Event communication

The request was partially successful.

Dear House of Commons,

I am writing to you under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 to request copies of all correspondence in the form of emails, notes, meeting minutes or other documents relating to the following events:

1) Event title: TMA Anti-Illicit Trade Survey 2019
• Date: 11th September 2019
• Sponsor: Craig Mackinlay MP
• On behalf of: Tobacco Manufacturers Associations

2) Event title: Mondelez Parliamentary Reception
• Date: 6th November 2019
• Sponsor: Bill Wiggin MP
• On behalf of: Weber Shandwick

I request that the information be provided electronically, to this email address.

Many thanks for your time.

Yours faithfully,

Amelia Crowther

FOI Commons, House of Commons

Dear Ms Crowther,

Freedom of Information request F20-595

 

Thank you for your request for information dated 9 November 2020, received
by us on the same date, which is copied below.

 

We will endeavour to respond to your request promptly but in any case
within 20 working days i.e. on or before 8 December 2020.

 

If you have any queries about your request, please use the request number
quoted above and in the subject line of this email.

CORONAVIRUS UPDATE

We will work hard to answer your information rights requests during the
current COVID 19 situation in line with statutory requirements, however
some requests may be affected by access to collections and availability of
staff. We will keep you informed of any identified delays in answering
your request.

Yours sincerely,

Sarah Price

IRIS Support Officer
Information Rights and Information Security (IRIS) Service | House of
Commons

[1]www.parliament.uk | [2]@ukparliament | [3]@houseofcommons

[4]House of Commons Privacy Notice for the Public

[5]Supporting a thriving parliamentary democracy

From: Amelia Crowther <[FOI #704721 email]>
Sent: 09 November 2020 12:03
To: FOI Commons <[email address]>
Subject: Freedom of Information request - Event communication

Dear House of Commons,

I am writing to you under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 to request
copies of all correspondence in the form of emails, notes, meeting minutes
or other documents relating to the following events:

1) Event title: TMA Anti-Illicit Trade Survey 2019

• Date: 11th September 2019

• Sponsor: Craig Mackinlay MP

• On behalf of: Tobacco Manufacturers Associations

2) Event title: Mondelez Parliamentary Reception

• Date: 6th November 2019

• Sponsor: Bill Wiggin MP

• On behalf of: Weber Shandwick

I request that the information be provided electronically, to this email
address.

Many thanks for your time.

Yours faithfully,

Amelia Crowther

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Please use this email address for all replies to this request:

[6][FOI #704721 email]

Is [7][House of Commons request email] the wrong address for Freedom of
Information requests to House of Commons? If so, please contact us using
this form:

[8]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/change_re...

Disclaimer: This message and any reply that you make will be published on
the internet. Our privacy and copyright policies:

[9]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/help/offi...

For more detailed guidance on safely disclosing information, read the
latest advice from the ICO:

[10]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/help/ico-...

Please note that in some cases publication of requests and responses will
be delayed.

If you find this service useful as an FOI officer, please ask your web
manager to link to us from your organisation's FOI page.

show quoted sections

FOI Commons, House of Commons

24 Attachments

Dear Ms Crowther,

Freedom of Information Request F20-595

Thank you for your request for information as copied below. You have asked
the House of Commons for copies of all correspondence in the form of
emails, notes, meeting minutes or other documents relating to the
following events:

• TMA Anti-Illicit Trade Survey 2019

◦ 11th September 2019
◦ Sponsored by Craig Mackinlay MP
◦ Tobacco Manufacturers Associations

• Mondelez Parliamentary Reception

◦ 6th November 2019
◦ Sponsored by Bill Wiggin MP
◦ Weber Shandwick

This information is held by the House of Commons. Please find all
correspondence and attachments held by the House of Commons banqueting
service about the first of these events, regarding the “TMA Anti-Illicit
Trade Survey,” attached. Due to the amount of information held by the
House regarding these events, all correspondence “Mondelez Parliamentary
Reception” correspondence will be sent attached to a follow-up email. The
exemptions formally applied below refer to all correspondence for both
events.

The names of staff members working for the House of Commons have been
redacted from the requested information to prevent them from being
identified. This information is therefore exempt by virtue of section 40
(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA), as disclosure of this
information to the public generally, in the House’s view, would not be
consistent with data protection principles in Article 5 of the General
Data Protection Regulations. This is an absolute exemption and the public
interest test does not apply.

