This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Equnior and SSE meetings with the Scottish Government 2022-23'.

RESTRICTED 
In response to item 1) 15/03/2022 Video conference with SSE, Michael 
Matheson MSP (Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport), 
Ministerial engagements travel and gifts 
 
CABINET SECRETARY FOR NET ZERO, ENERGY AND TRANSPORT
 
 
MEETING WITH SSE RENEWABLES  
TUESDAY 15th MARCH 2022 - 14:30 - 15:15 
 
Key 
You are meeting to discuss a collaborative approach to maximising local 
Message 
content in their projects. 
 
You will reiterate SG’s expectation SSE Renewables will work collaboratively to 
coordinate their use of key supply chain assets to minimise the risk of bottle 
necks in the pipeline, and to maximise their overall economic impact 
Who 
Paul Cooley - Director of Capital Projects - SSE Renewables 
Ronnie Bonnar - Chairman - Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult 
Tomoki Nishino - General Manager - Marubeni 
SSE Renewables is a renewable energy subsidiary of SSE plc, which develops 
and operates onshore and offshore wind farms and hydroelectric generation in 
the United Kingdom and Ireland 
What 
This is the first offshore wind leasing round in Scotland for a decade and is the 
first ever since the management of offshore wind rights were devolved to Crown 
Estate Scotland. 
 
The purpose of this meeting is for you to set the tone of Ministers’ expectations 
for these projects, both in terms of how they will interact with our statutory net 
zero commitments and our supply chain ambitions. 
Why 
This is a significant milestone in the expansion of offshore wind in Scotland and, 
moreover, this is the largest commercial floating offshore wind leasing round to 
date. SSE have secured one floating site in the east of Scotland  
Where 
Microsoft Teams  
 
When 
Tuesday 15th March 2022  
14:30 - 15:15
 
Supporting 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] Head of Offshore 
Officials 
Wind Policy & Supply Chain 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] Head of Onshore 
Electricity Policy 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] Supply Chain 
Team  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] Supply Chain 
Team 
 
Briefing 
 
Annex A:  
Agenda and Steering Brief for meeting  
 
Annex B:  Background for Agenda Item 2 (if required) 
 
Annex C:  Biographies 
 
Annex D:  Offshore Wind FMQ 
 
Annex E:  Green Free Ports FMQ 


RESTRICTED 
 
Annex F:  
Supply Chain Development Statement One Pager 
 
 
 

For Information 
For 
For 
Portf
Cons
General 
Copy List:  
Actio
Comm
olio 
tit 
Awaren

ents 
Inter
Inter
ess 
est 
est 
Minister for Business, Trade, Tourism & 
 
 
 
 
 
Enterprise  
 
 

 
 
 
 
Minister for Green Skills, Circular Economy 
 

and Biodiversity  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
Director of Marine Scotland 
 
DG Net Zero  
 
Kersti Berge, Director of Energy and Climate Change 
Andrew Hogg,  Deputy Director for Energy Industries 
Mike Palmer, Deputy Director, Marine Planning and Policy 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] Offshore Wind Policy and Supply Chain Unit 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] Offshore Wind Policy 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] Offshore Wind Policy and Supply Chain Unit 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] Offshore Wind Policy 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] Offshore Wind Policy and Supply Chain Unit 
Comms Net Zero and Rural Affairs 
John McFarlane SpAd 
Harry Huyton SpAd 
 
 


RESTRICTED 
MEETING WITH SSE RENEWABLES  
TUESDAY 15th MARCH 2022 - 14:30 - 15:15 
 

ANNEX A 
Agenda & Discussion Points  
 
1. Welcome & introductions 

•  You will provide a 5 minute speaking note, welcoming SSE Renewables 
setting out your expectations for these projects. 
 
Note – [Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
 
SSE Renewables – N/A  
 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
2. Introduction to the project, including key project milestones and supply 
chain commitments and ambitions 

•  SSE Renewables will present their plans for the project 
 
3. Discussion  
 

•  SSE Renewables may raise concerns with how National Grid ESO is taking 
forward the Holistic Network Design work in relation to ScotWind. 
 
 
4. Next steps 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



RESTRICTED 
Steering Brief 
 
Item 1: 
Welcome & introductions  
Key Message:  A few speaking points have been included in a separate annex to open 
this meeting.  
 
The aim of the discussion is to learn about SSE Renewables ScotWind 
project in the site E1. 
 
 

Item 2: 
Introduction to the project, including key project milestones 
and supply chain commitments and ambitions
 (Annex B) 
 
Key 
•  Are there any barriers or challenges that Ministers can help provide 
Messages: 
further  support  on  to  help  drive  forward  success  in  meeting  your 
supply chain commitments? 
•  Which Tier 1 Developers are you in conversation with? 
 
 
SSE Renewables has one ScotWind option that is in site E1. The project 
Discussion: 
is targeting floating platform.  
 
 
 
Background detail on the project is set out in Annex B 
 
 
 
 
 
Discussion  
Item 3: 
 
Key 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
Messages: 
information)]  
•  [Redacted  Regulation  10(5)(e)  –  (confidentiality  of  commercial 
information)] How are you going to use [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) 
–  (confidentiality  of  commercial  information)]  Are  you  committed  to 
utilising the fund in a way that would benefit other ScotWind projects, 
as well as this one?   
•  If  Raised:  National  Grid  ESO  have  been  working  to  account  for 
ScotWind  within  the  Holistic  Network  Design  work.  My  officials 
continue to engage with the ESO as this work moves forward.   
 
 
It would be useful to better understand any progress they have made in 
Discussion: 
their discussions with [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of 
commercial information)]  
 
 
Within their Supply Chain Development Statement the mentioned a 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)]. It would be beneficial if they were considering an approach 
to collaboration to benefit other ScotWind Projects.  
 
 
Background briefing on the project is set out in Annex B 
 
 
 



RESTRICTED 
Item 4: 
Next steps (Annex D) 
 
Key 
Following each of your bilateral discussions with developers, officials in 
Messages: 
Marine Scotland will seek to engage directly with the projects to outline 
the steps involved in consenting and licensing. SSE are set to meet 
Marine Scotland 15 March 2022 at 15:30 pm  
 
We are also keen that engagement on the supply chain with the 
developers continues to take place, so we will seek further discussion as 
the project develops and approaches various milestones.  
Discussion: 
•  Thank you for that outline today of your project, it was helpful to get 
into some of the detail of the development itself as well as the supply 
chain opportunities you are targeting. 
 
•  As I already mentioned earlier, I know Marine Scotland have been in 
touch you are meeting with them later today 15 March 2022 at 15:30 
pm to discuss the consenting process. 
 
•  My energy policy officials are also available and would be happy to 
continue to engage with you and your team as you approach various 
milestones for your development.  
 
 
 
 
 
 

  


RESTRICTED 
ANNEX B 
PROJECT OVERVIEW  
Project  
Site Location  
Site Location East 1  
Lead Developer  
Lead Developer SSE Renewables 
 
 
Indicative project timeline (please indicate the year quarter you are targeting)  
Scoping to be submitted for all phases, 
Scoping  
Q4 2022. 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
Planning/Consenting  
information)]  
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
CfD 
information)]  
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
FID 
information)]  
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
Commence Construction  
information)]  
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
Grid Connection  
information)]  
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
Commence operations  
information)]  
 
 
Supply chain  
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
information)] however we have active 
engagement with all Scottish ports and 
have recently undertaken a 4-week 
tour of facilities to increase 
engagement, understand current 
Preferred Port (manufacturing/fabrication)   capabilities and potential. 
Preferred Port (marshalling/installation) 
As above. 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
Preferred Port (O&M)  
information)]  
Floating – steel is currently anticipated; 
Foundation (fixed/floating - concrete or 
however, this will be confirmed 
steel) 
following further technical studies. 
This will be confirmed at a later stage, 
but we have already engaged with 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
Tier 1s 
information)] 





RESTRICTED 
This will be confirmed at a later stage, 
but we have active relations with all of 
Turbine supplier 
the major wind turbine suppliers. 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – 
(confidentiality of commercial 
MOUs with suppliers to date 
information)]  
The Project Partners will establish a 
supply chain fund to support the 
delivery of the SCDS, to underpin local 
Details of any supply chain pre-
orders and investments in the Scottish 
investment  
supply chain. 
 
ANNEX C – BIOGRAPHIES 
 
Paul Cooley - Director of Capital Projects - SSE Renewables 
 
Ronnie Bonnar - Chairman - Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult 
 
Tomoki Nishino - President & CEO - Marubeni 
 
 
 
Lead Applicant  Project Partners 
Location 
Technology 
Total 
Capacity 

SSE 
•  Marubeni 
E1 
Floating 
2610MW 
Corporation  
•  Copenhagen 
Infrastructure 
 
 


RESTRICTED 
 
 
ANNEX D 
OFFSHORE WIND 
 
  •  In the PfG, we committed to making offshore wind central to our delivery of net 
 
zero targets through further ScotWind offshore wind leasing rounds over this 
 
Parliament. 
  •  The results of ScotWind, the seabed leasing process for offshore wind, managed by 
 
Crown Estate Scotland (CES) was announced on Monday 17 January 2022.   
  •  This announcement outlined the winners of the competitive bidding process over 
 
areas of seabed where the next offshore wind projects will be located. This is the first 
 
devolved leasing round for offshore wind development in Scottish Waters and the first 
 
leasing round in Scotland in a decade. 
  •  The new offshore wind plan for Innovation and Targeted Oil and Gas Decarbonisation 
 
(INTOG)  process  was  announced  by  Crown  Estate  Scotland  on  22  February  2022.  
 
Developers will apply for the rights to build small scale innovative offshore wind projects 
 
of less than 100MW as well as larger projects connected to oil and gas infrastructure to 
 
provide electricity and reduce the carbon emissions associated with those sites.  
 
 
 
Top lines   
 
OFFSHORE WIND
 
•  Our Offshore Wind Policy Statement sets out the Scottish Government’s 
ambitions for offshore wind in Scotland, including an ambition to achieve 8-11 
GW of offshore wind in Scotland by 2030. This recognises that deployment 
must increase significantly if we are to meet our climate change targets. 
•  Scottish Ministers have made clear, time and again, that they will use every 
lever at their disposal to maximise economic returns for the offshore wind 
sector here in Scotland. 
 
SCOTWIND 

•  Scotland’s seas offer great opportunities for the sustainable development of 
offshore wind and are an important part of the green recovery and transition to 
net zero.  
•  The  level  of  ambition  shown  by  the  market  recognises  the  seriousness  of 
Scotland’s commitment to achieving our net zero targets and economic growth. 
I welcome the commitment made by developers to invest at least £1bn per GW 
in the Scottish Supply chain via ScotWind projects. 
•  ScotWind is the world’s largest commercial round for floating offshore wind and 
puts  Scotland  at  the  forefront  of  offshore  wind  development  globally.  We 
already have the world’s largest operating commercial floating wind farm and 
ScotWind  now  breaks  new  ground  in  putting  large-scale  floating  wind 
technology on the map at GW scale, offering Scotland a first-mover advantage. 
•  ScotWind will deliver c £700m in return for these initial awards alone which we 
will use to benefit the people of Scotland, particularly by helping to tackle the 
climate and biodiversity crises and deliver a low carbon society.  


