This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Equnior and SSE meetings with the Scottish Government 2022-23'.

In response to item 4) 26/04/2022 Scottish Parliament meeting with Equinor, Nicola 
Sturgeon MSP (First Minister) Lobbying Register 
 
BRIEFING FOR THE FIRST MINISTER 
 
MEETING WITH ANDERS OPEDAL, CEO OF EQUINOR 
 
Date (26 APRIL 2022) 
 
Key message  We welcome Equinor’s significant investment and partnerships in 
Scotland, especially in relation to our transition to renewable 
energy.  We are keen to understand more about their future 
ambitions to work with Scotland on energy transition.   
 
Energy transition will be covered in our draft Energy Strategy and 
Just Transition Plan, which will be published for consultation this 
year and will provide a roadmap for the future of Scotland’s 
energy system to meet our Net Zero targets. 
 
This also links to our drive for more renewables to further 
enhance our energy security and innovations in Carbon Capture, 
Utilisation and Storage (CCUS).   
What 
To meet with Mr Opedal and discuss Scotland’s energy transition 
and energy security in light of the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.  
Why 
This is Anders Opedal’s first official visit to Scotland as CEO of 
Equinor.  He has requested a meeting with the you.  This has been 
recommended as Equinor are significant investors in Scotland, 
with a focus on floating wind technology.  We recommend a short 
introductory chat with the First Minister to demonstrate 
Scotland’s commitment to the energy transition. We also see this 
as an opportunity for Equinor to be an early productive partner 
for our Copenhagen Hub.  
Who 
Anders Opedal – Chief Executive Officer – Equinor 
David Cairns – Vice President Political and Public Affairs – Equinor 
Al Cook - Executive Vice President for Exploration & Production 
Arne Gürtner - Senior Vice President UK & Ireland offshore – 
Equinor 
Where 
Scottish Parliament – First Minister’s Office, 4th Floor 
When 
26 April 2022 16:00 – 16:30 
Likely themes  Scotland’s ambitions in energy transition and reaching net zero. 
Equinor’s investments in Renewables and partnerships in Scotland 
and how this can support our energy transition 

Energy security in light of the Ukraine conflict and how to 
accelerate the move to renewable energy 
Media  
FM Comms will send a tweet after the meeting from 
@ScotGovFM: 
 
Today First Minister @NicolaSturgeon met with @Equinor_UK CEO 
Anders Opedal, they discussed Scotland’s ambitions in energy 
transition and reaching net zero as well as accelerating the move to 
renewable energy. 
 
PIC & tag @Andop68 & @ScotGovNetZero 
 
Official Support to take a photo at the beginning of the meeting. 
Supporting 
Frank Strang – Deputy Director, European Relations, Directorate 
official 
for External Affairs 
Attached 
Annex A: Agenda and Summary  
documents 
Annex B: Background on Equinor and Anders Opedal 
Annex C: Briefing - likely topics to be raised 
Annex D: Read out from Meeting between Cabinet Secretary for 
Net Zero, Energy and Transport and Arne Gürtner, Senior Vice 
President UK & Ireland offshore at Equinor and David Cairns, Vice 
President Political and Public Affairs at Equinor.   
 

ANNEX A 
 
Summary and Agenda  
 
Summary 
 
This is Anders Opedal’s first official visit to Scotland since being appointed as CEO of 
Equinor in November 2021, and he requested a meeting with the First Minister. We 
are recommending a short introductory chat as Equinor are serious investors in 
Scotland and gives you the opportunity to demonstrate Scotland’s commitment to 
the energy transition as well as understand more about Equinor’s future ambitions to 
work with Scotland on Energy Transition and developments within the North Sea. 
 
Equinor’s investments and partnerships in Scotland include: 
•  Hywind Scotland offshore wind farm in 2009 (the world’s first floating turbines); 
•  Mariner oil and gas field; and 
•  Partnership with SSE for CCUS in Peterhead. 
 
Agenda 
 
This is an in-person meeting to build relation with Equinor’s new CEO, Anders 
Opedal. While there is no set agenda it is likely that the following topics may arise: 
•  Scotland’s ambitions in reaching net zero; 
•  Equinor’s investments and partnerships in Scotland and how this can support 
our energy transition; and 
•  Energy security in light of the Ukraine conflict and how to accelerate the move 
to renewable energy. 
 
The Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero, Energy and Transport met with Arne Gürtner, 
Senior Vice President UK & Ireland offshore at Equinor and David Cairns, Vice 
President Political and Public Affairs at Equinor on 16 December 2021 to specifically 
discuss oil & gas policy. A readout of this meeting is attached as Annex D.   
 
Potential sensitivities: 
 
Equinor are the operator in the Rosebank Oil Field, which is due for Final 
Investment Decision approval by the North Sea Transition Authority later in 
2022.
 
 
Equinor were unsuccessful in the ScotWind leasing round, and are aware that the 
Scottish Government has had no involvement in the scoring of ScotWind bids. They 
have received feedback from Crown Estate Scotland. Equinor have indicated they will 
not be raising ScotWind at the meeting as the lack of success was their fault. 

ANNEX B 
 
Background on Equinor and Anders Opedal 
 
Equinor  
 
Equinor  has  significant  investments  and  partnerships  in  Scotland,  from  the  Hywind 
Scotland  offshore  wind  field,  the  world’s  first  floating  offshore  wind  farm,  to  the 
Mariner oil and gas field, to their partnership in Peterhead with SSE for carbon capture 
and  storage.  They  have  growing  partnerships  with  companies  in  Scotland  who  are 
supplying other O&G operations around the UK, and have a large office in Aberdeen. 
They  also  have  significant  future  ambitions  in  Scotland  as  a  partner  in  the  energy 
transition, and with our shared heritage of the North Sea.  
 
On 19th April, Equinor announced its Energy Transition Strategy for its 
ambition to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, with near- and medium-term 
decarbonisation and spending targets.   

•  Their strategy includes halving operational greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 
relative  to  2015  levels,  allocating  more  than  half  of  annual  gross  capex  to 
renewables  and  low-carbon  solutions  by  2030  and  reducing  net  carbon 
intensity—including  scope  three  emissions—by  20pc  by  2030  and  40pc  by 
2035.  
•  It has made nearly half of the reductions needed to hit the 2030 target through 
a combination of portfolio optimisation and energy efficiency measures  In the 
long term, the firm will use offsets to reach net zero and has established its own 
quality  criteria  based  on  the  Oxford  Principles  for  Net  Zero  Aligned  Carbon 
Offsetting. 
•  Equinor CEO Anders Opedal said “Our energy transition plan is based on actions. 
We  believe  it  demonstrates  that  we  have  the  right  strategy,  ambition  level, 
capabilities and track record to be a leading company in the energy transition 
while ensuring long-term shareholder value creation and competitiveness,”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





List of attendees 
 
Biographies:  
 

Anders Opedal, CEO Equinor 
 
Anders Opedal became Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 
of Equinor in November 2020 following various roles 
from procurement to technology.  
 
Opedal holds an MBA from Heriot-Watt University 
and a Masters degree in Engineering from the 
Norwegian Institute of Technology.  
 
 
 
 
David Cairns, Vice President Political and Public 
Affairs – Equinor 
 
David Cairns has been Vice President Policy and Public 
Affairs  Global  at  Equinor  since  August  2019,  and  is 
responsible  for  Equinor’s  UK  Government  relations. 
Before  joining  Equinor,  David  was  the  British 
Ambassador to Sweden (2015-19) and the Foreign and 
Commonwealth  Office’s  Director  for  the  Nordic  Baltic 
Network. 
 
 
 

Al Cook, Executive Vice President for Exploration & 
Production International - Equinor 
 
Cook joined Equinor in 2016. He comes from the 
position of Executive Vice President Global Strategy & 
Business Development (GSB), which he had since May 
2018. He started as SVP in Development & Production 
International overseeing operations in Angola, 
Argentina, Azerbaijan, Libya, Nigeria, Russia and 
Venezuela. He joined from BP, where he was Chief of Staff to the CEO. 
 


Arne GürtnerSenior Vice President UK & Ireland 
offshore – Equinor 
 
Arne Gürtner is Senior Vice President UK & Ireland 
offshore at Equinor. Based in Equinor’s UK operations 
headquarters in Aberdeen, Mr Gürtner leads the 
organisation supporting the Norwegian energy giant’s 
UK and Ireland upstream activities. That includes the 
Mariner development and Rosebank. Arne is also the 
co-chairman of Oil & Gas UK 

ANNEX C 
 
Briefing - likely topics to be raised  
 
1.  Highlight Scotland’s Net Zero ambitions 
 

•  Scotland has the most ambitious legislative framework for emissions reduction 
in the world and this is underpinned by a legal commitment to deliver a just 
transition.  
•  Our landmark 2019 Climate Change Act sets a target of net-zero emissions of 
all greenhouse gases by 2045.   
•  Our 75% target for 2030 goes far beyond what the Intergovernmental Panel on 
Climate  Change  (IPCC)  Special  Report  says  is  needed  globally  to  prevent 
warming of more than 1.5 degrees. 
•  Our emissions are down by over 50% (since the 1990 baseline), and we continue 
to outperform the UK as a whole in delivering long-term reductions.  
•  Our 2022-23 Budget sets out record levels of investment to address the climate 
emergency and deliver a just transition to net zero, including the first £20m of 
our £500m Just Transition Fund.  
•  Our  updated  Climate  Change  Plan  sets  out  a  comprehensive,  detailed  and 
ambitious policy package. Our focus is on delivering this. 
•  Higher  UKG  ambition  is  also  needed  to  unlock  reserved  issues,  including 
support for the development of fully sustainable security of electricity supply 
from  zero  carbon  sources  and  the  diverse  energy  system  we  need  to 
decarbonise heat and transport. 
 
