 8: Enlightenments and Revolutions: Europe 1680-1848 
(Old and new syllabus) 
Thirteen candidates sat the two papers, set on the old and new regulations, the vast majority under the new 
regulations. 
. Most to the 2i’s 
were in the upper range of marks, over 66, and of good standard. Three scripts went to the external. 
The examiners were concerned about the narrow range of questions chosen, and the even narrow breadth 
of knowledge shown in the answers. Only sixteen questions were attempted. Most confined themselves to 
France, Prussia, Russia and the Habsburg Monarchy. However, the examiners found it particularly worrying 
that Prussia was interpreted as a ‘small state’ in many answers to Question 11, which was answered by seven 
candidates, a clear sign of how limited their knowledge of the period was. The examiners allowed this as 
legitimate, which did much to raise the marks. No candidate answered a non-European question. There is a 
clear preference among the candidates for a purely European paper. 
 
EWF 9: From Independence to Empire: America 1763-1898  
24 candidates took EWF9 this year, nine were awarded Firsts and the remainder 2.1s. As a whole, the scripts 
were  lively  and  engaging,  well-informed,  and  engaged  the  questions  directly.  Candidates  were  also 
historiographically aware, often positioning themselves in and amongst the field carefully and, at their best, 
showing  the  significance  of  historian’s  historical  interventions.  Responses  that  fell  flat  were  often  too 
descriptive,  covering  a  good  range  of  events  and  demonstrating  sound  knowledge  without  developing  a 
detailed  close  analysis.  Here,  the  careful  deployment  of  case  studies  might  be  beneficial  in  helping 
candidates to square the circle of breadth of engagement and depth of analysis. 
 
11 

Although  there  was  some  clustering  in  candidate’s  responses  around  certain  topics,  a  good  range  of 
questions were answered. In fact, only six of the 30 questions were  not attempted. Interestingly, half of 
these were on topics from the late nineteenth century (17, 18, 19), which likely indicates student preferences 
in  the  paper  generally  and  the tendency to  develop  a  strong narrative around  slavery  and  emancipation 
across the paper and another around US imperialism. Student interests and the importance of some topics 
to the paper naturally resulted in some clustering, e.g. Q7 and Q27 on slavery and indigenous power were 
answered by almost half the candidates (12 and 11 respectively). Four candidates also answered Q5, showing 
clear interests in slavery. Those answering Q7 often engaged carefully with the histories of gender and the 
body in American slavery, developing sophisticated analysis; there was less evidence of candidate’s brining 
in gendered approaches on other topics though there were opportunities.  
  This was the first year in which “Section C. Themes” was compulsory. Only one of the theme questions was 
not answered (Q30), while Q27 was a clear preference, but the spread was more even between the others. 
These answers tended to be strong and afforded candidate’s the opportunity to engage imaginatively with 
the material they had prepared on core topics. 
 
EWF 10: The European Century, 1820-1925  
8 candidates took this paper. 

Candidates chose widely from the 28 questions available. 
Excellent scripts provided nuanced yet clear discussions of 3 questions, and candidates often showed 
awareness of recent scholarship. Weaker answers struggled to establish causality, were vague on agency, 
or failed to address the question, but instead discussed a (more or less) related topic.  
 
 
EWF 11: Imperial & Global History 1750-1930 
Demand for this paper has remained steady in recent years. In 2022 19 candidates sat the exam, plus two 
others who were listed as taking the paper but who did not sit the exam. Of the 21 students listed, 11 were 
in Joint Schools, a slightly higher proportion than last year. The proportion of candidates achieving a first 
class mark (9) was a little higher than last year. 10 candidates achieved an upper 2:1; no candidate achieved 
a mark below 65 (there were three scripts at 65 exactly). The essays were of a consistently high standard 
across the paper, and there were some superb individual essays on gender, orientalism, nineteenth-century 
China,  Islamic  revivalism,  and  the  1857  Indian  uprising.  As  in  previous  years,  there  was  quite  a  bit  of 
clustering. The most popular question in Section A, by quite some distance, was that on gender (answered 
by 12 candidates); the question on racism was answered by 6 candidates. This means that of the 28 essays 
written on Section A questions, 18 were on only two of the 14 questions available. This is a striking instance 
of clustering, and is presumably at least partly a reflection of the way the paper is covered in college tutorials, 
as well as reflecting prevailing thematic interests. All other Section A questions attracted one or two answers, 
or none (5 questions). In Section B, the question on Japan attracted the most answers (6), which was also 
the  case  last  year;  otherwise,  Section  B  answers  were  more  evenly  spread,  with  4  essays  on  China’s 
nineteenth  century,  and  3  each  on  Christianity, the  Black  Atlantic, the 1857 uprising,  the  Ottomans,  and 
Islamic revivalism. There were 5 unanswered questions, including 3 which spilled over onto the fourth page 
of  the  paper:  the  latter  were  on  topics  (the  Scramble  for  Africa,  Indian  nationalism,  and  anticolonial 
resistance)  which  we  would  normally  expect  to  attract  at  least  some  interest,  suggesting  perhaps  that 
candidates missed the fact that questions 27-29 were on the final page. Finally, it is worth noting that, in 
contrast with the past couple of years, there was much more of a balance between the thematic Section A 
(28 answers) and the place-specific Section B (29). 
 
EWF 12: The Making of Modern America since 1863 
42 candidates sat the European and World 12, America since 1863 paper in the 2021-2022 Academic Year. 
This included six joint schools students. 11 candidates received marks in the first-class range, 29 candidates 
received Upper Second Class classification, and two candidates received Lower Second Class classifications.  
 
12 

The  spread  of  question  responses  was  a  little  narrower  than  is  the  norm  for  this  paper  –  22  questions 
attracted responses, while eight questions had no takers. The questions on Jim Crow, Reconstruction, the 
Second Red Scare, the Civil Rights Movement, American imperialism, Reconstruction, and the New Deal were 
particularly  popular.  The  questions  that  addressed  post-1960s  developments  were  also  popular.  The 
asterisked questions attracted fewer takers than usual. Here, students should be mindful that the thematic 
questions are synoptic in nature and invite them to think expansively across their topics of study. Because 
of this, there are clear opportunities with the asterisked questions to furnish the reader with a response that 
offers a novel and interesting interpretation (qualities inherent in the very strongest essays).  
On the whole, the exams scripts were strong, and demonstrated a detailed knowledge and understanding 
of the historical specifics. Most responses were rich in evidence and told the reader a great deal about the 
broader  topic.  Many  responses  also  included  reference  to  historiography.  The  very  best  responses 
mentioned historiography, but also situated the response (and student’s own focussed argument) within the 
interpretative  landscape  discussed.  Similarly,  the  responses  that  consistently  achieved  high  marks  were 
those that offered a multi-faceted and nuanced response to the question set. The highest quality responses 
were all tailored to the specifics and offered a clear, thoughtful ‘take’ which demonstrated original analytical 
thinking and interpretative boldness.  
 
EWF 13: Europe Divided, 1914-1989 
Twenty-eight candidates took this paper, and were required to answer one question from each section. It 
was pleasing to see candidates answer a wider range of questions across all three sections of the paper than 
the  FHS  2022-2021.  While  many  answers  in  ‘Section  A:  1914-1945’  focused  on  revolutions,  ethno-
nationalism, and genocidal violence, questions relating to the social consequences of the two world wars, 
the outcomes of the Paris Peace conference, and the Allies’ access to resources produced some of the better 
answers. Among the best were those which drew across Europe for their examples, be it by drawing evidence 
from the Baltic states in the North, to territories of the former Ottoman empire in the south. Where relevant 
they also showed good awareness and understanding of Europe’s place in a changing, global world. Weaker 
answers tended to focus overly on Germany and Russia, and to travel time-worn arguments, material and 
literature, including references to ‘recent texts’ which were published in the 1980s. They were also quite 
general  or  vague  in  their  use  of  supporting  evidence,  and  often  gave  the  impression  of  attempting  to 
reiterate a tutorial essay rather than seeking to engage fully with the intellectual opportunities which the 
question posed on the paper opened up. There was a tendency in questions relating to ethno-nationalism 
and social and ethnic divisions to treat religious, ethnic and statehood categories as mutually exclusive when 
they are not. It is perfectly possible, for example for a Jew to be citizen of Poland and an ethnic German all 
at the same time. Nor are historians’ opinions the same thing as historical evidence. Answers in ‘Section B: 
1945-1989’  were  equally  well  distributed  this  year;  only  two  topics  solicited  no  answers:  the  role  of 
International and non-governmental organizations in shaping the lives of people and states, and the retreat 
of the welfare state.  In this section, the geographic range narrowed markedly, with examples drawn largely 
from the histories of the two Germanies, and France, with the exception of the question on communism 
where  the  best  answers  drew  on  detailed  knowledge  of  Romanian,  Bulgarian  and  Yugoslavian  history. 
‘Section  C:  Themes’ produced  some  wonderfully rich,  insightful answers  on the  limits  of  consumption to 
assuage political discontent, the history of the arts, and the effects of exposure to violence on individuals 
and communities. The best answers here ranged broadly in terms of geography and time. It is important to 
remember that theme answers (unless specified otherwise) require candidates to range across the period 
as a whole. Weaker answers tended to focus on the period solely after 1945. The question on organized 
religion  was  also  popular,  particularly  in  relation  to  Judaism  and  Islam.  The  best  answers  recognized 
doctrinal, as well as geographic diversity. What secularism comprised was generally less well-developed in 
all  the  answers.  There  was  less  variety  in  this  section,  with  five  questions  (history  of  youth/teenagers; 
globalization; humanitarianism and/or peace activism; entertainment; and the ‘end’ of revolutions) eliciting 
no answers. The two answers to the ‘question of Europe as a continent on the move’ did not recognize the 
reference (Gatrell) signalled the question was about refugees and the history of population displacement, 
but they produced effective answers nevertheless. 
 
13 

 
EWF 14: The Global 20th Century, 1930-2003 
Forty-six candidates took this paper, with joint schools of History and Politics comprising the largest joint 
schools’ cohort. The rubric requires candidates to answer three questions from at least two sections, one of 
which must be from ‘Section C: Global Themes’. Candidates are reminded the chronological divides of all the 
sections  are  permissive  –  not  restrictive.  In  Sections  B  the  best  answers  took  this  as  an  opportunity,  for 
example, to take a nuanced approach to analysing major religions, such as Islam, to articulate social and 
political  difference.  Equally,  thematic  answers  for  Section  C  need  to  range  broadly  across  the  entire 
chronology of the paper. While the strongest answers in this compulsory section demonstrated breadth of 
coverage,  and  precision  in  analysis  on  a  range  of  diverse  topics,  including  consumer  culture,  modern 
humanitarianism, and mass violence, many focused, seemingly by accident more than design, on the period 
after 1944. This was particularly notable in relation to the most popular question: people’s participation in 
mass violence. It was pleasing to note the wide range of questions answered in all three sections. In Section 
C, human rights, the global 1960s, and sexual liberation remained popular, only the questions relating to the 
technological revolution and neoliberalism went unanswered. As in 2021, less popular topics often elicited 
the best answers, and it is gratifying to note rising engagement with questions relating to natural resources, 
international development, and overpopulation. In Sections A and B, most questions also captured at least 
one  answer,  with  the  best  ones  working  hard  to  engage  fully  with  the  terms  of  the  question.  Especially 
impressive were answers on the still popular topic of the Second World War which engaged as much with 
the implications of a ‘final rivalry’ as with imperialism. In Section A, other popular topics included the origins 
of  the  Cold  War,  international  cooperation,  the  practices  of  postcolonial  states,  and  the  end  of  Bretton 
Woods. In Section B, the end of the Cold War, global challenges, and anti-globalization drew the majority of 
answers.  The  range  of  case  studies  was  impressive,  with  all  parts  of  the  world  drawn  into  the  mix,  in 
conceptually strong, empirically well-evidenced, and tightly argued answers. Candidates in the History and 
Politics joint schools are reminded history papers invite them to engage and evaluate historical evidence and 
not  rival  theories  about  concepts  and  causality  (although  political  science  shaped  some  excellent  critical 
engagement with the terms of the question in some answers) 
 
EWT (A) Masculinity & its Discontents, 200-2000 
20 candidates took the examination; 
, fifteen upper second marks (mostly 
upwards of 64), 
. There were 25 questions on the paper, in contrast to previous 
years. This was at the request of the Board, in order to bring the number of questions on the paper into 
line with those on the Outline papers. In the event, ten questions went unanswered. Of the fifteen that did 
attract answers, the most popular were those on queerness, homosociality, race, empire, and warfare.  
 
As in previous years, the level of engagement with the material, both conceptual and substantive, was 
exhilarating. Candidates rose to the challenge of this paper, developing cogent arguments in relation both 
to gender theory and to particular case studies. Answers ranged happily across medieval, early modern, 
and modern contexts, showing control of specific material in broad comparative frameworks.  
 
Future students and their teachers might devote some of their energies in two areas. One, theoretical 
precision: answers in particular on queer masculinity tended towards equating ‘queer’ with ‘gay’ or ‘male 
homosexual’. This narrowed what these answers could achieve. The second area for possible improvement 
is source criticism: candidates should welcome the chance to discuss the limits and the potential of the 
primary sources they are using. This would only enhance the power of the comparisons they are making.  
 
This is a paper that looks to encourage a combination of risk and precision. The best answers were those 
that showed curiosity and creativity with attention to detail in responding to the questions. Less successful 
were those that ‘played it safe’ by sticking to a rehearsed script. The less ventured, the less gained; 
conversely, high risk, high return.  
 
 
14 

EWT (B) Global Networks of Innovation, 1000-1700: China, Islam and the Rise of the West 
This year was the first time that the paper has been offered under its revised designation (replacing the 
previous title, ‘Technology and Culture in a Global Context, 1000-1700’). Students attended tutorials in 
Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity terms, while also attending eight lecture and discussion seminars in Trinity. 
A much larger cohort of candidates is expected for the Trinity 2023 exam, as increased interest in this 
relatively new paper develops.  
 
 By 
comparison with marks last year, this group wrote impressive essays, two of which were deemed to be 
worthy of a first (the third student wrote answers at a high II.1 level).  
Students had the option of answering three questions from a list of twenty-six. Two questions were 
answered by two of the candidates (numbers 9 and 20); these were: ‘how did the making and us of glass 
differ in the Islamic and European worlds before 1500?’ and ‘what were clocks used for in Eurasia besides 
timekeeping?’ The responses of the students who attempted these questions were both technically rich 
and historiographically sophisticated, and they were assessed at the low end of the First Class range.  
The outstanding essay of this group, which was awarded 85, addressed the question, ‘what were the 
differences in the use of gunpowder between Asia and Europe up to 1700?’ This answer showed an 
impressive knowledge of the history of military innovation and it engaged with a number of other course 
topics, including transcultural exchanges, alchemy and engineering.  Other answers addressed the 
transmission of Islamic technologies to Europe; the question of the ‘rise of the West’ within the Eurasian 
context; and the worldviews of Western individuals responsible for technological innovations. The markers 
of the exam scripts noted that students had avoided questions that had been popular in the past, such as 
alchemy, navigation and the nature and effect of paper and printing innovations. 
 
 
EWT(C) Waging War-in Eurasia 

 insisted on the urgent necessity of returning to invigilated, in-person exams, not least because 
of a nasty case of plagiarism. Thankfully this year we did so, and the integrity of the assessment process 
has thus been restored.  
Seven finalists registered for the paper 
. The spread of marks was more 
limited than in 2021, with none below 65, and only one first-class mark of 72. Three scripts received marks 
of 67, reflecting solid but not quite first-class performances. The spread of questions answered differed 
from last year but was closer to 2020, as four out of six candidates answered question 1 on the Mongols. 
Question 15 (on operation Barbarossa) was less popular than usual, with only two candidates choosing to 
answer it, the same number who answered Question 8 on Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.  I was satisfied to 
see one excellent answer on Ottoman warfare, and one on the Qing conquest of Inner Asia. Of the 
thematic questions (no candidate attempted more than one of these) the most popular was question 18 
on the military divergence, which three candidates answered, with two choosing question 23 on 
Mackinder and one question 16 on logistics. 
Overall the standard was satisfactory, with the two most substantial differences of opinion among the 
examiners (in both cases between 65 and 70) perhaps contributing to the evenness of the marks awarded, 
which were almost all in the high 60s. As the numbers were small this year it is hard to draw any clear 
conclusions from this. As might be expected apart from eliminating plagiarism the effect of a return to 
handwritten, invigilated exams is greater clarity of argument, spontaneity and fluency, but a reduction in 
the volume and detail of evidence. 
 
EWT (D) Catholicism in the Making of the Modern World, 1545-1970 
Six students sat the exam in 2022, two fewer than in 2021. The overall quality of the answers was also 
lower, 
 
. The most popular question was that on twentieth-century peace movements, which got 3 
answers, with mission, family and the Church’s attitude to the Third Reich being addressed by two 
 
15 

candidates each. The other questions that were attempted at least by one candidate covered a disparate 
range of topics (Ways of dying; Art; Sexuality; Nation building; Women’s empowerment; Conversion in 
early modern Asia; Late nineteenth century social teachings; and Papal politics) and it’s difficult to provide 
an overall assessment of the students’ choices. It can be said, nonetheless, that the long chronological 
reach of the paper was clearly a challenge for some of them, who attempted period-focused questions 
whenever possible. 
 
 
C) FURTHER SUBJECTS 
 
FS 1: Anglo-Saxon Archaeology c. 600-750; Society and Economy in the early Christian period 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
FS 2: The Near East in the Age of Justinian and Muhammad, 527-c.700 
Twelve candidates took the paper this year, spread across History, Ancient and Modern History, History 
and Economics, and History and Modern Languages.  
 
, eight candidates obtained marks from 60-69, 
  The candidates 
answered a good spread of questions – no 11 on Miaphysites was the most popular, and only questions 3, 
10 and 12 attracted no answers.  As usual, the candidates who did less well had written essays that did not 
address the question posed in the paper, while the candidates who achieved high marks engaged fully with 
the questions, provided nuanced interpretations of them, and wrote thoughtful and sophisticated 
reflections supported by detailed source analysis.   
 
FS 3: The Carolingian Renaissance 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
FS 4: The Crusades, c. 1095-1291 
14 candidates sat the paper. The cohort was offered a revision session in the first half of Trinity Term by 
the current convenor (CH), the previous convenor (CT) having retired in the period since most students 
attended classes (HT2021). Most performances in the examination clustered in the mid- to high-2.1 range. 
 12 of the 14 questions on the 
paper received at least one response. Particularly popular questions were those on the Capetian narratives 
and Villehardouin. Perhaps because this is a paper to which students return in revision after a period 
focusing on Special Subject and thesis sources, many candidates tend to focus primarily on the Section A 
text-focused questions. Answers for these Section A questions ranged from the competent to the very 
good, with the better scores coming from those candidates who able to support their case with precise 
reference to the set texts rather than from a derivative presentation of relevant debates in the secondary 
literature - although those debates are still important, and candidates can intervene effectively in them if 
they know their texts well. Our principal observation is that candidates should not fear Section B. The 
questions here are certainly more open-ended, but their greater scope is an opportunity to score well. 
Answering broad and demanding questions through thoughtful engagement with primary sources and 
significant modern scholarship is a high-level skill which markers of the paper recognise and reward.  
 
 
FS 5: Culture and Society in Early Renaissance Italy, 1290-1348 
This was an exceptionally strong year, with 6 out of 12 candidates being given first-class marks. What was 
particularly impressive about these scripts was their combination of a detailed reading of the set-texts (and 
images) with judicious generalization about the broader themes and controversies they contain. 
 
 
Otherwise, the range and quality of the answers attempted suggest a real, and gratifying, engagement with 
the intellectual challenges of this paper. 
 
16 

 
FS 6: Flanders and Italy in the Quattrocento, 1420-1480 
A relatively large cohort, by comparison with previous years, of nine candidates sat for the exam. In 
general their marks were very good, which compare with results in previous exams. Five of the students 
wrote impressive essays deemed worthy of a first, 
 
 
  
Students answered three questions in a list of fourteen, arranged in two sections that addressed, 
respectively, (A) fundamental topics and (B) analytical problems. For the first section, all of the students 
discussed Rogier van der Weyden’s pictorial strategies, developing in most cases their best answers on the 
exam, whereby sophisticated pictorial methods were assessed within their social contexts. The other 
popular question, though with mixed results among six students, requested an analysis of the devotional 
quality of Netherlandish painting, by contrast with pietistic approaches in Italian painting. Four students 
were also relatively prepared to discuss the influence of Italian patronage on Netherlandish painting. The 
outstanding essay in this group, awarded an 80, addressed technical innovations in painting as well as 
mercantile activity in sophisticated historiographical assessments that, overall, located those very specific 
developments within their broader contexts. Among questions avoided by students that were popular in 
the past, topics included the patronage of Netherlandish musicians, the different regions influenced by 
Netherlandish painting, some of the important reasons for this influence, immigration, and forms of 
material evidence of these transcultural exchanges.   
 