A small amount of information, consisting of maps of the parliamentary
estate and security arrangements relating to Parliament’s Off-Site
Consolidation Centre and access to the parliamentary estate, has been
redacted from the attached information as it is considered exempt under
s.24, s.31 & s.38 FOIA. These exemptions are limited and require a public
interest test to be performed. Please find the public interest tests for
each of these exemptions below:

S.31(1)(a) and (b) – Law enforcement

The information you have requested includes detailed security information,
plans and architectural information relating to the parliamentary estate.
This information could give crucial information on the layout, structure,
security arrangements and any potential weaknesses of building designs and
construction. The Houses of Parliament and their Members are known to be a
desired target for criminal and terrorist attacks and the requested
information could be invaluable to those attempting to plan or carry out
an attack on the estate. The House of Commons therefore considers the
information you have requested exempt from disclosure for the purposes of
law enforcement. Section 31(1)(a) and (b) permits the exemption of
information in instances where disclosure of this information would be
likely to prejudice the prevention and detection of crime. The public
interest test for this exemption is as follows;

The House recognises that there is a legitimate public interest in the
information you have requested given the importance of the work of
Parliament. As a high-profile landmark and a core part of central UK
governance, the Palace of Westminster is a natural focus of interest to
the public generally. Knowledge of the floor plans could give insight into
the effectiveness of security arrangements on the estate and the measures
taken by parliamentary security and law enforcement officials to maintain
adequate law enforcement on the parliamentary estate. The House recognises
that effective law enforcement is of great interest to Members and the
public given the legitimate public interest in the security of elected
representatives in Parliament. Further, this knowledge could be useful to
all those wishing to visit the parliamentary estate and all those in the
vicinity of the estate who wish to familiarise themselves with the layout
of the building.

However, these obligations and legitimate interests are outweighed by the
increased risk of criminal activity being undertaken if the information
was disclosed. The information you have requested could be invaluable to a
person wishing to circumvent or compromise parliamentary security
arrangements. In providing this detail, we would be publicising the
measures we have in place to prevent criminal activity being undertaken
against our property and the people on it. The location of where checks
are carried out to deliveries, how these checks are carried out and other
processes being employed would be valuable information to anyone with
malicious or criminal intent. This information would allow them to build
up a picture of how deliveries to the Estate are made and therefore the
means by which to attempt to circumvent those measures. By releasing
detailed maps of the estate and details of our security and access
arrangements, we could provide fixated individuals with highly useful
information for planning and committing criminal offences against Members,
staff or visitors, or the premises themselves. The information is likely
to be used alongside other information to assess the effectivity of
parliamentary security arrangements through a mosaic effect. In disclosing
this information, we would fail in our duty to prevent potential
vulnerabilities from being identified by individuals with malicious or
criminal intent against Members of either House, staff on the estate and
public guests and visitors to the estate, which in turn would fail in our
duty to assist those services providing us with law enforcement. This
places people and the building at risk of criminal victimisation. It is
our view that the greater public interest in maintaining the exemption
outweighs the lesser public interest in disclosing the information.

S.24(1) – National security

As the requested documents contain detailed plans of the layout of
Richmond House, this presents an obvious security risk if disclosed. The
work of Government Ministers on the parliamentary estate makes protecting
the fabric of the buildings, and those who work within them, a matter of
protecting national security. The House of Commons therefore considers the
information you have requested exempt from disclosure for the purpose of
safeguarding national security under section 24(1) FOIA. This provides an
exemption from disclosure where provision of the information would make
the UK, its system of government or its people more vulnerable to a
national security threat. The public interest test for this exemption is
as follows;

The House recognises the public interest in the security of the work of
government on the estate. We understand that there is a legitimate
interest in understanding the measures taken to secure the parliamentary
estate for elected Members of Parliament and to ensure the safe and
effective running of the UK government and Parliament itself.
Particularly, we acknowledge that there is an interest in knowing that the
high-profile Restoration & Renewal (R&R) programme will not negatively
impact the security of Members and, by extension, the work of government
on the estate. The requested information could be used to provide
assurance to the public generally of the work being done to ensure that
the security of the estate and all those working on it is maintained
during and after the completion of the R&R programme works.