Energy Strategy and Just Transition 
•  Our draft Energy Strategy and Just Transition Plan (ESJTP) will be published in 
Autumn  2022  and  will  be  critical  to  delivering  on  our  Net  Zero  Pathway, 
providing a detailed road map showing who needs to deliver what and by when 
in order to deliver on our targets. 
•  The ESJTP will take a whole-system view of how the sector must evolve to drive 
our transition to net zero, with a specific focus on actions needed to meet our 
2030 interim target. 
•  We  are  committed  to  working  across  society  to  deliver  lasting  action  that 
secures a just transition to climate resilience and net zero for Scotland 
•  On 7 December, Parliament overwhelmingly voted to endorse the importance 
of delivering a just transition for Scotland, and our response to the work of the 
Just Transition Commission. 
 
Oil and gas  

•  Sensitivity: Equinor are operator in the Rosebank Oil Field due for Final 
Investment  Decision  approval  by  the  North  Sea  Transition Authority  in 
2022
 
•  Climate Change has not gone away. The science is clear that the world cannot 
go  on  extracting  fossil  fuels  indefinitely  if  the  necessity  of  limiting  global 
warming to 1.5 degrees is to be achieved. We cannot in good conscience ignore 
that. 
•  In relation to oil and gas fields, already partially sanctioned, and to the licensing 
requirements of new fields, if we say the answer to our current reliance on oil 
and gas for jobs and energy is to keep opening new oilfields, we don’t have 
sufficient  imperative  to  develop  alternatives  quickly  enough.  Instead  we 
become fixed in a cycle of dependency. 
•  We must focus on how to accelerate the development of new sources of energy, 
with associated new jobs so that we can move away from oil and gas more 
quickly, with a presumption as far as possible against new development.  
•  I made clear the concerns on the licensing of new fields, including those already 
sanctioned, in writing to the PM in August, whose Government currently holds 
powers  over  such  decisions  –  calling  for  rigorous  climate  compatibility 
assessments  to  ensure  any  proposal  is  consistent  with  emissions  reduction 
targets. 
•  We are undertaking work to better understand Scotland’s energy requirements 
as  we  transition  to  net  zero,  ensuring  we  support  and  protect  our  energy 
security and our highly skilled workforce whilst meeting our climate obligations. 
 
 
2.  Equinor’s investments and partnerships in Scotland 
 

•  I welcome Equinor’s continued investment in Scotland in our pursuit of our net 
zero ambitions. 
•  I am keen to hear about Equinor’s plans for future ambitions to work in Scotland 
in energy transition. 
 
Offshore wind – Equinor Hywind involvement 
•  Sensitivity: Equinor were unsuccessful in the ScotWind leasing roundand 
are  aware  that  the  Scottish  Government  has  had  no  involvement  in  the 
scoring of ScotWind bids. They have received feedback from Crown Estate 
Scotland. 

•  Equinor’s 30 MW Hywind Scotland, located off the coast of Peterhead, was the 
world’s first commercial floating offshore wind farm.  
•  Scotland’s  natural  resources,  which  include  strong  and  consistent  wind 
resource, along with our established expertise in offshore oil and gas, skilled 
offshore workforce, excellent port structure and strong innovation hub, make 

Scotland one of the best places in the world to develop offshore wind and its 
supply chain. 
 
CCUS - Equinor Peterhead involvement 
•  Peterhead is  Scotland’s only flexible gas-fired power  station, operating since 
1982. 
•  Situated on Scotland’s east coast, the Peterhead site is ideally placed for carbon 
capture  technology,  with  access  to  essential  CO2  transport  and  storage 
infrastructure being developed through the Acorn Project.  
•  Equinor  and  SSE  Thermal’s  proposed  CCS  Power  Station  formed  part  of  the 
Acorn Cluster bid in the UK Cluster Sequencing process.  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  Equinor is also partnered with SSE Thermal on 3 projects within the successful 
Track 1 East Coast CCS Cluster. These include the Keadby 3 CCS Power station, 
the  Keadby  Hydrogen  power  station  and  the  Aldbrough  Hydrogen  Storage 
projects. 
•  The  Scottish  Government  supports  the  development  of  CCUS  as  a  common 
whole-system decarbonisation infrastructure with the flexibility to adapt over 
time to play a central role across the decarbonisation strategies of key sectors 
such as heat, industry and power.   
•  It is clear that CCUS will play an important role in helping us to reach net-zero 
emissions.  Advice from the Climate Change Committee describes CCUS as a 
“necessity, not an option” to achieve net-zero emissions.   
•  In October 2021, the UK government failed to award the Scottish Cluster (led 
by the Acorn Project at St Fergus, of which Peterhead Power Station was a part) 
Track 1 status in their CCUS cluster sequencing process. The Scottish Cluster was 
instead designated reserve status.  
•  We remain committed to supporting the continued growth and development 
of the Scottish Cluster to ensure that Scotland reaches its net zero goals by 
2045.  We  advised  the  UK  Government  that  we  would  help  to  support  the 
Scottish Cluster, and stand ready to deliver on that commitment. 
 
 
3.  Energy Security 
 

•  Whilst security of oil and gas supply is currently not an issue for the UK (as only 
4% of the gas and 8% of oil consumed in the UK is supplied directly from Russia) 
the UK cannot be separated from the rising and inherently damaging price risks 
facing both domestic and industrial gas consumers across Europe. 
•  Given  recent  international  events  we  should  be  looking  to  immediately 
accelerate the transition to renewables and reduce our dependence on oil and 
gas products.  

•  We  were  disappointed  not  to  be  involved  in  the  development  of  the  UK 
Government’s  Energy  Security  Strategy,  particularly  given  the  important  role 
that Scotland plays in exporting electricity to the rest of the UK.  
•  We believe that traditional nuclear power is poor value for consumers and, due 
to  the  long  lead  in  time  for  construction,  will  not  provide  additional  energy 
security in the immediate term. Renewable energy is the best way to meet net 
zero.  
 
 
 

ANNEX D 
 
Draft Read Out: Equinor – 16 December 2021 - Specifically in relation to Oil and 
Gas policy
 
Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero, Energy and Transport 
Arne Gurtner and David Cairns both of Equinor 
Scottish Government Energy Officials 
•  Equinor outlined their planned investment into the Rosebank oil field due for 
Final  Investment  Decision  in  the  coming  months  –  this  is  a  significant 
investment of £4bn  and will have a direct impact on the supply chain and jobs 
– asking directly what is the SG view of the Project. 
•  Cab Sec outlined the SG approach to refreshing the energy strategy and just 
transition plan, and that oil and gas will be a part of the energy mix, pointing 
also to the current energy demand and supply analysis work that is ongoing 
which  will  provide  a  view  on  what  is  Scotland’s  current  energy 
requirements.  Commenting also that the landscape has changed significantly 
and that any developments that have been sanctioned need to be justified and 
have a transparent accountability, noting the OGA license process needs to be 
clearly explained and far more transparent – all future developments will face 
the same challenge politically and environmentally as Cambo.  There needs to 
be far more transparency on the regulatory process. 
•  Equinor pointed to Rosebank already being part of the CCC projections and the 
need  to  avoid  a  cliff  edge  approach,  and  that  new  developments  will  be 
required to deliver domestic demands and to reduce the reliance on imports. 
•  Cabinet Secretary noted that there is a wider perception issue that needed to 
be addressed where developments should only go ahead against our domestic 
needs.   Wider  society  don’t  see  the  industry  as  being  transparent  and 
accountable, including that of the work of the OGA – the regulator should be 
more transparent and accountable and act as a guardian on delivering our net 
zero commitments. 
•  Equinor raised the point that the OGA has stepped up particularly in terms of 
reducing  emission  reductions  with  Cab  Sec  commenting  that  this  was  all 
process based for the regulator. 
•  Equinor noted that there is no evidence that shows from here until 2050 that 
the UK will not deliver less hydrocarbons tham what the UK requires for our 
energy demands. 
•  Cab Sec commented that the industry needs to have a process that provides 
both public and political certainty that is required about further developments. 
•  Equinor  noted  there  is  a  need  to  be  realistic  about  the  energy  transition  – 
industry is moving at pace but there is still a lag between when this activity will 
ultimately replace future energy and jobs. 

•  Cab Sec noted that the sector need to keep on justifying its social license to 
operate, recognising that the sector is and will be a key strength in the energy 
transition 
•  Equinor questioned if the spike in gas prices raised issues around our energy 
security, and updated on the Doggar Bank investment which is helping with the 
Scottish supply chain – notably Nigg and Star. 
•  Cab Sec closed noting that the recent months have showed that there is a need 
to  decarbonise  quicker  which  was  echoed  by  Minister  Kwarteng.   In  term  of 
what does this mean for our energy mix – this is still an issue for debate. 
 
 
 
ENGAGEMENT REPORT 
Minister  
First Minister (FM), Nicola Sturgeon   
Type of 
Bilateral meeting with Anders Opedal, CEO of Equinor  
engagement  
Date 

26 April 2022 
Who 
Anders Opedal (AO) – Chief Executive Officer , Equinor  
Arne Gürtner (AG)- Senior Vice President UK & Ireland offshore  
David Cairns – Vice President Political and Public Affairs  
Al Cook (AC)- Executive Vice President for Exploration & 
Production 
Attending 
Frank Strang  – Deputy Director, European Relations, Directorate 
Official 
for External Affairs 
 
Key Points  
AO described Equinor as being committed to using its history and 
innovative know-how to help be a part of the solution in terms of 
the transition to net zero. They had already taken action in terms 
of offshore wind, CCS and hydrogen. In as much as they 
continued to produce oil and gas, this was being decarbonised 
with emissions around a third of the world average. 
 
FM described Scotland's approach including driving up the 
sustainability of production and importantly investing in 
alternatives. She said that it was inevitable that any new oil and 
gas exploration would be under ever greater scrutiny. She 
mentioned the huge potential for hydrogen exports. She 
recognised shared goals with Equinor and wanted to identify 
ways of working together. 
 
AO welcomed the fact that his company and the Norwegian and 
Scottish governments were on the same page. With time he 
would expect the demand for Oil and Gas to fall but to be 
replaced by demand for decarbonised fuel and renewables. The 
FM commented that the faster we were able to develop 
renewables, the sooner we could reduce fossil fuel consumption. 
 

AO said in passing they were disappointed about the Scot Wind 
outcome and were asking themselves what they should do 
differently in future.  They had not lost interest. 
 