 
FS 7: The Wars of the Roses, c 1450-c.1500 
Nine candidates took the paper, 
 seven upper seconds, 
most of them in the upper half of the class.  Overall, then, this was a slightly weaker performance than 
usual, though candidates typically showed a good knowledge of the set texts, both in answering questions 
in Section A and more generally, and of the major secondary literature.  The main weakness in answers – 
and this might help to explain the small number of firsts – was a failure to pay attention to the precise 
demands of the question (for instance, the first question – on chronicles – asked about how helpful they 
were in establishing ‘narratives of events’, and relatively few candidates focused their comments on this 
particular theme, instead writing generally on the strengths and weaknesses of chronicles as 
sources).   Eleven of the fourteen questions attracted at least one answer, including all of those from 
Section A, but no-one answered on the international context, the role of the magnates or (surprisingly) 
whether Bosworth marked the end of the Wars. 
 
 
FS 8: Women, Gender and Print Culture in Early Modern England 
(Suspended 2020-21) 
 
FS 9: Literature and Politics in Early Modern England 
There were fifteen candidates for this further subject exam. All performed to a very creditable standard, 
with six first-class marks, and another nine in the range 62-69. Answers ranged across a wide away of 
topics, with all but two of the questions on the paper eliciting at least one answer, despite the 
comparatively small number of candidates. In particular, there were some very thoughtful answers in the 
section B part of the paper. As ever, a detailed knowledge of the set texts and the deployment of close 
reading skills produced the most impressive results. Candidates also showed a commendable knowledge of 
a wide range of secondary material and engaged constructively and often imaginatively with several 
contemporary debates. The quality of the responses demonstrated that the creative synergy between the 
two poles in this interdisciplinary paper continues to stimulate intellectual achievement of a very high 
order. 
 
 
17 

 
FS 10: The Iberian Global Century 
Only 5 candidates sat the paper. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
FS 11: Writing in the Early Modern Period 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
FS 12: Court culture and Art in Early Modern Europe, 1580-1700 
(Suspended 2020-21) 
 
FS 13: War and Society in Britain and Europe, c.1650-1815 
Five students took this paper in 2022.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FS 14: The Metropolitan Crucible: London 1685-1815 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
FS 15: Histories of Madness and Mental Healing in a Global Context  
(Suspended 2020-21) 
 
FS 16: Medicine, Empire and Improvement/Imperial Pathologies 
5 candidates sat the paper, which was examined in person at Exam Schools. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
FS 17 Constructing the First New Nation: A Political History of the United States 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
 
FS 18 – Nationalism in Western Europe, 1799-1890. 
Five candidates sat the paper, which is a lower number than our usual eight to ten. 
 
 
 
18 

2:2.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
FS 19: Intellect and Culture in Victorian Britain 
Five candidates took the paper this year, and were required to answer at least one question from sections A 
and B. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          
 
 
FS 20: The Authority of Nature: Race, Heredity and Crime, 1800-1940 
Fifteen candidates sat the examination. Four students were awarded a first-class mark, and the remaining 
eleven all achieved marks in the 2.i bracket. The highest agreed mark was 72, and the lowest 62. There 
were no instances of short weight scripts. 
Almost all questions were attempted by at least one candidate, with the exception of Q7 (on Marie Stopes) 
and Q11 (on eugenics in the post-WWII era), which attracted no answers. The most popular questions 
were those on mono/polygenism, Cesare Lombroso, and the relationship between eugenics and feminism, 
each of which were attempted by around half of all candidates. The volume of responses to Section A 
questions (23) and Section B questions (22) was remarkably even. Marks awarded for individual answers 
suggest the quality of responses was comparable across sections, as well as across different questions.  
The strongest answers were those which combined sophisticated understanding of the historiography with 
close analysis of the set primary sources, and which set out and cogently defended a distinct central thesis. 
The weakest responses were either superficial in their treatment of the primary texts, did not engage 
 
19 

closely enough with terms of the question, or lacked an organising argumentative thread.  
Some candidates showed a pleasing ability to contextualise the set texts with respect to audience, 
readership, usage, and genre. This sophisticated contextualist approach invariably made for more 
compelling answers, and students might well be encouraged to explore these issues more extensively in 
future years. 
 
 
FS 21: The Middle East in the Age of Empire, 1830-1971 
There were twenty candidates for this paper, six of whom were from FHS in Oriental Studies or European 
and Middle Eastern Languages and five from History Joint Schools. First class marks of 70 or above were 
achieved by four candidates, fewer than has been usual, 
 
Of the marks in the 2.i range, nine candidates gained marks above 65 with the remaining five scoring 
between 60 and 64; there were several ‘near misses’, with 3 candidates marked at 69. 
 
. The most popular questions were Q3 (visual 
sources and European perceptions, 7 answers), Q4 (tanzimat, 8 answers) in section A, and Q10 (colonialism 
in the Maghrib cf. elsewhere, 7 answers) and Q15 (Palestinian refugees, 11 answers) in section B. Every 
question except Q8 (negotiated independence versus armed struggle) attracted at least one answer. The 
best scripts showed good, detailed and thoughtful engagement with the sources and a critical grasp of the 
historiography, with controlled, sustained arguments covering a good range of chronology and geography. 
Weaker answers lacked consistent lines of argument, tended to be superficial, repetitive, to state the 
obvious, or to fall back (despite the best efforts of the entire paper) into presumed essentialising 
differences between the region and ‘the West’. This was especially a problem with Q3, which tended to 
attract some quite weak answers that failed to get beyond very general accounts of Orientalism and 
provided no, or very weak, contextualisation and reading of the art-historical material in particular (it may 
be necessary to rethink how these sources are presented or discussed, or even whether they should be 
replaced).   
  
 
FS 22: Transformations and Transitions in African History since c. 1800 
In 2022 12 candidates sat the exam, of which 4 were in Joint Schools. Five candidates achieved an agreed 
first-class mark, and 6 candidates achieved an upper second (including 3 candidates who achieved an agreed 
mark of 65). There were no instances of a lower second or third. As in previous years, the essays were of a 
consistently high standard across the paper. There was some clustering around particular questions, of which 
the most popular (with 8 answers) was the Section B question on the Scramble for Africa, which is evidently 
still viewed as the major landmark in the continent’s modern history. In terms of Section A source-focused 
questions,  there  were  6  answers  on  the  ‘either  Buxton  or  Lugard’  question.  Of  these,  there  was  a  clear 
preference for Lugard (4) over Buxton (2), which may be an issue of accessibility and perceived contemporary 
relevance.  As  in  previous  years,  smaller  clusters  appeared  around  questions  on  nineteenth-century 
commercial shifts (5 answers) and indirect rule (4 answers). Notably, 6 questions went unanswered by any 
candidate: on Fanon/violence, nineteenth-century European perceptions of Africa, anticolonial resistance, 
social  impacts  of  colonialism,  African  women’s  experience  of  colonialism,  and  postcolonial  economic 
challenges. This may reflect slightly briefer coverage of these topics in classes/tutorials, but at the same time, 
students  taking  this  ever-popular  paper  come  with  almost  no  prior  exposure  to  African  history  in  the 
curriculum. They therefore sometimes avoid topics in the exam which require sensitive handling and more 
in-depth reading, and stick to the ‘solid’, more easily navigable topics noted above. 
 
 
FS 23: Modern Japan 
10 candidates sat the paper. The cohort was offered a two-hour revision session in Week 1 of Trinity.  
 
 The others did well on the whole.  Seven candidates earned between 
 
20 

60 and 69, with no candidate receiving below 60. 
The assessors noted that the candidates responded with good command of the historians’ craft, by using 
the evidence and examples well, and they understood the significance of each question.  Overall, their 
analytical skills and knowledge acquired were amply demonstrated in the way they contextualised their 
response in historical and historiographical contexts.  Having said that, however, while everyone neatly 
earned above 60, the assessors note that we did not see the outstanding responses that we usually 
see frequently. We are not sure of reason for this, but we suspect that Covid may have had an impact. 
After all, the course had to be conducted online in the previous year, and the cohort only met face to face 
in a review session in Trinity term when the exam took place. 
 
FS 25: Nationalism, Politics and Culture in Ireland, c.1870-1921 
Thirteen students sat this paper. 
. The median mark was in 
the high 60s. There was a good range of questions attempted and no problem with excessive clustering. 
Students showed a keen awareness of the set texts and were able to draw upon them for illustration and 
quotation. The better scripts summarised certain texts as a whole or in large part as well as quoting 
pertinent lines. A degree of historiographical discussion was always welcome, so long as it did not 
overwhelm the candidate’s point of view. Knowledge of context and range across time, indicated by 
pertinent facts and figures, showed a confident knowledge in the better scripts. 
 
 
FS 26: A Global War, 1914-1920 
This year the final exam scripts for the Global War further subject were characterised by high competence 
– of the nine finalists, seven received overall marks over the midway point of the 2.1. and only a few 
individual essays received marks below 60. Candidates did genuinely address the questions being asked.  
All candidates demonstrated very good knowledge of core texts.  A good range of questions were 
addressed – the nine candidates tackled eleven out of the fourteen questions. At the same time neither 
marker felt that there were many outstanding essay answers deserving marks over 75– either in terms of 
unusually deep source knowledge yielding surprising answers or very sophisticated historiographically 
based arguments. In some ways this was disappointing – the large amounts of supplementary material 
posted on Teams for the classes during the lockdown had less impact than might have been hoped and the 
scripts didn’t seem to fully reflect the lively online classes and well prepared tutorial essays based on 
unusually extensive reading. It is possible that there was some intangible loss in the pedagogic experience 
which was genuinely not apparent at the time. (Perhaps out of class discussion?) It is also possible that the 
return to traditional exam format created an element of conservatism among the candidates which was 
less apparent in the classes and tutorials. The result was no disgrace to an excellent and rewarding year 
group who managed with grace and goodwill under difficult circumstances but perhaps not everything we 
might have hoped.  
 
 
FS 27: China since 1900 
In Trinity term 2022, 23 candidates sat the “FS - China since 1900 paper”. It was examined in person, in a 
three-hour written exam. 
 
  
Candidates answered questions from both Sections A and B, with an equal number of candidates choosing 
two Section A or two Section B questions. The assessors were pleased to see that Section A answers were 
more popular this year, and answers generally demonstrated a good grasp of primary sources. While 
candidates confidently responded to questions about the Cultural Revolution and early years of the 
People’s Republic of China, answers about Republican literary production or women’s history at times 
could have explored set texts in greater detail and engaged critically with the terms of the questions. 
Strong answers in Section B, meanwhile, embedded answers in relevant historiography. They drew out 
 
21 

different arguments and connected to debates in the field, especially for example in the case of the New 
Culture Movement and the economic consequences of Japanese imperialism.  
 
 
FS 28: The Soviet Union, 1924-1941 
7 students sat the paper, having attended a 90-minute revision class in the first week of Trinity term.   
 There were 
 no instances of 
short-weight.  The examiners were pleased to note that only 3 out of the 15 exam questions did not attract 
any takers. The topic of Soviet policy on the family proved to be the most popular. The strongest responses 
showed an awareness of the plurality of party opinion on this issue and critically interrogated the notion of 
a ‘retreat’ in family and gender policies under Stalin. Questions on Socialist Realism and the creative 
intelligentsia under Stalin also attracted considerable attention, with the strongest answers illustrating 
their points with specific examples from the Set Texts and showing sensitivity to the multiple agencies 
involved in the creation of Stalinist culture. The topic of ‘Soviet subjectivity’ seemed to be a little more 
challenging for students. While a number of students illustrated a close familiarity with specific diaries and 
memoirs, they did not always show an advanced understanding of the secondary literature on this topic. 
Overall, however, the examiners were impressed by the quality of the exam scripts. 
 
 
FS 29: Culture, Politics and Identity in Cold War Europe, 1945-1968 
Twenty candidates sat the paper. No candidates received marks below 60, although nine – nearly half – fell 
in the 60-65 range, suggesting the examiners’ general dissatisfaction with the overall quality of scripts. Five 
marks were in the 70+ range; the highest mark was 75. 
As I am writing this at a remove from the actual marking, I cannot offer much detail on the questions 
chosen or content of essays. I do remember that many students chose to write the comparative question 
on women’s status in Eastern and Western Europe but failed to include the most glaringly obvious points 
of comparison; I think just one essay out of the whole bunch, for example, mentioned reproductive rights. 
The popularity of the question reinforces the sense that women’s/gender history is of interest to many 
students, but the quality of the answers suggests this topic was not taught well/enough. 
 
 
FS 30: The Jews in Poland in the Twentieth Century: History and Memory 
Eleven candidates sat the paper, the first cohort to do so since this Further Subject was introduced. No 
candidate received a mark below 60. A hefty six candidates received a mark of 70 or above. The quality of 
the responses was very good overall. Both examiners were impressed with the demonstrated level of 
knowledge and generally detailed and thoughtful engagement with set texts. 
 
 
FS 31: Britain at the Movies: Film and National Identity since 1914 
Twelve candidates sat the paper. Only one question failed to elicit a response. All the other questions were 
attempted by at least one candidate, although questions on genre, including war films, inter-war 
documentary and romance, proved especially popular. Most popular of all, however, was question 8: 
‘Under what circumstances have films broken sexual taboos?’, which three quarters of the cohort 
attempted. The calibre of the responses was high. Five candidates gained overall marks of 70 or above and 
no-one got less than a 60. This means everyone gained a 2.i or higher.  Part of this success can be 
attributed to the fact that, taken as a whole, candidates showed extremely thorough knowledge of the 
films which comprise the set texts for this paper and were able to refer in detail to a well-chosen selection 
of these in their responses to the questions. However, weaker answers lacked sufficient contextual 
knowledge of the films to achieve real depth of analysis. Failure to unpack the questions carefully and to 
show understanding of the specific concepts that were referred to also undermined the competence of 
some answers. The most successful essays offered structured and precise engagement with the questions, 
 
22 

showing a good level of precise knowledge of the films as texts, as well as their production and reception 
and how this was framed by the wider historical context. Reference to specific relevant secondary 
scholarship and to other forms of primary evidence beyond the films themselves (for instance audience 
surveys or contemporary reviews) was also important in enhancing answers. Ultimately, then, wider 
knowledge that informed deeper engagement with the films was critical in achieving higher level marks.   
  
 
FS 32: Scholastic and Humanist Political Thought 
Five candidates sat the examination
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
FS 33:  Political and Social Thought in the Age of Enlightenment 
This paper was sat by six candidates. 
 
 
 In terms of exam performance, this was a successful paper. 
Neither marker took part in any of the teaching for this paper. 
The spread of questions attempted was narrow. All but one candidate answered Question 1 (on Hobbes); 
three answered Question 16 (the Enlightenment); and three on questions relating to Mary Wollstonecraft, 
7 and 8. Out of eighteen questions, ten were attempted by at least one candidate, but eight went 
unanswered. None of the questions pertaining directly to gender or the extra-European topics found 
takers. 
 
 
FS 34: Political Theory and Social Science, c. 1780-1820 
Six candidates sat this examination. 
, whilst the remaining 
candidates obtained marks in the 2.1 range, with most hovering around 63/64 %. This examination was 
competently treated by the six candidates who sat it, though it was disappointing there were not more 
first-class answers. A broad range of questions were answered, with half the candidates choosing to 
answer question 1. Two candidates answered question 7 and another two answered question 13. 
Questions 10, 16, and 17 were not answered by any candidate. With the exception of a few scripts, 
candidates were unable to show a detailed and forensic knowledge of the set texts and had limited 
knowledge of the secondary literature. It is clear that candidates need to engage more rigorously with, and 
have a better understanding of, the prescribed works for this paper. In some instances, candidates showed 
no more than a superficial understanding of these works.  
 
 
FS 35: Post-Colonial Historiography: Writing the (Indian) Nation 
Eleven candidates sat the paper, which was examined in person. Five gained marks of 70 or above and no 
candidate scored below 65. Eleven of the fifteen questions set attracted answers. Those not answered 
focused on the politics of early Indian feminism, diasporic and cosmopolitan influences on Indian 
nationalism, and the relationship between contemporary environmentalism and colonial conservation. 
There was some bunching of responses: in particular, the question seeking a comparison of oral and 
 
23 

literary approaches to Partition was answered by six candidates, and the question on the relationship 
between gender, domesticity and nationalism by seven. Though no scripts were poor, the more middling 
answers were characterised by a tendency merely to outline postcolonial theory and/or historiographical 
debates without offering much critical analysis. They were also less effective than the strongest candidates 
in relating theory and debate to the set texts. The best scripts showed a strong command of relevant 
theoretical debates while also integrated this with outstanding knowledge of the set texts, very precise 
focus on the question and a willingness to challenge historiographical orthodoxy.   
 
 
FS 36: Modern Mexico  
Ten students sat the exam in Trinity Term 2022. The cohort had been offered a revision session at the 
beginning of the term. This was a strong batch of exams, with six candidates garnering a first class mark 
and the remaining four candidates all achieving a mark in the sixties. The examiners agreed that candidates 
were able to offer nuanced, empirically–anchored of the Porfirian dictatorship, the Mexican Revolution, 
and the rise and fall of the one-party state, as well as deeply contextualised readings of the primary 
sources. 
 
SPECIAL SUBJECT GOBBETS PAPERS 
 
SS 1: St Augustine and the last days of Rome, 370-430 (Gobbet exam) 
Number of candidates = 7 
. Five takers had marks 70 or above, none below 60. 
 
Spread of Qs chosen and performance on assessment: 
All options were answered, but two questions (1F; 4F) by only one student each. For many questions the 
returns were too few to allow for a detailed report without compromising anonymity,  
 
1. All options were answered, with C the most popular (all students) followed by D and A (4 takers each). B, 
E and F had 2 takers each. 
1A: A popular question, if not always used to its full potential. All takers caught some of the ways in 
which the passage engages with Augustine’s views on sin and baptism, and how it foreshadows 
events in Augustine’s life, but few caught all of them. 
1B: good responses, although missing some of the potential, such as discussing the fit of the 
passage into the work as a whole, or its theological implications. 
1C: By far the most popular question. The best answers noted the importance of allegorical 
exegesis for Augustine’s understanding of the Bible, and how he blamed his own conceit rather 
than classical culture. Weaker answers strayed too far from the content of the passage, and failed 
to recognise its function in the work overall. 
1D: Although several responses were very good, the question was not always used to its full 
potential. The more successful answers paid attention to the role that Ambrose’s preaching played 
for Augustine’s spiritual development. 
1E: competent if somewhat uneven responses, with too little attention to the multiple conversions 
in Augustine’s Confessions, and how they structure the work. 
1F: interesting and competent responses on the relation between Augustine’s childhood faith and 
his struggles on the path to regain it. 
 
2. All options were answered, with A the most popular (6 takers) followed by D (5) and C (3), with 2 takers 
each for B, E and F. 
2A: very popular, and eliciting some very interesting responses. The best were sensitive both to 
political realities and Ammianus’ literary strategies, noting the satirical tropes, his audience, and 
the habits of the Roman elite. Weaker responses showed a tendency to cite the text, and missed 
 
24 

some of the finer details. 
2B: Too few responses to discuss, but the question allowed for discussing Ammianus’ rhetorical 
strategies, social unrest, and the importance of provisioning Rome. 
2C: The best responses gave details about Probus and recognised him both as typical of the highest 
Roman elite, and unique in his frequent holding of imperial office. There was a general lack of 
discussion of why he was controversial to many. 
2D: Generally competent and interesting responses that noted how the episode contributes to 
Ammianus’ negative characterisation of Valentinian I, and discussed his techniques, his readership, 
and the prevailing political culture. 
2E: Too few responses to discuss. 
2F: Too few responses to discuss. The question invited discussion on tax-evasion and the property 
of clerical officeholders. 
 
3. All options were answered, with B and D the most popular (5 takers each) followed by A (3 takers), while 
E and F had 2 takers each.  
3A: the best responses were attentive to Ambrose’s rhetorical strategies, notably in smearing 
Auxentius and presenting himself as the representative of Catholic unity. 
3B: The best responses were attentive to details, and to the chronology and audiences of the 
publications associated with the Altar of Victory. Several answers showed a good understanding of 
the religious milieu at the time, while some were uninformed and sloppy with details. 
3C: Several competent responses, but a general lack of attention to the post-facto publication of 
Ambrose’s letter, and what this means for interpreting his aims and audiences. Poorer answers 
were sloppy with details. 
3D: Spirited if somewhat mixed responses, where the strongest recognised details such as the 
name and status of the addressee Asella, the purported place and time of writing, and the need for, 
and nature of, defense on the part of Jerome. 
3E: Too few responses to discuss. The passage opened for several discussions, including the place of 
oratory, poetry and education in political culture, the role of Bordeaux, and Ausonius’ methods of 
self-glorification. 
3F: too few responses to discuss, but generally competent on unpicking inscription. The question 
opened for discussion of location, genre, aims, and content, as well as the individual honoured 
(Probus). 
 