However, the House also considers that an in-depth knowledge of the layout
and security measures of Richmond House would be invaluable information
for those wishing to carry out an attack on Parliament or otherwise pose a
threat to those Government Ministers working within it. The upcoming role
of Richmond House as the seat of the UK Parliament makes it a desirable
target for attack for those wishing to undermine the UK’s national
security. To uphold national security, it is incumbent upon the House to
ensure that terrorist groups, criminal factions or otherwise fixated
individuals are unable to circumvent security arrangements on the estate
using materials such as detailed floor plans of the estate. The
Information Commissioner’s Office guidance on this exemption states that
“It is not necessary to show that disclosing the information would lead to
a direct or immediate threat to the UK. In a time of global terrorism our
national security can depend on cooperating with others.” There is a
recognised increased threat against the safety of Members of the House of
Commons at this time. Further, the disclosure of this information would
publicise the measures we have in place to deter security threats to the
estate and the people on it, including Government Ministers and officials.
The location of where checks are carried out to deliveries, how these
checks are carried out and other processes being employed would be
valuable information to anyone planning an attack on the estate and the
workings of government on it. Motivated individuals or groups planning
attacks are known to conduct extensive research into the vulnerabilities
and accessibility of their intended targets. If we disclosed the requested
information, this would reveal details that could be used alongside
knowledge of parliamentary security arrangements through a mosaic effect
to attack the palace with the aim of disrupting the proper workings of
Parliament. For these reasons it is our view that the public interest in
maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosing the
information.

Section 38(1) – Health & safety

The risk that the exempted information in the requested documents could be
used to plan and commit criminal offences on the estate also poses a real
and legitimate threat to the health and safety of all people working on
and visiting the parliamentary estate. The increased threat of terrorist
attacks, violent and property crime and harassment that would result from
disclosure of the requested information would be likely to endanger the
physical or mental health and safety of individuals within the
parliamentary estate. We have therefore concluded that the information
requested is exempt information as provided by section 38(1) (a) and (b)
FOIA.

The House has considered the public interest in disclosing this
information and recognises the value in transparency of information about
the structure, architecture and plans of the estate. Any details of the
structural integrity of Richmond House contained within the requested
information would be of legitimate public interest for the physical health
and safety for those in the estate which is well known to be undergoing a
programme of restoration and renewal to fix structural issues in the
architecture of the Palace. Further, the requested information could also
provide valuable details about evacuation options in the case of an
emergency.

However, we have considered the countervailing public interest that
Members, staff and visitors to the Palace should be protected from
targeted malicious attacks or harassment, during a visit or in their place
of work. Detailed architectural information of the Palace can be used by
criminal or terrorist groups in planning targeted attacks on the Palace to
cause the most harm. Disclosing this information would therefore place the
physical health and safety of all those within the Palace at increased
risk. Disclosing the areas of the Palace that accommodate Members and
staff would make it easy for fixated individuals to make contact with
Members and staff to attack or harass them. Further, providing detail
about where checks are made and how these checks are carried out would
increase the likelihood of criminal activity or an attack on Parliament.
In this event, the health and safety of anyone on the estate would be in
serious danger. Indeed, a successful attack enabled by the circumvention
of security measures in the deliveries process would present a risk to the
lives of many. In these circumstances it is our view that the public
interest in maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in
disclosing the information.

You may, if dissatisfied with the handling of your request, complain to
the House of Commons. Alternatively, if you are dissatisfied with the
outcome of your request you may ask the House of Commons to conduct an
internal review of any decision regarding your request.  Complaints or
requests for internal review should be addressed to: Information Rights
and Information Security Service, Research & Information Team, House of
Commons, London SW1A 0AA or [1][House of Commons request email].  Please
ensure that you specify the full reasons for your complaint or internal
review along with any arguments or points that you wish to make.

If you remain dissatisfied, you may appeal to the Information Commissioner
at Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AF,
[2]https://ico.org.uk/.

Yours sincerely,

IRIS Officer 
Informaiton Rights and Information Security (IRIS) | Research and
Information
House of Commons, Palace of Westminster, London SW1A 0AA 
[3]parliament.uk
[4]cid:image003.png@01D59008.077E6640

The House of Commons welcomes feedback. If you have any compliments,
complaints or comments,
about the service that you have received please send an email to [5][email
address]

From: Amelia Crowther <[FOI #704721 email]>
Sent: 09 November 2020 12:03
To: FOI Commons <[email address]>
Subject: Freedom of Information request - Event communication

Dear House of Commons,

I am writing to you under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 to request
copies of all correspondence in the form of emails, notes, meeting minutes
or other documents relating to the following events:

1) Event title: TMA Anti-Illicit Trade Survey 2019

• Date: 11th September 2019

• Sponsor: Craig Mackinlay MP

• On behalf of: Tobacco Manufacturers Associations

2) Event title: Mondelez Parliamentary Reception

• Date: 6th November 2019

• Sponsor: Bill Wiggin MP

• On behalf of: Weber Shandwick

I request that the information be provided electronically, to this email
address.