It was agreed that the Ukraine crisis did not affect the 
fundamentals.  AO said Equinor had responded to short term 
needs but would not be tempted to change its longer-term 
strategies. The FM welcomed this.  
 
AC described their growing expertise in electrifying production 
including retrofitting existing platforms. They have particular 
plans for west of Shetland, all in the context of getting to net zero 
by 2050.  
 
AG said that they were keen to see the agenda as being not just 
about risks but also about opportunities. He spoke warmly about 
the 700 staff in NE Scotland many of whom are applying skills 
learnt for oil and gas in the context of renewables. 
 
FM commented on the need for leadership and welcomed the 
challenge between industry and government to spur each other 
to moving faster.  
 
AO said that he would very much welcome further contact 
perhaps during the FM’s visit in late summer. He was keen to 
show her activity on the ground, such as Northern Lights flexible 
CCS Project  
 
 
 
 


In response to item 6) 10/05/2022 Meeting with Equinor, Richard Lochhead MSP 
(Minister for Just Transition Employment and Fair Work), Ministerial engagements 
travel and gifts 
   
BRIEFING NOTE 4 
Meeting with Ms Kristin Westvik – Senior Vice President Operation North, 
Equinor 
 

When 
Tuesday 10 May 2022, 11:30 – 12:15 
 
Where 
Restaurant 
Clarion Hotel The Edge 
Key Messages 
•  We  welcome  Equinor’s  significant  investment  and 
partnerships  in  Scotland,  especially  in  relation  to  our 
transition to renewable energy.  
•  Keen to learn more on Equinor’s operations in the High 
North  and  how  they  compare  with  their  activities  in 
Scotland. 
•  Protecting  workers  and  supporting  the  creation  of  good, 
green jobs is a central component of a just transition. 
•  Energy  transition  will  be  covered  in  our  draft  Energy 
Strategy  and  Just  Transition  Plan,  which  wil   be 
published  for  consultation  this  year  and  wil   provide  a 
roadmap for the future of Scotland’s energy system to meet 
our Net Zero targets. 
 
Who 
Ms Kristin Westvik  
Senior Vice President Operation North, Equinor 
 
Kristin started her career in Equinor in 
1997 and has been responsible for several 
business areas in the company, both 
offshore and onshore. In 2018-2019, she 
led Equinor’s strategic planning for the 
Norwegian Continental Shelf, including the 
introduction of the new climate strategy for 
the company in Norway. Since February 2020, she has 
served as Senior Vice President of Exploration and 
Production North, and is responsible for Equinor’s operations 
from the coast of Møre to the Russian border. Kristin is 
original y from Stavanger.  
 

Why 
Equinor are significant investors in Scotland, with a focus 
on floating wind technology. The FM met their new CEO 
on 26 April (see engagement report at Annex C). 
 
A chance to strengthen international cooperation and 
progress in Just Transition; 1) emphasising Scotland’s 
world-leading progress, 2) learning from international 
practices to improve domestic policy and 3) reaffirming 
Scottish Government’s commitment to international 
collaborative working. 
 
Official Support 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] – Senior Policy Advisor, Transition Policy Unit 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third 
party)] Arctic Policy Lead, Nordic and Arctic Unit 
Social Media 
@Equinor   @Equinor_UK 
 
Briefing contents 

Annex A – Talking points 
Annex B – Equinor – Background Info 
Annex C – FM’s meeting with new CEO of Equinor (26 
April) 
 
 

 

TALKING POINTS   
 
 
 
ANNEX A 
 
Oil and gas  
Sensitivity: Equinor are the operator in the Rosebank Oil Field, which is due for Final 
Investment Decision approval by the North Sea Transition Authority later in 2023. Along 
with Cambo, Rosebank is one of the largest untapped discoveries in UK waters, with an 
estimated 300 million barrels of oil recoverable, according to some industry estimates. 
The three Rosebank licences are due to expire at the end of May, though Equinor may 
seek an extension from the North Sea Transition Authority. 

 
•  Climate Change has not gone away. The science is clear that the world cannot go on 
extracting fossil fuels indefinitely. 
•  We must focus on how to accelerate the development of new sources of energy, with 
associated new jobs so that we can move away from oil and gas more quickly, with a 
presumption as far as possible against new development.  
•  The FM made clear the concerns on the licensing of new fields, including those already 
sanctioned, in writing to the PM in August, whose Government currently holds powers 
over such decisions – cal ing for rigorous climate compatibility assessments to ensure 
any proposal is consistent with emissions reduction targets. 
•  We are undertaking work to better understand Scotland’s energy requirements as we 
transition to net zero, ensuring we support and protect our energy security and our 
highly skilled workforce whilst meeting our climate obligations. 
•  Ask: Norway’s rich oil and gas heritage – are there learnings or synergies that could 
be shared as we embark upon the path of a just transition for the oil and gas sector? 
•  Ask: What opportunities do you see for emerging industries, building on the skil set of 
your oil & gas workforce? 
•  Ask: I am particularly interested in your operations in the North of Norway. What’s the 
current situation? Are there plans to intensify and expand extraction? 
 
Equinor’s investments and partnerships in Scotland 
•  I welcome Equinor’s continued investment in Scotland in our pursuit of our net zero 
ambitions. 
•  As you wil  know, our First Minister met your new CEO in Edinburgh at the end of April. 
•  AskI am keen to hear your thoughts about Equinor’s plans and future ambitions to 
work in Scotland in energy transition. 
 
Offshore wind 
Sensitivity: Equinor were unsuccessful in the ScotWind leasing round, and are aware 
that the Scottish Government has had no involvement in the scoring of ScotWind bids. 
They have received feedback from Crown Estate Scotland. 
 
•  Equinor’s 30 MW Hywind Scotland, located off the coast of Peterhead, was the world’s 
first commercial floating offshore wind farm.  
•  Scotland’s  natural  resources,  which  include  strong  and  consistent  wind  resource, 
along with our established expertise in offshore oil and gas, skil ed offshore workforce, 
excel ent  port  structure  and  strong  innovation  hub,  make  Scotland  one  of  the  best 
places in the world to develop offshore wind and its supply chain. 
•  Ask:  Compared  to  your  operations  in  Scotland,  how  does  offshore  wind  feature  in 
Equinor’s plans for the region you are responsible for? 
 
 
 

EQUINOR – BACKGROUND INFO 
 
 
ANNEX B 
 
Equinor  has  significant  investments  and  partnerships  in  Scotland,  from  the  Hywind 
Scotland offshore wind field, the world’s first floating offshore wind farm, to the Mariner oil 
and gas field, to their partnership in Peterhead with SSE for carbon capture and storage. 
They have growing partnerships with companies in Scotland who are supplying other O&G 
operations around the UK, and have a large office in Aberdeen. They also have significant 
future  ambitions  in  Scotland  as  a  partner  in  the  energy  transition,  and  with  our  shared 
heritage of the North Sea.  
CCUS - Equinor Peterhead involvement 
•  Peterhead is Scotland’s only flexible gas-fired power station, operating since 1982. 
•  Equinor and SSE Thermal’s proposed CCS Power Station formed part of the Acorn 
Cluster bid in the UK Cluster Sequencing process.  
•  In  March  2022,  SSE Thermal  and  Equinor  submitted  a  planning  application  to  the 
Scottish Ministers for a proposed 910MW Peterhead Carbon Capture Power Station 
project.  This  is  now  being  considered  by  the  Energy  Consents  Unit,  with  a 
determination likely next year. 
•  In total, the proposed new station could capture an average of one and a half million 
tonnes of CO2 a year.  
•  Equinor is also partnered with SSE Thermal on 3 projects within the successful Track 
1  East  Coast  CCS  Cluster.  These  include  the  Keadby  3  CCS  Power  station,  the 
Keadby Hydrogen power station and the Aldbrough Hydrogen Storage projects. 
•  The Scottish Government supports the development of CCUS as a common whole-
system decarbonisation infrastructure with the flexibility to adapt over time to play a 
central role across the decarbonisation strategies of key sectors such as heat, industry 
and power.   
•  In October 2021, the UK government failed to award the Scottish Cluster (led by the 
Acorn  Project  at  St  Fergus,  of  which  Peterhead  Power  Station  was  a  part) Track  1 
status in their CCUS cluster sequencing process. The Scottish Cluster was instead 
designated reserve status.  
•  We  remain  committed  to  supporting  the  continued  growth  and  development  of  the 
Scottish  Cluster  to  ensure  that  Scotland  reaches  its  net  zero  goals  by  2045.  We 
advised the UK Government that we would help to support the Scottish Cluster, and 
stand ready to deliver on that commitment. 
 
On 19th April, Equinor announced its Energy Transition Strategy for its ambition to 
reach  net-zero  emissions  by  2050,  with  near-  and  medium-term  decarbonisation 
and spending targets.   

•  Their strategy includes halving operational greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 relative 
to 2015 levels, al ocating more than half of annual gross capex to renewables and low-
carbon  solutions  by  2030  and  reducing  net  carbon  intensity—including  scope  three 
emissions—by 20pc by 2030 and 40pc by 2035.  
•  It  has  made  nearly  half  of  the  reductions  needed  to  hit  the  2030  target  through  a 
combination of portfolio optimisation and energy efficiency measures  In the long term, 
the firm wil  use offsets to reach net zero and has established its own quality criteria 
based on the Oxford Principles for Net Zero Aligned Carbon Offsetting. 
•  Equinor CEO Anders Opedal said “Our energy transition plan is based on actions. 
We believe it demonstrates that we have the right strategy, ambition level, 
capabilities and track record to be a leading company in the energy transition while 
ensuring long-term shareholder value creation and competitiveness,”
. 
 

ENGAGEMENT REPORT – MEETING BETWEEN FM AND EQUINOR 
ANNEX C 
 
Date 
26 April 2022 
Who 
Anders Opedal (AO) – Chief Executive Officer  
Arne Gürtner (AG) – Senior Vice President UK & Ireland offshore  
Al Cook (AC) – Exec Vice President for Exploration & Production 
 
Key Points  
AO described Equinor as being committed to using its history and 
innovative know-how to help be a part of the solution in terms of the 
transition to net zero. They had already taken action in terms of 
offshore wind, CCS and hydrogen. In as much as they continued to 
produce oil and gas, this was being decarbonised with emissions 
around a third of the world average. 
 