4. All options were answered, with E the most popular (6 takers) followed by B (5 takers), A and D (3 takers 
each). C had 2 takers, and F only 1. 
4A: Generally good answers, with perhaps a tendency to stray beyond the passage. The best 
answers recognised the importance of will, and were careful with details. 
4B: Good answers overall. The best ones noted the tensions between asceticism and traditional 
family values, and the role of the devil for displacing the guilt. There was a general lack of 
discussion on where the liquidated funds were meant to go. 
4C: The best answers noted the details and historical circumstances, the need to safeguard the 
credibility of the clergy, and the tensions between family and monastery. 
4D: competent and interesting responses, the best one situating it both within bids for friends 
among the Roman elite and theological tussles with Pelagius. 
4E: Interesting and generally competent responses on Augustine’s views on virginity and marriage. 
The best responses noted how the letter was exploited to address this more broadly, how 
Augustine’s views differed from those of contemporaries, and how he fused ascetic and family 
values. 
 
4F: Too few responses to discuss. 
 
Overall Reflections: That all questions received at least one response, even in a relatively small cohort, 
 
25 

shows independence and knowledge on the part of the students. What produced problems for some was 
failure to situate text in their literary context, while some were sloppy with details, but overall the 
questions were very competently answered. 
 
SS 2: Francia in the Age of Clovis and Gregory of Tours  
(Did not run in 2021-22) 
 
SS 3: On the Road to Baghdad 
Seven candidates took the paper this year, six from the main school and one from Ancient and Modern 
History.  
 
  This was an exceptionally strong cohort, the best of whom were 
able to provide detailed contextualization of their chosen passages, in-depth discussion of the implications, 
and exploration of the significance of topoi.  Weaker answers were simply descriptive, often vague, and did 
not demonstrate historical knowledge. 
 
SS 4: Byzantium in the Age of Constantine Porphyrogenitus  
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 5: The Norman Conquest of England 
There were six takers for Norman Conquest, five from History and one from History and Modern 
Languages.  
 the rest marks in the 60s.  The standard of 
performance overall was encouraging, with mostly solid, competent answers and some very strong ones.   
 
SS 6:  The Peasants’ Revolt of 1381  
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 7: Joan of Arc and her Age, 1419-35 
There were eleven candidates for this paper, nine from History, one from History and Modern Languages, 
and one from History and Politics.  
 achieved an agreed first class mark, and the rest had 
reasonable 2.1 marks, ranging from 64 to 69.   
 
SS 8: Painting and Culture in Ming China  
Number of candidates = 6 
Range of gobbets 
 of Qs chosen are quite even.   
Range of EE marks: 58 (1), 65(2), 67(1), 70(1), 73 (1) 
On the Gobbets paper, two extracts attracted all 6 candidates (1a, 4a) – both are paintings and significant 
documents. Two went ignored (1f, 4c); 1f is a colophon on a court painting that requires quite substantial 
knowledge of court politics; 4c is another colophon that requires an in-depth understanding of Chinese 
painting theories. The in-depth contextualization required of these two questions might have discouraged 
students.  
Students with lower scores mostly offer clear identification and definition of a problem but give relatively 
thin historiographical context. Questions 1b and 1e each attracted in-depth research by two candidates, 
showing complexity and sophistication of comprehension. One candidate presents innovative views on 
several artworks, such as the Eight Views. Argument is coherent, controlled, and relevant with conceptual 
and analytical precision.  
Overall Reflections: 
The group consisted of 6 students, 2 from History of Art, 4 from History. It’s gratifying that one student 
from HoA and one from History have both achieved first class standard, both able to interpret images with 
in-depth formal analysis and contextualization.  No student fell below 2i standard in any of the gobbets. 
The standard of performance on the Gobbets paper overall was very pleasing.  
 
 
26 

SS 9: Politics, Art and Culture in the Italian Renaissance: Venice and Florence 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 10: The Peasants’ War of 1525 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 11: The Trial of the Tudor State, 1540-1560 
11 candidates sat this paper, 8 History and 3 AMH.  
 eight marks in the 
60s.  
.  By and large the candidates demonstrated a mastery of the gobbet 
form; there were some very impressive performances, and it was good to see them making connections 
between the texts. All managed twelve responses. But while aware of the relevant secondary literature, 
some were elusive as to the specifics of the document, and relied too much on the wording of the extract 
itself, which can lead to some laboured and narrow exposition. Even some of the better candidates were 
uneven in their performance, with good answers marred by ones where they missed the point entirely. The 
lesson is to read all the texts, and to read them carefully. It is clear that students enjoy talking about 
iconography, but are rather less precise when it comes to the economy. 
 
SS 12: The Crisis of the Reformation: Political Thought and Religious Ideas 1560–1610 
There were 8 candidates.  
 gained 1st class marks, the others 2nd class.   The spread was between 72 
and 64.  On the whole, the scripts were of a good standard, showing that the students had engaged with 
the texts and thought about them, and could situate them within the political and intellectual context of 
the period.  The responses were spread across a range of gobbets, and candidates were able to choose 
gobbets about which they could write to at least a 2:1 standard.  The brief essays produced some 
thoughtful responses, especially in the best scripts.  
 
 
SS 13: The Thirty Years War  
Number of Candidates: 9 
 
Spread of Questions (Gobbet Exam) 
The spread of responses was pretty even across the range of gobbets offered, with all those on the paper 
being tackled by at least one candidate. The rubric compels students to tackle a range of different types of 
sources (official records, ego-documents, statistical information, literary accounts, visual images).   
Performance 
Performance was bunched at the high 2.1/low 1st boundary which was broadly in line with the 
performance on the Extended Essays. Though five students scored slightly lower on the Gobbet paper than 
on the essay, the drop only affected the overall outcome in terms of degree class in two cases. Two 
students did better on the exam than on the essay, including one with a first in contrast to a high 2.1. The 
other two matched their essay marks exactly, including the lowest scored candidate overall. It was good to 
see that each student’s achievement was broadly even across the four sections of the paper, with usually 
only a few marks difference between their highest and lowest scores. This reflects a good consistency of 
engagement across the full range of material on the course. 
The most common shortcoming was poor contextualisation of the gobbet and/or not commenting fully on 
the language (or visual image) in the source. By contrast, the stronger answers not only addressed these 
aspects, but were also articulate in identifying each gobbet’s significance as well as identifying ambiguities 
and issues surrounding interpretation.  
 
SS 14: The Scientific Movement in the Seventeenth Century 
There were five candidates for this paper, four from History and one from Ancient and Modern History.  
 
  Good answers locate the passage or image correctly and identify the issues raised clearly and 
 
27 

concisely; weaker answers are vague, largely descriptive, lack the support of sound historical context and 
fail to identify significant debates. 
 
SS 15: Revolution and Republic, 1647-1658 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 16 gobbets: English Architecture, 1660-1720 
Eleven candidates took this paper. 
 no candidate 
received a mark of below 60. Half the marks were in the mid 2.1 range. Candidates produced some 
informed and engaged work, with a clear understanding of the nature of the gobbet exercise and of the 
prescribed texts. It might be noted that the markers received the request for a report on Special Subject 
Gobbets marking at the start of the 2022-23 academic year and are thus not in a position to provide a 
more detailed report (for example on the range of questions taken) on this occasion. 
 
SS 17: Imperial Crisis and Reform, 1774-1784 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 18 gobbets 2021-2: Becoming a Citizen, c. 1860-1902  
Twelve candidates took the ‘Becoming a Citizens, c. 1860-1902’ gobbets papers in 2021-2.  
 
 No candidates were awarded an agreed mark of 
below 60. Agreed marks were more widely spread for this cohort – between 64 and 77 – than they had 
been for the intensely pandemic-affected cohort of 2020-21 who took the exceptional open-book gobbets 
paper. 
Candidates responded accurately and intelligently to gobbets from across the paper, suggesting that there 
were no themes about which all candidates had limited understanding. There were also no very weak 
responses, so it was encouraging to note that all students had revised seriously for the paper and knew 
sufficient texts quite well.  
The strongest individual answers, awarded marks into the high 80s, responded accurately and 
independently to the precise gobbet set. They revealed outstanding knowledge of texts, authors’ 
biographies, genres, and historical contexts, which they were able to use selectively and concisely. The 
candidates made links to other texts, drawn from across the paper, to develop original, thought-provoking 
and lively arguments. Secondary reading was used critically to reveal not only how a particular gobbet 
supported other historians’ interpretations of the period, but also to point out the ways in which evidence 
from the paper challenged historical and scholarly orthodoxies.  
The weakest answers, awarded marks in the low 60s, showed some accurate knowledge of the gobbet, 
were able to identify relevant themes the gobbet raised, and identified some other texts in which similar 
themes appeared. However, these weaker responses were not able to develop the analysis beyond this 
level and made some factual errors. Often these responses failed to focus in sufficient depth on the precise 
sentences and their historical context. They also needed to think more reflectively about the source 
material, to engage critically with secondary reading, and to make more ambitious and productive 
connections to other texts so as to form an argument.   
Overall, this was a pleasing performance that revealed the value of the return to in-person teaching and a 
closed-book gobbets examination for this year-group.   
 
SS 19 gobbets: Race-Sex & Medicine in Early Atlantic World  
11 candidates took this paper, the marks ranging from 63 to 73. 
The students all did well in the gobbet exercise. No student achieved a mark below 60 percent, even 
before papers were second marked. 

Marks between first and second marker were fairly consistent, though there were a handful of marks with 
 
28 

a discrepency of up to 8 marks. In these cases, markers revisited the papers together and negotiated a 
suitable mark.  
 
 
SS 20: Art and its Public in France, 1815-1867 
Five candidates took the paper this year and did exceptionally well – there was no agreed mark below 68 
and two well above 70.  Answers were highly competent at successful identification and contextualization, 
with sensitive and imaginative interpretation of images.  The assessors however did notice a tendency, 
where images were to be compared, to concentrate on one at the expense of the other.  Altogether very 
satisfactory performance. 
 
SS 21: Slavery, Emancipation and the Crisis of the Union, 1848-1865 
Seven candidates sat the gobbets paper, 
. The marks ranged from 62 to 74; 
 
.  All but two of the extracts were the subject of gobbet answers. 
This was, overall, a strong set of papers. All but one candidate consistently understood the core issue(s) 
being raised by the gobbets and were to a greater or lesser extent able to connect their analysis to the 
larger historiographical and historical issues we discussed on the course.  
I did not see in the assessment of the gobbet paper any reasons to think that there are any problems with 
the teaching or assessment of this course. The extended essays, however, were rather less satisfactory. 
Too many of the students ended up writing long versions of tutorial essays rather than demonstrating the 
deep engagement with the Set Texts which I had hoped to see. This is something for me to be aware of 
when I teach the students for the Long Essay this term.  
 
 
SS 22: Race, Religion and Resistance in the United States, from Jim Crow to Civil Rights 
15 students took the exam – all did well, some scored very highly.  
 the remainder scored marks in the range 60-69. 
There were no clear patterns in terms of which questions were taken or which scored highly. Students took 
a wide range of questions – every question was attempted by at least one candidate.  
There were many excellent (and high-scoring) answers to individual questions, with perceptive discussions 
of the source, historical context, key themes, and historiography. However, a number of candidates either 
did not complete all twelve answers, or had a few weaker or shorter answers, which brought their overall 
mark down. 
 
 
SS 23: Terror and Forced Labour in Stalin’s Russia 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
SS 24: Empire and Nation in Russia and the USSR 
Did not run in 2021-22. 
 
SS 25: From Gandhi to the Green Revolution: India, Independence and Modernity 
There were 18 students in all: 1 each in DAMH, DMHN, and DMHP, and 15 in DMHY. 
Out of these, 9 (or exactly 50%) secured marks of 70 or above, a surprisingly high number. 
The highest mark was 74 and the lowest 65, which shows the still very narrow range of assessment. 
 
SS 26: Nazi Germany, a Racial Order, 1933-1945 
Not requested (too few candidates) 
 
 
 
29 

SS 27: France from the Popular Front to the Liberation, 1936-1944 
There were nine candidates, all of whom performed at a good or very good level. There was a good 
distribution of answers across almost all of the gobbets set, and it was pleasing to see how the candidates 
recognised the challenge to go beyond explanation into analysis. 
The marks awarded ranged from 64 to 71. 
 the highest mark 
of 71; and three others marks of 68. There were no marks below 60, though some individual gobbets fell 
below this level. 
This performance confirms the continued success of the Special Subject as a challenging but rewarding 
paper, which encourages students with a good knowledge of French to develop higher skills of critical 
analysis.  The bunching of marks at the top end of the Upper Seconds and the lower First Class is perhaps a 
problem, but not, we suspect, confined to this paper. When students perform well on a paper of this kind, 
it is unusual for the average of the marks awarded to reach into the high 70s. Conversely, marks in the high 
60s are a sign of high achievement on a gobbets paper of this kind, which obliges students to analyse 
twelve different pieces of text in three hours. 
 
 
SS 28: War and Reconstruction: Ideas, Politics and Social Change, 1939-1945 
The numbers taking the exam were quite small this year- seven candidates
 
 
 The rest of the marks achieved 2.1 overall. 
 2.1 marks were typical of individual gobbet answers with a preponderance of first class marks, including 
some quite high marks,  over 2.2 marks  
. There was a slight slide in 
quality compared to the ‘open book’ version of the exam last year even though both examiners were very 
careful not to compare apples and oranges – it may be that return to the regular writing format caused a 
few adaptation problems for the year group that didn’t sit Prelims– although it is noteworthy that none of 
the candidates short-weighted the exam. Despite only seven candidates a wide range of gobbets attracted 
answers and few got no answers at all (although this examiner was quite sad that the Picture Post photo 
gobbet, which had involved substantial effort to reproduce, was one of these!) Candidates are still a little 
reluctant to take on visual gobbets which is a shame.  
 
 
SS 29: Britain from the Bomb to the Beatles: Gender, Class and Social Change, 1945-1967 
There were fourteen candidates for the gobbets paper this year, ten from History, one from History and 
Modern Languages, and three from History and Politics.  Eight of the fourteen candidates achieved agreed 
first class marks (range 70-76) and the rest gained marks in the 2.1 range (62-67).  A very strong 
performance generally from this cohort, with good contextualization and perceptive and cogent 
engagement with relevant themes and historiography of the set texts. 
 
SS 30: The Northern Ireland Troubles, 1965-1985 
1. Number of candidates = 17 
  The highest mark was 72.  The other 
13 were 2.1 marks, mostly in the upper 60s and averaging out at 66.5. 
3. Spread of Qs chosen and performance on assessment: 
The  best  answers  were  those  which  contained  plenty  of  accurate  information  and  showed  a  good 
understanding of the sources.  Some of the higher-scoring candidates were admirably resourceful when it 
came to producing echoes of / counterpoints to particular claims from other sources.  Also to be commended 
were those candidates who challenged the perspectives presented in the extracts (e.g. the CSJ’s comparison 
of  NI  with  South  Africa;  Oliver’s  view  that  ‘violence’  meant  the  Civil  Rights  protests  rather  than  loyalist 
activity and that violence was the source of political instability rather than the other way round). 
The weaker answers were excessively descriptive and in the most depressing cases found ways of repeating 
the extract rather than analysing it. 
Q1.    Oliver  attracted  the  most  answers  (12);  Healy  got  11  and  the  CSJ  got  9.    O’Neill  attracted  only  4 
 
30 

candidates,  although  the  extract’s  reference  to  ‘rational  argument’  could  have  been  used  to  open  up 
discussion  of  his  moderate  and  patrician  standpoint.    Answers  on  McCann  were  disappointing,  generally 
failing to link the gobbet with other references to Protestants in his book.   Not all candidates opting for 
Healy picked up on the theme of local government and convinced the examiners that they had a detailed 
knowledge of the discriminatory measures at local level. 
Q2. Thirteen candidates went for Cameron, although not all of them picked up on the importance of there 
being IRA stewards at a Civil Rights march.  Callaghan drew 9 candidates, none of whom really got the point 
that Unity Flats is in Belfast, and the contrast being drawn was between Belfast and Derry.  That’s quite a 
recherche point; where comments were interesting they were nevertheless rewarded fully. 
Unusually, only 5 candidates went for Collins, obviously unsure about the particular incident and the people 
mentioned. Candidates might still have got points by relating the recklessness described in the extract to 
Collins’s wider criticisms of the IRA. 
Answers to 2d, on loyalist paramilitary violence, should have shown wider knowledge of Dillon and Lehane’s 
book;  only  one  bright  spark  drew  on  the  relevant  interview  with  Andy  Tyrie  by  O’Malley.    Candidates 
attempting 2e needed to open up the question of Maria McGuire’s deteriorating relations with conservative 
IRA figures. 
Q3.  Bunching  here.    Surprisingly,  18  chose  the  Forum  report,  though  they  did  not  always  explain  what 
‘identity’ means or explore the more general shift towards alienation, culture, flags, emblems, etc.  A meagre 
2  attempted  Paisley,  being  discouraged  by  the  arcana  of  the  Williamite  settlement  etc,  something  they 
should know about from Jennifer Todd’s classic article on Unionism. 
The  H  Block  photograph  was  popular  (13).    The  candidate  who  thought  the  cell  looked  ‘cramped  and 
unpleasant’ was rather missing Robinson’s point!  Disappointingly, some failed to contrast the photo with 
the  dirty  protest  (despite  the  caption)  and  few  brought  into  play  the  prisoners’  own  accounts  from  Nor 
Meekly Serve My Time

Only two candidates knew Thatcher well enough to comment on her thoughts about expelling Catholics. 
Q4.  Almost everyone liked the soldiers (15).  Mostly they were capable of commenting on ‘messing people 
about’ but failed to illuminate the reference to ‘local celebrities’ – i.e. the point that the soldiers knew who 
the IRA players were.  Answers on Rose should have been able to bring to bear statistics from other relevant 
questions in his survey.  Knowledge of the demographic situation, raised by the Barritt and Carter extract, 
was limited.  The visual images attracted only 4 apiece, and answers on Bernadette Devlin failed to make 
wider points about the gendering of political life.  (Nor, indeed, did candidates seem to notice the presence 
of a female IRA volunteer in gobbet f.) 
 
SS 31: Pop and the Art of the Sixties 
Ten candidates sat this paper; seven from History of Art and three from History.  
 first 
class  marks  ranging  from  70  to  75,  and  the  rest  2.1  marks  ranging  from  63  to  68.    Generally  a  strong 
performance from this cohort with very good analysis and interpretation of both texts and images.  Weaker 
candidates  tended  to  force  their  argument  round  to  topics  they  felt  comfortable  with  rather  than  the 
text/image  they  were  actually  responding  to,  and  had  little  to  contribute  in  the  way  of  context  or 
engagement. 
 
SS 32: Britain in the Seventies  
There were eight candidates for this paper in 2022; all from the History main school.  The range of agreed 
marks was as follows: 2 x 70; 3 x 69; 3 x 66.  A large proportion of answers were knowledgeable and succinct, 
hitting the nail on the head and identifying the key points of the extracts.  The occasional weaker answer 
lacked depth of analysis of both immediate and broader context, and missed historical significance.   
 
SS 33: Neoliberalism and Postmodernism: Ideas, Politics and Culture in Europe and North America, 1970-
2000 
Eleven candidates took the gobbets paper, eight from the main school and three from History and Politics.  
.  Four candidates gained agreed first class 
 
31 

marks, ranging from 71 to 74; seven gained marks in the 60s, ranging from 65 to 69.  The best candidates 
gave sophisticated treatment of extracts, and demonstrated strong understanding of narrower and broader 
contexts.  Candidates should be aware that time-management is crucial in the gobbets paper, and if they are 
unable to complete twelve answers, the short-weight rules will apply. 
 
SS 34: Revolutions of 1989 
Fourteen candidates sat the paper; the cohort was divided into two seminar groups.  
 
  
   
The overall quality of the responses was very good, though they weren’t generally as strong as in previous 
years.  In any case, both examiners were struck by the high level of knowledge and thorough engagement 
with set texts assigned for the course. 
 