Many thanks for your time.

Yours faithfully,

Amelia Crowther

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Please use this email address for all replies to this request:

[6][FOI #704721 email]

Is [7][House of Commons request email] the wrong address for Freedom of
Information requests to House of Commons? If so, please contact us using
this form:

[8]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/change_re...

Disclaimer: This message and any reply that you make will be published on
the internet. Our privacy and copyright policies:

[9]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/help/offi...

For more detailed guidance on safely disclosing information, read the
latest advice from the ICO:

[10]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/help/ico-...

Please note that in some cases publication of requests and responses will
be delayed.

If you find this service useful as an FOI officer, please ask your web
manager to link to us from your organisation's FOI page.

show quoted sections

FOI Commons, House of Commons

51 Attachments

F20-595 (2 of 2)

IRIS Officer 
Informaiton Rights and Information Security (IRIS) | Research and
Information
House of Commons, Palace of Westminster, London SW1A 0AA 
[1]parliament.uk
[2]cid:image003.png@01D59008.077E6640

The House of Commons welcomes feedback. If you have any compliments,
complaints or comments,
about the service that you have received please send an email to [3][email
address]

From: FOI Commons
Sent: 08 December 2020 16:19
To: '[FOI #704721 email]' <[FOI #704721 email]>
Subject: F20-595 Response (1 of 2)

Dear Ms Crowther,

Freedom of Information Request F20-595

Thank you for your request for information as copied below. You have asked
the House of Commons for copies of all correspondence in the form of
emails, notes, meeting minutes or other documents relating to the
following events:

• TMA Anti-Illicit Trade Survey 2019

◦ 11th September 2019
◦ Sponsored by Craig Mackinlay MP
◦ Tobacco Manufacturers Associations

• Mondelez Parliamentary Reception

◦ 6th November 2019
◦ Sponsored by Bill Wiggin MP
◦ Weber Shandwick

This information is held by the House of Commons. Please find all
correspondence and attachments held by the House of Commons banqueting
service about the first of these events, regarding the “TMA Anti-Illicit
Trade Survey,” attached. Due to the amount of information held by the
House regarding these events, all correspondence “Mondelez Parliamentary
Reception” correspondence will be sent attached to a follow-up email. The
exemptions formally applied below refer to all correspondence for both
events.

The names of staff members working for the House of Commons have been
redacted from the requested information to prevent them from being
identified. This information is therefore exempt by virtue of section 40
(2) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA), as disclosure of this
information to the public generally, in the House’s view, would not be
consistent with data protection principles in Article 5 of the General
Data Protection Regulations. This is an absolute exemption and the public
interest test does not apply.

A small amount of information, consisting of maps of the parliamentary
estate and security arrangements relating to Parliament’s Off-Site
Consolidation Centre and access to the parliamentary estate, has been
redacted from the attached information as it is considered exempt under
s.24, s.31 & s.38 FOIA. These exemptions are limited and require a public
interest test to be performed. Please find the public interest tests for
each of these exemptions below:

S.31(1)(a) and (b) – Law enforcement

The information you have requested includes detailed security information,
plans and architectural information relating to the parliamentary estate.
This information could give crucial information on the layout, structure,
security arrangements and any potential weaknesses of building designs and
construction. The Houses of Parliament and their Members are known to be a
desired target for criminal and terrorist attacks and the requested
information could be invaluable to those attempting to plan or carry out
an attack on the estate. The House of Commons therefore considers the
information you have requested exempt from disclosure for the purposes of
law enforcement. Section 31(1)(a) and (b) permits the exemption of
information in instances where disclosure of this information would be
likely to prejudice the prevention and detection of crime. The public
interest test for this exemption is as follows;

The House recognises that there is a legitimate public interest in the
information you have requested given the importance of the work of
Parliament. As a high-profile landmark and a core part of central UK
governance, the Palace of Westminster is a natural focus of interest to
the public generally. Knowledge of the floor plans could give insight into
the effectiveness of security arrangements on the estate and the measures
taken by parliamentary security and law enforcement officials to maintain
adequate law enforcement on the parliamentary estate. The House recognises
that effective law enforcement is of great interest to Members and the
public given the legitimate public interest in the security of elected
representatives in Parliament. Further, this knowledge could be useful to
all those wishing to visit the parliamentary estate and all those in the
vicinity of the estate who wish to familiarise themselves with the layout
of the building.