FM described Scotland's approach including driving up the 
sustainability of production and importantly investing in alternatives. 
She said that it was inevitable that any new oil and gas exploration 
would be under ever greater scrutiny. She mentioned the huge 
potential for hydrogen exports. She recognised shared goals with 
Equinor and wanted to identify ways of working together. 
 
AO welcomed the fact that his company and the Norwegian and 
Scottish governments were on the same page. With time he would 
expect the demand for Oil and Gas to fall but to be replaced by 
demand for decarbonised fuel and renewables. The FM commented 
that the faster we were able to develop renewables, the sooner we 
could reduce fossil fuel consumption. 
 
AO said in passing they were disappointed about the ScotWind 
outcome and were asking themselves what they should do 
differently in future. They had not lost interest. 
 
It was agreed that the Ukraine crisis did not affect the fundamentals. 
AO said Equinor had responded to short term needs but would not 
be tempted to change its longer-term strategies. The FM welcomed 
this.  
 
AC described their growing expertise in electrifying production 
including retrofitting existing platforms. They have particular plans 
for west of Shetland, all in the context of getting to net zero by 2050.  
 
AG said that they were keen to see the agenda as being not just 
about risks but also about opportunities. He spoke warmly about the 
700 staff in NE Scotland many of whom are applying skills learnt for 
oil and gas in the context of renewables. 
 
FM commented on the need for leadership and welcomed the 
challenge between industry and government to spur each other to 
moving faster.  
 
AO said that he would very much welcome further contact perhaps 
during the FM’s visit in late summer. He was keen to show her 
activity on the ground, such as Northern Lights flexible CCS Project. 

 
 
ENGAGEMENT REPORT 
Minister (or Senior official)  Minister for Just Transition, Employment and Fair 
Work 
Type of engagement  
Meeting 
Date 
10 May 2022 
Who 
Kristin Westvik, SVP Operations North at Equinor 
Knut Harald Nygård, Equinor 
Tone Anita Karlsen, Equinor 

Key Points  
•  Energy security and clean supply of gas for 
Europe  
•  Upcoming  Equinor  report  on  the  socio-
economic  benefits  of  CCS  investments  in 
Peterhead  
•  Net  zero  transition  and  energy  security  not 
mutually exclusive 
•  Scottish  lessons  from  production  in  the  UK 
Continental  Shelf  and  the  observation  that 
production is declining,  with a clear impetus 
on  ensuring  workforce  can  transition  to 
renewable sector 
•  Concept of a ‘skills passport’ for workers 
•  Ensuring  economic  benefits  of  investments 
are seen by local communities  
Actions  
N/A 
 
 
Attending Official(s)  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a 
third party)], Senior Policy Advisor – Just Transition 
Policy  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a 
third party)], Senior Policy Officer – Arctic and 
Nordic Unit 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a 
third party)], Private Secretary 
 
 
 


In response to item 7) 17/05/2022 Norwegian Consulate General meeting with 
Equinor, Angus Robertson MSP (Cabinet for the Constitution External Affairs and 
Culture) Lobbying Register 
 
BRIEFING NOTE FOR THE CABINET SECRETARY FOR CONSTITUTION, 
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS AND CULTURE 
 
Tuesday, 17 May 2022  
 

Key 
•  Scotland  values  its  longstanding  links  with  Norway.  Your 
Messages 
contribution  to  our  economy,  culture  and  society  is  greatly 
appreciated.  
•  We  welcome  continued  close  collaboration  on  shared  areas  of 
interest including sustainable transport, environmental policies and 
green transition.  
•  We are in the process of opening a new office in Copenhagen. It 
will have a pan-Nordic remit and will offer further opportunities to 
deepen Scottish-Norwegian links.  
 
Who 
•  Professor Julian Jones  - Honorary Consul General, Norwegian 
Consulate General  
•  Mona Røhne – Consul, Norwegian Consulate General 
•  David Windmill – Retiring Honorary Consul General  
 
Professor Julian Jones was appointed 
as new Honorary Consul General of 
Norway in February 2022. Before 
starting his diplomatic career, Professor 
Jones held numerous management and 
leadership posts at Heriot Watt 
University including Deputy Vice-
Chancellor and interim Principal and Vice-Chancellor. 
 
Full
 attendee list is attached at Annex B. 
  
What 
Attendance at a reception to celebrate Norwegian Constitution Day 
and thank retiring Honorary Consul General, David Windmill. 
 
You have been asked to deliver short closing remarks.  
 
Where  
Norwegian Consulate General, 12 Rutland Square, EH1 2BB                                                                                                           
When 
Tuesday 17 May 16:00-18:00  
 
Due to Parliament Business, you will attend the event briefly 
from approximately 17:30-18:00. The organisers have been 
notified. 

Supporting 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] Head 
Officials 
of Nordic and Arctic Unit 
Mobile:[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 

Attached 
Annex A: Core Brief 
documents 
Annex B: Full attendee list  
 
Speaking note attached separately 
 
 
CORE BRIEF  

 
 
 
 
ANNEX A  
 
Scottish Government office in Copenhagen 

•  Scottish Government wil  open a new office in Copenhagen. It became operational earlier 
this week. 
•  [Redacted  Regulation  11(2)  –  (personal  data  of  a  third  party)],  formerly  Deputy 
Director for Investment Finance, has been appointed as Head of Office and wil  lead this 
expansion of Scotland’s international network into the Nordic region.  
•  The office wil  be co-located with the existing SDI team within the local British Embassy. 
Similarly to SDI, it wil  undertake a pan-Nordic remit but Norway wil  be a priority country.  
•  The office wil  be tasked with increasing Scotland’s cultural, commercial and policy visibility 
in  the  region,  brokering  new  opportunities  for  collaboration  around  the  Scottish 
Government’s  priorities  for  international  engagement  –  net  zero  and  climate  action,  a 
sustainable recovery from the pandemic and social wellbeing, among others.  
•  Collaboration with international partners wil  be key to promoting a green and just recovery 
from  the  pandemic.  Existing  links  around  energy,  net-zero  and  environment  make  the 
Nordic region one of our key partners. 
•  The  office  wil   also  be  tasked  with  increasing  cooperation  with  Copenhagen-based 
organisations such as the Nordic Council of Ministers and UN agencies.  
 
Norwegian Constitution Day – background note  
Norwegian Constitution Day is an official national holiday observed on May 17. Among 
Norwegians, the day is referred to simply as syttende mai ("seventeenth May"), 
Nasjonaldagen (The National Day) or less frequently - Grunnlovsdagen (The Constitution 
Day).  
 
The Constitution of Norway was signed in 1814 in Eidsvol , declaring Norway an 
independent nation in an attempt to avoid annexation with Sweden after the devastating 
defeat in the Napoleonic wars. Norway was under Swedish rule at that time and the Swedes 
saw the celebration as a provocation. After several attempts, King Carl Johan forbade 
celebrating the day. This veto triggered a higher level of ambition towards Norwegian 
independence.  
 
Norwegian Constitution Day is of non-military nature. It is often celebrated in the form of 
children's parades and marching bands with an abundance of flags forming the central 
elements of the celebration.  
 
Norway’s reaction to the war in Ukraine  
•  Fol owing Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Norway has overturned its longstanding policy of 
not sending weapons to non-NATO countries that are at war. To date, it has donated three 
tranches of supplies including military equipment and arms.  
•  Norway  has  also  been  one  of  the  largest  donors  in  humanitarian  aid  and  Norwegian 
companies  were  quick  to  cease  investments  with  Russian  government  companies, 
including the energy giant Equinor as wel  as the Norwegian oil fund. 
•  In terms of sanctions on Russia, Norway is not a member of the European Union but has 
followed all five sanction packages introduced by the EU Member States. The fifth sanction 
package  has  highlighted  a  political  and  economic  issue  of  port  closures.  Norway  has 
agreed to close  its  seaports  and borders to Russian  traffic  following  the EU’s  decision, 

however, it excluded Russian fishing vessels, which constitute around 60-62% of Norway’s 
maritime traffic and play a vital role in the country’s economy.  
•  The war in Ukraine has triggered Norwegian government’s decision to boost its military 
spending by additional 3,5 mil ion kroner (€362 mil ion) with extra money being directed at 
increasing its military presence in the north, particularly in its naval coast guard vessels 
and as well as civil preparedness. 
•  The number of Ukrainian refugees expected to arrive to Norway is currently estimated as 
45,000  –  considerably  fewer  than  the  initial  figure  of  60,000.  Norwegian  municipalities 
have  established  13  ordinary  reception  centres,  2  transit  centres  and  84  emergency 
centres.  Around  half  of  those  arriving  from  Ukraine  decides  to  stay  in  private 
accommodation rather than asylum centres.  
 
Key links with Norway  
•  Norway  is  the  4th  largest  contributor  of  Foreign  Direct  Investment  for  Scotland  and 
Scotland’s 7th largest export destination, worth £1.1bn (excluding oil and gas) in 2019, up 
1.4% from 2018. 
•  The largest sector for exports in 2018 was energy, which accounted for 25% of all exports. 
•  Norway  is  ranked  8th  investment  partner  with  Scotland.  More  than  300  Norwegian 
companies are present in the UK, of which 100 are situated in Scotland, employing 6,000 
people with a Scottish turnover of £2,382m.  
•  1,797 Norway-born people resident in Scotland (Census 2011).  
•  585 Norwegian students enrolled in Scottish universities in academic year 2019/2020. 
 
Recent ministerial engagement with Norway  
•  May 2022 – Mr Lochhead’s address at the Arctic Frontiers Conference in Tromsø, Norway 
and meetings in Oslo focused on energy transition and fair work.  
•  May  2022  –  Mr  Matheson  addressed  the  Energy  Transition  Summit  in  Kristiansand, 
Norway.  
•  March 2022 – Deputy First Minister met with the Norwegian Deputy Head of Mission to 
the UK, Øyvind Hernes 
 
New joint declaration between the UK and Norway 
•  Last week, the UK and Norway signed a new joint declaration which wil  allow the two 
countries to ‘boost security, sustainability and prosperity in Europe and beyond’.  
•  The  agreement  focuses  on  seven  key  areas  for  collaboration:  climate  change  and 
environmental  issues;  research  and  innovation;  culture  and  education;  and  strategic 
dialogue and institutional exchanges.  
•  The  Norwegian  Prime  Minister,  Jonas  Gahr  Støre,  has  described  the  declaration  as 
‘historic for his region’ and allowing Norway to cooperate ‘more extensively with the UK 
than any other country in the world’.  
 