 
Disciplines of History 
This is a large paper, as it is required of all students in Single Honours History and AMH.  In total, 208 students 
sat the paper. Forty-eight students gained marks of 70 or over, twelve students scored below 65. 
It  is  an  interesting  paper  to  mark  because  very  many  of  the  answers  succeed  in  capturing  a  candidate’s 
cumulative  wisdom  and  matured  historical  sensibility  developed  over  three  years  of  study.  Of  all  papers 
offered,  it  perhaps  comes  closest  to  being  an  ‘all  round’  paper  that  allows  candidates  to  speak  to  the 
discipline as a whole with their own authorial voice. The paper is divided into two sections. 
The first, Making Historical Comparisons, is certainly challenging, as comparative history is difficult for the 
best  practitioners  to  carry  through  with full  success.  It  can  pay  very  rich dividends, however.  Candidates 
would do well to consider the different kinds of comparative approaches which might be employed: is this 
entangled history, where one situation directly influences another, or conceptual history, in which a single 
model is used to compare and discriminate between fairly discrete episodes? The best answers brought a 
consciously deployed analytical framework to bear rather than simple laying out case-studies side by side. 
There is nothing in the paper that forbids candidates from using a multiplicity of case studies. However a 
proliferation will tends to undermine the genuinely comparative aspect and the essay turns into a discussion 
of a theme with illustrations drawn apparently at random from various regions and times. The best essays 
in  the  comparative  section  usually  used  two  or  at  most  three  case  studies,  controlled  by  a  model  or 
historiographical theory of action and process. Such high quality answers maintained control throughout and 
identified both commonalities and divergences. 
‘Making Historical Arguments’ is, to a significant degree, a task of two halves. It asks the candidate to survey 
existing  historiography  and  it  also  invites them to  identify  those  analytical  tools  they  find  most useful to 
construct their own, personalized discussion of a problem. Very often candidates will seize upon the most 
‘up to date’ historiographical tendency as best fitted for their purpose. It is certainly valid for the candidate 
to prefer contemporary or near contemporary historiographers over older variants. The important thing, 
however,  is  to  develop  one’s  own  orientation  and  historical  sensibility.  In  history, old  analysis  are  rarely 
rendered entirely irrelevant by news advances, though obviously unexamined prejudices do often require 
rooting out. It may well be that a candidate will prefer tools and approaches that are somewhat older and 
perhaps less ‘fashionable’ and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. The best answers in this section, 
and there were many of this nature, were notably individual: not in the sense of breaking with all previously 
existing points of view, but by assembling the candidate’s own suite of useful methodologies and arguments 
and  applying  this  personalized  tool-kit  to  problems  and  examples  which  come  through  as  genuinely 
fascinating to them. The best answers in Disciplines will be attentive to the display of historical skill but will 
set them in service to their own perspective shaped and developed over the entirety of the degree. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
32 

APPENDIX A.    REPORT ON FHS RESULTS AND GENDER (Main School only) 
 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2022 

 
 
         79 M       127 W 
 
Main School Only 
 F 

Paper 
F Avrg 
M Avrg 
DIFF 
High 
High 
F Low 
M Low 
F 70 + 
M 70 + 
F < 60 
M < 60 
ALL 
67.31 
67.86 
0.55 
  
  
  
  
20 (15.9) 
13 (16.9) 
BH 
67.4 
66.9 
0.5 
25 

22 
17 
39 (30.1) 
18 (23.4) 
EWH 
65.29 
67.57 
2.28 

12 
42 
12 
17 (13.5) 
27 (35.1) 
FS 
67.38 
67.86 
0.48 
23 
17 
19 
11 
41 (32.5) 
28 (36.4) 
SSg 
67.21 
68.32 
1.11 
14 
17 
14 

29 (23) 
37 (48.1) 
SSEE 
68.27 
68.47 
0.2 
31 
20 
14 
13 
46 (35.7) 
32 (41.6) 
DH 
66.23 
66.69 
0.46 
11 
13 
34 
23 
29 (23) 
19 (24.7) 
TH * 
68.83 
67.9 
0.93 
42 
19 
11 
11 
60 (47.6) 
29 (37.7) 
 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2021 
 
117 M 
 107W 
 
Main School Only 
 

Paper 
F Avrg 
M Avrg 
DIFF 
 F High 
High 
F Low 
M Low 
F 70 + 
M 70 + 
F < 60 
M < 60 
ALL 
68 
68.8 
0.8 
  
  
  
  
28 (26.1) 
43 (36.8) 
BH 
67.1 
67.73 
0.63 
12 
17 
21 
29 
25 (23.4) 
37 (31.6) 
EWH 
66.64 
67.17 
0.53 
16 
16 
22 
22 
27 (25.2) 
39 (33.3) 
FS 
66.96 
67.35 
0.39 
16 
16 
19 
23 
34 (31.8) 
37 (31.6) 
SSg 
67.02 
68.59 
1.57 
11 
14 
11 

25 (23.4) 
52 (44.4) 
SSEE 
68.35 
69.23 
0.88 
35 
35 
12 

45 (42.1) 
57 (48.7) 
DH 
65.74 
66.66 
0.92 
14 
12 
35 
31 
24 (22.4) 
34 (29.1) 
TH * 
68.21 
68.85 
0.64 
27 
32 
14 
13 
43 (40.2) 
45 (38.5) 
 
GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2020 
 
97 M 
113 W 
 
Main School Only 
 

Paper 
F Avrg 
M Avrg 
DIFF 
 F High 
High 
F Low 
M Low 
F 70 + 
M 70 + 
F < 60 
M < 60 
ALL 
68.09 
68.18 
0.09 
  
  
  
  
30 (26.5) 
30 (30.9) 
BH 
67 
68 


11 
30 
21 
26 (23.0) 
38 (39.1) 
EWH 
66.52 
68 
1.48 
13 
18 
35 
18 
31 (27.4) 
35 (36.1) 
FS 
67.79 
67.56 
0.23 
19 
15 
16 
15 
42 (37.2) 
37 (38.1) 
SSg 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
SSEE 
68.95 
68.93 
0.02 
37 
25 
18 
17 
49 (43.3) 
41 (42.2) 
DH 
67.58 
66.73 
0.85 
23 
14 
24 
30 
35 (30.9) 
33 (34) 
TH * 
69.4 
68.14 
1.26 
33 
28 
13 
16 
53 (46.9) 
44 (45.3) 
 
 

GENDER STATS BY PAPER FHS 2019 
 
103M 
121W 
 
 
 
 
Paper 
F Avrg 
M Avrg 
DIFF 
F High 

F Low 
M Low 
F 70 + 
M70 + 
F< 
M< 
High 
60 
60 
ALL 
67.71 
68.14 
0.43 
 
 
 
 
 23 (19.0) 
24 (23.3) 
BH  
66.74 
68.09 
1.35 

18 
31 
21 
32 (26.5) 
40 (38.8) 
GH 
67.13 
67.66 
0.53 
14 
13 
23 
23 
32 (26.5) 
37 (35.9) 
FS 
67.97 
68.25 
0.28 
18 
17 
14 
18 
45 (37.2) 
37 (35.9) 
SSg 
67.01 
67.79 
0.78 

13 
21 
15 
28 (23.1) 
33 (32) 
SSEE 
68.51 
68.48 
0.03 
33 
16 
16 
11 
 49 (40.5) 
41 (39.8) 
DH 
67.08 
68.8 
0.28 
19 
11 
27 
24 
 36 (29.8) 
23 (22.3) 
TH* 
69.6 
70 
0.4 
41 
29 
17 
10 
60 (49.6) 
55 (53.4) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
33 

APPENDIX B 
 
FHS RESULTS AND STATISTICS
 
 Note: Tables (i) – (iii) relate to the Final Honour School of History only. Statistics for the joint schools 
are included in tables (iv) and (v). 
 
(i) 
Numbers and percentages in each class 
 
  
 
Class 
Number 
 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
I 
84 
113 
109 
109 
II.1 
122 
19 
99 
114 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
DDH 
Incomplete 
Fail 
211 
Total 
208 
224 
224 
 
 
 
 
 
Class 
Percentage 
 
2022 
2021 
2020 
2019 
I 
40.8 
50.5 
51.7 
48.7 
II.1 
59.2 
48.7 
46.4 
50.9 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
DDH 
Incomplete 
Fail 
 
 
 
 
 
 
34 

(ii) 
Numbers and percentages of men and women in each class    
 
(a) 2022 
 

Class 
Nos 
% 
Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes) 
in each class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
 
84 
40.7 
39 
50.7 
44 
34.9 
53% 
II.1 
121 
59.3 
39 
50.7 
82 
65.1 
67.8% 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
DDH 
Incomplete 
Fail 
Total 
208 
100 
81 
 
127 
 
 
 
(b) 2021 
 

Class 
Nos 
% 
Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes) 
in each class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
 
113 
50.5 
66 
56.4 
47 
43.9 
41.6 
II.1 
109 
48.7 
50 
42.7 
59 
55.1 
54.1 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
DDH 
Incomplete 
Fail 
Total 
225 
100 
117 
100 
108 
100 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
35 

(c) 
2020 
 
Class 
Nos 
% 
Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes) 
in each class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
 
109 
51.7 
50 
51.5 
59 
52.2 
54.1 
II.1 
98 
46.5 
45 
46.4 
53 
46.9 
54.1 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
DDH 
Incomplete 
Fail 
Total 
211 
100 
98 
100 
113 
100 

 
 
           (d) 

2019 
 
Class 
Nos 
% 
Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total 
sexes) 
in each class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
 
109 
48.7 
58 
55.8 
51 
42.5 
46.8 
II.1 
114 
50.1 
45 
43.3 
69 
57.5 
60.5 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
224 
100 
104 
100 
120 
100 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
36 

 
(iii) 

Performance of Prelims. Candidates in Schools (First and Thirds) and Vice Versa (HIST only) 
 
 
 
 
Prelims Nos 2020 
Finals not 
FHS Results in 2022 
 
taken in 
2022 
 
I 
II.1 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
 
Distinction:  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pass:  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
(Can’t report on this since Prelims was cancelled in 2020.) 
 
Prelims results in 2020 
Prelims not 
Finals Nos 2022 
taken in 2020 
Distinction 
Pass 
 
Class I:  
 
 
 
 
Class II.1:   
 
 
 
Class II.1:  
 
 
 
Class III/Pass: - 
 
 
 
 
 
 
37 

(iv) Performance of candidates by paper 
 
a) 
Thesis (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper)  
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
89 
43.6 
29 
37.7 
60 
47.6 
67.4% 
II.1 
107 
52.5 
45 
57.1 
62 
49.2 
57.9% 
II.2 

3.4 
III 
Pass 
Incomplete 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 

*Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
 
b) 
Special Subject Extended Essay (sex paper showing marks for that paper) 
 
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
78 
37.5 
32 
39.5 
46 
36.2 
59% 
II.1 
126 
60.6 
48 
59.3 
78 
61.4 
61.9% 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 
 
 
*Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
 
 
 
38 

 
c) 
Disciplines of History (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
48 
23.1 
19 
23.5 
29 
22.8 
60.4% 
II.1 
148 
71.2 
58 
71.6 
90 
70.9 
60.8% 
II.2 
12 
5.8 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 
 
 *Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
 
d) 
BIF History of the British Isles Essays and Portfolio (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper)  
   
(includes BIF Theme Papers) 
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
57 
27.4 
18 
22.2 
39 
30.7 
68.4% 
II.1 
144 
69.2 
60 
74.1 
84 
66.1 
58.3% 
II.2 

3.4 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 
 
*Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
            
 
 
 
39 

 
e)  European and World History (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper) 
Includes EWT theme papers (a) (b) (c) & (d)  
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
44 
21.2 
27 
33.3 
17 
13.4 
38.6% 
II.1 
154 
74 
52 
64.2 
102 
49 
66.2% 
II.2 
10 
4.8 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 
 
 
*Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
 
f) 
Further Subjects (Sex/Paper showing marks for that paper)  
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
70 
33.7 
28 
34.6 
42 
33.1 
60% 
II.1 
130 
62.5 
51 
63 
79 
62.2 
60.8% 
II.2 

3.9 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 
 
 
*Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
40 

g) 
Special Subjects Gobbets (sex paper showing marks for that paper) 
 
Class 
Nos 

Men 
Women 
Women as % of 
(both 
total in each 
sexes) 
class 
 
 
 
Nos 
% 
Nos 
% 
 
I 
66 
31.7 
37 
45.7 
29 
22.8 
43.9% 
II.1 
140 
67.3 
43 
53.1 
97 
76.4 
69.3% 
II.2 
III 
Pass 
Fail 
Total 
208 
 
81 
 
127 
 
 
*Some candidates have their marks disregarded 
 
 
 
 
v) FHS Results by Gender and School Type 
 
 
School type 
2022  M=77   W=127    
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
1st  
1st   
1st % 
1st % 
2.1 
 2.1 
2.1% 
2.1% 
2.2 
2.2  
2.2% 
2.2  % 
  












State  
20 
24 
48.8% 
54.5% 
21 
50 
51.2% 
60.2 




Independent 
14 
13 
58.3 
35.1 
10 
24 
26.3 
28.9 




Overseas/Unknown 


41.7 
43.8 


58.3 
56.3 




Total 
39 
44 
50.7 
34.9 
38 
83 
49.4 
65.1 




State breakdown: 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 

M= 
W = 
School type 
2021 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
117 
107 
  
  
  
1st  
1st   
1st % 
1st % 
2.1 
 2.1 
2.1% 
2.1% 
2.2 
2.2  
2.2% 
2.2  % 
  












State  
27 
29 
40.9%  61.7% 
27 
33 
54% 
56.9% 



33.3 
Independent 
34 
14 
51.5%  29.8% 
18 
19 
36% 
32.8% 


33.3 
33.3 
Overseas/Unknown 


7.6% 
8.5% 


10% 
10.4% 




Total 
66 
47 
56.4%  43.9% 
50 
58 
42.7% 
54.2% 


33.3 
66.7 
State breakdown: 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
41 

 
W = 
School type 
2020  M= 95 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
114 
  
  
  
1st  
1st   
1st % 
1st % 
2.1 
 2.1 
2.1% 
2.1% 
2.2 
2.2  
2.2% 
2.2  % 
  












State  
20 
32 
40% 
54.2% 
15 
29 
33.3% 
53.7% 


  
  
Independent 
27 
20 
54% 
33.9% 
26 
20 
57.8% 
37% 


  
  
Overseas/Unknown 


6% 
11.9% 


8.9% 
9.3% 


  
  
Total 
50 
59 
52.6%  51.8% 
45 
54 
47.4% 
47.4% 


2.1% 
0.9% 
State breakdown: 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
M= 
W = 
School type 
2019 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
103 
121 
  
  
  
1st  
1st   
1st % 
1st % 
2.1 
 2.1 
2.1% 
2.1% 
2.2 
2.2  
2.2% 
2.2  % 
  












State  
22 
28 
37.9%  54.9% 
16 
35 
36.4% 
50.0% 
  
  
  
  
Independent 
31 
19 
53.5%  37.3% 
25 
26 
56.8% 
37.1% 
  
  
  
  
Overseas/Unknown 


8.6% 
7.8% 


6.8% 
12.9% 


  
  
Total 
58 
51 
56.3%  42.2% 
44 
70 
42.7% 
57.9% 

  
  
  
State breakdown: 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
 
 
 
42 

 
Examiners: 
 
External Examiners: 
 
 
 
 
N:\Faculty office\Faculty office\FHS\2022\Examiners’ Report\FHS History Examiners’ Report 2022-FINAL.docx  
20 October 2022 
 
43 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

FACULTY OF ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
 
 
 
 

EXAMINERS’ REPORTS 2022 
 
 

v2 

Contents 
 
Preliminary Examination in English Language and Literature ................................................ 3 
Paper 1A: Introduction to English Language & Literature – Approaches to Language .... 5 
Paper 1B: Introduction to English Language & Literature – Approaches to Literature .... 6 
Paper 2: Early Medieval Literature, c. 650-1350............................................................. 7 
Paper 3: Literature in English 1830-1910 ....................................................................... 8 
Paper 4: Literature in English 1910 - Present ................................................................. 9 
FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE ....................... 13 
CHAIR’S REPORT .......................................................................................................... 13 
FHS EXAMINERS’ REPORTS ........................................................................................ 18 
FHS Paper 1: Shakespeare Portfolio (Course II Paper 5) ............................................ 18 
FHS Paper 2: Literature in English 1350-1550 (Course II Paper 3) .............................. 19 
FHS Paper 3: Literature in English 1550-1660 (Course II Paper 6) .............................. 20 
FHS Paper 4: Literature in English 1660-1760 ............................................................. 21 
FHS Paper 5: Literature in English 1760-1830 ............................................................. 22 
FHS Paper 6: Special Options ..................................................................................... 24 
FHS Paper 7: Dissertation ........................................................................................... 31 
FHS Course II Paper 1: Literature in English 650-1100 ................................................ 32 
FHS Course II Paper 2: English and Related Literatures: The Lyric ............................. 32 
FHS Course II Paper 4: History of the English Language to c.1800 ............................. 33 
FHS Course II Paper 5: The Material Text ................................................................... 33 
EXTERNAL EXAMINER REPORTS: FHS ....................................................................... 34 
MST AND MPHIL (MEDIEVAL STUDIES) IN ENGLISH ..................................................... 47 
CHAIR’S REPORT .......................................................................................................... 49 
EXTERNAL EXAMINER REPORTS: PGT ....................................................................... 54 
 
 
 

v2 

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 
 
Part I   
A. 

STATISTICS 
This year there were 236 candidates for the Preliminary Examination in English Language 
and Literature.  
Joint Schools Candidates took optional English papers in the following numbers: 
• 
Paper 1: EML 32; HENG 11; CLENG 15 
• 
Paper 2: EML 0; HENG 0 
• 
Paper 3: EML 14; HENG 4 
• 
Paper 4: EML 15; HENG 7 
 
Numbers and percentages in each category 

Category 
Number 
 
 
Percentage (%) 
 
2021-22 
2020-21 
2019/20 
2021-22 
2020-21 
2019/20 
Distinction 
56 
(52) 
NA* 
23.72% 
(22.41%)  NA* 
Pass 
179 
(176) 
NA* 
75.84% 
(77.16%)  NA* 
*Prelims were cancelled in 2019/20 
 
Marking of scripts 
 
All scripts are singled-marked for Prelims. 
 
As in previous years, meetings were arranged by setters of each paper with all markers to 
ensure fair and robust marking during the marking window. 
 
Scaling was not deemed necessary. 
 
B. 

NEW EXAMINING METHODS AND PROCEDURES 
This year saw a return to 3-hour, in-person invigilated exams after 8-hour OBOW were used 
in 2020–21. Examiners agreed that the examination methods and procedures were robust 
and effective. (see below) 
 
After shifting to OBOW mode of assessment in 2020–21, this year saw a return to the 
traditional 3-hour in-person invigilated and hand-written exam. The process went smoothly 
with no problems reported from Examination Schools. There were some issues with delivery 
of scripts, with lengthy and unscheduled delays disrupting markers’ plans. 
 
 
 

 

v2 

Part II 
 
A. 
GENERAL COMMENTS ON THE EXAMINATION 
 
Despite the shift from OBOW to in-person, results were broadly in accord with previous 
years. 
 
 
 
 
B. 

DETAILED NUMBERS ON CANDIDATES’ PERFORMANCE IN EACH PART OF THE 
EXAMINATION 
 
•  Detailed numbers on candidates’ performance in each part of the examination 
  
 
Scripts awarded marks of 70+ for 
each paper:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Paper 
2022 
2021  2020 
2019 
2018 
1. Introduction to English Language 
40 
33 
37 
38 
and Literature: Combined 
(16.9%) 
(14%) 
n/a 
(16.6%) 
(17.0%) 
48 
32 
47 
49 
Section A Language 
(20.3%) 
(14%) 
n/a 
(21.1%) 
(22.0%) 
46 
29 
47 
47 
Section B Literature 
(19.5%) 
(13%) 
n/a 
(21.1%) 
(21.1%) 
46 
41 
45 
40 
2. Literature in English 650-1350 
(20.8%) 
(18%) 
n/a 
(20.2%) 
(18.0%) 
38 
34 
54 
36 
3. Literature in English 1830-1910 
(16.1%) 
(15%) 
n/a 
(24.2%) 
(16.1%) 
52 
28 
48 
46 
4. Literature in English 1910-Present 
(22.0%) 
(12%) 
n/a 
(21.5%) 
(20.7%) 
  
  
 
 
 

v2 

C. 
COMMENTS ON PAPERS AND INDIVIDUAL QUESTIONS 
 
Paper 1A: Introduction to English Language & Literature – Approaches to Language 
All questions in Section A of Paper 1 were attempted this year. By far the most popular was 
question 1 (language and power). Also popular were: question 2 (gender embedded in 
language); question 3 (Creole languages); and question 8 (metaphor). 
 
There were many excellent submissions this year, and candidates are to be commended on 
their hard and thoughtful work. A large number of students engaged in strong Critical 
Discourse Analysis. At the top of the mark range, there was exceptional writing, showing 
incisive and sophisticated reflection, depth and breadth of research, and imaginative 
analysis.  
 
Candidates are reminded to focus on language; they should not submit purely literary 
analyses. For example, whilst some responses to the question on Creole languages (question 
3) were excellent, others took a more general, essay-like approach that did not focus 
sufficiently on the language of the passages chosen.  
 
Candidates should remember that Section A is a commentary: it requires close, focused 
analysis of the chosen passages, with precise terminology employed. The response should 
not be an essay, and should not simply describe the contents of the passages. Precision in 
the analysis is important, and responses that do not provide detailed analysis of passages 
will not score highly. The commentary also needs to probe the effects of the linguistic 
features, rather than simply parsing the passages. For example, candidates should not 
merely note nouns and verbs without doing interpretative and analytical work. 
 
In choosing the passages, candidates are advised not to select overly short passages; 
passages need to be of sufficient length to allow for rich and varied analysis. The examiners 
also advise candidates to choose texts that offer effective contrasts. Many of the scripts this 
year were let down by texts that were too similar. This meant that candidates would only 
have interesting points to make on the first passage, and were then forced to simply repeat 
themselves when discussing the second passage. 
 