RESTRICTED 
•  In addition, ScotWind will deliver several billion pounds more in public benefit 
via the investment of rental revenues once all the projects become operational.  
•  The  announcement  of  these  awards  heralds  aadn  exciting  era  of  economic 
development  underpinned  by  balanced  and  effective  regulation  at  a  scale 
seldom seen before in Scotland’s history.  
•  The projects given the green light by CES today would, if approved, deliver far 
in excess of our current planning assumption of 10GW of offshore wind. The 
planning, consenting and funding processes that lie ahead - together with the 
need to fully consider the views of stakeholders about impact - means that it is 
not possible to know now exactly what scale of development will be permitted 
ultimately.  
•  ScotWind also promises to be transformational in  delivering wider economic 
supply chain benefits to help power Scotland’s green recovery the length and 
breadth of the country. 
•  Each  application  was  required  to  include  a  Supply  Chain  Development 
Statement setting out its supply chain goals and committing developers to meet 
those goals through the various stages of their projects. This provides us with 
an excellent tool to ensure that, working with the sector, Scottish communities 
reap the maximum possible economic benefits from ScotWind projects. 
 
We welcome the public commitment made by the winning bidders to invest at 
least £1bn per gigawatt of capacity in the Scottish economy. 
 
•  This this investment will be transformational in delivering the wider supply chain 
benefits to help power Scotland’s green recovery the length and breadth of the 
country. 
•  The  scale  and  ambition  of  ScotWind  projects  will  create  a  large  volume  of 
sustained demand that will mark a step change in developing Scotland’s supply 
chain and capability in manufacturing.  
•  We  are  determined  to  realise  the  significant  opportunities  for  Scottish 
businesses. Collaboration will be key and we will be working closely with the 
successful  projects  and  wider  supply  chain  to  maximise  the  benefits  for  the 
people of Scotland from the use of our significant offshore wind resources.  
•  We will also work closely with the Scottish Offshore Wind Energy Council to 
implement  the  recommendations  in  the  Strategic  Investment  Assessment 
starting with a Collaborative Framework to bring together industry, the supply 
chain  and  the  public  sector  to  build  Scotland’s  offshore  wind  manufacturing 
capabilities and get Scottish businesses ready to win offshore work.  
•  Recent successes in the offshore wind supply chain such as the new wind tower 
manufacturing facility at  the Port of  Nigg show the opportunity resulting from 
the energy transition and the substantial potential to deliver high value green 
jobs and generate sustainable economic growth.  
 
We remain fully committed to using every lever within our devolved 
competence to support and grow the offshore wind supply chain here in 
Scotland. 

•  Applicants to the ScotWind leasing round were required to include a Supply 
Chain  Development  Statement  setting  out  its  supply  chain  goals  and 
committing  developers  to  meet  those  goals  throughout  the  lifetime  of  their 
projects. 


RESTRICTED 
•  Failure  to  deliver  the  commitments  laid  out  in  the  final  SCDS  can  trigger 
remedies ranging from financial penalties to an inability to progress to seabed 
lease.  
•  The introduction of Supply Chain Development Statements demonstrates how 
serious the Scottish Government is about holding developers to account if they 
do not honour their supply chain commitments.  
•  We fully expect developers and Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to 
be engaging with the domestic supply chain from the outset to ensure that those 
commitments come to fruition.  
•  We  have  also  been  calling  for,  and  welcome,  the  additional  conditionality 
required by the UK Government for supply chain commitments in Contracts for 
Difference (CfD) rounds.  
 
We are determined to maximise the economic opportunity for the Scottish 
supply chain from our offshore wind potential. 

•  Scotland has a great legacy of offshore engineering skills and ScotWind will be 
an opportunity to build on that legacy for a clean energy future,  including the 
potential  to  diversify  our  existing  industries  and  generate  thousands  of  new 
jobs. 
•  We  will  drive  forward  offshore  wind  skills  development  –  working  with 
stakeholders to focus on the opportunities for diversification and skills transfer 
from our oil and gas sector, in line with our commitment to a Just Transition.  
•  We will also continue to make every effort to ensure that our indigenous supply 
chain can maximise the benefit from developing Scotland’s significant offshore 
wind potential and the opportunities for innovation that will unlock this. 
 
 
INNOVATION AND TARGETED OIL AND GAS DECARBONISATION 
•  By replacing traditional energy sources with offshore wind generation these 
plans will support the decarbonisation of oil and gas infrastructure, facilitate 
decommissioning and grow our offshore wind sector. 
•  We will be engaging with communities, environmental interests and marine 
industries as we develop these plans so we can ensure they support and 
accelerate a rapid transition for the oil and gas industry. 
 
We are determined to maximise the economic opportunity for the Scottish 
supply chain from our offshore wind potential. 

•  We will drive forward offshore wind skills development – working with 
stakeholders to focus on the opportunities for diversification and skills transfer 
from our oil and gas sector, in line with our commitment to a Just Transition.  
•  We will also continue to make every effort to ensure that our indigenous 
supply chain can maximise the benefit from developing Scotland’s significant 
offshore wind potential and the opportunities for innovation that will unlock 
this. 
 
We remain fully committed to using every lever within our devolved 
competence to support and grow the offshore wind supply chain here in 
Scotland. 

10 

RESTRICTED 
•  Applicants to ScotWind leasing Rounds  are required to submit a Supply 
Chain Development Statement that sets out the level and location of supply 
chain impact throughout the lifetime of projects. 
•  We believe that these Supply Chain Development Statements signify how 
seriously the Scottish Government takes this issue and, more importantly, will 
provide certainty of a pipeline of projects to suppliers across Scotland. 
 
We know that transmission charging remains a barrier, and a particular 
disadvantage, for projects located in Scotland or Scottish waters. 

•  Scottish generators clearly face higher transmission network costs as a result 
of their location and distance from main GB demand centres. 
•  The Scottish Government has long argued that Ofgem needs to be given an 
explicit remit to help achieve net zero – something that the UK Government 
has finally acknowledged in its recent Energy White Paper. 
 
It is vital that National Grid ESO continues to work to take account of 
ScotWind and engage fully with stakeholders as the Holistic Network Design 
process moves forward.  
 

•  We understand that the HND will account for 17 GW of offshore wind, 10.7 of 
that being ScotWind projects.  
•  We have been clear with National Gird ESO that developers not accounted for 
in the first HND need to be given certainty on their position as soon as 
possible.  
 
 
11 

RESTRICTED 
ANNEX E 
Green Freeports FMQ 
20 Feb: 
The National reported an opinion piece stating the Scottish Greens would have 
nothing to do’ with Freeport plans. The piece criticised the plans stating it would lead to 
the transfer of jobs into a new area, rather than creating new ones. 
16 Feb: 
The Herald reports Alba deputy leader, Kenny MacAskill, has told the SNP and 
Greens to ‘stop squabbling’ over the UKG’s Freeport proposals and focus on taking 
leadership of a strategy. He is quoted as saying SG leadership could open the door for 
new freight and passenger routes from Scottish ports, ending reliance on Scottish goods 
needing to be sent to Heathrow and Dover to be shipped overseas. 
16 Feb: 
P&J article reports that 9 SNP trade union group activists have hit out at plans to 
build two freeports in Scotland after Kate Forbes confirmed the £52 million agreement. 
The party’s TUG union has joined the Scottish Greens in speaking out against the 
controversial deal which they will be raising at the SNP’S National Executive Committee. 
15 Feb: The Herald reports SNP activists have challenged the party’s leadership over 
plans for two green freeports ‘under Boris Johnson’s levelling up agenda.’ The article 
states the SNP Trade Union Group said the decision to work with the UKG risked 
undermining devolution’ and ‘opening a lawless’ backdoor into the Scottish economy’ 
and passed a motion of concern over the plans at the SNP union conference. The article 
details how the Scottish Greens have also attacked their SNP partners over the plans 
and criticised them for ‘working with the Tories’
14 Feb: BBC News reports the UK and Scottish Governments have agreed to establish 
two green freeports in Scotland. Article states Scottish Greens criticised the plans as 
greenwashing’ and described it as a ‘corporate giveaway’, signifying the first major split 
from the SNP since their power-sharing deal began last year. It details how the UKG and 
SG were unable to agree plans to establish the freeports but Scottish Ministers have now 
agreed a joint approach. 
   
Top Lines 
•  We have negotiated hard to ensure that establishment of two Green Freeports in 
Scotland  will  create new,  well-paid  jobs,  deliver  a  just  transition to  net  zero  and 
support economic transformation based on fairness. 
•  Reflecting our net zero ambitions, we adapted the UK’s Freeport model to meet 
the needs of the Scottish economy.  
•  Applicants will need to show both governments, as equal partners, how they will 
contribute  towards  reaching  net-zero  by  2045,  through  submitting  robust 
decarbonisation plans. 
•  All details will be set out in a finalised joint applicant prospectus to be published 
next month – with winning bids announced over the summer.  
•  Once operational, the Scottish Government will be monitoring the performance of 
green freeports very carefully to ensure that the highest standards in practice are 
pursued and maintained.      
 
Fair work and net zero are central tenets of Scotland’s future economy.  
•  Green freeports will aim create internationally competitive clusters of excellence in 
new green technologies and industries, bring major benefits to Scottish businesses 
and our wider economy.  
12 

RESTRICTED 
•  We  have  always  been  clear  that  any  adapted  freeports  model  implemented  in 
Scotland must make a strong contribution to a green and fair recovery, including a 
firm commitment to creating new fair work opportunities and net-zero principles. 
•  The Scottish Government’s Fair Work First approach which features payment of 
the real living wage, will be clearly referenced in the joint bidding prospectus.  
•  Applicants seeking to be designated as a green freeport in Scotland will of course 
know about the centrality of Fair Work First in the Scottish policy context and seek 
to reflect that in developing their bids. 
 
PREVIOUS TALKS 
After productive dialogue with HM Treasury, we were ready to launch a joint 
applicant prospectus for green ports in March 2021– but continued delay from 
Westminster has put our ports at a disadvantage.
 
•  With  clear  industry  support  for our own  green port  proposal,  we  had  hoped  we 
could work together to find a fair and sustainable way forward.  
•  We were clear that it was crucial Scotland received a fair funding allocation to help 
establish green ports – up to £25m per green port – the same as that available to 
freeports in England.  
•  The  Secretary  of  State  for  Scotland  indicated  in  September  that  the  UK 
Government would not: promise fair funding for green ports in Scotland compared 
to  that  on  offer  to  freeports  in  England;  give  assurances  about  equal  decision-
making; nor accept our proposals for higher labour or environmental standards in 
their model. 
•  So while we wanted to work with the UK Government, we could not sign up to a 
UK freeport policy that didn’t include fair funding; an equal say on decision making; 
or  a  strong  commitment  to  fair  work and  net  zero.  The  new  agreement  reached 
does  provide  fair  funding;  equal  voice  for  both  governments;  and  clarity  for 
applicants on how their commitment to net zero and fair work will be scrutinised by 
the Scottish Government. 
 