Minister Lochhead’s visit to Norway (9-12 May) – brief summary 
•  Minister  for  Just  Transition,  Employment  and  Fair  Work,  Richard  Lochhead,  visited 
Tromsø (Northern Norway) last week to address the Arctic Frontiers conference. 
•  During the conference, the Minister took part in a panel discussion on energy transition in 
Scotland  and  the Arctic.  He  also    met  with  a  number  of  leading Arctic  representatives 
including  the  Chair  of  the  US Arctic  Research  Commission,  the  Senior  Vice  President 
Operation  North  of  Equinor  and  the  Vice-chair  of  the  European  Parliament’s  Foreign 
Affairs Committee.  
•  As part of the programme, Mr Lochhead also travelled to Oslo where he had a number of 
meetings with organisations including NHO, Stattnet and NorthConnect.  
 
 


 
 
 
 
FULL ATTENDEE LIST  

 
 
 
    ANNEX B  
 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)], Head of Nordic and 
Arctic Unit, Directorate of External Affairs, Scottish Government 
Cairns, David, Vice President Political and Public Affairs - Global, Equinor 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)n]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
Duncan, Stephen, Director Tourism and Comms, Historic Environment Scotland 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
Fitzpatrick Professor, Chief Scientific Adviser for Scotland, Scottish Government 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)], Head of First 
Minister’s Policy Unit, Scottish Government 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  

[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
Jones, Julian, Hon Consul General, Norway 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]   
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]   
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Robertson, Angus, Cabinet Secretary,  Constitution, External Affairs and Culture, Scottish 
Government 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) –  (personal data of a third party)] 
Røhne, Mona, Consul, Norway 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 

[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]   
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Wightman, Scott, Director External Affairs Department, Scottish Government 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Windmill, David, Former Hon Consul General Norway 
 
CABINET SECRETARY FOR CONSTITUTION, EXTERNAL AFFAIRS AND 
CULTURE  
 
Speaking Note for the reception at the Norwegian Consulate – 17 May 2022 
 
 
Introduction  

 
Thank you Julian (Jones, Honorary Consul 
General) and Mona (Røhne, Consul) for hosting us 
this afternoon and for inviting me to say a few 
words. It is a great joy to be here with you all to 
celebrate Syttende Mai.  
 
Historic links 
 
Scotland and Norway have developed rich, diverse 
and longstanding bonds dating back centuries. 

Every corner of Scotland reminds us of this close 
relationship – from the Norse origins of many town 
names in our Highlands and Islands, to the Norges 
Hus in Dumfries, which served as cultural centre 
for exiled Norwegians during the Second World 
War. 
 
These historic connections and shared heritage 
remain evident in many aspects of our lives and 
are reflected in cultural and economic partnerships 
and, of course, a rich network of people-to-people 
ties.  
 
We deeply value these enduring links with Norway 
– be it through family bonds, cultural and 
academic exchanges or our policy and research 
collaborations.  
 
Continued engagement  
 

As we address the challenges stemming from the 
pandemic, the climate emergency and the ongoing 
war in Ukraine, international cooperation and 
mutual learning are of crucial importance.  
 
And that’s why our long and rich friendship with 
Norway is all the more significant.  
 
Norway is one of Scotland’s key international 
partners. Our countries continue to pool 
knowledge and build on each other’s expertise in a 
wide variety of sectors – including energy, 
transport, marine economy and sustainable rural 
development, to name but a few.  
 
For instance, we are keen to learn from Norway’s 
experience of decarbonising the transport network, 
including aviation. Norway set a high level of 
ambition that other nations, including Scotland, are 

called to match if we are to accelerate our 
transition to net zero.  
 
Our Minister for Just Transition Richard Lochhead 
visited Tromsø last week to address the Arctic 
Frontiers conference.  
 
He took part in a panel discussion on energy 
transition in Scotland and the Arctic, before 
travelling to Oslo for meetings with organisations 
such as NHO, Statnett and NorthConnect. 
 
The value of increasing Scottish-Norwegian 
collaboration further across government, business 
and academia came up in every engagement the 
Minister had while in Norway.  
 
And the Scottish Government is committed to 
achieving just that.  
 

We are in the process of opening a new office in 
Copenhagen. In fact, the Head of Office relocated 
there earlier this week. The office will work to 
promote cultural, economic and policy 
collaboration with our Nordic partners – including 
Norway.  
Our new hub will increase Scotland’s footprint in 
the region, and will open new avenues for our 
nations to work even more closely together. 
 
Global Affairs Framework 
 
This is just one concrete example of the Scottish 
Government’s continued commitment to 
internationalism. 
 
Earlier this month, we published our new Global 
Affairs Framework  
 

It sets out the values and principles that underpin 
Scotland’s international activity and demonstrates 
the interconnectedness between global and 
domestic objectives.  
 
The world is currently being tested on whether it 
supports not just the principles, but also the reality 
of adopting a rules-based approach to protect the 
most fundamental values - peace, freedom and 
prosperity.  
 
These are values and objectives that both 
Scotland and Norway subscribe to unreservedly.  
 
Thanks to retiring Honorary Consul General 
 
Ladies and gentlemen, before concluding I would 
like to thank David Windmill for the tireless work he 
has done for well over a decade to establish and 

reinforce many of the Scottish-Norwegian links 
which I have just mentioned. 
 
In education, business, research, culture and 
tourism – collaborative relationships between 
Scotland and Norway have gone from strength to 
strength. David’s help in developing these special 
relationships has been invaluable. 
 
I am confident that our existing collaborations with 
like-minded Norwegian partners will successfully 
continue under Julian’s tenure.  
 
On behalf of the Scottish Government and the 
many Ministers and colleagues he has worked 
with over the years, I would like to wish David an 
enjoyable retirement from his Consular duties. I 
am however confident there will be more 
opportunities to continue to draw from your 
experience and enthusiasm. 

 
Thank you and a very happy Constitution Day to 
you all. 
 
688 words (approximately 4.5 minutes) 
 
 
 

In response to item 8) 30/05/2022 Dakota Hotel, Glasgow, meeting with Equinor, Ivan 
McKee MSP (Minister for Business Trade Tourism and Enterprise), Lobbying Register 
 
MINISTERIAL ENGAGEMENT BRIEFING: 
MINISTER FOR BUSINESS, TRADE, 
TOURISM & ENTERPRISE  
 
Engagement 
  Investor Dinner with Minister Ivan McKee to coincide with the 
title 
publication of the EY Annual Attractiveness Survey 2022 
Engagement 
  Monday 30 May 2022, 18:00 – 20:30 GMT  
timings 
Arrival and drinks from: 18:00 
Dinner: 18:00-20:30 
Venue and full 
  Private Dinner at the Dakota Hotel Glasgow, 179 West 
address 
Regent Street, Glasgow, G2 4DP  
Background / 
  •  The  purpose  of  this  investor  dinner  is  to  maintain  and 
purpose 
strengthen  relationships  with  the  most  senior  contacts 
 
amongst a small, carefully selected cohort of our key inward 
investors. These are investors with whom we have landed key 
investments recently and / or have important investments in 
the pipeline.  
•  This informal dinner will present an opportunity for the Scottish 
Government  and  SDI  to  consult  with  companies  that  have 
invested  in  Scotland  to  understand  what  more  Government 
and agencies can do to support and grow their investment, in 
light  of  Scotland’s  positive  FDI  performance  highlighted  in 
EY’s attractiveness survey (to be published on 31 May 2022).  
Meeting 
  •  David McClelland, Head of Global VC Operations & 
attendees / 
Managing Director and Country Speaker, Merck KGaA 
Greeting party 
•  Rob de-Hooge, Site Director at Dalry, DSM  
 
•  Geoff Burns, Senior Site Director, Charles River 
Laboratories 
•  Graeme Shepherd, Director of Operations, Ardagh Glass  
•  David Cairns,  Vice President Political and Public Affairs-
Global, Equinor 
•  Sarah Cridland, VP Commercial Projects and UK Country 
Manager, TechnipFMC  
Supplementary 
  •   High-level survey results in this briefing are embargoed until 
information / 
these are published by EY on 31 May 2022
Sensitivities 
•   A  separate  press  release  and  Comms  in  relation  to  the  EY 
survey results will be issued by SG Comms on 31 May 2022. 
Suggested 
 
A photo will be taken at the dinner to publicise the good news of 
tweet / Media 
the EY survey if the investors present are amenable 
Official support 
  •  Richard Rollison, Director, Scottish Government, 
and mobile 
Directorate for International Trade and Investment, 
number 
 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
•  Neil Francis, Interim Managing Director, International 
Development Scottish Enterprise (SE), [Redacted  
Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  

Briefing contents 
Annex A
 – Strategic context / Background)  
Annex B – Suggested points to make / Discussion Topics  
Annex C – Company Backgrounds including any recent investments by the companies 
Annex D – Biographies  
Annex E – ADDITIONAL BRIEFING: Top Lines / Highlights – EY Attractiveness Survey 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ANNEX A 
STRATEGIC CONTEXT / BACKGROUND 
•  This investor dinner is being held to coincide with the publication of EY’s Annual 
Attractiveness Survey 2022 on FDI. It gives the Scottish Government and Scottish 
Development International the opportunity to thank companies that have invested 
in  Scotland  and  to  further  understand  what  the  Scottish  Government  and  its 
agencies can do to support and grow their investment in Scotland.  
•  This is an informal dinner with a carefully selected cohort of key existing investors. 
The  Minister  is  requested  to  ‘host’  the  event  alongside  SE’s  Neil  Francis.  This 
involves being present to welcome the investors and interact with them over the 
course of the dinner.    
•  In the Inward Investment Plan (Oct 2020), we set out a commitment to add 100,000 
high-value jobs over the next 10 years to the Scottish economy.  
•  The  EY’s  annual  attractiveness  survey  will  be  published  on  31  May  2022.  In 
advance  of  the  survey  results  being  published,  the  Minister  and  Scottish 
Government officials attended a pre-brief discussion with EY in relation to the high-
level survey results in advance of publication. 
•  A  brief  summary  of  the  high-level  survey  results  has  been  shared  in Annex  E. 
Please note that the results are currently embargoed until 31 May 2022.  
•  The initial results are looking very positive for Scotland and back up SDI’s results, 
which were announced at the FDI World Forum event in Edinburgh. Scotland has 
maintained its position as the most attractive FDI location outside of London, and 
Scotland’s cities are in the top 20 UK cities for investment. 
 