As with all papers, it is vital that candidates read the questions carefully, and respond to the 
specific terms and statement(s) of the question. There were a number of responses this year 
which showed little relevance to the given question, which meant that the candidates could 
not provide incisive or compelling work. Candidates are strongly discouraged from simply 
re-purposing a pre-written piece of work. 
 
The examiners also noted that a significant number of responses showed little research, 
with very limited bibliographies. Some bibliographies had only one item, and others had 
nothing except for a list of entries from the Oxford English Dictionary. It is very important 
that candidates read widely. Work that does not show sufficient awareness of relevant 
critical and/or linguistic methods will not do well. It is important that candidates provide a 
clear critical/theoretical framework, and use relevant critical vocabulary. 
 

v2 

There were responses that made excellent use of corpora and tables, using these tools and 
forms of apparatus productively in service of their argument and analysis. However, there 
were other responses with tables simply ‘dropped in’ without contributing to the argument 
or analysis. Candidates are reminded that if they choose to use corpora and tables, these 
need to serve a purpose.  
 
Candidates should also remember to put time aside for polishing their referencing and 
presentation. The passages given must have line numbers and full details of their sources. 
Candidates should choose one referencing system and maintain it throughout—referencing 
needs to be consistent. There was also a large portion of submissions that contained too 
many typos.  
 
From a data privacy standpoint, candidates are reminded that when citing from digital 
media, names must be redacted. There should not be any identifying features of individuals. 
 
It is important that students make the most of the support offered during the year. 
Attending the core lectures and using the Faculty reading lists are two crucial ways that 
candidates can ensure they are aware of and responsive to the requirements of this section 
of the paper. 
 
 
Paper 1B: Introduction to English Language & Literature – Approaches to Literature 
All 12 questions were attempted. Certain traditions of thought dominated, as is usual, 
especially narratology (Propp, Génette, Brooks, Porter Abbott), poststructuralism (Barthes, 
Derrida, Cixous, Foucault), and reader response theory (Fish, Iser). It was, however, 
encouraging to see other areas in the history of theory and criticism appear, for example 
psychoanalysis, contemporary poetics, and the post-war strand of Anglo-American 
philosophy represented most prominently by Stanley Cavell. There was a relative dearth of 
engagement with theoretical materials from the twenty-first century.  
A wide and interesting range of primary texts were marshalled in discussion of themes and 
theory: from Shakepeare, to Milton, to nineteenth-century poetry and novels, to modern 
and postmodern literature. The best answers engaged with such texts in a way which made 
their thematic or theoretical interest very clear, and did not produce something that looked 
too much like an essay for prelims paper 3 or paper 4 – or indeed a Wikipedia-style 
summary of a critical genealogy.  
Some less successful answers tried to demonstrate too wide a range of theoretical 
knowledge, creating a patchwork of often weakly-understood, or theoretically incompatible 
materials from a variety of sources. In weaker scripts, this commitment to contiguity came 
at the expense of any argument at all. Stronger answers were able to balance argument 
with engagement. Examiners are cognizant of the fact that a 1500-2000-word essay is a 
short essay. The majority of responses in the first-class range demonstrated the fact that it 
is better to do one thing very well than to do many things averagely.  

v2 

As in previous years, a number of candidates showed little sense of citation norms in 
academic work. The worst instances in this line proved to be test cases for the importance 
of good scholarly presentation, obscuring their sentence-level expression and their broader 
arguments through confused, inconsistent, opaque, or even non-existent practices of 
referencing, quotation, and bibliography.  
 
Paper 2: Early Medieval Literature, c. 650-1350 
There were some excellent exam scripts this year, with candidates demonstrating deep 
engagement with Old and/or Early Middle English language and literature, as well as 
sensitivity to relevant literary, historical and cultural contexts. In the commentary section, 
as in previous years the vast majority wrote on the Old English set texts, with The Dream of 
the Rood 
overwhelmingly the favourite. Clearly many students have read the set texts 
attentively and know them well.  
 
A recurrent weakness in the commentary section was a failure to analyse the style of the 
passage in a systematic way. Weaker commentaries this year were often lacking in detail, 
making only vague or imprecise statements about poetic style and demonstrating poor 
comprehension of Old or Early Middle English language. Candidates are reminded that they 
should unpack their commentary passages in depth, thinking about a range of stylistic 
choices in the given extract. 
 
In the essay section, it was heartening to read work that engaged with a range of texts— 
including lesser-known Old English ones, various Early Middle English texts (such as Havelok 
and Ancrene Wisse), and even Anglo-Latin texts. This has been very good to see. Candidates 
are warmly encouraged to be adventurous in their reading, particularly when it comes to 
essays (where they can explore any texts of their choice, as long as these texts fall within 
the period and as long as no more than a third of the paper is on non-English material). As in 
previous years, it was concerning that some candidates engaged very minimally with the 
original language(s). Whilst candidates can discuss texts in translation if the texts are in Latin 
or Anglo-Norman (or another language other than English), this should not take up more 
than a third of the whole exam script. It is vital that candidates engage closely with the Old 
English or Early Middle English texts in their original, with sufficient quotation. Old English 
and Early Middle English quotations must always be given in the original language. 
Candidates can additionally offer a translation if they wish, but they absolutely must not 
quote from Old English and Early Middle English texts solely in translation. 
 
Across both the commentary and essay components, many candidates did not meet the 
criterion for ‘sophistication’ in argument and engagement. In particular, many scripts 
showed a lack of research into medieval literature and a lack of engagement with 
scholarship. To ensure they are producing work that is sufficiently ‘sophisticated’, 
candidates are advised to read a wide range of secondary material and to engage actively 
with it (for example, reflecting on whether they agree or disagree with different scholars’ 
arguments). 
 

v2 

Questions 15 and 4 were most popular, with 3, 5, 8 and 14 also getting lots of attention. 
There were a disappointingly large number of rubric violations and essays which failed to 
display 'substantial' knowledge of enough texts. Problems included the usual not answering 
the question specifically or thinking about the implications of the quotation and/or 
question. The best scripts showed wide knowledge beyond the set texts, and engaged with 
Old or Early Middle English language and literature in detail, but there were many that were 
disappointing lacking in ambition. The ‘elegies’ were popular as always. As in previous years, 
there were only a handful of essays on Early Middle English, with the vast majority of 
students concentrating solely on Old English. 
 
Paper 3: Literature in English 1830-1910 
This was an unusual year in some respects: not only a return to timed examinations in 
Oxford, but for many candidates their first experience of producing handwritten essays in 
large exam halls. The results for this paper were mixed. Candidates at the upper end of the 
scale submitted work that was remarkable for its range, originality, clarity and polish. Other 
candidates were less ambitious and correspondingly less successful. (It was noticeable how 
many essays offered a simple comparison of two texts, although without any explanation as 
to why they had been juxtaposed in this way; often the result was as awkward as watching 
two people who have nothing in common being forced on a date.) Fewer scripts than in 
some previous years were awarded Distinctions, largely because although many candidates 
had clearly read some important literature from the period, they proved to have insufficient 
skill – or insufficient practice – in articulating and developing a critical argument.  
 
One problem that returned alongside timed exams was irrelevance. A number of candidates 
dumped essays that were only vaguely related to the set question: ironically, the Arnold 
question about seeing ‘the object as in itself it really is’ particularly attracted these. It would 
benefit next year’s cohort to be reminded that the prompt is designed to help them create 
an argument with added edge and direction: it is, therefore, an essential part of the 
question being asked, and it has to be addressed in order for the answer to be successful. 
Several candidates did not appear to understand the clear marking criteria for the paper, 
and a few boldly attempted exercises in creative writing rather than critical analysis. 
Generally these did not fare well. While recognising the pressures of timed exams, it was 
still a little dispiriting to see that their reintroduction also saw the return of legendary 
figures such as The Lady of Shallott [sic], and candidates are urged to check that they can 
spell the names of the works they have chosen to write about. 
 
In terms of the specific authors and literary works tackled, Dickens’s Bleak House was often 
paired fruitfully with David Copperfield or Great Expectations, while there was much 
excellent work on Middlemarch, that novel often sustaining a whole essay, including 
meticulous studies of its presentation of intellectual disciplines and disputes, political 
alignments and class issues. Other George Eliot novels were written about much more 
rarely, with Silas Marner probably most frequently encountered.  Writing on Hardy was 
largely confined to Tess and Jude, although there was some excellent use of his Victorian 
and Edwardian poetry.  Writing on Conrad was surefooted, though mostly on Heart of 
Darknes
s and The Secret Agent.  Work on the ‘woman question’ was more predictable, with 
the gentle mock heroic of Patmore’s The Angel in the House often cited but rarely explored.  

v2 

Some candidates fell back on A-Level style accounts of New Women in Stoker’s Dracula.  
The Yellow Wallpaper and its contexts were managed well, although there was little on Kate 
Chopin and nothing on George Egerton.  Charlotte Brontë was a stalwart on less ambitious 
essays, though candidates found it difficult to manage the pre-Victorian inspirations and 
settings of Wuthering Heights.  
 
On the whole, work on American contexts, including those of slavery, was good, with Poe 
proving to be an especially popular choice of author. Work on slave narratives was generally 
disappointing, with insufficient sense of the nature and provenance of the texts or their 
literary quality, though Douglass tended to draw out better writing, and there was good 
scholarly use of The Bondwoman’s Narrative.   
 
Essays on poetry included a number of studies not really suited to closed book 
examinations.  Two pre-packed Victorian poems were often compared and contrasted (e.g. 
‘Porphyria’s Lover’ and ‘Mariana’).  This often resulted in practical criticism by default, 
seriously limiting the scope and even the relevance of an answer to the question.  Only the 
very best answers were able to give a proper survey of the work of a lyric poet with 
appropriate illustration.  Some of the writing on Hopkins, and to a lesser extent Dickinson, 
achieved this.  Work on Tennyson was also promising, though often lacking in range, and 
Browning’s dramatic monologues provided admirable service, with ‘Andrea del Sarto’ a 
favourite this year.  Swinburne’s Poems and Ballads First Series produced good work on 
transgressive or aesthetic themes, though the range of these essays was often narrow; ‘Ave 
Atque Vale’ and ‘Anactoria’ were the favourite poems.  Elizabeth Barrett Browning was 
more confidently handled than Christina Rossetti, where the theological background 
sometimes proved troubling.  There was very little attention to drama, with Wilde the only 
regularly chosen dramatist, followed (perhaps a little surprisingly) by Ibsen.  However, the 
questions also stimulated a number of more unusual literary choices, and it was refreshing 
to see how widely many candidates had read in the period. 
 
 
Paper 4: Literature in English 1910 - Present 
All questions were answered, with the most popular being those on history, formal 
experimentation, identity, culture and nationhood (Questions 12, 4, 2 and 6). The most 
popular authors were Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Samuel Beckett, Katherine Mansfield, James 
Baldwin, and Jean Rhys, with a significant number of candidates writing on Ezra Pound, Toni 
Morrison, Claudia Rankine, Langston Hughes, Kamau Brathwaite, Zadie Smith, Sarah Kane, 
James Joyce, Samuel Selvon, Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Harold Pinter, and J. M. 
Coetzee. Other writers addressed by several candidates included Thomas Pynchon, Jean 
Toomer, Hope Mirrlees, Harold Pinter, W. H. Auden, Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, Mina 
Loy, George Orwell, Margaret Atwood, Rebecca West, Wallace Stevens, Muriel Spark, 
Flannery O’Connor, and Vladimir Nabokov.  
 
Candidates took a pleasingly wide and diverse range of approaches to the questions and 
there was a refreshing sense that the hold of standard narratives and critical cliches had 
been loosened. So, for example, Question 12 – a quotation from C. L. R. James on delving 
into one’s own history – was used as a prompt for exploring the ways in which a wide range 

v2 

of authors including W. B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Chinua Achebe, Chimamanda Ngozi 
Adichie, Derek Walcott and Claude McKay challenged and revised national, racial and 
literary traditions, forms and structures of thought. The most popular approach to Question 
21 on the dialogue between art forms and the ‘dialogue with the people’ was to discuss the 
influence of jazz on the poetry and prose of the Harlem Renaissance, and discussions of 
literary representations of the city drew almost as frequently on the poetry of Frank O’Hara 
as on the prose of Joyce or Woolf.   
 
As always, the strongest essays engaged thoughtfully and precisely with the issues raised in 
the title quotes, constructing robust and informed arguments, rooted in dexterous and 
insightful analysis of relevant texts. Weaker responses tended to select a single word or 
approximate theme and then offer a cluster of loosely related observations, linked by 
association rather than by a clear line of argument.   
 
There were marked differences in the depth and breadth of reference and knowledge 
demonstrated by candidates. Many answers limited their engagement to just two poems, 
short stories or one-act plays – extreme examples of such limited scope included essays on 
Imagism devoting entire paragraphs to Pound’s ‘In a Station of the Metro’. Knowledge and 
range varied radically across different writers – it was a rare candidate who ventured 
beyond ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’ and The Waste Land when discussing Eliot, 
whereas Woolf enjoyed recognition of a fuller range of her writings, including Three 
Guineas, Orlando, The Waves 
and Between the Acts.  Too often candidates addressed 
individual poems or short stories with no sense of context, whether within an individual 
writer’s career and trajectory, or in dialogue with historical, political, geographical or literary 
particularities. However thoughtful or deft a close reading of such limited material may be, 
it is hard to demonstrate ambition of thought or depth of knowledge in an essay that 
contains nothing more. The strongest candidates showed remarkable command of wide and 
detailed reading, engaging thoughtfully and intelligently in critical debates, and constructing 
sinuous and sophisticated arguments, supported by insightful and attentive textual analysis. 
Range and substance took many forms, whether locating chosen texts and writers within 
contemporary critical and theoretical debates, considering the development of single 
writers across a number of works, or revealing the intertextual dialogue between 
chronologically distanced – but linked – writers and texts. As in previous years, a recurring 
weakness was the tendency to bring together two disparate texts or authors without a 
coherent rationale for their selection, and then comparing and contrasting them to little 
critical effect. Too often candidates deemed a notional thematic similarity between two 
disparate texts, or a single biographical feature held in common between two authors 
otherwise utterly removed from one another as reason enough to mount a comparison. 
These responses were always limited, and failed to gain any significant critical traction, or to 
draw significant or revealing conclusions of any sort. An effective exam essay must offer 
substantive and clearly-explained intellectual, literary, critical, or historical grounds for any 
comparison it makes. Such practices indicate, perhaps, a retreat to school-level habits under 
the pressure of exam conditions – as did some reductively descriptive essays on Nineteen 
Eighty-Four
 and The Handmaid’s Tale.  
 
Notably, careful thought and a well-structured argument repeatedly garnered higher marks 
than many longer scripts written in haste. Indeed, some candidates were too concerned to 
10 
v2 

cover sides at speed at the cost of coherence and legibility. Misinterpretation and over-
interpretation of the title-quote was a recurrent trend. Howard Brenton’s hope (Question 4) 
that developing new forms would produce new truths, for example, was repeatedly 
translated into an assertion that new truths could only be delivered via new forms – a 
misreading with which candidates then took issue. Many candidates were hampered by a 
lack of technical knowledge about literary forms, modes, and language, evident most 
obviously in the unreflective use most candidates made of the phrase ‘stream of 
consciousness.’ This despite Question11, citing Dorothy Richardson who rightly called the 
phrase ‘muddle-headed.’  Drama was approached by many candidates as prose in dialogue 
form with no acknowledgement of the dynamics, possibilities or history of performance. A 
number of weaker essays offered confidently conclusive statements about the despair and 
meaninglessness inherent in Beckett’s plays, for example, with no supporting evidence 
beyond bland assumptions or isolated quotations. Collectively scripts offered a wealth of 
considered, thoughtful and pleasingly alert discussions of texts drawn from the full scope of 
the 112 years covered by this paper, and the quality of the top scripts was hugely 
impressive, demonstrating an extraordinary breadth of knowledge and precision of thought, 
expressed with elegance and verve, and confounding any notions of the constraints 
imposed by the format of a three-hour exam. 
 
 
11 
v2 

 
E. 

NAMES OF MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
 
 
 
 
12 
v2 

FINAL HONOUR SCHOOL OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE  
 
CHAIR’S REPORT 
Part I   
 
A. 

Statistics  
 

212 candidates completed their degree, of whom 15 took Course II. 
 
Class 
Number 
Percentage (%) 
 
2021/22  2020/21 
2019/20 
2018/19 
2017/18 
2021/22 
2020/21 
2019/20 
2018/19 
2017/18 

79 
94 
93 
79 
87 
37.26% 
42.2% 
41.7% 
33.9% 
39.91% 
II.I 
128 
128 
127 
154 
129 
60.38% 
57.4% 
57.0% 
66.1% 
59.17% 
 
Of the Firsts, two were achieved via the so-called ‘alternative’ route (requiring 4 marks of 70 
or above and an average of 67.5 or above). 
All scripts and coursework essays were double blind marked. In accordance with the Guide 
for Examiners, scripts/essays were third-marked wherever markers one and two could not 
reach agreement, and automatically third-marked in cases where the initial marks varied by 
15 marks or two classes. 
 
Examiners’ and assessors’ marking profiles were scrutinised, and the median marks for 
larger papers were compared with those in 2018, 2019 and 2021. It was determined that no 
scaling of marks was necessary. 
 
B. 
New examining methods and procedures 
 
 
Following a decision taken by the Faculty in the summer of 2021, 8-hour OBOW (‘open-
book, open-web’) exams were again used for Course I, Papers 2-5 and Course II, Papers 1, 2, 
3 and 6(a), but with the word limit for each answer reduced to 1,500 words (or 2,250 in the 
case of Course II, Paper 2). The following guidance was provided in the Course I Circular to 
Tutors and Candidates: ‘Individual answers should each be between 900 and 1500 words. 
There will be no penalties for under or over-length scripts, but examiners will not read 
essays beyond 1500 words, and it should be noted that essays of under 900 words are 
unlikely to be able to display at the highest level the qualities assessed by the marking 
criteria. Please note that the upper limit is a maximum, not a target: a typical length for an 
essay is around 1200 words, and it is perfectly possible for the assessed qualities to be fully 
displayed in an essay that is at the lower end of the range of permitted word-lengths’ (the 
Course II guidance was identical, but with appropriate adjustment for Paper 2).  As noted in 
the reports on individual papers below, the reduction in the word limit seems, with some 
reservations, to have had a beneficial effect in encouraging students to engage with the 
questions set and produce relevant answers. 
13 
v2 

 
The length of every script and coursework submission was checked by Faculty 
administrative staff. In the case of OBOW scripts, material beyond the 1,500-word (or 2,250-
word) limit was highlighted so that markers could see where to stop reading. In the case of 
coursework submissions, information on word-length was provided to markers and the 
Exam Board to assist with the accurate application of penalties for over-length work.  
 
Except for the very few handwritten papers, all assessments were run through Turnitin. 
Suspicious scores triggered an initial investigation by Faculty administrative staff, with 
problematic work being referred to the Chair, who determined whether further 
investigation should be undertaken by the Board. Evidence of plagiarism was referred to the 
Proctors, and penalties for poor academic practice were imposed by the Board.  
 
Faculty administrative staff constructed a new database for handling the marks, to replace 
the old Markit programme. It took a lot of work to set up, but resulted in a more stable and 
efficient system, with less manual inputting of data, and clearer presentation of information 
to the Exam Board.  
 
 
C. 
Any changes in examining methods, procedures and examination conventions 
which the examiners would wish the faculty/department and the divisional board 
to consider. 

 
We suggest that third-marking be required whenever the first marks vary by 10 or more 
(rather than by 15 or more as at present). In practice, these cases are almost always also 
ones where the two markers fail to agree, and it would seem appropriate to standardise this 
aspect of the marking process, thereby bringing it in line with what is now the Divisional 
norm.   
 
The examination conventions currently state that ‘candidates who have failed a paper, or 
fail to attend an examination without permission, are not permitted to resit that paper.’ 
However, the Examinations and Assessments Framework, which details the University’s 
policy on examinations, states that ‘Students are normally entitled to one resit of any failed 
assessment unit of a University Examination’ (an ‘assessment unit’ in our terms means a 
paper). This apparent discrepancy between our conventions and the EAF is problematic and 
we suggest that the Faculty give it some attention.   
 
 
D. 
How candidates are made aware of the examination conventions  
 
The examination conventions are provided in the Course Handbook. They are also included, 
along with other guidance, in the Circulars to Tutors and Candidates. In addition, the Faculty 
produced an online Frequently Asked Questions page, and directed students to the 
University’s guidance about Inspera. 
 
14 
v2 

Part II 
 
A. 

General comments on the examination 
 
The standard of performance was, as ever, high. Candidates this year are especially to be 
commended given the disruption they experienced during the first half of their course.  
 
It is notable that the proportion of Firsts (37.26% of candidates) has returned to pre-
pandemic levels.  
 