 
 
 
13 

RESTRICTED 
ANNEX E 
 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)]  
 
 
14 

RESTRICTED 
 
 
In response to item 2) 16/03/2022 Video conference with SSE, John McFarlane 
(Special Adviser), Lobbying Register 
 

•  Regulation 10(4)(a) – (Information not held) 
 
 

 
15 

RESTRICTED 
 
In response to item 3) 18/03/2022 Inveralmond House, Perth, meeting with SSE, 
John Swinney MSP (Cabinet Secretary for Finance and the Economy Cabinet 
Secretary for Covid Recovery Deputy First Minister), Lobbying Register 
 

•  Regulation 10(4)(a) – (Information not held) 
 
 
 
 

 
16 

RESTRICTED 
 
 
In response to item 5) 03/05/2022 Video conference with SSE, Nicola Sturgeon 
MSP (First Minister), Ministerial engagements travel and gifts 
 
BRIEFING FOR THE FIRST MINISTER 
 
MEETING WITH ALISTAIR PHILLIPS-DAVIES, CEO, SSE  
 
3 May 2022 
 
Key message  •  The  ScotWind  announcement  is  a  tremendous  vote  of 
confidence  in  Scotland.  The  level  of  ambition  shown  by  the 
market recognises the seriousness of Scotland’s commitment to 
achieving net zero targets along with economic growth. 
•  We  welcome  the  commitment  made  by  developers  to  invest 
£1bn per GW in the Scottish Supply chain via ScotWind projects. 
ScotWind  is  the  springboard  for  realising  these  goals  but 
anchor  projects  such  as  Berwick  are  also  critical  to  pre-
ScotWind supply chain development.   
•  We’re keen to continue to build on our previous engagement 
and take forward actions to realise this significant supply chain 
opportunity.  
What 
A meeting with Alistair Phillips-Davies, CEO of SSE. 
 
SSE’s 4.1GW Berwick Bank site, will act as a catalyst for investment 
in Scotland of potentially a blade facility in [Redacted Regulation 
10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Why 
We are actively seeking opportunities to both capture ‘first mover’ 
advantage from ScotWind and set out our attractiveness to 
supply chain companies which in turn will add significant 
economic value to the Scottish supply chain.  
 
Who 
Alistair Phillips-Davies, CEO, SSE 
Stephen Wheeler, Managing Director, SSE 
Alexandra Malone, Director of Corporate Affairs Office 
 
Where 
Teams meeting: 
 
When 
12.15-12.45 
Supporting 
Andy Hogg, Deputy Director, Energy Industries,  
official 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Head of Offshore Renewable Energy & Supply Chain  [ 
17 

RESTRICTED 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
 
Attached 
Annex A: Agenda, Summary  
documents 
Annex B: Background Note - Offshore Wind & CfD AR4 
Annex C: 
Background Note - Berwick Bank  
Annex D: 
Biographies 
Annex E:
  Letter from Alistair Phillips-Davies dated 29th March 
2022 
 
18 

RESTRICTED 
Annex A 
Agenda  
 

•  Introductions  
•  Current Status Update from SSE on Berwick Bank, including: 
-  Timescales 
-  Issues 
Discussions with [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
•  Update on the proposed Offshore Wind Tower Facility at Nigg 
•  Next steps / Actions  
 
 
Aims for the Discussion 
 

•  Establish  if  it  is  still  SSE’s  intention  to  submit  Berwick  Bank’s  planning 
application in July 2022 or due to proposed changes possibly September 2022.   
Establish when SSE will [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
 
•  Are SSE willing to give an indication of who is currently favoured.  
Encourage both [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  and  [Redacted  Regulation  10(5)(e)  –  (confidentiality  of  commercial 
information)] 
•  to  continue  to  work  with  Scottish  Government  officials  and  our  enterprise 
agencies to provide the detailed information we need to enable us to construct 
a support offer package.  
•  Encourage SSE to continue to have an active dialogue with Marine Scotland in 
advance of submitting their planning application. 
 
Summary
  
 
Following publication of SSE Renewables’ Requests for Information on economic 
benefits to support their 4.1 GW Berwick Bank offshore wind farm [Redacted 
Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  At this stage, they are still developing their technical options and thinking but 
have given an indication that such a facility may bring 750-1000 direct jobs and 
a further 1,500 indirect jobs for the wider supply chain.  
Following your recent meetings with [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality 
of commercial information)] 
•  Scottish  Government  and  enterprise  agency  officials  continues  on  their 
proposals with on what public sector support may be available. 
19 

RESTRICTED 
•  SSE have indicated that they will submit their planning application to Marine 
Scotland in July 2022 but this may slip to September.  SSE have indicated they 
hope to receive a determination 9 months thereafter. 
 
Berwick Bank Consent 
 

•  MS-LOT have stated that the potential risks identified through “scoping” will 
probably have implications for the determination timeline.  Further information 
is can be found at Annex C 
•  UKG will announce on the Energy Security paper in April, including reportedly 
increased ambitions for renewables deployment.  Currently Marine Scotland are 
reviewing  how  this  might  improve  our  ability  to  accelerate  our  consenting 
processes. 
 
Offshore Wind Tower Facility, Nigg 
 

•  Nigg Offshore Wind (NOW) has been brought forward by Global Energy Group 
(GEG), a Scottish headquartered energy services company, along with Bilbao 
based,  offshore  wind  tower  manufacturing  specialist,  [Redacted  Regulation 
10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)], to build a state-of-the-
art offshore wind tubular rolling facility at Port of Nigg. NOW will be a 450-
meter-long, 38,000 m2 factory, capable of rolling steel plate to supply towers 
which will weight in excess of 1,000 tonnes each and other products, to the UK 
offshore fixed and floating wind industry in the UK and abroad.  
•  This  facility  will  be  the  first  to  be  built  in  the  UK  to  this  specification  and  is 
inclusive of rolling machinery robotics and a new blast and paint shop at a cost 
of [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e)  – (confidentiality of commercial information)] The 
new  factory  is  an  enabler  to  firmly  establish  the  Port  of  Nigg  as  a  strategic 
offshore  wind  hub  which  includes  the  consolidation  of  the  Port’s  existing 
marshalling  and  staging  work  for  turbine  components  and  foundations  (the 
marshalling and staging work already employs over 120+ people). 
•  The  expectation  for  the  factory  at  Nigg  was  that  their  initial  output  once 
operational would be to provide 81 towers for the Dogger Bank Offshore Wind 
Farm. The developer for the project is SSE with GE Renewables appointed as 
Tier 1 tower supplier. In turn, HWG have a contract to provide towers with the 
agreement  that  81  of  these  come  from  Nigg  instead  of  the  [Redacted 
Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)]  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
Green Freeports 
 
Lines to take: 
 
20 

RESTRICTED 
•  The Green Freeport prospectus was published on Friday (25th March), so I hope 
the  information  contained  with  that  document  along  with  your  meeting  of 
officials leading on the topic last week (also on Friday 25th March) addressed 
your questions.  I can arrange for them to meet with you again if you would like 
to discuss the matter further.  In addition I will ensure the Minister for Business, 
Trade,  Tourism  &  Enterprise  who  is  leading  on  this  work  is  aware  of  the 
opportunity. 
 
Background 
 
•  Joint SG/UKG applicant prospectus was published on 25 March 2022  
•  Window for questions/clarifications for bidders up to 29 April 2022 
•  Bids to be invited by 20 June 2022,  
•  Applications will be assessed jointly by SG and UKG against four key objectives  
▪  Regeneration and job creation 
▪  Net zero/decarbonisation 
▪  Increasing trade and investment 
▪  Promoting innovation  
•  Bids must score a High on regeneration and job creation and at least a Medium 
on net zero to be shortlisted 
•  SG and UK Ministers will decide jointly on two winners, scheduled for late July 
2022 
•  All  bidders  will  be  asked  to  set  out  strategies  to  embed  fair  work  practices, 
referencing  Fair  Work  First.  SG  has  made  clear  that  it  will  only  support  bids 
which show a clear commitment to Fair Work, including payment of the Real 
Living Wage  
Officials were due to brief [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of 
commercial information)] on 25 March 2022 
 
21 

RESTRICTED 
Annex B 
How the Offshore Wind Market Operates  
 
The project developer will typically procure the design, supply and installation of 
turbines from the turbine OEM and one or more Tier 1 equipment and installation 
contractors. In other cases, some developers choose to multi-contract, using in-
house or contracted-in expertise to manage up to 100 direct contracts.  
 
Contracts for manufacture and construction are often signed two years before 
construction although in some cases, large supply contracts are sourced earlier via 
strategic framework agreements sometimes making it difficult for new entrants to 
get an opportunity.  
 
Tier 1 – Prime contractors - This top level of the supply chain typically supply 
Turbines, blades, towers, gearboxes, wind turbine generators (WTGs), control 
systems, transformers, foundations, substations (offshore and onshore) and Export 
and Array Cables.  
 
Tier 2 – Principal suppliers  - Typically supply the components for projects such as 
machine parts, flanges, fixings, bearings, castings, forgings and rolled steel.  
 
Tier 3 – Specialist suppliers - 
Typically provides smaller components, technologies 
and products to Tier 1 suppliers.  
 
Operations and maintenance 
The operations and maintenance of offshore wind farms offers an opportunity for 
both high-value employment, and the domestic supply chain. This includes offshore 
installation and maintenance vessels, equipment and facilities.  
 
To secure the long-term strategic benefits to Scotland – that is, a high volume of 
highly skilled jobs – a focus on not just growing but also supporting the 
development of a sustainable local supply chain is required.  
 
The scale of offshore wind project deployment expected in Scotland (and RUK) is 
sufficiently large that it could attract specialist facilities from Tier 1 contractors, like 
those being sought by Vestas in Scotland, and these are more likely than not to be 
taken up by existing players in markets for towers, cabling etc.  
 
As we have seen recently with offshore wind related projects in Scotland, the 
underlying viability and commerciality of projects is heavily impacted by onward 
contract options. This is in part a result of the Contract for Difference (CfD) process – 
operated by UKG. The bidding rounds for a CfD is expected to be announced in June 
2022.  
22 

RESTRICTED 
 
It is not known which bids will succeed which in turns means that those developers 
who are bidding, cannot commit to contracts with Tier One of the supply and they 
then too cannot commit to those in the lower tiers. All of this means that without 
firm line of sight on a project pipeline, the supply chain are reluctant to take on the 
significant financial and legal risks of committing to development of say a 
manufacturing facility for offshore wind components. 
Annex C 
Berwick Bank Offshore Wind Farm  
 
Berwick Bank is currently scoped at 4.1GW and we are pleased to see the ambition to 
build what could be largest offshore wind farm in the world, here in Scottish waters. 
 
Consenting Timelines 
 
The table below provides anticipated timelines for an application from the Company 
which fully follows the scoping opinion, and compares this with potential timelines 
taking into account the risks identified below.  
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Potential risks to determination timeline 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
Mitigation of Risk 
 
 
Officials continue to engage with the Company following the issue of the scoping 
opinion to provide further clarity and guidance. Officials met with senior 
management from the Company on 02 March 2022 to highlight potential consenting 
risk and encourage the Company to consider their consenting strategy in light of the 
scoping opinion as well as concerns raised by stakeholders. The recent 
announcement by UKG that Contracts for Difference rounds will now take place on 
an annual basis may help the Company to manage its timelines for securing a 
consent in a way which aligns with the requirements of the scoping opinion. 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Officials continue to encourage and facilitate engagement between the fishing sector 
and the Company. 
 
 
 
23 




RESTRICTED 
Annex D 
Biographies  
 
Alistair Phillips-Davies, Chief Executive, SSE 
Alistair joined SSE in 1997, and possesses a detailed 
knowledge of the operations of each business area 
having held a number of senior roles throughout the 
Company. 
 