 
 

ANNEX B 
 
SUGGESTED POINTS TO MAKE / DISCUSSION TOPICS 
 
Short Welcome and EY Survey results 
 
•  Scotland’s first Inward Investment Plan (IIP) published in October 2020, sets out a 
strategic approach for attracting investment that aligns with our values as a nation, 
positioning inward investment to play a key role in the creation of a fair, sustainable, 
inclusive and low carbon future for Scotland. 
•  You announced SDI’s Results during your opening remarks at the FDI World Forum 
in  Edinburgh:  113  inward  investments  into  Scotland  in  the  operating  year 
2021/2022, representing a total of 7,641 real living wage jobs.  
•  The Ernst & Young (EY) Annual Attractiveness Survey 2022 results which are due 
to  be  published  on  31  May,  indicate  positive  results  for  Scotland  –  122  inward 
investment  projects  were  secured  in  Scotland  in  2021,  up  107  from  2020, 
maintaining its position as top UK location outside London (see Annex E).  
•  Opportunity to pick up on the EY survey further to understand investor perceptions 
of Scotland and what more support we could provide. 
 
General Discussion Points: 
 
Explore growth ambitions and promote Scotland as a destination for further 
investment 

•  Highlight the ‘Team Scotland’ approach Scotland takes to supporting businesses 
and  investors.  Encourage  them  to  remain  engaged  with  relevant  enterprise 
agencies 
•  You are keen to build strong relationships with leading investors in Scotland and 
want to maintain a strong dialogue 
•  Scotland’s  ambitions  are  around  attracting  values-led  investment  which  will 
support our ambitions around net-zero and creating a wellbeing economy 
 
Understand any challenges or barriers faced by companies in Scotland 
•  Offer  your  support  in  any  challenges  faced  by  the  organisation,  outlining  our 
ambitions to make Scotland a great place to do business 
•  Seek the group’s views on what factors continue to make Scotland attractive for 
their companies, where our competitive advantage may be less strong / eroding,  
•  Potential  discussion  around  supply  chain  reshoring  –  is  this  happening  in  their 
businesses? 
 

Impact  of  Covid,  Brexit  and  other  geopolitical  events  on  how  international 
expansion decisions will be made going forward 
•  Opportunity  to  discuss  /  gain  insight  into  how  Covid,  Brexit  and  other  recent 
geopolitical  events  have  changed  how  international  expansion  decisions  will  be 
made going forwards and for companies to speak with SG first hand. 
 
 
 

ANNEX C 
 
COMPANY BACKGROUNDS INCLUDING ANY RECENT INVESTMENT BY THE 
COMPANIES / PIPELINE INVESTMENT 
 
1.  Merck KGaA
 
 
Company Profile 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
 
2.  DSM 
 
Company Profile 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
3.  Charles River Laboratories 
 
Company Profile 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
4.  Ardagh Glass 
 
Company Profile  
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
5.  Equinor  
 
Company Profile 
•  Equinor is a Norwegian national energy operating company. They directly employ 
21,000 to develop, oil, gas, wind, solar in over 30 countries worldwide. Equinor are 
one of the largest offshore operators in the world and are significant driving force 
in transition from hydrocarbons to renewable forms of energy including an active 
approach to innovation and investment in new technology.       
•  Equinor is focused on carbon reduction and aims to be near net zero by 2050. 
•  Equinor’s strong technology base and ability to apply new technologies constitute 
a  competitive advantage  for  them.  Each  year,  Equinor  spends  around  NOK 2.8 
billion  on  research  and  technology  development,  split  between  internal  and 
external activities.    
•  Equinor annual revenue for 2021 was $90.924B, a 98.45% increase from 2020.   
Annual revenue for 2020 was $45.818B, a 28.81% decline from 2019.    
•  The company is the second biggest taxpayer in the world ahead of Apple, Amazon 
or Meta (Facebook). 
•  Equinor  are  keen  to  build  a  ‘Norway-Scotland  bridge’  to  engage  directly  in 
discussions with Scotland at SG (to include SE) focussed on energy transition 
      

Equinor – North Sea Projects (Current and Proposed) 
1) Mariner project: This was the digital front runner in the North Sea using technology 
to  provide  safe  and  efficient  production.  The  project  has  a  30-year  life  to  2050. 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)e – (confidentiality of commercial information)]Mariner is 
located East of Shetland and has its design and operations base in Equinor UK office 
in Aberdeen.  Mariner has created 700 full time jobs in Scotland.  
 
2) Dogger Bank: Dogger Bank is a joint venture between SSE Renewables (40%), 
Equinor (40%) and Eni (20%). Dogger Bank will be the world’s largest offshore wind 
farm, capable of producing 3.6GW of electricity, enough to power 5 million homes, or 
about 5 per cent of total UK demand.  
 
3) Hywind Scotland The world’s first floating wind farm, the 30 MW Hywind Scotland 
pilot park, has been in operation since 2017, demonstrating the feasibility of floating 
wind farms that could be ten times larger.  Equinor and partner Masdar invested NOK 
2 billion to realise Hywind Scotland, achieving a 60—70% cost reduction compared 
with the Hywind Demo project in Norway. Hywind Scotland started producing electricity 
in October 2017. Hywind Scotland has the highest average wind capacity factor of all 
UK offshore windfarms at 57.1 %.   
4) Rosebank Project (proposed,  Confidential):  Rosebank  is  an  oil  development 
located in deep water to the west of Shetland, with water depth of around 3,889 feet. 
The project is currently in feed stage and is expected to start commercial production 
in 2025. Final investment decision (FID) of the project will be in late 2022. [Redacted 
Regulation  10(5)e  –  (confidentiality  of  commercial  information)].  It  will  involve  the 
drilling of approximately 24 wells and includes FPSO, subsea manifold, and subsea 
trees. [Redacted Regulation 10(5)e – (confidentiality of commercial information)]  
5) Peterhead Carbon Capture Power Station: This is being developed SSE Thermal 
and Equinor. The proposed plant could become one of the UK’s first power stations 
equipped  with  a  carbon  capture  plant  to  remove  CO2 from  its emissions  and would 
connect  into  the  Scottish  Cluster’s  CO2 transport  and  storage  infrastructure,  which 
underpins plans to deliver one of the UK’s first low-carbon industrial clusters.  
 
 
6.  TechnipFMC  
 
Company Profile 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
 


ANNEX D 
 
BIOGRAPHIES 
 
David  McClelland,  Head  of  Global  VC  Operations  &  Managing  Director  and  Country 
Speaker, Merck
 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
Rob de-Hooge, Site Director (Dalry), DSM Nutritional Products Limited 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
Geoff Burns, PhD, General Manager, Charles River Laboratories 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
Graeme Shepherd, Director of Operations (Irvine), Ardagh Glass 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
David Cairns – Vice President Political and Public Affairs-Global, Equinor 

David Cairns was formally the British Ambassador to Sweden and the 
FCO’s Director for the Nordic Baltic Region. After joining the FCO in 
1993, David Cairns served in Japan as Second Secretary Commercial 
and in Geneva as the Head of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) 
Section. He has also held a number of positions based in London.  
Sarah Cridland – VP Commercial & Subsea Projects – UK, Mediterranean & 
Caspian and Country Manager UK, TechnipFMC  
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ANNEX E 
 
ADDITIONAL BRIEFING: Top Lines / Highlights – EY Attractiveness Survey 
2022 [Embargoed until Monday 31 May 2022] 
 
•  122 inward investment projects were secured in Scotland in 2021, up 107 from 
2020, maintaining position as top UK location outside London 
•  Scotland outpaced UK and Europe, increasing projects secured by 14% 
compared to +5.4% in Europe and +1.8% across the UK 
•  Scotland’s perceived attractiveness to inward investors as UK’s top FDI location 
grows to record 15.8%, up from 7% pre-pandemic in 2019 
•  Scotland's share of all UK FDI projects rises to its highest in the past decade, 
securing 12.3% of projects in 2021, up from 11% in 2020 
•  Scotland’s strength in high-value, high-growth industries like digital and 
utilities/cleantech, and an increase in manufacturing production FDI, bodes well 
for the future 
•  Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen remain in the Top 10 locations outside of 
London for attracting projects. Edinburgh ranked equal first with Manchester, with 
Dundee and Livingston also making the Top 20 
•  Edinburgh secured 17% of digital projects. Glasgow secured 6 business services 
projects, which is the largest number in this area behind London. 
 
•  Top 20 Scottish cities:  
City 
Position in  
No. of Projects in 
2022 Survey 
2021 Survey 
Glasgow 
4th (unchanged from 2020) 
23 (unchanged from 
2020) 
Edinburgh 
1st outside London (joint 
31 (36 in 2020) 
position with Manchester) 
Aberdeen 
8th (joint position with 
14 (13 in 2020) 
Cambridge) 
Dundee and Livingston 
15th (joint position for both 

cities) 
 
•  On jobs, 4 leading sectors generated inward investment projects in Scotland: 
o  Digital / Tech – 33 Projects  
o  Utility supply – 18 Projects 
o  Business services (awaiting figures) 
o  Machinery and Equipment – 14 Projects 
•  Digital  projects  in  Scotland  rose  by 73.4%  whilst  digital  projects  across  Europe 
reduced by 7%. The result of a rise of digital projects sees Scotland reach 2nd place 
in  UK  only  behind  London,  but  ahead  of  the  South-East  England  region.  So, 
Scotland vs London now in the Digital / tech sector. 
•  R&D projects declined slightly – slipping to 3rd place, however, Scotland ranked 2nd 
for R&D FDI projects. 
•  The US clearly remains the single big originator of FDI projects in Scotland. US 
projects – 36 – represented 29.5% of projects in Scotland against 24% for the UK. 
Spain was 2nd with 9.8% projects, whilst Germany was 3rd with 6.6% projects. 
 