However, these obligations and legitimate interests are outweighed by the
increased risk of criminal activity being undertaken if the information
was disclosed. The information you have requested could be invaluable to a
person wishing to circumvent or compromise parliamentary security
arrangements. In providing this detail, we would be publicising the
measures we have in place to prevent criminal activity being undertaken
against our property and the people on it. The location of where checks
are carried out to deliveries, how these checks are carried out and other
processes being employed would be valuable information to anyone with
malicious or criminal intent. This information would allow them to build
up a picture of how deliveries to the Estate are made and therefore the
means by which to attempt to circumvent those measures. By releasing
detailed maps of the estate and details of our security and access
arrangements, we could provide fixated individuals with highly useful
information for planning and committing criminal offences against Members,
staff or visitors, or the premises themselves. The information is likely
to be used alongside other information to assess the effectivity of
parliamentary security arrangements through a mosaic effect. In disclosing
this information, we would fail in our duty to prevent potential
vulnerabilities from being identified by individuals with malicious or
criminal intent against Members of either House, staff on the estate and
public guests and visitors to the estate, which in turn would fail in our
duty to assist those services providing us with law enforcement. This
places people and the building at risk of criminal victimisation. It is
our view that the greater public interest in maintaining the exemption
outweighs the lesser public interest in disclosing the information.

S.24(1) – National security

As the requested documents contain detailed plans of the layout of
Richmond House, this presents an obvious security risk if disclosed. The
work of Government Ministers on the parliamentary estate makes protecting
the fabric of the buildings, and those who work within them, a matter of
protecting national security. The House of Commons therefore considers the
information you have requested exempt from disclosure for the purpose of
safeguarding national security under section 24(1) FOIA. This provides an
exemption from disclosure where provision of the information would make
the UK, its system of government or its people more vulnerable to a
national security threat. The public interest test for this exemption is
as follows;

The House recognises the public interest in the security of the work of
government on the estate. We understand that there is a legitimate
interest in understanding the measures taken to secure the parliamentary
estate for elected Members of Parliament and to ensure the safe and
effective running of the UK government and Parliament itself.
Particularly, we acknowledge that there is an interest in knowing that the
high-profile Restoration & Renewal (R&R) programme will not negatively
impact the security of Members and, by extension, the work of government
on the estate. The requested information could be used to provide
assurance to the public generally of the work being done to ensure that
the security of the estate and all those working on it is maintained
during and after the completion of the R&R programme works.

However, the House also considers that an in-depth knowledge of the layout
and security measures of Richmond House would be invaluable information
for those wishing to carry out an attack on Parliament or otherwise pose a
threat to those Government Ministers working within it. The upcoming role
of Richmond House as the seat of the UK Parliament makes it a desirable
target for attack for those wishing to undermine the UK’s national
security. To uphold national security, it is incumbent upon the House to
ensure that terrorist groups, criminal factions or otherwise fixated
individuals are unable to circumvent security arrangements on the estate
using materials such as detailed floor plans of the estate. The
Information Commissioner’s Office guidance on this exemption states that
“It is not necessary to show that disclosing the information would lead to
a direct or immediate threat to the UK. In a time of global terrorism our
national security can depend on cooperating with others.” There is a
recognised increased threat against the safety of Members of the House of
Commons at this time. Further, the disclosure of this information would
publicise the measures we have in place to deter security threats to the
estate and the people on it, including Government Ministers and officials.
The location of where checks are carried out to deliveries, how these
checks are carried out and other processes being employed would be
valuable information to anyone planning an attack on the estate and the
workings of government on it. Motivated individuals or groups planning
attacks are known to conduct extensive research into the vulnerabilities
and accessibility of their intended targets. If we disclosed the requested
information, this would reveal details that could be used alongside
knowledge of parliamentary security arrangements through a mosaic effect
to attack the palace with the aim of disrupting the proper workings of
Parliament. For these reasons it is our view that the public interest in
maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosing the
information.