Prior to joining the Board in 2002 as Energy Supply 
Director,  Alistair  was  Director  of  Corporate  Finance 
 
and  Business  Development.  In  2010,  he  became 
Generation and Supply Director, before Deputy Chief 
Executive in 2012, then Chief Executive in 2013. 
Stephen Wheeler, Managing Director, SSE 
He was previously Managing Director of SSE Ireland, 
and  prior  to  this,  General  Manager  (Ireland)  of  SSE 
Renewables.  He  was  part  of  the  successful 
management team that grew the Airtricity renewable 
energy  platform  before  SSE  acquired  it  in  2008. 
Before  joining  Airtricity,  he  spent  over  10  years 
working  with  ABB  and  Siemens  internationally, 
 
specialising in the development and construction of 
generation assets. Stephen is a graduate of Electrical 
Engineering  at  University  College  Dublin,  with  an 
MBA  from  the  UCD  Michael  Smurfit  Graduate 
Business School, and a past Chairman of Wind Energy 
Ireland (WEI). 
Alexandra Malone, Director of Corporate Affairs 

Alexandra Malone is Director of Corporate Affairs for 
SSE  Renewables.  She  has  responsibility  for  policy 
development,  stakeholder  engagement,  community 
and  government  relations,  communications  and 
brand across all the jurisdictions in which the business 
operates. Previously she held several senior positions 
 
in  Corporate  Affairs  and  worked  in  SSE’s  Energy 
Portfolio Management business.  Prior to joining SSE 
in  2012,  Alexandra  worked  for  the  Government  of 
Canada focussing on energy and climate policy. She 
holds a BSc from McGill University and a Master’s in 
Resource Management from Dalhousie University. 
 
 

24 

RESTRICTED 
In response to item 9) 09/06/2022 Meeting with SSE at SSE Perth HQ, Michael 
Matheson MSP (Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport), Lobbying 
Register 
 
What 
The Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport has been invited to 
visit SSE Perth HQ 
 
Where 
SSE HQ, Inveralmond House, 200 Dunkeld Road, Perth, PH1 3AQ  
 
When 
Thursday -  9 June 2022 09:00 -10:15 
 
Key 
•  We continue to believe that the significant growth in renewables, storage, 
Message(s) 
hydrogen and carbon capture provides the best pathway to net zero by 2045, 
and will deliver the decarbonisation we need to see across industry, heat and 
transport. 
•  The Scottish Government has led the way in supporting world-leading 
hydrogen demonstration projects and has committed to investing £100 
million in the hydrogen sector in Scotland from 2021 - 2026 to achieve our 
hydrogen production ambition of 5GW of renewable and low-carbon 
hydrogen by 2030 and 25GW by 2045. 
•  This  year’s  Programme  for  Government  references  the  opportunity  from 
ScotWind – it will raise just under £700 million in revenue for Scotland and will 
bring  billions  of  pounds  of  investment  into  the  Scottish  supply  chain  and 
economy. 
•  Our focus for ScotWind now switches to supply chain opportunities, and 
to the consenting regime - ensuring that this works as effectively as possible 
as  we  process  applications  from  developers  and  determine  what  can  be 
consented in light of environmental and other impacts. 
 
Why 
 
Following Mr Matheson’s recent visit to Sloy Hydro Power Station, there were 
discussions regarding a potential visit in early June.  The Cabinet Secretary has 
been invited to visit SSE HQ in Perth where he will be given a brief presentation 
on SSE investment plans and updated on key projects including Berwick Bank.   
This will be followed by an office tour, including the new office space, 
Renewable Operations Centres (Hydro and Wind), and Network Control Room.   
 
Speech 
N/A 
details 
Greeting 

Jamie Maxton, Head of External Relations,  SSE will meet Mr Matheson, on 
Party 
arrival [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
 
Supporting  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
official  
 Whole Systems and Technical Policy Unit  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – 
(personal data of a third party)] 
 
25 

RESTRICTED 
Briefing 
Briefing is included as follows: 
Page Numbers 
contents 
Annex A: Bios and Programme  
2-3 
Annex B: Offshore Wind Top Lines 

Annex C: Onshore Wind Top Lines 

Annex D: Hydrogen Top Lines 

Annex E: Energy Top Lines 
7-9 
Annex F: Background Berwick Bank and Nigg 
10-11 
Annex G: Sensitivities relating to Russia 
12 
  
 
 
 
26 



RESTRICTED 
Annex A 
 
Bios and Programme 
 
Gregor Alexander, Finance Director 
 
Gregor is a Chartered Accountant. He joined SSE in 1990 and since 
this time has worked in various finance roles within the Company, 
including Treasury and Tax, prior to joining the Board as Finance 
Director in 2002. 
During his career Gregor has been instrumental in a number of the 
major transactions and investments which define the Group. His 
extensive and long-standing knowledge of financial markets and 
experience of shareholder views, has supported the development of 
SSE's financial strategy, and purpose to create value for 
shareholders and society. 
 
 
Stephen Wheeler, Managing Director, SSE Renewables 
 
Stephen Wheeler is Managing Director of SSE Renewables, part of 
the FTSE-listed SSE plc, leading the transition to a net zero future in 
the UK, Ire and internationally through the world-class development, 
construction, financing and operation of renewable energy assets.  
Stephen is also Country Lead for SSE plc in Ireland, which includes 
the country’s second largest energy supplier, SSE Airtricity. 
 
Previously Managing Director of SSE Thermal where he was focused 
on decarbonising SSE’s flexible generation, energy-from-waste and 
energy storage portfolio. Prior to this, Stephen was Managing Director of SSE Ireland, 
responsible for SSE plc’s overall strategy, commercial performance, operations and 
business development in Ireland and Northern Ireland across renewables, thermal and retail. 
Before joining SSE, he played a central role in the development and growth of Airtricity 
(2004 to 2008) and was part of the team that completed the sale of its European business to 
SSE in 2008 for c€1.1bn. 
 
Prior to Airtricity, he spent over 10 years working with ABB and Siemens internationally, 
specialising in the development and construction of thermal generation assets. A graduate of 
Electrical Engineering at University College Dublin, with an MBA from the UCD Michael 
Smurfit Graduate Business School, and a past Chairman of the Irish Wind Energy 
Association (IWEA). 
 
Clair Dunk, Facilities Manager 
 
Clair has worked for SSE now for 15 years.  Her current post is Perth Campus Facilities 
Manager as part of the wider Property & FM Team looking after the main non-operational 
sites throughout the UK & Ireland.  She has a team of 7, and principally we look after the 
safety, statutory compliance and maintenance and upgrade of the property and site.  
 
Her team also provides day to day support and service to the Executive and Group Services 
Teams, as well as the main SSE Business Units based here, including Networks 
(Distribution and Transmission), Renewables (Wind & Hydro), Thermal Development and 
27 

RESTRICTED 
Energy Portfolio Management.  The main operational control rooms are located on the site, 
and these run 24/7, 365 days of the year, and are critical to the key businesses operations. 
 
 
Programme 
 
Time:  
09.00am – 10.15am 
 
Location:  
SSE HQ, Inveralmond House, 200 Dunkeld Road, Perth, PH1 3AQ  
 
Itinerary: 
•  09.00am – Arrive at reception Jamie Maxton will meet Mr Matheson on arrival 
 
•  09.05am – 09.30am – Brief presentation in Link Building Boardroom to 
discuss SSE investment plans and update on key projects, including Berwick 
Bank 
 

•  09.30am – 10.10am – Office tour led by Clair Dunk, Facilities Manager, 
covering new office space, Renewable Operations Centres (hydro & wind) 
and Network Control Room.  
 

•  10.15am – Depart. 
 
Further visit information: 
•  Please reverse park on arrival.  
•  Tea and coffee will be served during the meeting in the boardroom. 
•  No PPE is required for this visit. 
•  Due to its operational status, and in common with all our staff, we ask that 
guests take a Lateral Flow Test before visiting the Renewables Control 
Centre. Face coverings, however, are not required. 
 
 
 
28 

RESTRICTED 
Annex B 
 
Offshore Wind/Supply Chain 
 
•  Each ScotWind application was required to include a Supply Chain Development 
Statement (SCDS) setting out its supply chain goals and committing developers to 
meet those goals through the various stages of their projects. 
•  ScotWind  promises  to  be  transformational  in  delivering  wider  economic  supply 
chain  benefits  to  help  power  Scotland’s  green  recovery  in  communities  across 
Scotland.  We  welcome  the  commitment  of  developers  to  invest  an  average 
projection of £1.5 bn in Scotland per project, which equates to over £25bn across 
the 17 ScotWind projects. 
•  The  Scottish  Offshore  Wind  Energy  Council  (SOWEC)  is  working  to 
implement  the  five  key  recommendations  in  the  Strategic  Infrastructure 
Assessment (SIA), starting with the
 creation of a Scottish Floating Offshore 
Wind Port Cluster

•  SOWEC has been identified by both industry and government as the key vehicle 
for taking forward the strategic supply chain opportunities from ScotWind. 
•  SOWEC published its Offshore Wind Collaborative Framework Charter on 11 May. 
24 developers have signed up to the Charter, which includes all active developers 
in Scotland and encompasses all 17 ScotWind projects. 
•  The Charter builds on the SIA recommendations, with developers agreeing to work  
together  to  build  a  pipeline  of  supply  chain  work  greater  than  the  sum  of  its 
individual parts, and to deliver on the potential that offshore wind presents in the 
coming years. 
•  Mr  Mckee  is  linking  in  with  all  the  working  groups  to establish and  overview  of 
ongoing work, and SG is also recruiting for three PMO roles to support SOWEC 
and the working groups. 
•  We  are  working  with  SOWEC,  ETZ  and  enterprise  agencies  to  deliver  the 
Offshore Wind Supply Chain Summit, scheduled to take place in Aberdeen on 
22 August, hosted by ETZ.  
•  70% of ScotWind developments are taking place within a 100 nautical mile radius 
of Aberdeen and the region is home to the biggest concentration of energy supply 
chain  companies  in  the  UK,  and  to  75%  of  the  world’s  subsea  engineering 
capability. 
•  The focus will be on supply chain opportunities from all offshore wind projects  – 
not just ScotWind. 
•  Key themes will likely focus around:  
o  coordination  between  developers  to  even  out  supply  chain  requirements, 
growing our indigenous supply chain and attracting new inward investment 
where there are gaps, and  
o  ensuring  our  port  infrastructure  is  utilised  in  an  optimal  and  collaborative 
manner. 
•  Questions will be issued to developers and Supply Chain companies in advance 
of the Summit to ask what they would like to cover. 
 
 
 
29 

RESTRICTED 
Annex C 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Onshore Wind 
•  We  do  not  believe  that  Scotland  can achieve  our  2030  decarbonisation  targets 
without a substantial increase in onshore wind deployment. 
•  Onshore  wind  is  a  cheap  and  reliable  source  of  electricity  generation;  with 
Scotland's  resource  and  commitment  seeing  us  lead  the  way  in  onshore  wind 
deployment and support across the UK. 
•  Support for maximising onshore wind deployment does not come at any cost, and 
the  planning  system  exists  to  ensure  that  development  sites  are  optimised  and 
offer net benefit wherever possible. 
•  The Scottish Government support the extension and replacement of existing sites 
with new and taller turbines, based on an appropriate, case by case assessment.  
 
Draft OnWPS Consultation 
•  The  Onshore Wind  Policy  Statement  consultation  was  launched on  28  October 
2021, which includes our ambition that an additional 8-12 GW of onshore wind be 
installed by 2030.  
•  The  consultation  considered  other  key  themes  such  as  barriers  to  deployment, 
positive  environmental  impacts,  community  benefits  and  shared  ownership, 
circular economy and supply chain opportunities. 
•  The  consultation  closed  on  31  January  2022,  and  a  full  policy  statement  is 
expected  to  be  published  later  this  year  with  consultation  analysis  also  to  be 
published in due course. 
 