Minister for Business, Trade, Tourism and 
Enterprise Ivan McKee MSP 

 
 
T: [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data 

of a third party)]  
 
 
E: [ Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data 
of a third party)]  
 
 
 
 
David Cairns  
 
Vice President Political and Public Affairs-
Global Equinor 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of 
a third party)]  
 
 
 
___ 
23 June 2022 
 
 
Dear David, 
 
I wanted to write to thank you for attending the recent investor dinner held in 
Glasgow on 30 May. As a valued investor, it was my pleasure to have you take part 
in this important discussion and to recognise and thank you for the commitment you 
have made by investing in Scotland.  
 
In light of the publication of the latest EY Annual Attractiveness Survey Scotland 
2022 
results, which highlighted Scotland’s strong FDI performance, I found our 
conversation to be incredibly useful to help deepen my understanding of what more 
the Scottish Government and our enterprise agencies can do to support existing 
investors and continue to attract further investment.  
 
I would like to reaffirm my commitment to ensuring that the Scottish Government, 
supported by our enterprise agencies, has meaningful engagement with our key 
investors. Taking a Team Scotland approach, I am keen to ensure this dialogue 
continues. 
  
Thank you again for your ongoing support. 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 

 
 
 

           IVAN McKEE 
In response to item 11) 16/06/2022 Video conference with Equinor, Michael 
Matheson MSP (Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero Energy and Transport), Ministerial 
engagements travel and gifts 
 
 

1.  Briefing for the Cabinet Secretary for Net Zero, Energy and Transport 
 
MEETING WITH DAVID CAIRNS, VICE PRESIDENT OF EQUINOR  
16 June 2022, 09:00-09:30 
 
Key 
•  The Scottish Government expects offshore wind, both fixed and 
Message 
floating, to play a significant role in our energy transition, and 
recognises the huge economic opportunity attached to commercial 
scale development.  
•  The Scottish Government is a strong advocate for the development 
of Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS). We believe 
Scotland is uniquely positioned to deploy this technology on an 
industrial scale.  
 
Who 
David Cairns, Vice President, Equinor 
 
What 
MS Teams Meeting 
 
Why 
Mr Cairns wrote to Minister Forbes on 18 May 2022 thanking you for 
your support on a media release relating to Peterhead Carbon Capture 
Power Station, and offering to meet to discuss this and other 
investments by Equinor in Scotland. 
 
Due to previous engagements with Equinor, it was agreed that you 
would meet Mr Cairns to discuss Equinor’s investments.  
 
Where 
Microsoft Teams 
When 
Thursday, 16 June 2022 
9:00-9:30 
 

Supporting  [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] CCUS 
Officials 
Policy Officer  
Briefing 
Annex A: Meeting Notes – Equinor Projects in Scotland (pg 2
Annex B: Top Lines (pg 5) 
Annex C: Biography (pg 13
 
 

 ANNEX A 
 
EQUINOR PROJECTS IN SCOTLAND 
 
Peterhead CCS 
•  On 11 May 2021, SSE Thermal and Equinor unveiled plans to jointly develop a new low-
carbon power station at Peterhead, which could become one of the UK’s first power stations 
equipped with carbon capture technology. 
•  On 01 March 2022, a section 36 application seeking consent for construction and operation 
of Peterhead CCS was formally lodged with the Energy Consents Unit.  
•  The application covers a low carbon combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) generating station 
with a capacity of up to 910 megawatts gross electrical capacity, including post-combustion 
carbon capture plant and works to the existing cooling water, natural gas and electrical grid 
connections and ancillary works on land at and in the vicinity of the existing Peterhead 
Power Station Site. 
•  The existing Peterhead Power Station’s capacity will be reduced from 1,180 MW to around 
300 MW and will remain available to operate alongside the new low carbon CCGT generating 
station. However, it is only expected to operate if grid demand cannot be fulfilled by the new 
generating station. 
•  The Peterhead site is ideally placed for carbon capture technology, with access to essential 
CO2 transport and storage infrastructure being developed through the Acorn Project. 
•  The Energy Consents Unit formally consulted Aberdeenshire Council, and statutory and 
other consultees, regarding the application for consent on 1st April 2022. Notices have been 
placed in national and local newspapers inviting representations from members of the public 
regarding the proposal.  Aberdeenshire Council have until 1st August 2022 to respond to the 
Scottish Ministers, unless an extension is agreed. 
•  Peterhead CCS has been identified as an eligible project in Phase 2 of BEIS’ cluster 
sequencing process. It will now be evaluated as a potential Phase 2 deployment project. 
Individual emitter projects selected in Phase 2 will have the first opportunity to be 
considered to receive government support. 
HyWind Scotland 
•  Equinor’s 30 MW HyWind Scotland, operational since 2017, is the world's first floating 
offshore wind farm. We recognise the reputational benefit this has brought for Scotland. 
•  HyWind Scotland promised to deliver “learning for Scotland” in terms of floating wind and 
the utilisation of the technology to decarbonise Oil and Gas. However, Scotland has 
benefitted very little from the development so far. 
•  Most of the learning for floating technology from this project has now been taken forward 
for the new HyWind Tampen project being developed by Equinor in Norwegian waters. 
 
 

ScotWind 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Equinor’s UKCS offshore oil and gas activities 
Mariner Field 
•  Equinor are the operator of this heavy oil field located 100 km East of Shetland.  
•  Mariner is Equinor’s first operated asset in the UK, - the development has been praised for 
its use of offshore digitial workers, automated drilling and digital twin technologies to 
improve costs, including the use of Echo, a digital copy of the platform, to deliver safe and 
efficient solutions.  First oil from the field was announced in 2016. Wood Mackenzie have 
estimated that the field is expected to produce more than 300 million barrels of oil over the 
next 30 years.   
•  Equinor have stated that the field employs over 500 people, offshore and onshore, 
contractors included - with contracts worth more than USD 1.3 billion awarded, it will 
support a significant level of investment and jobs in the UK supply chain for many years to 
come. 
Rosebank Field 
•  Equinor have a 40% stake as operator of this oil and gas field. This is one of the UK 
Continental Shelf’s largest remaining oilfields (the field also contains reserves of gas), 
Rosebank was discovered in 2004 and lies about 80 miles north-west of Shetland. The field is 
estimated to hold about 240 million barrels of oil equivalent. 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
On 8 April Equinor confirmed push back of Rosebank sanction to 2023 – the Field was due 
for approval May 2022. 

•  An Equinor spokesperson said: “We have a close dialogue with UK authorities on the next 
steps and expect FID next year.” 
•  The three Rosebank licences are due to expire at the end of May, though Equinor may seek 
an extension from the North Sea Transition Authority (as per normal licensing governance). 
 
In May Equinor confirmed its exit from Russia led to a $1.08bn impairment; reporting also 
pre-tax profits for the first three months of the year of $17.2 bil ion off the back of 
increased energy prices. 

•  In response to the energy crisis in Europe Equinor has increased and optimised its 
production in order to deliver more gas. 
•  Equinor CEO Anders Opedal said:  “With an energy crisis in Europe, Equinor’s top priority is 
securing safe and reliable deliveries. Strong operational performance and good regularity 
gave high production in the quarter.  We have optimised the gas production to deliver higher 
volumes…” . 
 

ANNEX B 
 
TOP LINES 
 
CCUS 

•  The Scottish Government supports the development of CCUS as a common whole-system 
decarbonisation infrastructure with the flexibility to adapt over time to play a central role 
across the decarbonisation strategies of key sectors such as heat, industry and power.   
•  It is clear that CCUS will play an important role in helping us to reach net-zero 
emissions.  Advice from the Climate Change Committee describes CCUS as a “necessity, not 
an option” to achieve net-zero emissions.   
•  The development of strategically located CCS infrastructure in Scotland’s industrial clusters 
in Grangemouth and the North East could protect and ensure the just transition for 
important domestic industries into a low-carbon future, protecting jobs and utilising existing 
skills.  
•  Our Climate Change Plan update outlines an envelope of 3.8 million tonnes of negative 
emissions required to meet our 2030 milestone and 5.7 million tonnes in 2032; this cannot 
be delivered without CCUS.   
•  Scottish Government economic scenario analysis shows that, in 2045, Scottish GDP could be 
1.3-2.3% (£3.8Bn-£6.7Bn) higher in scenarios with CCUS, than without. 
•  Ensuring the Scottish Cluster carbon capture and storage project is deployed as soon as 
possible is critical to supporting net-zero, supply chain growth and economic benefit in 
Scotland.  
•  The project has the potential to support an average of 15,100 jobs between 2022 and 2050, 
with a peak of 20,600 jobs in 2031. 
•  The Cluster’s Acorn project is uniquely placed to be the least cost and most deliverable 
opportunity to deploy a full-chain CCS project in the UK. 
•  We do not hold all the necessary legislative and regulatory levers needed to support the 
Scottish Cluster, as they are not devolved. UK Government support including access to BEIS 
business models is essential to providing the certainty and support required to accelerate 
the Scottish Cluster project. 
•  We are working constructively with the UK Government to ensure the Scottish Cluster has 
the certainty it needs to continue its development. To this end, we have continued to 
advocate for the cluster in our engagement, and have offered £80 million from our Emerging 
Energy Technologies Fund. 
•  To date, BEIS has indicated that the Scottish Cluster will need to participate in Track-2 of the 
cluster sequencing process rather than be accelerated on a Track-1 timetable.  
•  On 08 April 2022, the Secretary of State for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy Kwasi 
Kwarteng, and UK Government for Scotland Minister Malcolm Offord, announced 
publication of the CCUS Investor Roadmap. 