I would like to express my gratitude to Faculty administrative staff for the exemplary 
support they provided throughout the examining process, and to my fellow Examiners, both 
internal and external, for their collaborative wisdom and unstinting work.  
 
 
 
B. 

Detailed numbers on candidates’ performance in each part of the examination 
 
In Course I, all the papers are compulsory, though Paper 6 includes 21 options, which were 
taken by between 8 and 15 students each, and Paper 7 is the dissertation.  
 
In Course II, taken by 15 students, Papers 1-4, 6 and 7 are compulsory, with Papers 6 & 7 
being the same as in Course I, and Paper 3 being the same as Course I, Paper 2. Course II, 
Paper 5 offers a choice between ‘The Material Text’ (taken by 9 students this year) and 
‘Shakespeare’ (taken by 6 students) which is the same as Course I, Paper 1.  
 
In the following tables, Course II students are included in the data for the Course I Papers 
that are shared with Course II. Numbers for the other Course II Papers are too small to be 
presented as statistics, and the same is true of the individual options in Course I, Paper 6. 
However, it is evident from the comments on individual papers under ‘D’ below that a wide 
range of material is being addressed in these smaller papers and options, and that the 
standard of work in them is high. 
  
 
 
Paper 1 Shakespeare (Course II Paper 5) 
Paper 2 1350-1550 (Course II Paper 3) 
 
Marks 
Candidates 

Marks 
Candidates 

 
70+ 
68 
33.66% 
70+ 
53 
25.12% 
 
60-69 
125 
61.88% 
60-69 
136 
64.45% 
 
50-59 

3.47% 
50-59 
20 
9.48% 
 
 
 
Overall 
202    
Overall 
211 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
 
Paper 3 1550-1660 (Course II Paper 6) 
Paper 4 1660-1760 
15 
v2 

 
Marks 
Candidates 

Marks 
Candidates 

 
70+ 
58 
29.44% 
70+ 
45 
22.84% 
 
60-69 
117 
59.39% 
60-69 
141 
71.57% 
 
50-59 
20 
10.15% 
50-59 
10 
5.08% 
 
 
 
Overall 
197 
Overall 
197 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
 
Paper 5 1760-1830 
Paper 6 Special Options (Submission) 
 
Marks 
Candidates 

Marks 
Candidates 

 
70+ 
48 
24.62% 
70+ 
80 
39.80% 
 
60-69 
142 
72.82% 
60-69 
111 
55.22% 
 
50-59 

2.05% 
50-59 

4.48% 
 
 
 
Overall 
195 
Overall 
201 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
Paper 7 Dissertation 
 
 
 
 
Marks 
Candidates 

 
 
 
 
70+ 
78 
37.14% 
 
 
 
 
60-69 
126 
60.00% 
 
 
 
 
50-59 

2.86% 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Overall 
210 
 
 
As the tables show, more marks of 70+ are achieved in the ‘coursework’ papers (1, 6 and 7) 
than in the timed examinations. This continues the pattern of past years, with OBOW papers 
being no different from 3-hour handwritten exams in this regard.     
 
   
C. 
Comments on papers and individual questions 
See ‘FHS 2022 Examiners’ Reports’ 
 
D. 
Names of members of the board of examiners 
 
Chair:  
 
 
Internal Examiners: 

16 
v2 

 
External Examiners: 
 

 
 
 
 
 
17 
v2 

FHS EXAMINERS’ REPORTS 
FHS Paper 1: Shakespeare Portfolio (Course II Paper 5) 
 
199 candidates took this paper. There were some exceptionally high-quality portfolios. The 
best work developed its arguments or explored its questions through sustained, detailed 
analysis of the chosen texts or modes; this was not limited to close reading of Shakespeare’s 
language and dialogue (though this was done superbly well in some essays) but included in-
depth attention to whatever medium or materials were at issue, whether in the early 
modern playhouse (scripting, staging, costume, props, actors etc) or in later adaptations and 
iterations (cuts, translation, camera angles, scenic choices etc). Examiners were always 
grateful for work which showed independent thinking, a sense of adventure underpinned by 
thorough reading and alertness to particularities. The most impressive essays developed 
their approaches not in isolation from critical history but in dialogue with it, generating 
confidence from an assurance about critical or historical contexts, including work of recent 
vintage. We preferred risk-taking to canned reproductions. The better portfolios didn’t rely 
exclusively on a single critical approach or methodological frame (this doesn’t however 
mean variety for variety’s sake; range should provide depth, not just a thin spread; there is 
no compulsion to produce three essays of entirely distinct modes and habits).  
 
There were some powerful essays that really took on the plays or poems, sometimes in 
relation to cross-cultural or -temporal versions, sometimes in relation to the conventions or 
possibilities of Shakespeare’s period. There was a lively sense of engagement with theory of 
many kinds, including Romantic, post-structuralist, critical race theory, disability studies, 
performance studies, queer theory, sex and gender and trans studies. There was excellent 
work on book history (though perhaps limited engagement with textual variants/editing) 
and a few outstanding pieces on varieties of translation. There was some good use of visual 
and material culture, of music or cinematography in films, and revealing source work (eg on 
unusual contemporary or classical texts). There was perhaps less awareness of the play-
texts as active prompts or records of performance than there might have been.  
 
The weaker portfolios either reproduced conventional or fashionable approaches without 
much sign of re-thinking anything, or relied on little more than paraphrases of Faculty 
lectures or skimmed reading. Some students presented clever-sounding terms or a barrage 
of putative authorities as a screen to hide a basic absence of their own careful attention to 
detail, or an authentically possessed and developed throughline. Quotations were 
sometimes used opportunistically or with facile disregard for what the words actually said, 
or in what context. Some essays seemed to equate analytical thoroughness with frequency 
of citation; there were portfolios with bibliographies far more detailed than anything in the 
actual essays. Some examiners noted a deficient awareness of genre (not just the Folio’s 
comedy/history/tragedy) as an active frame of reference.  
 
Pretty much all of Shakespeare’s works were written about, and no single play or sub-group 
dominated students’ attentions. There were as many essays about, say, Richard II or 
Merchant of Venice as there were about Hamlet or Lear, perhaps more.  Even the less-
discussed works (eg King John, Love’s Labour’s Lost) attracted some incisive, singular 
analyses. The narrative poems were more discussed than Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Some 
18 
v2 

examiners noted the difficulty of determining the desirable range of works to be studied, 
and of achieving the right balance between in-depth analysis and range across the 
Shakespeare corpus. The minimum number of texts is five, which many students restricted 
themselves to. When such essays engaged intensively with the chosen texts they could be 
impressive; but they were much less so when this limited range seemed a sign of limited 
reading. Some of the best work ranged widely and confidently across Shakespeare and his 
contemporaries. By the same token, there were some portfolios that namechecked dozens 
of plays without engaging deeply with anything. Students should be assured that there are 
many ways of showing range and depth and thoroughness, and we would not wish to 
prescribe or quantify beyond what has already been done. 
 
 
FHS Paper 2: Literature in English 1350-1550 (Course II Paper 3) 
 
216 students sat this paper, of whom 15 were following Course II and 3 Joint Schools. This 
was the second year of examinations in the 8-hour OBOW format, and the reduced word-
limit this year meant that essays were more focused on addressing the question, and there 
were correspondingly fewer instances of downloaded irrelevant material. There were some 
excellent essays on a wide variety of texts, and speaking from a range of critical vantage 
points, the best of them communicating genuine engagement with the period and its 
literature as well as with current critical and scholarly approaches. Some candidates 
produced truly impressive pieces of critical argumentation under exam conditions, closely 
relevant to the question, reflective, coherent and controlled, with some shrewd, attentive 
close reading. The commonest weakness in middling-to-good scripts was a tendency for 
textual quotation and assemblage of material from critics to swamp critical argument. 
Essays that engaged thoughtfully with a specific critical approach were stronger than those 
whose content seemed to be driven by an eclectic mix of brief quotations from numerous 
critics. In extreme cases essays blurred the line between overreliance and poor academic 
practice. In some cases, more sustained discussion of fewer examples would have improved 
the essay, while others would have benefited from more textual range – essays on a 
restricted amount of primary material (and there were, disappointingly, quite a few essays 
focussing on only one smallish text) tended to be weak in other respects too. Weaker 
responses were generally relevant but did not engage closely with the wording of the 
question. Q14, a quotation from Alan of Lille, was handled especially loosely, with 
candidates picking out individual phrases such as ‘book’, ‘picture’ or ‘mirror’ but not 
addressing the quotation’s overall point. When a quotation is accompanied by a question, 
candidates need to pay attention to the tag-question as well as to the meaning of the 
quotation itself. (For example, with Q2, a few candidates disregarded the restriction to 
allegorical texts, or stretched the definition of ‘allegory’ beyond breaking point.) A few 
essays appeared to be downloaded from tutorial work on other topics with some 
inadequate gestures towards relevance in the introduction and conclusion: these were 
penalised accordingly.  The range of texts and authors covered was creditable, though not 
impressive. Chaucerian dream vision, Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich, Hoccleve’s 
Complaint, verse-romance, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Pearl retained their status 
as perennial favourites. There were quite a few essays on the lyric, drama (moralities and 
cycle-plays), Malory, Henryson, Tudor texts (especially More’s Utopia), and The Canterbury 
19 
v2 

Tales. There were relatively few essays on Gower, Langland, Lydgate (other than Dance of 
Death
), Cleanness / Patience, Scots poets other than Henryson, Skelton, Wycliffite or 
Chaucerian prose. All questions were answered. 
 
The best commentaries combined a clear, nuanced understanding of the passage as a whole 
with multiple dimensions of stylistic and formal analysis, and offered well-sustained, 
interesting readings. Some impressed with their level of technicality, others with critical 
nuance and sophistication. It was clear that many candidates knew the poem well, could 
offer thoughtful, relevant cross-referencing, and were able to integrate exposition on e.g. 
the handling of sources into a critical reading. Some candidates took advantage of the 
OBOW format by making good use of MED evidence. In weaker commentaries, there was a 
reliance on narrative summary or exposition for its own sake, a tendency to give primacy to 
context over close reading, or to rely on compilation of material from secondary sources 
(generally editorial notes from the standard scholarly editions). Bland paraphrase was more 
common than skewed reading (forcing detail to fit a pre-set view of the poem as a whole or 
Chaucer as an author). Some good accounts were compromised by excessively selective 
discussion of the passage. At the weak end, there were genuine misunderstandings of what 
the passage said.  Surprisingly for an OBOW exam, misunderstandings of the content / 
meaning were quite common, more often the result of losing the syntactic thread than 
misunderstanding individual words, or taking individual lines and phrases out of their 
immediate context; some idioms were misread because of confusion with a modern 
expression that sounds a little similar. The inference would be that candidates are spending 
insufficient time working on the text in the original Middle English as opposed to 
translations, and that Middle English comprehension is therefore in many cases poor. There 
were difficulties with discussion of versification. Candidates are to be commended for 
attempting to analyse versification in the service of critical commentary. However, the 
results were mixed, with laboured comments on rhyme and sometimes rhythm, and 
unsuccessful attempts at scansion where Chaucer was being heard in modern English. There 
was some loose application of terminology (e.g. asyndeton). 
 
 
FHS Paper 3: Literature in English 1550-1660 (Course II Paper 6) 
 
There was a wide range of texts discussed, from canonical authors like Philip Sidney 
(primarily verse), Bacon, Herbert, Donne, and Spenser, to more unusual material, including 
prose pamphlets, Martha Moulsworth’s Memorandum, Catholic verse, the Marprelate 
tracts, Godwin’s Man in the Moone, and scientific writing. Female writers were well-
represented: not only those who are familiar within the scope of women’s writing (Wroth, 
Mary Sidney, Isabella Whitney, Ann Lock), but also less familiar authors of manuscript 
material (particularly Hester Pulter). There was strong work on empire, race, and travel, but 
an unfortunate tendency to draw on the same set of texts in the same ways. The fact that 
many different candidates discussing less canonical texts and topics did so in very similar 
ways suggests that many students treat classes and lectures as ends in themselves, with 
very minimal digestion or further independent application of what is offered in them. 
  
20 
v2 

Although a lack of independence was most characteristic of weaker scripts, irrelevance to 
the question was a substantial problem even among those that were otherwise highly 
accomplished, and such irrelevance was firmly penalised.  The best essays were subtly, and 
in some cases combatively, responsive to the question and engaged directly with its terms 
and implications. But very many answers read as if highly prepared in advance, minimally 
adapted from pre-existing material, and hence only in loose or oblique ways relevant to the 
titles and questions, which seemed to be treated as excuses for existing arguments, rather 
than as generating new ones. Strikingly few candidates who wrote on question 5, for 
example, actually addressed 'dramatic form'; or actually made a 'case for prose', as required 
by question 8, rather than just writing about prose works. Question 1 (on the genre of 
romance) was frequently answered with material on sonnet sequences, and its header 
quotation from Wroth often ignored.  There were similar problems with ‘satire’ in question 
7, where the concept was frequently too elastically understood.  And question 16 (on 'racial 
thinking') was often used to discuss 'otherness' more vaguely. 
 
The new limit of 1500 words produced many competent but not many strikingly good 
answers; many essays felt like attempts at something more like a 2,000-word tutorial or 
portfolio essay, with the 8-hour open-book format used to gather large amounts of 
information (whether contextual material, secondary criticism, or lengthy quotation of 
primary texts) rather than to produce exciting or innovative analysis and argument. 
 
 
FHS Paper 4: Literature in English 1660-1760 
 
Most examiners were impressed by the overall quality of work on this Paper, especially 
given the disruptions to this cohort’s time at university. Every question was attempted at 
least once, and there were excellent answers on a rich variety of texts and topics.  
 
This year’s shorter format seems to have worked well. Only a handful of candidates 
exceeded the word limit, and then not usually to the detriment of their essays’ structure. 
Irrelevance was generally less prevalent than last year, perhaps helped by the reduction in 
word limit. However, a significant minority still either wrote only about a small part of the 
question, or attempted to wrest it to a different topic during their introductions, and then 
proceeded to write about something different, with varying degrees of relevance. 
Candidates should be reminded that it speaks to their knowledge of the period being 
examined that they are able to read, understand, and respond to the question as a whole. 
The best answers did just this, engaging the questions completely and in depth, and 
providing detailed reflections on the quotations and rubrics. They offered careful analysis of 
key terms, and maintained impressive structural control over the shape, pace, and 
development of their arguments. 
 
There were many fine introductions to essays, but also a notable tendency to introductory 
bloat (and thus loss of focus and clarity). Others were brief to the point where it was not 
possible to ascertain what argument or approach was being proposed. In terms of 
structuring, correct paragraphing remains a problem, with many essays suffering from weak 
arrangement of material and inconsistent pacing in argument. Perhaps relatedly, a notable 
21 
v2 

proportion of answers adopted an extremely linear (Author/Text 1, then 2, then 3...) 
structure, reducing greatly their opportunities for detailed cross-thinking and development 
of argumentative points. Certain answers – especially, but not limited to, essays on science, 
life-writing, and the development of fiction and the novel – featured long sections of 
miscellaneous (though thematically related) information dumped in without integration into 
an argument. This tended to undermine the essays’ ability to provide a flexible response to 
the particulars of the question (and, sometimes, to fit their material into the word limit). 
 
As last year, the most popular texts were by Aphra Behn, Margaret Cavendish, Eliza 
Haywood, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, and John 
Milton. Interest in religious writing was pleasingly higher than in previous years, with 
Thomas Traherne, John Bunyan and Lucy Hutchinson joining Milton as subjects of interest. 
Less was written, though, on such mid-century poets as Thomas Gray, William Collins, and 
Thomas Warton. Restoration poetry was generally represented by the Earl of Rochester 
(and to a lesser extent John Dryden). Restoration comedies by Behn, George Etherege and 
William Wycherley dominated answers on the theatre, although there were also some fine 
forays into less well known drama, including plays by Mary Pix, Susanna Centlivre, George 
Farquhar, and Dryden. There was, though, very little on heroic drama, opera, or pageantry. 
Candidates are also encouraged to think more about plays as events – that is, to reflect on 
how drama was actually performed and received in the theatre – rather than treating them 
as texts to be read. 
 
A perhaps unprecedented number of essays on Richardson included discussion of Clarissa 
and even Sir Charles Grandison as well as Pamela, sometimes to great effect. On the other 
hand, many answers on Lady Mary Wortley Montagu were limited to the greatest hits of her 
letters from Turkey, and essays on Oroonoko frequently lacked any acknowledgement of 
Behn’s other work. This all demonstrates with particular clarity that, although it is important 
for candidates to show that they have read widely, deep familiarity with a single author’s 
wider body of work can more effectively equip them to demonstrate ‘range’ in an essay 
than scattered or arbitrary comparisons between multiple writers. 
 
More answers than ever discussed the literature of the period in the light of contemporary 
colonialism and changing ideas of race. The difference between the strongest and weakest 
of these was very often the precision with which they outlined cultural and historical 
contexts: while too many depended on a vague, unhistoricised sense of the existence of 
slavery and empire, the best showed rigorous reading of history and theory, and generated 
brilliantly original and incisive readings. 
 
 
FHS Paper 5: Literature in English 1760-1830 
 
228 candidates sat the exam this year and all questions on the paper were attempted. 
Poetry and the novel were the primary forms of focus, although there were some notably 
ambitious answers on theatrical ‘experiment’ in the period, as well as some highly 
intelligent answers on confessional narratives and the literary essay (particularly on Lamb, 
Hazlitt, and De Quincey), and on the rhetorical strategies and generic instability of both 
22 
v2 

abolitionist writing and first-person accounts of slavery (Mary Prince and Olaudah Equiano 
were key figures for the latter). Canonical choices were popular (especially Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Blake, Keats, Shelley, Byron, Clare, Austen, Sterne) but there was also some 
pleasing incorporation of work by under-discussed writers. Those who considered Irish 
fiction in particular often revealed unusual choices of primary material and admirable 
alertness to context. Women’s poetry was a popular topic, especially in response to 
question 3. Charlotte Smith, Felicia Hemans, and Letitia Landon were prominent here, but 
answers were surprisingly repetitive on this topic. Smith’s Elegiac Sonnets also drew plenty 
of attention in response to questions 1 and 3; again, there was much repetition across 
answers here. Austen was an overwhelming presence in response to question 2, question 3, 
and question 5, but answers varied heavily in quality; the weakest had a narrow textual 
range, were descriptive rather than analytical, and tended to flatten the nuances in her 
thinking. Answers to the prompt on sensibility frequently evaded defining the term, or 
handling it with enough care. Reponses based on labouring-class writing in general were 
scant, apart from some detailed work on Burns in response to question 21 on national 
identity. Responses to question 25 on the relationship between text and image focussed 
overwhelmingly on Blake, with a frequently disappointing lack of detail when it came to 
comparing his poetry to his prints and illustrations. Responses to question 16, a prompt 
which invited candidates to think about the relationship between literature and science in 
the period, were also frequently vague when it came to defining what ‘science’ meant in the 
argument, or lacked meaningful reference to specific treatises flagged as contextually 
important. Quite a few of the essays on the sublime didn’t seek to define the concept, with 
the result that the connection of the texts discussed to that concept often remained 
unclear.  
 
The best answers this year showed informed and imaginative (but not laboured) 
engagement with both the prompt and the precise terms of the question. They were 
elegantly argued and managed to marry interpretation with contextual knowledge, 
demonstrating sharp understanding of critical debate and the stakes of their own argument, 
along with a deft combination of a wide range of reference from an author’s work and 
sustained close analysis of their style. Strong answers were able to incorporate and respond 
to secondary criticism without relying excessively and unquestioningly on it or, alternatively, 
mindlessly berating the cited critics. The weakest answers either completely ignored the 
opportunity to work with the prompt or laboured over a few key words in an effort to force 
an irrelevant answer to fit the question. They also had a narrow textual range (either single-
author answers that lacked depth of engagement across the author’s works, or comparative 
answers that lacked flexibility and other informative references). Weaker essays also tended 
to juxtapose two texts without giving any rationale for the comparison or relating them to 
the terms of the quotation, or to be catalogue-like, trying to discuss a large number of works 
and consequently leaving themselves insufficient space to analyse the works in any detail.  
Quite a few candidates failed to make it clear at the outset which part(s) of multi-part 
questions they were answering (despite explicit instructions to do so on the cover sheet), 
and in some cases it never became obvious which part or parts they might have been 
intending to write about. Sometimes candidates used their introductory paragraphs 
unhelpfully, riffing on the topic quotations for too long rather than introducing and framing 
the essay itself. Some answers were extremely well-presented in terms of appropriate levels 
of referencing for this exam format; but, given the amount of time candidates had to edit 
23 
v2 

and proofread their answers, the number of orthographical, grammatical, syntactical, and 
factual errors in many scripts was concerning. There was sometimes a sense that candidates 
had not taken advantage of the open-book examination format when it came to providing 
sustained textual analysis of primary works and to attempting to locate their arguments as 
responses to relevant critical debate. These concerns notwithstanding, there was some 
highly astute, ambitious, and impressive work on display this year. 
 