 
30 

RESTRICTED 
Annex D 
 
 
Hydrogen 
•  Scotland has many of the key natural resources and components necessary to grow 
a  strong  hydrogen  economy,  supporting  jobs  and  GVA growth,  and  developing 
new industrial opportunities on a significant scale. 
•  The  development  of  a  hydrogen  economy  with  a  strong  export  focus  is  a 
substantial economic opportunity for Scotland. 
•  The Scottish Government has led the way in supporting world-leading hydrogen 
demonstration  projects  and  is  now  committing  to  invest  £100  million  in  the 
hydrogen sector in Scotland over the next five years. 
•  Scotland’s vast offshore wind resources, skilled technicians and engineers, highly 
specialised  technical  companies,  and  an  experienced  offshore  workforce  will  be 
able to assist in bringing forward large scale green hydrogen production. 
•  The development of a hydrogen economy with a strong export focus is a substantial 
economic opportunity for Scotland. With our pipeline of 40GWs of renewables going 
forward, our close proximity to Germany and existing strong relationships we are 
very well positioned to act as a partner nation for the large scale production and 
export and we are actively seeking opportunities to collaborate internationally. 
•  Our  draft  Hydrogen  Action  Plan  –  published  Nov  2021  –  sets  out  a  strategic 
approach to support development of the hydrogen economy in Scotland. Following 
its  publication,  a  10  week  consultation  was  conducted  and  feedback  gathered 
during this will inform our final Hydrogen Action Plan, which will be published later 
in this year.  
 
 
 
31 

RESTRICTED 
Annex E 
 
Energy  
 
Renewable Energy 
• 
Renewable  generation  capacity  continues  to  grow  at  pace  as  other  forms  of 
generation such as nuclear and gas power plants are expected to close. 
• 
We  continue  to  believe  that  the  significant  growth  in  renewables,  storage, 
hydrogen and  carbon capture  provides the  best  pathway  to net  zero  by  2045, 
and  will  deliver  the  decarbonisation  we  need  to  see  across  industry,  heat  and 
transport. 
• 
Scotland has some of the most extensive renewable generation capabilities in 
Europe  but  investments  in  these  areas  are  being  held  back  by  unfair  network 
charges, which are focussed on the location of generation 
• 
Ofgem’s own analysis suggests that by 2040 Scottish renewable & low carbon 
generators will be the only ones to pay a wider TNUoS charge, with all others 
including gas generators elsewhere in GB being paid credits.   
• 
A  new  approach  is  needed  here,  rather  than  small  modifications  to 
methodologies.  This  approach  should  reward  developers  who  are  investing  in 
renewable generation, rather than penalise them for taking forward projects  in 
the best locations.  
• 
Onshore  Wind  –  the  draft  onshore  wind  policy  statement  consultation  is  now 
closed and official are considering the responses received and the drafting of a 
final policy statement.  This final statement will be published before the end of 
2022 and will reinforce the support SG has for onshore, and the crucial role it will 
play in our 2030 net zero ambitions. 
 
Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) 
•  The  Scottish  Government  is  supportive  of  CCUS,  an  industrial  scale 
decarbonisation  system  with  the  potential  to  make  a  very  positive  impact  on 
achieving  Scotland’s  emissions  targets.  The  advice  from  the  Climate  Change 
Committee describes CCUS as a “necessity, not an option” to achieve net zero 
emissions.  
•  Scottish  Government  economic  scenario  analysis  shows  CCUS  would  have  a 
positive impact on the Scottish economy. In 2045, Scottish GDP could be 1.3-2.3% 
(£3.8Bn-£6.7Bn) higher in scenarios with CCUS, than without. 
•  It is clear that CCUS will play  an important role in helping us to reach net-zero 
emissions.   Advice  from  the  Climate  Change  Committee  describes  CCUS  as  a 
“necessity, not an option” to achieve net-zero emissions.   
•  Scotland  remains  the  best  placed  and  most  cost-effective  nation  in  Europe  to 
deploy  CCUS  due  to  our  unrivalled  access  to  vast  CO2  storage  potential  in  the 
North  Sea  and  opportunities  to  repurpose  existing  oil  and  gas  infrastructure  for 
CO2 transport and storage. This presents us with an economic opportunity in future 
to be at the centre of a European hub for the importation and storage of CO2 from 
Europe. 
•  CCUS with the highest possible capture rates could be a crucial technology for 
industrial decarbonisation and our energy transition, creating options and providing 
industry with the flexibility to transition their products and services to net-zero.  
32 

RESTRICTED 
•  We believe that the Scottish Cluster’s Acorn CCS project is uniquely placed to be 
the least cost and most deliverable opportunity to deploy a full chain CCS project 
in  the  UK.  By  deploying  CCUS,  hydrogen  and  direct  air  capture  technologies  in 
Scotland, the Scottish Cluster could support an average of 15,100 jobs between 
2022-2050, with a peak of 20,600 jobs in 2031.  
•  The UK Government’s decision not to give the Scottish Cluster clear and definitive 
Track  1  status  in  its  CCUS  cluster  sequencing  process  is  illogical  and  could 
endanger both Scottish and UK-wide net-zero targets, and a just transition.  
•  We  are  working  constructively  with  the  UK  Government  to  ensure  the  Scottish 
Cluster has the certainty it needs to continue its development. To this end, we have 
continued  to  advocate  for  the  cluster  in  our  engagement,  and  have  offered  £80 
million from our Emerging Energy Technologies Fund to accelerate its deployment. 
•  We remain committed to supporting the continued growth and development of the 
Scottish Cluster and the development of CCUS in Scotland to ensure that Scotland 
reaches its net zero goals by 2045.    
 
Heat Pumps 
•  In order to meet our statutory emissions reduction targets, installation rates of zero 
emission heating systems need to grow quickly. 
•  Installation rates for low and zero emission heating systems, such as heat pumps, 
will need to peak at over 200,000 homes per year in the late 2020’s.  
•  This compares to current installation rates of around 3000 low and zero emission 
heating  systems  per  year  and  an  estimated  120,000  annual  fossil  fuel  boiler 
replacements in Scotland.  
•  We have been working with the heat pump industry to explore the potential for 
Heat Pump Sector Deal for Scotland and the group published its final report last 
December.   We  will  respond  to  the  group’s  recommendations  alongside  our 
Supply Chain Delivery Plan later this year 
  
Skills and Supply Chain 
•  The  pace  of  the  Heat  in  Buildings  transition  requires  a  substantial  growth  in 
supply  chains,  particularly  in  the  availability  of  skilled  heating  and  energy 
efficiency installers. 
•  It  is  vital  that  the  supply  chain  is  equipped  with  the  necessary  skills  and 
qualifications to provide a high quality service to consumers. We estimate that an 
additional 16,400 jobs will be supported across the economy in 2030 as a result 
of investment in the deployment of zero emissions heat. 
•  We  have  a  strong  foundation  on  which  to  build,  with  the  heat  and  energy 
efficiency  sectors  in  Scotland  generating  an  annual  turnover  of  £2  billion  and 
supporting around 12,500 full-time equivalent jobs  
•  Unlocking  investment in  the  supply  chain  must  start  with  clear  demand for  its 
products and services. Our investment of at least £1.8 billion, as outlined in the 
Strategy,  will  strengthen  demand  and  support  an  increase  in  jobs  and  skilled 
workers.  
•  We will work with industry to co-produce a new ‘Heat in Buildings Supply Chain 
Delivery  Plan’  later  in  2022,  specifically  focussed  on  strengthening  the  broad 
supply chains needed to deliver at the pace and scale we need. 
 
 

33 

RESTRICTED 
Energy Strategy/Just Transition Plan 
•  Our commitment to refreshing the 2017 energy strategy and our commitment to 
publishing  a  just  transition  plan  for  the  sector,  represent  two  sides  of  the  same 
challenge. 
•  We cannot underestimate how big the challenge of energy transition is. Making 
sure that no one is left behind and that the costs and benefits are shared fairly for 
all  of  Scotland  is  something  we  have  not  done  before,  but  will  be  crucial  to  our 
success. 
•  The Energy Strategy & Just Transition Plan will explore the difficult choices that 
we, as a country, will have to make.  We want  people to engage widely with the 
ESJTP,  so  that  we  can  hear  from  all  voices,  as  we  come  together  towards 
consensus. This goes beyond that of the usual consultation process and will allow 
Scottish  Government  to  make  decisions  that  reflect  the  best  outcome  for  all  of 
Scotland 
 
Whole System Approach 
•  It is critical that we take a whole system approach to the development of our energy 
system. 
•  Decisions taken in one part of the energy system interact with other parts. As we 
transition to Scotland’s future energy system, these interactions will grow both in 
number and scale. 
•  It is crucial that we look at the bigger picture and ensure that all sectors of our 
energy system work together. Taking a whole systems approach allows us to find 
joint  opportunities  to  enable  our energy  system  as  a  whole to  support Scotland, 
and everyone who lives and works here. 
•  Decisions on important parts of  the energy system, such as our electricity and gas 
networks, are reserved. To ensure that we get the right outcomes in these reserved 
areas we must clearly lay out what we expect of the UK government. 
 
 
34 

RESTRICTED 
Annex F 
Background to Berwick Bank and Nigg 
Berwick Bank 
•  Berwick bank is an SSE owned offshore wind farm project,  currently scoped at 
4.1GW to build what could be largest offshore wind farm in the world in Scottish 
waters. 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
SSE’s 4.1GW Berwick Bank site, which will act as a catalyst for investment in 
Scotland of potentially [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
SSE will make their decision in May 2022 on whether to [ Redacted Regulation 
10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
We are actively seeking opportunities to both capture ‘first mover’ advantage  from 
ScotWind and set out our attractiveness to supply chain companies which in turn will 
add significant economic value to the Scottish supply chain. [Redacted Regulation 
10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  The  size  offers  the  possibility  of  clustering  and  spin  outs  e.g.  resin 
manufacturing/components etc. 
• [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
• [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
• [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
• [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
Nigg  
•  Nigg Offshore Wind (NOW) has been brought  forward by Global Energy Group 
(GEG),  a  Scottish  headquartered  energy  services  company,  along  with  Bilbao 
based,  offshore  wind  tower  manufacturing  specialist,  [Redacted  Regulation 
10(5)(e)  –  (confidentiality  of  commercial  information)]  to  build  a  state-of-the-art 
offshore wind tubular rolling facility at Port of Nigg. NOW will be a 450-meter-long, 
38,000 m2 factory, capable of rolling steel plate to supply towers which will weight 
in excess of 1,000 tonnes each and other products, to the UK offshore fixed and 
floating wind industry in the UK and abroad.  
•  This facility was to be the first to be built in the UK to this specification with inclusive  
rolling machinery robotics and a new blast and paint shop at a cost of [Redacted 
Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] The new factory 
is an enabler to firmly establish the Port of Nigg as a strategic offshore wind hub 
which includes the consolidation of the Port’s existing marshalling and staging work 
for turbine components and foundations (the marshalling and staging work already 
employs over 120+ people). 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
 
 

 
 
35 

RESTRICTED 
Annex G 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
 
 
36 

RESTRICTED 
 
In response to item 10) 14/06/2022 Video conference with SSE, Michael Matheson 
MSP (Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport), Ministerial 
engagements travel and gifts 
 
•  Regulation 10(4)(a) – (Information not held) 
 
 
37 

RESTRICTED 
 
 
In response to item 13) 15/08/2022 Phone call with SSE, Richard Lochhead MSP 
(Minister for Just Transition Employment and Fair Work), Ministerial diaries 
 
•  Regulation 10(4)(a) – (Information not held) 
 
 
38 

RESTRICTED 
 
 
In response to 14) 07/09/2022 Video conference with SSE, Michael Matheson MSP 
(Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport), Lobbying Register, 
Ministerial engagements travel and gifts 
 