Section 38(1) – Health & safety

The risk that the exempted information in the requested documents could be
used to plan and commit criminal offences on the estate also poses a real
and legitimate threat to the health and safety of all people working on
and visiting the parliamentary estate. The increased threat of terrorist
attacks, violent and property crime and harassment that would result from
disclosure of the requested information would be likely to endanger the
physical or mental health and safety of individuals within the
parliamentary estate. We have therefore concluded that the information
requested is exempt information as provided by section 38(1) (a) and (b)
FOIA.

The House has considered the public interest in disclosing this
information and recognises the value in transparency of information about
the structure, architecture and plans of the estate. Any details of the
structural integrity of Richmond House contained within the requested
information would be of legitimate public interest for the physical health
and safety for those in the estate which is well known to be undergoing a
programme of restoration and renewal to fix structural issues in the
architecture of the Palace. Further, the requested information could also
provide valuable details about evacuation options in the case of an
emergency.

However, we have considered the countervailing public interest that
Members, staff and visitors to the Palace should be protected from
targeted malicious attacks or harassment, during a visit or in their place
of work. Detailed architectural information of the Palace can be used by
criminal or terrorist groups in planning targeted attacks on the Palace to
cause the most harm. Disclosing this information would therefore place the
physical health and safety of all those within the Palace at increased
risk. Disclosing the areas of the Palace that accommodate Members and
staff would make it easy for fixated individuals to make contact with
Members and staff to attack or harass them. Further, providing detail
about where checks are made and how these checks are carried out would
increase the likelihood of criminal activity or an attack on Parliament.
In this event, the health and safety of anyone on the estate would be in
serious danger. Indeed, a successful attack enabled by the circumvention
of security measures in the deliveries process would present a risk to the
lives of many. In these circumstances it is our view that the public
interest in maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in
disclosing the information.

You may, if dissatisfied with the handling of your request, complain to
the House of Commons. Alternatively, if you are dissatisfied with the
outcome of your request you may ask the House of Commons to conduct an
internal review of any decision regarding your request.  Complaints or
requests for internal review should be addressed to: Information Rights
and Information Security Service, Research & Information Team, House of
Commons, London SW1A 0AA or [4][House of Commons request email].  Please
ensure that you specify the full reasons for your complaint or internal
review along with any arguments or points that you wish to make.

If you remain dissatisfied, you may appeal to the Information Commissioner
at Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire SK9 5AF,
[5]https://ico.org.uk/.

Yours sincerely,

IRIS Officer 
Informaiton Rights and Information Security (IRIS) | Research and
Information
House of Commons, Palace of Westminster, London SW1A 0AA 
[6]parliament.uk
[7]cid:image003.png@01D59008.077E6640

The House of Commons welcomes feedback. If you have any compliments,
complaints or comments,
about the service that you have received please send an email to [8][email
address]

From: Amelia Crowther <[9][FOI #704721 email]>
Sent: 09 November 2020 12:03
To: FOI Commons <[10][email address]>
Subject: Freedom of Information request - Event communication

Dear House of Commons,

I am writing to you under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 to request
copies of all correspondence in the form of emails, notes, meeting minutes
or other documents relating to the following events:

1) Event title: TMA Anti-Illicit Trade Survey 2019

• Date: 11th September 2019

• Sponsor: Craig Mackinlay MP

• On behalf of: Tobacco Manufacturers Associations

2) Event title: Mondelez Parliamentary Reception

• Date: 6th November 2019

• Sponsor: Bill Wiggin MP

• On behalf of: Weber Shandwick

I request that the information be provided electronically, to this email
address.

Many thanks for your time.

Yours faithfully,

Amelia Crowther

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Please use this email address for all replies to this request:

[11][FOI #704721 email]

Is [12][House of Commons request email] the wrong address for Freedom of
Information requests to House of Commons? If so, please contact us using
this form:

[13]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/change_re...

Disclaimer: This message and any reply that you make will be published on
the internet. Our privacy and copyright policies:

[14]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/help/offi...

For more detailed guidance on safely disclosing information, read the
latest advice from the ICO:

[15]https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/help/ico-...

Please note that in some cases publication of requests and responses will
be delayed.

If you find this service useful as an FOI officer, please ask your web
manager to link to us from your organisation's FOI page.

show quoted sections