 
FHS Paper 6: Special Options 
 
20th and 21st Century Theatre 
 
13 students took the course. The range of topics included contemporary transgender writer-
performers; race in contemporary African-American plays; representation of mental 
disorder; encoded female landscape in Beckett; disorder in recent plays; extremeness and 
violence on stage; heterotopia in Pinter’s drama; nationhood and scenography; monologic 
drama; voice in plays by Beckett and Carr; Kane and sexual violence; torture on stage; and 
trauma and the use of props on stage. 
 
The strongest essays had a cogent overall argument grounded in deep understanding of the 
plays and performances under discussion, evidenced by careful, precise, and rigorous 
analysis, a good sense of relevant contexts, impressive grasp of the extant critical discourse 
on the chosen plays, playwrights, performances, and/or topics, and alertness to theatre as 
both text and performance.   Their presentation was clean and accurate and the writing 
articulate and sophisticated in expression. 
 
Weaker essays lacked a clear sense of argument, or made arguments that were not 
convincingly rooted in analysis of texts and/or performances.  Their logic was difficult to 
follow and their written expression lacked sophistication or was ineffective.  They showed 
inadequate research, and either too broad or too narrow a focus.  Their presentation was 
marked by errors of style, spelling, and/or punctuation. 
 
Dream Literatures, Dream Cultures 
 
Eight students took this option. The essays produced were impressive in range, taking in 
both new material and rereading the works that had been read in class in expanded ways. 
The best essays produced new readings of dream texts based on theoretical and historical 
material that shed light on how writers explored the concept of dreaming. Some essays 
focused on one writer and others worked across authors--both approaches worked. Some of 
the essays occasionally lost focus, lacking a clear argumentative throughline or losing sight 
of whether their claim had to do with a particular concept related to dreaming or to an 
aspect of the text itself. The essays that made a clear attempt to read a text in light of a 
particular idea or dream theory were the most successful. 
 
24 
v2 

Fairytales, Folklore, and Fantasy 
 
Fifteen candidates took this option. Candidates employed a wide range of primary texts and 
historical periods in this option, with some inter-period work on show. While many 
candidates concentrated on fairy tales and fantasy from Europe, some explored the 
Caribbean and African-American material on mermaids that was added to the Paper this 
year. Candidates who rose to the challenge of the paper did so through marrying detailed 
and contextualised close engagement with the specifics of their chosen material alongside a 
nuanced grasp of the critical of theoretical field (e.g. feminism, critical race theory, etc.). 
Weaker scripts were characterised by arguments that were not embedded in close reading, 
a superficial grasp of theory, and the summarisation of, rather than engagement with, other 
scholarship. 
 
Faith, Proof and Fantasy on the Early Modern Stage 
 
There were nine students on ‘Faith, Proof and Fantasy’ this year. The essays submitted very 
pleasingly varied in topic – they wrote on the fictional space of the prologue, on the 
credibility of widows; on verisimilitude in true crime pamphlets and plays; on blood as a 
stage effect; on the dead as witnesses; on resistance to the performance of femininity, on 
witch-plays staging interrogations of supernatural evidence. The essays were theoretically 
and historically informed and freshly interpretative of the play texts; the standard was 
uniformly high. Plays covered included Every Man in his HumourRalph Roister Doister
Gammer Gurton’s NeedleThe Tragedy of MariamThe Duchess of MalfiThe Devil is an Ass
The Witch of EdmontonAmends for LadiesTamburlaineThe AlchemistHenry VHenry VIII
Bartholomew FairA New Way to Pay Old DebtsMichaelmas Term3 Henry VIArden of 
Faversham
A Warning for Fair WomenA Yorkshire Tragedy, The Late Lancashire Witches, 
The Spanish Tragedy, Julius Caesar, Troilus and Cressida, Summer’s Last Will and Testament, 
Women beware Women
.  
 
Good Poets, Bad Politics? Wordsworth and Eliot 
 
Eight candidates took this option. The best essays were outstandingly good and ranged 
across an impressively wide range of long and short poems by both poets, as well as the full 
range of their prose writings. In the case of Eliot, this involved discussion of some of the 
‘new’ materials published in the Johns Hopkins Complete Prose. Most concentrated 
primarily on one of the two poets, but the best essays made use of concepts from both sets 
of criticism. Several explored the depiction and production of awkward affective states 
(despair, despondency, bathos, and immobility) and went on to consider their potential 
political implications. There was also some good work on the relationship between political 
thought and religion in both poets, including a teasing out of Eliot’s claim to be an Anglo-
Catholic royalist. In some cases, clever, creative work was let down slightly by lack of 
attention to presentation and difficulties with structuring a longer argument. 
 
25 
v2 

Freedom, Anarchy, Strangeness and Decay: Oscar Wilde and Cultures of the Fin De Siècle  
  
There were twelve students on this option. The standard of essays was consistently high, 
with some impressive, thoroughly researched and original essays at the top end. Written 
work ranged across a wide spectrum of topics from periodical publication, nationalism and 
aestheticism, to theories of impressionism in poetry and painting, representations of dance 
and the gendered gaze, and fictional and theatrical responses to the idea of automata and 
the waxwork. All the essays engaged thoughtfully and precisely with their chosen primary 
texts and demonstrated an admirable readiness to challenge extant critical assumptions. 
The strongest work was theoretically sophisticated, deeply informed, and deftly argued, and 
there was evidence of energetic thought and vigorous personal engagement across the 
board. 
 
Language, Persuasion, People, Things 
 
Eight candidates took this paper. The standard of work was very good indeed, making 
commendable use of a range of approaches and methodologies, and exploring aspects of 
commodification in relation to gender, politics, ideology, and consumerism, in often 
innovative and richly detailed ways. The individual topics chosen were diverse, though as in 
previous years, gender ideologies proved a popular focus for exploration, as did cross-period 
comparisons, while both rhetoric and critical discourse analysis were used well for their 
potential in anatomising persuasion at work. There was some strong work on cultural 
prescriptivism, and on persuasive dissimulations, alongside some commendably rigorous 
collection (and analysis) of available data, in both verbal and visual forms.  Weaker essays 
could struggle with presentation, and in developing the structure of the submitted work 
beyond a list of examples. The best work was, however, arresting in its range and depth, as 
well as in its intellectual ambition, and cogent critical engagement.   
 
Literature, Culture, and Politics in the 1930s 
 
Thirteen students took this option. Given the overarching theme of the course, the work 
tended strongly towards the historicist (although no methodology was ever precluded), and 
the essays offered some new takes on traditional 1930s topics (for example, the Depression, 
the Spanish Civil War, the interwar ‘generation', the approach of the Second World War) or 
considered less textbook dimensions of the period (for example, representations of specific 
kinds of consumption such as fashion, cinema, travel, and alcohol culture). Successful work 
was produced both on individual authors and across a range of authors, and, with both 
types of project, candidates consistently did well to identify the appropriate scope for an 
essay of this length. The transition from tutorial essays to long-form work probably explains 
why candidates occasionally struggled to organise their material and make the trajectory of 
their argument clear. As always, the best work found a compelling literary payoff for what 
was often very wide-ranging cultural-historical research.  
 
26 
v2 

Myth, Legend and Saga in Old Norse Literature  
 
There were eight takers for this option, and the work produced was strong across the board. 
A pleasing range of topics were covered, including poetry, sagas, and reception history. The 
best essays were sophisticated and original, combining excellent close readings with a clear 
argument. There was some impressive use of theory to throw new light on well-known Old 
Norse texts. In the weaker scripts, candidates struggled to formulate their argument and/or 
to ground their own critical views sufficiently within the texts themselves. 
 
Old and Middle Irish for Beginners 
 
Six candidates sat this paper. The standard was very high. 
 
Others and Coetzee 
 
There were 8 candidates for this option. All made the most of the opportunities it affords, 
crossing  disciplines,  media,  languages,  periods,  and  continents.  While  some  prioritized 
Coetzee and others focussed on their ‘other’, all engaged thoughtfully with the logic of the 
‘and’ underpinning their argument. The best made creative use of the comparison/contrast it 
opened up,  testing the  relationship  between  literary  and  philosophical  writing, fiction  and 
photography, etc., and thinking self-reflexively about the terms of the comparison/contrast 
they chose to address. Some also backed this up with genuinely original research. The less 
assured either treated the terms guiding their analysis uncritically or struggled to sustain a 
carefully sequenced argument appropriate to a 6000-word essay.  
 
Possibilities of Criticism 
 
Once again the work submitted for this paper was highly committed, inventive, and 
thoughtful. Some of the writing was of outstanding originality, both thematically and 
formally adventurous, discovering new perspectives upon the works and ideas engaged with 
(always the measure of the best essays); there were pieces submitted of surpassing wit, 
incisiveness, and stylistic audacity; even the less realised efforts were really possessed by 
the students, and suffered mainly from a lack of time to refine the approach or argument, 
remaining somewhat inchoate. Authors engaged with included Barthes, Behn, Benjamin, 
Calvino, Carson, Cusk, Deleuze, Derrida, Annie Ernaux, Euripides, Felski, Cormac McCarthy, 
Milton, Saadiya Hartman, Joyce, Kierkegaard, Klein, Nelson, Oswald, Proust, Saunders, 
Sebald, Shakespeare, Stepanova, Zadie Smith, Spinoza, Whitman.  
 
Postcolonial Literature 
 
Thirteen students took this paper. Topics covered included gender in Black British 
Literature: Francophone Caribbean Poetry in translation; Chronotopes in Ben Okri; 
Mourning in Sara Suleri: Latin in Derek Walcott’s Poetry; Thresholds in Sarah Howe; Silence 
27 
v2 

in Patricia Grace and M. NourbeSe Philip; Laughter in Sam Selvon and Zadie Smith. The best 
essays presented original approaches that brought postcolonial studies together with other 
approaches, such as material text, environmental studies, or medical humanities, with a 
good sense of historical context. Particularly striking and valuable was the greater attention 
to questions of form/style/genre. Essays that were less successful tended to reiterate well-
worn critical ideas without situating these models in relation to more recent work, to ‘apply’ 
theory to texts, or to overstate the political currency of literature. 
 
Seeing Through Texts 
 
Seven scripts were examined for this option. The material covered ranged widely over late-
medieval literature and visual/material culture. One of the most encouraging aspects of the 
essays is the way that students felt confident to navigate genuinely interdisciplinary work. 
The best essays allied this to exploring a clear set of questions or problems, and were 
reflective about the critical materials and debates that those engaged. Some of the essays 
could have done this more, or had a stronger argumentative structure. On the whole the 
examiners enjoyed reading this impressive work. 
 
Texts in Motion: Literary and Material Forms, 1550-1800 
 
Written work for this paper was in general of an excellent standard, with a high proportion 
of first class marks. Nine students submitted work. The best work was outstanding in its 
sophistication, lucidity, critical self-awareness and ambition. Candidates consistently 
demonstrated the ability to reflect thoughtfully on their own methods, and on the methods 
of other scholars. The strongest work responded both meticulously and imaginatively to the 
archival emphasis of this paper, and combined research into print or manuscript texts (or in 
some cases objects) with theoretical reflection and/or literary sensitivity. There was 
particularly good and ambitious work on non-book textual objects, and on manuscript 
cultures: these essays showed considerable archival work, and showed real confidence in 
dealing with difficult texts that challenged or resisted conventional variables of literary 
critical analysis. Less strong work was still characterised by archival industry but was less 
engaged with the specifics of the texts under discussion, and was more inclined towards the 
descriptive, rather than the analytical. Presentation and writing was good, often excellent. 
In general, there was a clear sense of the candidates responding to the particular 
intellectual and methodological challenges and opportunities of this paper. 
 
The American Novel After 1945 
 
Fifteen students took this option, and the standard was good. The essays often focused on 
two novels (more rarely one or three). The best performances combined a clear and 
distinctive line of argument with detailed close reading and a cogent theoretical frame. 
Where essays were less successful, it tended to be because the use of theory muddied 
rather than sharpened the argument, or because the discussion of the novels was more of a 
paraphrase than an analysis. 
28 
v2 

The Avant-Garde 
 
14 students took this paper. Essay topics included authors and texts discussed during the 
course, as well as other material deriving both from the historical avant-garde and its 
broader and longer legacy. Essays were submitted on figures such as Amiri Baraka, André 
Breton, Claude Cahun, Leonora Carrington, Jayne Cortez, Maya Deren, Marcel Duchamp, 
Leonor Fini, Yagi Kazuo, Wyndham Lewis, the Baroness von Freytag-Loringhoven, Mina Loy, 
René Magritte, F. T. Marinetti, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Frank O'Hara, and Ishmael Reed. 
Essays were pleasingly interdisciplinary, looking at writing and its relation to ceramics, 
cinema, magazines, music, painting, sculpture, and semiotics. Questions of gender and race 
provided a particularly productive spur to discussions of the politics of the avant-garde. Each 
excellent submission made a precise and discrete intervention on a particular critical matter, 
backed up with well-directed research that was always marshalled in service of an 
argument, as well as powerful and relevant close reading. Less good work often indicated 
that candidates had spent insufficient time considering how to level an argument across 5-
6000 words, reading more like drawn-out tutorial essays ordered simply by association or 
even mere contiguity of individual points. Where essays succeeded, candidates showed a 
sensitivity to the fact that an extended essay needs distinct phases in its analysis, and a 
conclusion that reveals the broader stakes of its argument. 
 
The Good Life: Literature, Philosophy, Film 
 
15 students took the option this year. Final essays were generally of a high or very high 
standard. The best work was attentive to formal, generic and media distinctions (eg. 
between genres within the novel, or between the novel and film), in order to generate 
questions about the ethical work, or ethical questions, that form is capable of doing or 
raising. Less distinguished work simply noted a theme and enumerated its manifestation 
across one or two texts. The most distinguished work was able to treat philosophical texts 
and literary and cinematic themes as equally self-conscious and provocative. 
 
Tragedy 
 
Fourteen candidates took this paper. The course encourages comparative work across a 
great variety of periods and genres, from ancient to contemporary, and real originality, 
literary sensitivity, and flair were on show in several essays that comparatively explored 
their chosen works with analytical and theoretical precision. Candidates who did less well 
had often failed to justify ambitious comparisons between very disparate texts, lacking a 
theoretical framework for their analysis, or had otherwise become embroiled in theory to 
the exclusion of close textual analysis. There was also excellent work on single novels, or 
single authors, showing that precise focus and close reading can produce work of equal 
ambition and power. Several candidates fruitfully considered transformations and 
appropriations of ‘tragedy’ under the pressures of shifting cultures, analysing postcolonial, 
queer, and Black literatures, and many candidates made effective use of their freedom to 
discuss texts of their own choosing beyond the seminar reading list.  
 
29 
v2 

Writers and the Cinema  
 
Twelve candidates took this option. The standard of extended essays was very strong, with a 
high number of students receiving first-class marks. Students grasped the opportunity 
afforded by this Paper’s interdisciplinary focus, alighting on ambitious and original topics 
which explored an array of connections between film and literature. Both the literary and 
cinematic texts covered by essays were impressively wide-ranging. Candidates wrote on 
diverse cinematic genres and traditions, including early actuality film, contemporary 
documentary, silent comedy, the horror film, classical Hollywood cinema and avant-garde 
filmmaking. Essays studied film’s relationship to novels, poetry, short stories, and drama, 
with some of the authors written about including: Donald Barthelme, Samuel Beckett, 
Elizabeth Bishop, Elizabeth Bowen, Angela Carter, H. D., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Christopher 
Isherwood, George Orwell, and David Shields. The strongest essays understood that the 
essence of this particular option is the study of film and literature: they exuded a deep 
critical appreciation of both media and reflected thoughtfully on the relationship between 
them, demonstrating a strong grasp of scholarship in the two disciplinary fields and 
supporting their arguments with detailed close analysis of literary and cinematic texts. Some 
essays would have benefited from having a more tightly-defined topic and selection of texts: 
they attempted to cover too much ground for an essay of this length and accordingly did not 
have the space to develop their arguments and close readings as fully as their ideas merited. 
 
Writing Feminisms/ Feminist Writing 
 
There were eight essays submitted for this paper, covering a wide range of authors including 
Adrienne Rich, Toni Morrison, Carol Ann Duffy, Audre Lorde, Jeanette Winterson, Ali Smith, 
Alice Oswald, Sally Rooney, and Margaret Atwood. As these names suggest, the essays 
primarily focused on modern and contemporary women’s writing, although it was notable 
that most of the strongest essays carefully established the precise social, political, and 
cultural contexts of their chosen authors. The highest-marked essays made sophisticated 
theory a starting point for original and incisive close analysis, with particular attention to 
intersectionality and intertextuality. Weaker essays tended to be limited to making 
observations around a theme or pointing out resemblances between two texts, without 
clearly establishing an argument. It was in some cases apparent that essays needed at least 
one further editing stage, both to improve presentation, and to refine their theses. 
Writing Lives 
 
There was much exciting work produced in response to the varieties and modes of life-
writing examined during this course – and the submitted essays demonstrated imagination 
and rigour. Students took in a wide variety of approaches, including single-author and 
generic focuses, tackling aphorisms, anecdotes, poetry, novels, diaries, memoirs, 
manuscripts, and photographs, as well as less conventional modes of 
biographical/autobiographical inscription such as tattoos, recipes, and dress. Topics 
varied varied widely across periods, modes, and media; works studied included those by 
Auden, Adiche, Barbellion, Bishop, Cusk, Dillon, Gallop, Lear, Lorde, Myles, Lorde, Nelson, 
The Refugee Tales, Ali Smith, and Gertrude Stein. 
30 
v2 

FHS Paper 7: Dissertation 
  
 
This year’s dissertations covered a broad range of topics from Old English runic inscriptions, 
to Asian American poetry, to media like Instagram and blogs. A range of genres and styles 
were addressed, including theatre, journalism and film, and there was some promising 
interdisciplinary work dealing with photography and the visual arts. Awareness of non-
English literary traditions was effectively mobilised. Although there was some cross-period 
analysis, most candidates preferred to focus on a single period and often on a single author. 
As was the case last year, there was a considerable body of material on North American and 
world literature.  
 
The best dissertations conveyed enthusiasm for their topics and the pleasure of reading and 
conducting original research. They showed genuine ambition and inventiveness backed up 
by painstaking research. Both single-author and multiple-author projects were dealt with 
well, when single-author projects showed a breadth of knowledge across the author’s 
oeuvre and relevant critical and theoretical frameworks, and when multiple-author projects 
carefully clarified the justification for reading texts together. Candidates were able to 
engage critically with up-to-date scholarly methods and debates and use these to inform 
their close readings. Their work demonstrated both breadth and depth of reading, was 
elegant and incisive in its engagement with primary materials, and was written in articulate 
and fluent prose. Many candidates produced original and creative readings of familiar texts, 
and were able to articulate their contribution to a live field. The very strongest work 
combined an impressive command of a substantial body of material, a carefully organised 
and informed argument, meticulous close reading, and a clear sense of how the argument 
contributed to discussions in the wider field. Some candidates showed a great deal of 
enterprise in their research in terms of working out what kinds of context might be relevant, 
often considering work on other media or from other disciplines. Some also showed deep 
engagement with textual reading (e.g. manuscript readings and situating reading in material 
texts, but also other forms of close reading). It was also noted that candidates were willing 
to think through material literary infrastructures shaping the production, circulation and 
reception of texts. It was pleasing to see so many candidates doing original research and 
bringing a healthy self-reflexivity to their own critical and scholarly practice.  
 
Scripts at the weaker end suggested that candidates were struggling to choose a topic that 
could be tackled successfully within the word limit, and either opted for something too 
narrow or attempted to cover too much. Some appeared to have a poor understanding of 
what a dissertation should look like and ended up with something more like a collage of 
tutorial essays than a sustained argument. A recurrent issue was structure, with many 
candidates failing to see an argument through to the end or to choose a leading focus from 
among their options. They deployed lots of information and material, but without 
marshalling it into a coherent and critical argument. In general, candidates who used 
structuring devices fared better, although section divisions in themselves do not amount to 
a structure unless they correspond to real steps within the argument. Another recurrent 
issue was the difficulty of identifying the critical payoff for what was often attentive and 
hardworking analysis – the ‘so what’ of the dissertation. Candidates struggled to articulate 
the critical interest and significance of their work, either making broad sweeping claims that 
31 
v2 

did not stand up to scrutiny or taking a descriptive rather than an analytical approach. 
Although students are commendably anxious to make ‘original’ critical interventions, 
weaker dissertations sometimes do this based on distortive interpretations of the primary 
and secondary sources, rather than by working with the texts towards more nuanced 
understanding. Some candidates gave lists of examples and long quotations that they barely 
utilised; others attempted to create an appearance of range through the strategic dumping 
of secondary material rather than really engaging in a focussed way with the field. Although 
presentation was generally good, some dissertations showed sloppy grammar and sentence 
use. 
 
On the whole, examiners were impressed by the range and overall standard of the 
dissertations and by the candidates’ enthusiasm for their topics. They commended the high 
level of ambition and enterprise on display, which resulted in some truly exceptional work. 
 