MEETING WITH THE MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SSEN 
7th September 2022 , 11:15 – 12:00 
 
Key 
•  The energy landscape has changed significantly since ED2 plans 
Message 
were submitted, with high electricity prices continuing to force more 
and more customers into fuel poverty. 
•  It is essential that any investment that is funded by the customer is 
well justified and leads to better outcomes for those bill payers. 
•  Ofgem’s approach has been taken to ensure consumers do not 
speculatively fund work that may not be required, implementing 
uncertainty mechanisms to unlock necessary additional funds. 
•  It is important to reach the right balance between baseline 
allowances and uncertainty mechanisms for the best outcome for 
both consumers and DNOs. 
Who 
Chris Burchell, Managing Director of SSEN 
 
What 
A meeting to discuss Ofgem’s Draft Determinations on SSEN’s 
business plan 
Why 
SSEN wrote to you to ask for a meeting to discuss their concerns with 
Ofgem’s proposals 
Where 
Microsoft Teams meeting 
When 
7 September 2022 
11:15-12:00 

Supporting  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Officials 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Alternative 
 
contact 
Briefing 

Annex A:  Agenda and Steering Brief for meeting  
Annex B:  Background for Agenda item 2 – Ofgem’s Draft 
Determinations  on ED2 Business Plans 
Annex C: Background for Agenda item 2 – Reduction in Baseline 
Funding 
Annex D: Background for Agenda Item 2 – Impact of Draft 
Determination on Scottish Islands 
Annex E: Background for Agenda item 3 – Support for Vulnerable 
Consumers 
Annex F: Biography for Chris Burchell 
39 

RESTRICTED 
 
MEETING WITH THE MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SSEN 

 
ANNEX A 
Agenda & Discussion Points  
 

1.  Introductions 
2.  Ofgem’s Draft Determinations on ED2 Business Plans 
3.  Support for Vulnerable Consumers 

 
Item 1: 
Introductions  
 
Key Message:  In the midst of the current cost of living crisis, ongoing price increases 
continue to push increasing number of households into fuel poverty. 
 
It is imperative that costs to consumers are minimised while still 
delivering net zero targets. 
 
The DNOs and Ofgem will need to find the right balance between 
baseline allowances and uncertainty mechanisms to ensure consumers 
are protected both in the short term and throughout the transition to net-
zero.   
 

 
 

Item 3: 
Ofgem’s Draft Determinations on ED2 Business Plans (Annexes B,C 
and D ) 
Key 
 
Messages: 
•  The Scottish Government has welcomed SSEN’s approach to 
align its baseline allowance proposals with delivery of 
Scotland’s statutory climate change targets.  
 
•  However, the energy landscape has changed dramatically 
since the DNOs submitted their business plans. 
 
•  The DNOs must work with Ofgem to reach a balance, 
minimising cost to consumers while delivering on important 
projects to meet net-zero targets. 
 
•  Given the higher risk of fuel poverty on Scottish Islands, it is 
essential that SSEN are able to deliver vital connections and 
invest in island resilience. 
 
 
•  What does SSEN consider to be a fair outcome for ED2 that 
Discussion: 
will minimise consumer costs while delivering on net zero 
ambitions? 
 
•  Ofgem has noted some challenges with investment proposals 
not meeting required evidence thresholds. Are you now 
40 

RESTRICTED 
providing this evidence, to reach a better outcome in final 
determinations?  
 
•  If it is not possible to change baseline funding, are there 
improvements to the Uncertainty Mechanisms that could help 
mitigate your concerns? 
 
 
 
Background briefing for this item is set out in Annexes B, C and D 
 
 
 
 
Item 2: 
Support for Vulnerable Consumers (Annex E ) 
 
Key 
•  Protection for vulnerable consumers is critical to ensure they 
Messages: 
are supported as much as possible, especially during power 
outages. 
 
•  Ofgem has approved SSEN’s proposal to provide vouchers for 
battery packs for all newly registered priority services 
customers and most medically vulnerable customers without 
access to alternative backup generation. 
 
 
•  What will provision of battery packs mean for the protection of 
Discussion: 
vulnerable consumers? 
 
•  How has Ofgem’s proposal for resilience impacted plans for 
improving performance for worst served customers? 
 
 
 
Background briefing for this item is set out in Annex E 
 
 
 
 
 

41 

RESTRICTED 
Annex B 
Ofgem’s Draft Determinations on ED2 Business Plans 
 
 
•  Ofgem published its Draft Determinations for GB’s electricity distribution networks 
on 29 June 2022. This is followed by an 8-week consultation period.  
 
•  Final determinations will be made by December 2022. 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  SSEN has seen the most significant reduction to its baseline allowances and has 
raised a number of concerns with officials particularly in relation to  
-  Reduction in baseline funding (Annex C) 
-  Island communities (Annex D)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
42 

RESTRICTED 
Annex C 
Reduction in Baseline Funding 
 

•  Ofgem has made a change to the accounting methodology for ED2 which 
will  see  the  cost  of  distribution  network  assets  recovered  over  a  longer 
period of 40 years. This combined with several other efficiencies translates 
to a reduction in annual consumer bills. 
 
•  The  RIIO  framework  provides  DNOs  with  allowed  revenues,  or  baseline 
allowances,  which  is  the  minimum  that  the  DNOs  can  recover  from 
customers in two separate license areas covering North of Scotland (SSEN) 
and South of Scotland (SPEN).    
 
•  The DNOs are required to use these allowances to deliver their business 
activities,  or  agreed  outputs,  which  include  operations  and  maintenance, 
providing new connections and new network investments where there are 
high levels of certainty. 
 
•  A package of in-period ‘uncertainty mechanisms’ will also enable the DNOs 
to dial investment up or down to reflect changing requirements on the grid. 
For example, by providing additional funds to allow the DNOs to respond to 
higher-than-expected demand for heat pump or EV connections. 
 
•  Ofgem has used National Grid’s System Transformation scenario to inform 
its estimates of electricity demand and baseline funding for the RIIO ED2 
period. This is a relatively conservative Future Energy Scenario with much 
lower uptake of  Heat Pumps and EV’s  than DNOs  have included in  their 
draft business plans.  
 
•  Ofgem  has  taken  this  approach  to  ensure  that  consumers  do  not 
speculatively  fund  work  that  may  not  be  required,  relying  on  uncertainty 
mechanisms to unlock additional funds where necessary. 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
 
Impact of cuts  
 

•  The  DNOs  worked  very  closely  with  the  Scottish  Government  on  the 
development of the business plans for RIIO-ED2. This was done in order to 
ensure  the  business  plans  supported  Scottish  Government  net-zero 
ambitions and, indeed, the projected growth of additional demand in areas 
such as electric vehicles and zero emissions domestic heating. 
 
•  Both DNOs have, for example, reflected the Scottish Governments target 
for  more  than  1  million  homes  and  50,000  non-domestic  buildings  to  be 
running  on  low  or  zero  carbon  heating  systems  by  2030  in  their  own 
scenarios. The  plans  therefore  reflected  cost  efficiencies  that  could  be 
achieved through anticipatory investment to ensure the networks can meet 
the expected demand increase. 
43 

RESTRICTED 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
44 

RESTRICTED 
Annex D 
Impact of Draft Determination on Scottish Islands. 
 
•  Ofgem  has  made  two  key  decision  that  will  impact  SSEN’s  plans  to  support 
customers on Scottish Islands. 
 
o  Reducing its baseline allowance for subsea cable investment by 26%  
o  Rejection  of  a  specific  island  specific  ‘fix  on  fail’  uncertainty  mechanism 
which  would  allow  SSEN  to  respond  to  unexpected  outages  on  subsea 
cables. 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
Concerns with the Network Asset Risk Methodology (NARM) 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
•  NARM  is  an  agreed  methodology  used  by  all  DNOs  to  calculate  the  risk  and 
likelihood  of  failure  of  assets  on  the  distribution  network.  These  scores  are 
calculated for each asset and Ofgem will increase baseline allowances where the 
NARM score signals a high enough level of risk. 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
Investing in Islands Resilience 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
 
Impact of subsea cable failure 
 
•  The significant impact of sub-sea cable outages on local communities was recently 
highlighted with the failure of the Skye – Harris circuit which took 318 days to repair.  
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
 
                                                                                                                              

45 

RESTRICTED 
Annex E 
Support for vulnerable customers 
 
Impact of ED2 cuts on customer bills 
 

•  Ofgem’s cuts to baseline allowances will lead to higher than expected bill 
reductions for households in North and South Scotland.  
 
-  SSEN expects consumer bills to be reduced by £26.10 per annum for 
households in North Scotland.  
-  SPEN expects consumer bills to be reduced by £19 per annum for 
households in South Scotland.  
 
•  Both SPEN and SSEN have indicated that that this level of bill reduction will 
be short-lived as some of the cuts can be recovered through uncertainty 
mechanisms.  
 
Improving Resilience 
 

•  The  DNOs  experienced  some  of  the  most  challenging  conditions  for  their 
networks  in  a  generation  over  winter  2021/2022.  Widespread  devastation 
caused by Storm Arwen led to disruption to almost 1 million customers including 
a  small  but  significant  proportion  experiencing  a  disruption of  up  to  11  days. 
Storms  Malik  and  Corrie  subsequently  resulted  in  over  450  High  Voltage 
network faults, disconnecting 120,000 homes in the North of Scotland alone.  
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  An addition Ofgem has approved a Consumer Value Proposition that will enable 
SSEN to provide Personal Resilience Plans (PRPs) for all new registrations on 
the priority services register – a system designed by Ofgem to help vulnerable 
energy customers.   
 
•  PRP’s will also be proactively offered to their most vulnerable customers (more 
than 44,000), tailored in each case with clear actionable support and, in certain 
situations, provision of personal battery storage. 
 
 
 
Consistency across Scottish DNOs 

 
•  It is important to note that Ofgem has rejected similar proposals made by 
SPEN to protect vulnerable consumers.  
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
46 

RESTRICTED 
 Annex F 
 
 
•  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
 
 
 
 
47 

RESTRICTED 
 
 
 
In response to item 15) 14/09/2022 Video conference with SSE, John McFarlane 
(Special Adviser) and Harry Huyton (Special Adviser), Lobbying Register 
 
•   Regulation 10(4)(a) – (Information not held) 
 
 
48 

RESTRICTED 
 
 
In response to item 15) 28/09/2022 Video conference with SSE, Michael Matheson 
MSP (Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport), Ministerial 
engagements travel and gifts 
 
Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero, Energy and Transport 
 
MEETING WITH STEPHEN WHEELER, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF SSE 
RENEWABLES 
28 SEPTEMBER, 10.15 – 11.00 
 
Key 
We recognise the importance of Berwick Bank as an anchor 
Message 
opportunity to a tier one developer to secure first mover 
advantage for supply chain development in advance of ScotWind. 
 
Who 
Stephen Wheeler - Managing Director, SSE Renewables 
Jamie Maxton – Head of External Relations (Scotland), SSE 
Renewables 
What 
Meeting to receive update on Berwick Bank, Coire Glas, cost of 
living and REMA, and discuss allegations against SSE 
Renewables regarding stipulation of no employment of British 
crew on Seagreen O&M vessel Edda Brint. 
Why 
You were scheduled to meet with Stephen Wheeler on 13 
September to visit Seagreen offshore wind farm, however, the 
visit was cancelled following the sad news about Her Majesty. 
SSE Renewables requested a short meeting with you to discuss 
matters they had intended to raise on the visit. 
Where 
MS Teams 
 
When 
Wednesday 28 September      
10.15 – 11.00 
Supporting  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Officials 
Offshore Wind Policy Adviser 
Mobile: [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] 
Alternative  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
contact 
 Offshore Wind Policy Manager 
Mobile: [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] 
 
Briefing 
Annex A:  Agenda and Steering Brief for meeting 
 
Annex B: Berwick Bank / SSE Offshore Wind Projects 
 
Annex C:  Coire Glas 
 
Annex D: Cost of Living and REMA 
 
Annex E: Edda Brint and Fair Work 
49 

RESTRICTED 
 
ANNEX A 
Agenda & Discussion Points  
 
1. Welcome & introductions 
 
2. Update on Berwick Bank 
 
3. Coire Glas 
 
4. Cost of Living update & wider market reform 
 
5. Edda Brint 
 
6. Summary 
 
Sensitivities: 
 
The Innovation and Targeted Oil and Gas (INTOG) offshore wind leasing process is 
now open, avoid discussions on bids. 
 
Line to take if raised: 
Crown Estate Scotland has now opened the INTOG seabed lease application 
process, and the round is expected to conclude by autumn 2023. It is not appropriate 
for Scottish Ministers to discuss bids until the leasing round has concluded. 
 
Item 1: 
Welcome and Introductions 
 
Key 
•  I regret that I was not able to join you on a site visit to 
Message: 
Seagreen, I am looking forward to a rescheduled visit. 
•  Keen to hear from you today on the topics you had intended to 
cover at the site visit, and hear your perspective on the alleged 
stipulation that only two British crew should be employed on 
the Edda Brint vessel to save on costs. 
 
Item 2: 
Berwick Bank Update 
 
Key 
•  We recognise the importance of Berwick Bank as an anchor 
Messages: 
opportunity to a tier one developer to secure first mover 
advantage for supply chain development in advance of 
ScotWind. 
It is my understanding you have now received initial offers from 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
•  How is that evaluation going and do you a firm date to select 
your preferred turbine supplier? 
 
 
Discussion: 
Iterative Plan Review  
 

50 

RESTRICTED 
•  Through our iterative plan review (IPR) process we will consider 
the  impacts  of  the  new  potential  generation  figure  of  27.6GW 
for ScotWind. As the Berwick Bank development was part of the 
earlier Round 3 leasing award from 2008, it will be included as 
part of the baseline in our assessments of effects for the IPR.   
•  The next steps for the IPR process will be to complete a 
compatibility assessment to identify which aspects of the 
environmental and socio-econonic assessments are impacted 
by the new information, followed by re-assessment of these 
impacts. 
•  Marine Scotland will also assess the combined cumulative 
impacts from ScotWind and the Innovation and Targeted Oil 
and Gas (INTOG) leasing round. We have the opportunity to 
combine the two work streams and create one plan for 
offshore wind energy in Scotland, in this way ScotWind 
assessments will account of INTOG and vice -versa and 
Scottish Ministers will have a better understanding of the 
overall strategic picture for offshore wind.  
•  The combined draft plan for offshore wind energy and 
associated supporting assessments will go out for a public 
consultation, planned for Spring/Summer 2023. 
•  There are recognised barriers to the future consenting and 
construction of offshore wind in Scotland and the UK. These 
are identified in the Sectoral Marine Plan for Offshore Wind 
Energy 2020 and the Scottish Government is committed to 
addressing these through marine planning and dedicated 
research.  
 
 
 
Background briefing for this item is set out in Annex B 
 
 
 
 
Item 4: 
Coire Glas 
 
Key 
•  It is critical that the appropriate market and regulatory 
Messages: 
arrangements are put in place by National Grid Electricity 
System Operator, Ofgem and UK Government to support 
pumped storage hydro.  
 
 
Discussion: 
•  We believe that the case for reviewing incentives for Pumped 
storage Hydro (PSH), which has always been strong, is now 
greater than ever. As we continue to decarbonise our energy 
system, as well as our demand for energy linked to transport 
and heat, greater storage – PSH, as well as other forms – 
across the network will be essential to help balance 
fluctuations in demand and ensure system stability.  
•  At present, there is no market mechanism available to secure 
investment in PSH, with some large projects in Scotland 
51 

RESTRICTED 
awaiting that signal. It is critical that UK Government considers 
mechanisms to enable the development of PSH. 
•  Finding the means to unlock these huge investments would be 
absolutely key in keeping up with our respective commitments 
to deliver a green economic recovery from the Covid-19 crisis- 
a point that we have raised with BEIS in our response to their 
call for evidence on barriers to the deployment of large-scale 
and long-duration electricity storage.  
 
 
Background briefing for this item is set out in Annex C 
 
 
Item 4: 
Cost of living & market reform 
 
Key 
•  We await further detail of the UK Prime Minister’s 
Messages: 
announcement that “Renewable and nuclear generators will 
move onto Contracts for Difference to end the situation where 
electricity prices are set by the marginal price of gas.” as part 
of a package of reform to address the cost of energy crisis. 
 
 
 Review of Electricity Market Arrangements in the UK (REMA) 
Discussion: 
 
•  In the longer term, the UK Government’s Review of Electricity 
Market Arrangements presents an opportunity to reflect on the 
structure of the market and consider what we can do to ensure 
it serves the best interests of consumers and deliver net zero. 
•  I am deeply concerned about the suggestion of moving 
towards the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) model - It is 
vital that we deliver net zero at lowest cost to the consumer 
but it is not clear how penalising developers for taking forward 
projects in the best locations will achieve that. 
 
 
 
Background briefing for this item is set out in Annex D 
 
 
 

 
Edda Brint employment stipulation 
Item 3: 
 
Key 
•  I understand that Fiona Hyslop MSP contacted you directly 
Messages: 
regarding the alleged stipulation that no British crew should be 
employed on Edda Brint, and you have responded, denying 
these allegations. 
•  I would be keen to understand more about this situation from 
your perspective and about your relationship with Edda Wind. 
Are you taking any further actions to investigate these 
allegations? 
52 

RESTRICTED 
 
•  While employment law remains reserved to the UK 
Discussion: 
Government, we will use our Fair Work policy to promote fairer 
work practices across the labour market in Scotland. 
•  We are committed to using all the levers that are available, for 
example, through our public spend, as well as promotion 
through every relevant policy agenda to make Fair Work the 
norm. 
•  The new national Living Hours Accreditation Scheme 
recognises that the number and frequency of work hours are 
critical to tackling in-work poverty. We welcome SSE’s 
accreditation under this scheme in 2021. 
•  Fair Work is a key driver for achieving sustainable and 
inclusive economic growth and a wellbeing economy and is at 
the heart of our economic recovery and renewal.  The Scottish 
Government’s ambition – shared by the Fair Work Convention 
– is for Scotland to be a Fair Work Nation by 2025. 
•  Fair Work is central to the 10-year National Strategy for 
Economic Transformation, which builds on the COVID 
Recovery Strategy and will support progress towards net zero, 
help restore the natural environment, stimulate innovation and 
create jobs. 
•  We have concluded a public consultation on the action needed 
for Scotland to become a leading Fair Work nation by 2025.  
•  We will publish a refreshed Fair Work Action Plan this year, 
incorporating the views from our public consultation, and 
focusing on minority ethnic and disabled people’s employment 
and the gender pay gap. 
 
 
Background briefing for this item is set out in Annex E 
 
 
 
Summary 
Item 5: 
 
 
Thanks for the updates today, please do stay in touch with my 
Discussion: 
officials as projects progress. 
 
 
 

53 

RESTRICTED 
ANNEX B 
SSE Offshore Wind Projects Background 
 
Berwick Bank 

•  Berwick Bank is part of Firth of Forth lease area, awarded by The Crown Estate in 
Round 3 in 2008.  
•  Berwick Bank is an SSE owned offshore wind farm project, currently scoped at 
4.1GW to build what could be the largest offshore wind farm in the world in 
Scottish waters. Applications for section 36 consent and marine licences are 
expected in December 2022. 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  Berwick Bank is likely to be the first offshore wind farm in Scottish waters to 
submit a derogations case (for consideration under the Habitats Regulations) with 
their application, due to predicted impacts on European protected sites in relation 
to certain seabird species. 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
•  SSE have made clear their expectation that the preferred supplier locate a blade 
manufacturing facility in Scotland but as indicated above, Berwick Bank is uniquely 
placed with its scale to offer this opportunity over ScotWind sites. Currently, there 
are no competing projects from the rest of the UK south of the border. Were a similar 
scaled project to emerge in the rest of the UK, Scotland would lose the first mover 
advantage it currently has the opportunity to exploit.  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  First Minister has met with [Redacted – (Not in scope)] 
•  She has been clear in previous discussions that Scottish Ministers are not able to 
discuss active projects.  
•  Officials have been continuing to meet with SSE in regards to their supply chain 
plans around Berwick Bank in particular their preferred OEM bidder. 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Seagreen 
•  The Seagreen offshore wind farm is a joint project between SSE Renewables (49%) 
and Total Energies (51%). Consents for the Seagreen Alpha and Bravo wind farms 
were granted in 2014. 
•  Located off the Angus coast, it will be the largest offshore wind farm in Scotland 
once completed. It is also the deepest fixed foundation offshore wind farm in the 
world. 
•  Seagreen generated first power in August 2022. It will have 114 turbines and will add 
1.1 gigawatts of offshore wind capacity when fully operational (expected Q2 2023), 
with a connection to the grid via new substation at Tealing near Dundee. 
54 

RESTRICTED 
•  The wind turbine jackets were assembled at Nigg. SSE estimates that Seagreen has 
supported 141 peak construction jobs at Nigg, and will support 80 direct full-time role 
at its O&M base on Montrose. 
•  Seagreen Wind Energy Limited has been consented permission to install 150 
offshore wind turbines. The remaining 36 turbines have not yet been constructed – 
these will require connection to Cockenzie in East Lothian, for which a separate 
marine licence has been granted (known as Seagreen 1A). A variation to the s.36 
consents is currently under determination, to allow the remaining 36 turbines to be 
larger.  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
ScotWind – E1 (Ossian) 
•  The lease option agreement for the site, which is approximately 100km off the Angus 
coast, was awarded in January 2022. The partnership comprises SSER, Marubeni 
Corporation and Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners. 
•  The lease area has average water depths of 72m, making the site suitable for the 
deployment of approximately 145 floating offshore wind turbines to deliver up to 
2.6GW of installed capacity – enough to be capable of powering almost 4.3 million 
Scottish homes and offsetting around 5 million tonnes of harmful carbon emissions 
each year. 
•  An application for the project is expected towards the end of 2023. If consent is 
granted, construction is expected to commence in 2027. 
•  All the ScotWind Projects are fully aware that the final projects’ size and generating 
capacity will be shaped by our planning assumptions and the consenting process, or 
by any adjustment to them made in light of new evidence and technology. 
•  Projects from ScotWind would be expected to submit consent applications, to Marine 
Scotland, in 2023/24 and we would expect to see construction from 2027 onwards. 
•  SSE Renewables announced in August that the project would take its name from the 
Poems of Ossian, a historic series of books which depict the epic quests and 
adventures of a third-century Scottish leader across rolling seas. 
 
Beatrice 

•  The Beatrice Offshore wind farm was consented in 2014. Construction commenced 
in 2017 and the project was fully operational in 2019.  
•  The Beatrice offshore wind farm comprises 84 wind turbine generators with a 
capacity of 588MW, and is located in the Moray Firth. The operation and 
maintenance base is located in Wick. 
•  Post consent monitoring at the wind farm site is ongoing, providing valuable 
information on the impacts of offshore wind on the environment. 
 