 
 

FHS Course II Paper 1: Literature in English 650-1100 
 
Sixteen students sat this paper and every question except nos 10 and 16 was answered. The 
most popular questions were 4 (on the presentation of ‘others’), 6 (on ‘borders and 
boundaries’), and 9 (on translations into Old English). There was impressive range across 
most of the papers, from essays that revisited first-year texts from a different angle, to 
Alfredian translations and Cynewulfian poetry, to studies of particular manuscripts. The best 
candidates were impressively learned and wide-ranging in their references, seeking out less 
well-known texts, advancing new interpretations, and bringing palaeographical and 
linguistic skills to bear on their reading of Old English literature. There was some excellent 
engagement with the multilingualism of early medieval culture, especially Anglo-Latin and 
to a lesser extent Old Norse. The weaker candidates sometimes recycled first-year material 
with little or no evidence of further reading and/or struggled to fit a prepared essay into on 
the of question on the paper. No one wrote on the reception of Old English literature (e.g. in 
modern translation) and there was very little on biblical translations. Overall, though, the 
standard was high and showed an impressive engagement with literature from across the 
whole period.  
FHS Course II Paper 2: English and Related Literatures: The Lyric 
A wide range of questions was answered. The most popular were questions (6) and (9), 
which offered possible dismissals of medieval lyric (e.g. as sounding like nursery rhyme, or 
as offering a narrowly male gaze), which candidates usually disputed, and (11) on poetic 
failure. Candidates engaged well with the polemical limitations of the questions, often 
evaluating them methodically through essays with a clear structure. The best essays used 
paragraphing well to consider different perspectives with several fresh ideas in turn. Other 
essays were less successful when they only nodded to a content-related word in the 
question (gender, religion, nature) and then rehearsed material grouped only loosely under 
that theme, and related only tenuously to the question’s challenge. Many good answers 
commented in detail on formal aspects, such as voice, imagery, virtuosity and structure 
(features perceptible even when working in translation). A few analysed in depth metrical 
32 
v2 

features or diction, especially in English but also in French on several occasions. There was 
in the best scripts, too, a sophisticated and precise critical vocabulary for debating literary 
practice, and a refreshing metacritical reflection on method (e.g. the politics of studying 
Arabic lyric; the separation of musicology from literary criticism; editorial failings) in ways 
that studying comparative literature invites. Most candidates discussed lyrics in English, but 
over half discussed the Arabic and Spanish of Islamic Europe, often with considerable 
technical knowledge of form; over a third of candidates discussed French, whether of 
England or France; and Galician, Latin and Welsh appeared too. There was less coverage of 
Celtic languages and Norse than in previous years. But most individual essays focused on 
one language; only a few took the opportunity the paper offers to write comparatively 
about texts from more than one language. 
FHS Course II Paper 4: History of the English Language to c.1800 
Thirteen candidates took this paper. In general, performance was very strong with four first 
class papers, and a further six gaining marks of 65 or above. Performance on the 
commentaries was particularly pleasing this year, with a lot of assured and linguistically 
informed scrutiny of the chosen texts. Submitted papers covered a wide range of topics, 
though lexicography, language variation, contact and contact features, private writing, and 
text type theory generated a good set of theoretically informed answers in which candidates 
handled a pleasing range of approaches and material. Presentation was generally extremely 
good, and period covered was commendable with many candidates revealing an impressive 
command of diachronic analysis. Weaker answers were marked by a failure to address the 
demands of the question chosen, as well as by significant gaps within the language analysis 
attempted.  
FHS Course II Paper 5: The Material Text 
In Section A, an equal number of candidates tackled the ‘Nowell codex’ and the ‘Vernon 
manuscript’. For the Nowell codex, there were good observations on the text and on 
editorial method; for the Vernon manuscript, on word and image and on the page design. 
Candidates are encouraged to continue these strengths while also considering both areas of 
interest in relation to both manuscripts. The best commentaries were also well shaped into 
essays, picking out overarching themes in their observations. For Section B, this was the first 
year in which there were no questions set, and all candidates devised their own topics for 
their essay in this Section. Popular topics included illustrated manuscripts, from Gospel 
books to herbals, and the history of reading, through annotations and layout, in each case 
using examples of diverse genre and date across the cohort—though many individual 
candidates took the opportunity to specialize, across both Section A and Section B, in pre-
Conquest or post-Conquest materials. The topics were largely well chosen, usually managing 
to balance themes of large implication with examples of precise observation, connecting the 
two as far as possible within the limits of one essay. Some essays could be strengthened by 
being more selective among the details discussed, selecting with analytical rigour the 
evidence which serves a wider argument. But precise knowledge of material texts was 
evident across almost all essays, and the enthusiasm for this subject was even more 
universally evident. 
 
33 
v2 


 
EXTERNAL EXAMINER REPORTS: FHS 

Course(s) examined:  
FHS 
Level: (please delete as appropriate 
Undergraduate X 
Postgraduate 
 
Please complete both Parts A and B.  

Part A 
Please () as applicable*   Yes  
No 
N/A /  
Other 

A1.   Are  the  academic  standards  and  the  achievements  of  students  X 
 
 
comparable with those in other UK higher education institutions of 
which  you  have  experience?  [Please  refer  to  paragraph  6  of  the 
Guidelines for External Examiner Reports].
 
A2. 
Do the threshold standards for the programme appropriately reflect  X 
 
 
the  frameworks  for  higher  education  qualifications  and  any 
applicable subject benchmark statement? [Please refer to paragraph 7 
of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports]. 
 
A3.   Does  the  assessment  process  measure  student  achievement  X 
 
 
rigorously  and  fairly  against  the  intended  outcomes  of  the 
programme(s)? 
A4. 
Is  the  assessment  process  conducted  in  line  with  the  University's  X 
 
 
policies and regulations? 
A5.   Did  you  receive  sufficient  information  and  evidence  in  a  timely  X 
 
 
manner  to  be  able  to  carry  out  the  role  of  External  Examiner 
effectively? 
A6. 
Did you receive a written response to your previous report? 

 
 
A7. 
Are you satisfied that comments in your previous report have been  X 
 
 
properly considered, and where applicable, acted upon?  
If you answer “No” to any question, you should provide further comments when you complete Part B.  
34 
v2 

Part B 
 
In your responses to these questions, please could you include comments on the effectiveness of 
any changes made to the course or processes in response to the COVID-19 pandemic where 
appropriate. 
 
B1. Academic standards 
 
a.  How do academic standards achieved by the students compare with those achieved by 
students at other higher education institutions of which you have experience? 
 
This is my third year as external examiner for FHS. It has been a pleasure to do this work 
each year, and I have been as impressed with the quality of the work this time as I was in 
previous years. The work is as good - often better - than work I have seen at Russell Group 
institutions. The writing - even in weaker work - is clear and often confident; there is a good 
sense of chronological and formal range and variety. Students often exhibit detailed 
knowledge of relevant scholarship, and the strongest work is truly impressive. 
 
b.  Please  comment  on  student  performance  and  achievement  across  the  relevant 
programmes or parts of programmes and with reference to academic standards and 
student  performance  of  other  higher  education  institutions  of  which  you  have 
experience  (those  examining  in  joint  schools  are  particularly  asked  to  comment  on 
their subject in relation to the whole award). 

 
This year I was asked to look at the full range of scripts for 5 candidates (with final averages 
ranging from a solid 2:2, to the highest 2:2 and lowest 2:1; to a solid 2:1 and a solid first 
class). I was also asked to look at the 3 highest-ranking dissertations, which was a particular 
pleasure and privilege. I was asked to offer recommendations for the dissertation prize. 
 
The dissertation work was fascinating to read, and while there were differences in quality 
between them, they were all stand-out pieces of research. The strongest could have easily 
done extremely well at MA level (at least in many Russell Group institutions), and all three 
pieces suggested that their authors were capable of postgraduate work.  
 
The candidates whose work sat in the 2:2 and low 2:1 range were fairly marked and the 
marks reflected the ability on display across the run of scripts. It was heartening to see a 
clear pattern emerge that confirmed individual marks, and although it was a real shame to 
have someone miss out on a 2:1 by very little, there is always a borderline candidate and it 
seemed to me the right decision overall.  
 
The work was in almost all cases engaged and often very engaging. Students really dug into 
topics, and were able to be articulate (or at least quite well-informed) across an impressive 
range of material. The stronger work (and I include 2:1 work here) exhibits intellectual 
ambition and liveliness - there is a notable presence of individual ‘voice’ and little sense of 
‘rote’ repetition. 
 
35 
v2 

It was very helpful and interesting to see the full run of scripts from work in different class 
bands. 
 
B2. Rigour and conduct of the assessment process 
 
Please comment on the rigour and conduct of the assessment process, including whether it 
ensures equity of treatment for students, and whether it has been conducted fairly and within 
the University’s regulations and guidance. 
 
As I commented in previous years, the process is very rigorous and it is impressive to see 
how carefully and judiciously the board proceeds. Being asked to participate in the MCE 
meeting gives one a very rounded picture of the process, and also confirms that the Board 
acts scrupulously and fairly according to existing rules and regulations (even if there are 
cases where one might be tempted to act differently, due to a candidate’s very difficult 
personal circumstances).  
 
The marking process is mostly also very rigorous and careful. The work is double-marked 
and there are regular instances when a third marker is called in to adjudicate (rather than 
simply ‘dividing the difference’ between two marks). I have a few suggestions (see below), 
but these do not detract from my overall sense that students are served very well by the 
markers and the Board. 
 
I noted a slightly greater willingness to award marks in the high first-class bands - this is 
really heartening. However, I would recommend further consideration of this, especially 
with dissertations. I agree that grade inflation is concerning, but there can be no question of 
that in the cases I’ve been asked to look at. These students might end up competing for 
funding for postgraduate work, and it would be a real disservice to disadvantage them by 
not making use of the full range of marks available. 
 
B3. Issues 
 
Are  there  any  issues  which  you  feel  should  be  brought  to  the  attention  of  supervising 
committees in the faculty/department, division or wider University? 
 
We discussed the 8-hour exam format, especially in view of the fact that some students with 
disabilities felt that the new format did not sufficiently take into account their needs. While 
it seems that in the original planning process it was decided that 8 hours was sufficient to 
allow all students to work to the best of their abilities, I do see the objection that the 8 
hours still allows students without special needs to re-read or edit work, while others might 
need the full 8 hours simply to complete the assessment. It would be worth considering how 
this might be addressed - or how it might be better communicated, if no change is made. 
 
While in most cases marking and feedback were clear, there were instances in which the 
marks and the comments did not seem to match up. In some scripts, the comments 
suggested really strong work, while the mark given was less generous; in others, it was the 
other way round. I would recommend urging markers to bear the marking criteria in mind 
and to ensure that marks and comments are in line with one another. Some markers were 
36 
v2 

exemplary. The dissertation marksheet helpfully outlines areas that markers should be 
taking into consideration - it is therefore very easy to refer to those criteria in comments. 
 
A third marker is automatically called in when the first and second marks diverge by 15 
points. I saw one piece of work where the marks diverged by 14 - and this made me think 
that the threshold for this could be lowered, especially since the two initial marks will often 
lie in different class bands.  
 
While I can see that there is often not much to say about how a final mark was reached 
when markers diverge by only 2 or 3 points, where there is greater divergence it is 
important to write more than ‘mark agreed after discussion’.  
 
Here, as in other institutions, there are concerns about plagiarism. It would be worth 
introducing more plagiarism training for students, especially when it comes to 
differentiating between ‘poor academic practice’ and ‘plagiarism’. I am very happy to see it 
being taken so seriously by this Board and support that approach wholeheartedly. It does a 
disservice to academia - not to mention other students - to be too lenient in this regard. 
 
B4. Good practice and enhancement opportunities  
 
Please comment/provide recommendations on any good practice and innovation relating to 
learning,  teaching  and  assessment
,  and  any  opportunities  to  enhance  the  quality  of  the 
learning  opportunities
  provided  to  students  that  should  be  noted  and  disseminated  more 
widely as appropriate. 
 
See my comments above.  
 
I was very pleased to see one particularly creative course (P6 Option: Possibilities of 
Criticism) - which looked extremely challenging and stimulating in its remit. It was not 
surprising, perhaps, to see that the work produced divided markers, as the course allows for 
innovative forms and responses. It would be worth having (I did not see any) clear 
guidelines for what is being asked of students, and how more experimental and speculative 
work will be assessed (for students, as well as second markers and externals). 
 
B5. Any other comments  
 
Please  provide  any  other  comments  you  may  have  about  any  aspect  of  the  examination 
process. Please also use this space to address any issues specifically required by any applicable 
professional body. If your term of office is now concluded, please provide an overview here. 
 
My thanks to 
 for running the Board 
(online) despite all suffering from Covid at the time. I’m not sure this sets a good precedent 
- as colleagues should not be expected to work when ill - but it certainly demonstrated their 
commitment to students and the process. 
 
37 
v2 

Date: 
20 July 2022 
 
Please ensure you have completed parts A & B, and email your completed form to: external-
xxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx AND copy it to the applicable divisional contact set out in the 
guidelines. 

 
 
38 
v2 


Course(s) examined:  
English Literature 
Level: (please delete as appropriate 
Undergraduate 
 
 
Please complete both Parts A and B.  

Part A 
Please () as applicable*   Yes  
No 
N/A /  
Other 

A1.   Are  the  academic  standards  and  the  achievements  of  students  x 
 
 
comparable with those in other UK higher education institutions of 
which  you  have  experience?  [Please  refer  to  paragraph  6  of  the 
Guidelines for External Examiner Reports].
 
A2. 
Do the threshold standards for the programme appropriately reflect  x 
 
 
the  frameworks  for  higher  education  qualifications  and  any 
applicable subject benchmark statement? [Please refer to paragraph 7 
of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports]. 
 
A3.   Does  the  assessment  process  measure  student  achievement  x 
 
 
rigorously  and  fairly  against  the  intended  outcomes  of  the 
programme(s)? 
A4. 
Is  the  assessment  process  conducted  in  line  with  the  University's  x 
 
 
policies and regulations? 
A5.   Did  you  receive  sufficient  information  and  evidence  in  a  timely  x 
 
 
manner  to  be  able  to  carry  out  the  role  of  External  Examiner 
effectively? 
A6. 
Did you receive a written response to your previous report? 

 
 
A7. 
Are you satisfied that comments in your previous report have been  x 
 
 
properly considered, and where applicable, acted upon?  
If you answer “No” to any question, you should provide further comments when you complete Part B.  
 
 

39 
v2 

Part B 
 
In your responses to these questions, please could you include comments on the effectiveness of 
any changes made to the course or processes in response to the COVID-19 pandemic where 
appropriate. 
 
B1. Academic standards 
 
a.  How do academic standards achieved by the students compare with those achieved by 
students at other higher education institutions of which you have experience? 
 
The standard of the work produced by English literature undergraduates at Oxford is 
exceptionally high. 
 
b.  Please  comment  on  student  performance  and  achievement  across  the  relevant 
programmes or parts of programmes and with reference to academic standards and 
student  performance  of  other  higher  education  institutions  of  which  you  have 
experience  (those  examining  in  joint  schools  are  particularly  asked  to  comment  on 
their subject in relation to the whole award). 

 
I read scripts at the high end of the first category, and then some work on either side of the 
first/2:1 boundary. 
 
I was lucky enough to read the run of the highest awarded first class student, which was 
quite stunning in its lucidity, its originality, and its control. All of the work that I saw in these 
categories had first class potential, and all showed independence and seriousness of 
thought. What was most striking about the range of work that I read was that all students 
have a writerly control of voice and tone – a mark of the quality of the teaching at Oxford.  
 
The standard of work at Oxford is exceptionally high in comparison with other comparable 
degree programmes in the UK. I noted that some of the most poorly performing students on 
the cohort had some first class marks in their array – a tribute to the quality of the cohort, 
and of the diligence and inclusiveness of the teaching. 
 
B2. Rigour and conduct of the assessment process 
 
Please comment on the rigour and conduct of the assessment process, including whether it 
ensures equity of treatment for students, and whether it has been conducted fairly and within 
the University’s regulations and guidance. 

 
There are not many English departments in the UK that still follow a blind double marking 
procedure across the board. That Oxford uses blind double marking in all cases makes this 
an exceptionally rigorous and scrupulously fair examination process. I could always see how 
both examiners came to their mark, and I could almost always see how agreed marks were 
arrived at (sometimes after a third examiner had been consulted). 
 
The marking is highly consistent in its own terms, and is exemplary in its clarity and fairness. 
40 
v2 

The exam board itself was conducted impeccably. Every decision was made with care, and 
with consistency, and each student was given proper consideration. 
 
The mitigating evidence process is thorough, and the proper consideration was given to 
ensuring that any adverse circumstances were taken into account in a way that was fair for 
all students. 
 
B3. Issues 
 
Are  there  any  issues  which  you  feel  should  be  brought  to  the  attention  of  supervising 
committees in the faculty/department, division or wider University? 
 
It seemed to me that there was some variation in practice between joint boards and the 
English single honours board. I would recommend that rules are standardised for all joint 
exam boards with an English component, in line with those governing the single honours 
board, to avoid inconsistencies. 
 
I note that the examining load for faculty seems to be unusually heavy at Oxford, in 
comparison with other universities in the UK. It may be that this is an effect of your 
examining practices, and so unavoidable. But it is worth mentioning, in case there are any 
planning procedures that might lighten the load on faculty. 
 
B4. Good practice and enhancement opportunities  
 
Please comment/provide recommendations on any good practice and innovation relating to 
learning,  teaching  and  assessment
,  and  any  opportunities  to  enhance  the  quality  of  the 
learning  opportunities  
provided  to  students  that  should  be  noted  and  disseminated  more 
widely as appropriate. 
 
I am struck by the fact that the exam board at Oxford still has autonomy (where boards in 
other UK universities are tending to become less autonomous). I was struck too by the care 
with which the board exercised its autonomy, and by its commitment to making fair, 
consistent and measured decisions in all case. 
 
The administrative support offered to the Board, and to myself as external examiner, was 
exemplary in every way. 
 
B5. Any other comments  
 
Please  provide  any  other  comments  you  may  have  about  any  aspect  of  the  examination 
process. Please also use this space to address any issues specifically required by any applicable 
professional body. If your term of office is now concluded, please provide an overview here. 
 
Only to emphasise how impressed I have been this year by the quality of student work that 
the faculty produces, and by the clarity and rigour of the examination process. The English 
Literature exam board at Oxford provides a model for other universities to follow. 
 
 
41 
v2 

Date: 
11th August 2022 
 
Please ensure you have completed parts A & B, and email your completed form to: external-
xxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx.xx AND copy it to the applicable divisional contact set out in the 
guidelines.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
42 
v2 


Course(s) examined:  
ENGLISH BA; ENGLISH AND CLASSICS BA 
Level: (please delete as appropriate 
Undergraduate 
 
 
Please complete both Parts A and B.  

Part A 
Please () as applicable*   Yes  
No 
N/A /  
Other 

A1.   Are  the  academic  standards  and  the  achievements  of  students  X 
 
 
comparable with those in other UK higher education institutions of 
which  you  have  experience?  [Please  refer  to  paragraph  6  of  the 
Guidelines for External Examiner Reports].
 
A2. 
Do the threshold standards for the programme appropriately reflect  X 
 
 
the  frameworks  for  higher  education  qualifications  and  any 
applicable subject benchmark statement? [Please refer to paragraph 7 
of the Guidelines for External Examiner Reports]. 
 
A3.   Does  the  assessment  process  measure  student  achievement  X 
 
 
rigorously  and  fairly  against  the  intended  outcomes  of  the 
programme(s)? 
A4. 
Is  the  assessment  process  conducted  in  line  with  the  University's  X 
 
 
policies and regulations? 
A5.   Did  you  receive  sufficient  information  and  evidence  in  a  timely  X 
 
 
manner  to  be  able  to  carry  out  the  role  of  External  Examiner 
effectively? 
A6. 
Did you receive a written response to your previous report? 
NA 
 
 
A7. 
Are you satisfied that comments in your previous report have been  NA 
 
 
properly considered, and where applicable, acted upon?  
If you answer “No” to any question, you should provide further comments when you complete Part B.  
 
 

 
43 
v2 

Part B 
 
In your responses to these questions, please could you include comments on the effectiveness of 
any changes made to the course or processes in response to the COVID-19 pandemic where 
appropriate. 
 
B1. Academic standards 
 
a.  How do academic standards achieved by the students compare with those achieved by 
students at other higher education institutions of which you have experience? 
 
I have several years' examining experience at BA level: at Durham, where I was chair of 
examiners for two years; at my current institution, UCL; and at Keele, where I was an 
external examiner for four years. This year -- my first as an external at Oxford -- I was, for 
the most part, asked to comment on high achievers: the second-top First, the winner of the 
Charles Oldham Shakespeare Prize, two low Firsts and two scripts on the 1/2:1 borderline. 
All were comparable to those from Durham or UCL graded at similar levels; students at 
Keele, though often highly intelligent, tended to be less polished and well-informed.