INTOG 
55 

RESTRICTED 
•  Through the INTOG leasing round we are providing opportunities for innovation in 
wind energy to power the new growth sectors of hydrogen production, carbon 
capture and storage and floating wind and facilitating decarbonisation of our oil and 
gas production. 
•  We welcomed the launch of the INTOG leasing round by Crown Estate Scotland, for 
applications on the 10th August. This will close in mid-November. It is not 
appropriate for Scottish Ministers to discuss bids until the leasing round has 
concluded 
•  At present, we are working with stakeholders on the INTOG steering group to 
develop the scoping and methodologies for the assessments to consider the 
potential impacts of INTOG on the marine environment and other marine 
sectors.  Once the leasing application window has closed, we will progress the plan-
level assessments and required consultation with an aim to have a final plan adopted 
by end 2023.   
•  Only INTOG projects which form part of the adopted final plan will progress through 
to option agreement, the next phase in the leasing process. 
56 

RESTRICTED 
ANNEX C 
Coire Glas 
 
•  The Coire Glas project is a proposed large-scale hydro pumped storage 
scheme at Loch Lochy in the Great Glen. It will have a potential capacity of up 
to 1500MW and would more than double Great Britain’s existing electricity 
storage capacity. 
•  It would be the first pumped storage hydro built in 30 years. 
•  In October 2020 the Scottish government gave revised consent for the 
project, with a clause to start construction no later than 7 years from the date 
of consent. (revised consent was to increase the capacity from 600MW to 
1500MW). 
 
Barriers to investment in Pumped Storage Hydro 
•  At present, there is no market mechanism available to secure investment in PSH, 
with some large projects in Scotland awaiting that signal. It is critical that UK 
Government considers mechanisms to enable the development of PSH. 
•  In 2021 Paul Wheelhouse wrote to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy 
and Industrial Strategy, Kwasi Kwarteng on this matter in the hope that the UKG 
can commit to a fresh and meaningful review of options for securing new PSH 
investments and capacity. 
•  Moreover, finding the means to unlock these huge investments would be 
absolutely key in keeping up with our respective commitments to deliver a green 
economic recovery from the Covid-19 crisis.  
•  Not only will their development spur great investment and employment, but it can 
be expected that, with sufficient care and maintenance, they would be able to 
endure for over a century, providing a huge boost to the rural economies of both 
the Highlands and Southern Scotland. 
•  In September 2021 BEIS sought evidence on barriers to the deployment of large-
scale and long-duration electricity storage, and on different approaches for 
supporting the deployment of these technologies. In our response we reiterated 
all of the above points.  
 
 
 
57 

RESTRICTED 
ANNEX D 
Cost of living 
 
Review of Electricity Market Arrangements in the UK (REMA) 
 

•  GB electricity market arrangements govern the way that electricity is traded, 
setting incentives to encourage innovation and minimise overall system costs 
•  The existing market framework was designed for a different time and UK 
Government is increasingly concerned that this could act as a barrier to Net 
Zero and lead to higher overall costs for GB consumers, 
•  BEIS’s Review of Electricity Market Arrangements (REMA)  was announced 
as part of the British Energy Security Strategy on the 4 July.   
•  REMA  will consider a broad suite of reforms to tackle a range of structural 
issues in the electricity markets. This looks beyond high prices and includes 
issues with dispatch arrangements and incentives for low carbon flexibility  
•  Overall REMA represents a significant and far reaching programme of work 
that will review the structure of the GB wholesale market, the role of subsidy 
mechanisms (e.g CfD and Capacity Market), incentives for flexibility and 
demand side response and certain aspects of electricity security (capacity and 
operabilit 
 
Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) 
 
•  Some stakeholders including National Grid ESO and Ofgem have published 
strong statements of support for Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) model for 
the GB Wholesale electricity market,  as a preferred outcome from REMA 
•  The price signals received through an LMP model would be analogous to 
those provided through TNUoS charges and will be designed to incentivise 
generators to locate close to demand and for demand to locate in areas of 
high generation. 
•  We expect that this will create a significant disadvantage for generators 
located in Scotland and that it would not align with Scottish Governments net 
zero targets 
•  The LMP model would also create a significant risk for ScotWind developers, 
particularly those that have not yet been included in National Grid’s Holistic 
Network Design as part of the Offshore Transmission Network Review for 
Offshore Wind 
•  While we are concerned with the risks created for generation, it is important to 
acknowledge that the same model may have corresponding benefits for 
consumers 
 
Wholesale market intervention to address cost of energy 
 

•  The most recent package of support announced by UK Prime Minister Liz 
Truss on 8 September was focussed on retail market intervention. 
•  However, the PM also announced that “Renewable and nuclear generators 
will move onto Contracts for Difference to end the situation where electricity 
prices are set by the marginal price of gas.” This would effectively set an 
agreed price at which those generators could sell their electricity.   
58 

RESTRICTED 
•  No further detail has been published in respect to these measures.   
•  Both the contract price and contract length will have a significant bearing on 
whether this proposal represents good value for money for GB consumers. 
 
Consumer Support Plan Details 

 
1.  BEIS have announced an Energy Bill Relief Scheme in addition to the 
Energy Price Guarantee, which will provide support for non-domestic 
consumers across the UK in the form of a supported wholesale price. BEIS 
have advised that the scheme will apply to fixed contracts agreed on or after 1 
April 2022, as well as to variable and flexible tariffs and contracts. The 
scheme will initially run for six months from 1 October 2022 to 31 March 2023, 
with the first reduced bills being those received in November 2023. The UKG 
will publish a review into the operation of the scheme in three months to 
inform decisions on future support after March 2023. The discount will be 
automatically applied to bills. BEIS do not appear to have provided an overall 
cost for the non-domestic scheme, and we understand this is owing to the 
cost being determined by the wholesale market price between October and 
April, when the support expires. 
 
Support for Businesses 
 
2.  Key points to note in relation to support for business within the announcement 
are: 
•  Non-domestic customers on existing fixed price contracts will be eligible 
for support as long as the contract was agreed on or after 1 April 2022. 
This is provided that the wholesale element of the price the customer is 
paying is above the Government Supported Price, their per unit energy 
costs will automatically be reduced by the relevant p/kWh for the duration 
of the Scheme.  
•  Customers entering new fixed price contracts after 1 October will receive 
support on the same basis. 
•  The UK Government will set a Supported Wholesale Price – expected to 
be £211 per MWh for electricity and £75 per MWh for gas, which is less 
than half the wholesale prices anticipated this winter.  
•  Those on default, deemed or variable tariffs will receive a per-unit discount 
on energy costs, up to a maximum of the difference between the 
Supported Wholesale Price and the average expected wholesale price 
over the period of the Scheme.  
•  The amount of this Maximum Discount is likely to be around £405/MWh for 
electricity and £115/MWh for gas, subject to wholesale market 
developments.  
•  Non-domestic customers on default or variable tariffs will therefore pay 
reduced bills, but these can still change over time and may still be subject 
to price increases.  
•  BEIS has advised it is working with suppliers to ensure all their customers 
in England, Scotland and Wales are given the opportunity to switch to a 
fixed contract/tariff for the duration of the scheme if they wish, underpinned 
by the Government’s Energy Bill Relief Scheme support. 
59 

RESTRICTED 
•  For businesses on flexible purchase contracts, typically some of the 
largest energy-using businesses, the level of reduction offered will be 
calculated by suppliers according to the specifics of that company’s 
contract and will also be subject to the Maximum Discount.  
•  Equivalent support will also be provided for non-domestic consumers who 
use heating oil or alternative fuels instead of gas and further detail on this 
will be announced shortly. 
•  BEIS will publish a review of the scheme in three months to inform 
decisions on future support after March 2023. The review will focus in 
particular on identifying the most vulnerable non-domestic customers and 
how the Government will continue assisting them with energy costs. 
 
60 

RESTRICTED 
ANNEX E 
 
Edda Brint employment stipulation background 
 
•  Edda Brint is a service operation vessel (SOV) purpose-built for Vestas wind 
turbine technicians for the Seagreen project, with capacity for up to 60 people. It 
has been chartered for Seagreen O&M until 2037. 
•  You previously responded to correspondence from Fiona Hyslop MSP (22 June 
2022) in relation to claims that SSE Renewables have deliberately chosen not to 
use British crew members on their vessel Edda Brint with the exception of the 
Captain and Chief Engineer in order to save on employment costs. Ms Hyslop 
has responded asking that you raise this in your discussions with SSE 
Renewables. 
•  Two letters were also sent to other Ministers in May 2022 by two employees of 
Edda Wind / Seagreen – one to the First Minister and one to Jenny Gilruth MSP - 
outlining the same concerns. Both employees have asked to remain anonymous. 
•  Ms Hyslop followed up with a letter to you (19 August 2022), expressing further 
concerns about this issue and reputational risk if this issue were to be made 
public, asking for information in relation to the employment of British crew 
members on SSE vessels, and the outcome of discussions with SSE 
Renewables. 
•  Ms Hyslop also wrote about this issue to SSE directly. SSE have responded with 
a letter to Ms Hyslop (07 September 22) to categorically deny that they have 
stipulated that they do not want British crew on the vessel, and that they have 
stipulated in supply contracts that suppliers must maximise the use of UK skills, 
services and content. 
 
Fair Work First  
 

•  Fair Work First criteria have been applied to some £4bn worth of public sector 
funding since 2019. 
•  We have expanded Fair Work First criteria to support flexible working and oppose 
fire and rehire practice. 
•  In line with the Bute House Agreement, we will introduce a requirement on public 
sector grants recipients to pay at least the real Living Wage to all employees and 
to provide appropriate channels for effective workers’ voice, such as trade union 
recognition. 
•  Through our Fair Work First policy we are leveraging employers’ commitment to 
fair work by applying Fair Work criteria to public sector grants, other funding and 
contracts where it’s relevant and proportionate to do so  Employers are being 
asked to commit to:  
o  appropriate channels for effective voice, such as trade union 
recognition. 
o  Investment in workforce development.  
o  no inappropriate use of zero hours contracts.  
o  action to tackle the gender pay gap and create a more diverse and 
inclusive workplace.  
o  payment of the real Living Wage. 
o  Offer flexible and family friendly working to all workers from day one of 
employment. 
61 

RESTRICTED 
o  Oppose the use of fire and rehire practices 
•  To support the adoption of the Fair Work First criteria, on 24 September 2021, we 
published updated Fair Work First guidance, which provides good practice 
examples to guide employers’ approaches and, importantly, explains the benefits 
of Fair Work for workers and organisations.  
•  On 10 September, the Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Economy wrote jointly 
with portfolio Cabinet Secretaries to public sector leaders, including in the police, 
NHS, local government and public bodies, to advise of these new criteria and 
reaffirm our commitment that the public sector should show leadership in 
adopting Fair Work practices. 
 
Living Wage 
 

•  The number of accredited Living Wage employers is up from 14 in 2014 to 2700 
in 2022 with 55,000 workers getting a pay uplift to at least the real Living Wage. 
•  The Scottish Government welcomes the new Real Living Wage rate of £10.90 
per hour and £11.95 for London, announced by the Minister for Just Transition, 
Employment and Fair work, on 22 September 2022 which applies to all 
employees aged 18 and above. 
•  It applies to newly accredited employers from 22 September 2022, and all 
existing accredited employers from 15 May 2023. 
•  Scotland remains the best performing of all four UK countries with the highest 
proportion of employees paid the real Living Wage or more (85.6%). Ahead of 
England 82.8%, Wales 82.1% and NI 78.7% and the UK 82.9%.  
 
 
 

  
 
 
62