•  The Roadmap does not signal any significant changes in UK Government approach to 
supporting the deployment of CCUS in UK. However, it does reiterate the UK Government’s 
commitment to supporting four CCUS clusters to be operational by 2030. It does not include 
any new commitments to support the Scottish Cluster accelerate its deployment, but does 
acknowledge its status as a “reserve cluster”.  
OFFSHORE WIND 
•  Our Offshore Wind Policy Statement sets out the Scottish Government’s ambitions for 
offshore wind in Scotland, including an ambition to achieve 8-11 GW of offshore wind in 
Scotland by 2030. This recognises that deployment must increase significantly if we are to 
meet our climate change targets. 
o  Scotland’s seas offer great opportunities for the sustainable development of offshore 
wind and are an important part of the green recovery and transition to net zero.  
o  Scottish Ministers have made clear, time and again, that they will use every lever at their 
disposal to maximise economic returns for the offshore wind sector here in Scotland. 
•  The results of ScotWind, the seabed leasing process for offshore wind, managed by Crown 
Estate Scotland (CES), were announced on 17 January 2022.  Lease option agreements with 
all successful applicants are now in place.  
o  The announcement outlined the winners of the competitive bidding process over areas 
of seabed where the next offshore wind projects will be located. This is the first 
devolved leasing round for offshore wind development in Scottish Waters and the first 
leasing round in Scotland in a decade. 
o  ScotWind is the world’s largest commercial round for floating offshore wind and puts 
Scotland at the forefront of offshore wind development globally. We already have the 
world’s largest operating commercial floating wind farm and ScotWind now breaks new 
ground in putting large-scale floating wind technology on the map at GW scale, offering 
Scotland a first-mover advantage. 
o  The projects given the green light by CES would, if approved, deliver far in excess of our 
current planning assumption of 10GW of offshore wind. The planning, consenting and 
funding processes that lie ahead - together with the need to fully consider the views of 
stakeholders about impact - means that it is not possible to know now exactly what 
scale of development will be permitted ultimately.  
o  ScotWind will deliver c £700m in return for these initial awards alone which we will use 
to benefit the people of Scotland, particularly by helping to tackle the climate and 
biodiversity crises and deliver a low carbon society.  
o  In addition, ScotWind will deliver several billion pounds more in public benefit via the 
investment of rental revenues once all the projects become operational. 
o  A clearing process is in progress for site NE1. The window for all eligible developers to 
confirm their intention to apply closed on 10 May. Option agreements with successful 
applicants will be signed later in 2022. 
•  The new offshore wind plan for Innovation and Targeted Oil and Gas Decarbonisation 
(INTOG) process was announced by Crown Estate Scotland on 22 February 2022.  Developers 
will apply for the rights to build small scale innovative offshore wind projects of less than 

100MW as well as larger projects connected to oil and gas infrastructure to provide 
electricity and reduce the carbon emissions associated with those sites.  
•  We remain fully committed to using every lever within our devolved competence to support 
and grow the offshore wind supply chain here in Scotland. 
o  Applicants to the ScotWind leasing round are required to submit a Supply Chain 
Development Statement that sets out the level and location of supply chain impact 
throughout the lifetime of projects. 
o  We believe that these Supply Chain Development Statements signify how seriously the 
Scottish Government takes this issue and, more importantly, will provide certainty of a 
pipeline of projects to suppliers across Scotland. 
•  We know that transmission charging remains a barrier, and a particular disadvantage, for 
projects located in Scotland or Scottish waters. 
o  Scottish generators clearly face higher transmission network costs as a result of their 
location and distance from main GB demand centres. 
o  The Scottish Government has long argued that Ofgem needs to be given an explicit 
remit to help achieve net zero – something that the UK Government has finally 
acknowledged in its recent Energy White Paper. 
SUPPLY CHAIN 
•  Ministers have been calling for action for some time with little progress being made and now 
wish to see tangible actions being taken to support the Scottish supply chain. 
•  As more large scale windfarms are built throughout this decade, we fully expect developers 
to be engaging early with companies based in Scotland to ensure that key manufacturing 
contracts do not go to yards overseas.  
•  Developers and those at the top of the supply chain have a responsibility to ensure that local 
suppliers have a realistic opportunity to compete for key manufacturing contracts. 
•  The introduction of a Supply Chain Development Statement by Crown Estate Scotland as 
part of the ScotWind leasing round will help to release economic benefits for the Scottish 
economy and we expect developers to honour their commitments. 
•  We welcome the introduction of a more robust Supply Chain Plan process as part of the CfD 
auction later this year, and we expect applicants to be engaging with the domestic supply 
chain from the outset of the process. 
•  There is considerable on-going work, including the Strategic Infrastructure Assessment (SIA) 
that was commissioned by the Scottish Offshore Wind Energy Council (SOWEC) to 
understand how Scotland could capitalise on the economic opportunity resulting from 
offshore wind. Published on 20th August the SIA will now be taken forward by SOWEC, with 
Mr McKee and Brian McFarlane (SSE) in their capacity as SOWEC co-chairs leading the group 
to develop an action plan to take forward the SIA’s recommendations. 
•  On 11 May, SOWEC published its Offshore Wind Collaborative Framework Charter. 24 
developers have signed up to the Charter, including successful bidders for all 17 ScotWind 
projects. 

•  The Charter builds on the 2021 Strategic Investment Assessment (SIA) recommendations 
adopted by the Scottish Offshore Wind Energy Council (SOWEC), and is a clear way to 
support and enable developers’ collective supply chain commitments. The Collaborative 
Framework Charter will help forge effective partnerships to deliver on the potential that 
offshore wind presents in the coming years. 
•  We are working with SOWEC, ETZ and enterprise agencies to deliver the Offshore Wind 
Supply Chain Summit, scheduled to take place in Aberdeen on 22 August, hosted by ETZ.  
•  The focus will be on supply chain opportunities from all offshore wind projects – not just 
ScotWind. 
•  The key themes will likely focus around  coordination between developers to even out 
supply chain requirements, growing our indigenous supply chain and attracting new inward 
investment where there are gaps, as well as  ensuring our port infrastructure is utilised in an 
optimal and collaborative manner. 
•  This work will be complemented by recent changes to the UKG Contract for Difference 
Supply Chain Plan process, to ensure greater utilisation of the domestic supply chain. Failure 
to do so could result in termination of CfD agreements. 
ENERGY STRATEGY AND JUST TRANSITION PLAN 
•  The Energy Strategy and Just Transition Plan, which will be published for consultation in the 
Autumn, will outline a coordinated vision for Scotland’s energy system using a whole-
systems approach. 
•  This plan will establish the energy system’s role in delivering our national Just Transition 
Outcomes and guiding public and private sector activity accordingly. 
o  Our work will be based on the National Just Transition Planning Framework, a world-
first, which sets out an ambitious approach to working with others on the economic and 
social impacts of transition. 
o  The plan will not only achieve our ambitious emissions reductions targets, but will do so 
in a way that ensures a positive outcome for all of Scotland, including business, the 
economy, jobs and skills. 
o  Since 2017 we have committed to Net Zero, legislated to eradicate fuel poverty as far as 
is practical, and published an updated Climate Change Plan providing a detailed, clear 
and credible pathway to meeting emissions targets over the period to 2032.  
o  The Energy Strategy and Just Transition Plan will provide an opportunity to bring the 
strategy for Scotland’s energy sector up-to-date and allow us to respond to new 
challenges and emerging opportunities. 
OIL AND GAS 
We have been consistently clear that oil and gas wil  continue to be part of Scotland’s 
energy mix as we transition to net zero.
 
•  Our focus is now on achieving the fastest possible, just transition for the oil and gas 
sector – one that delivers jobs and economic benefit, ensures our energy security, and 
meets our climate obligations. 

•  The principle underpinning is the one already encapsulated in our Co-operation 
Agreement – that unlimited extraction of fossil fuels, or maximum economic recovery in 
UK policy terms, is not consistent with our climate obligations. 
•  We recognise that our vision and roadmap for the energy sector can’t happen in 
isolation – a Just Transition Plan for Energy wil  be at the heart of our refreshed Energy 
Strategy,
 publishing as one coherent document in 2022. 
•  To inform the Energy Strategy and Just Transition Plan for Energy we have announced 
the award of a programme of work to better understand Scotland’s energy 
requirements
 as we transition to net zero and how this aligns with our climate change 
targets. 
•  The oil and gas supply chain is a significant part of the energy transition supply chain
it is clear that renewable or low carbon jobs cannot replace oil and gas jobs immediately 
and a managed transition is needed. 
•  The knowledge and experience of the oil and gas sector and its supply chain wil  be 
very important for developing and investing in essential low carbon technologies, such 
as CCUS – a technology that is seen by experts such as the UK Committee on Climate 
Change and the International Energy Agency as being vital to achieving Scottish, UK and 
international climate emissions targets. 
•  Many of the key levers needed to support the oil and gas sector are reserved to 
Westminster.  We seek to work closely with the UK Government to ensure both 
governments are doing all they can to protect jobs and retain vital skills. 
•  The Scottish Government will continue to use the devolved levers at our disposal to 
reduce emissions and meet our climate change targets. 
In relation to oil and gas fields, already partially sanctioned, and to the licensing 
requirements of new fields, if we say the answer to our current reliance on oil and gas for 
jobs and energy is to keep opening new oilfields, we don’t have sufficient imperative to 
develop alternatives quickly enough. Instead we become fixed in a cycle of dependency. 
•  We must focus on how to accelerate the development of new sources of energy, with 
associated new jobs so that we can move away from oil and gas more quickly, with a 
presumption as far as possible against new development.  
•  There is currently no evidence to demonstrate that Cambo could or should pass such an 
assessment, but have been clear (in August letter to the PM) that an assessment should 
take place to inform the decision that the UK Government will take. This also recognises 
the reality that it is a decision the Scottish Government is not able to make. 
•  The Scottish Government has offered to engage further about what this process should 
involve, to ensure it is credible and commands confidence – so far the offer has not 
been taken up by UK Government. 
•  We are undertaking work to better understand Scotland’s energy requirements as we 
transition to net zero, ensuring we support and protect our energy security and our 
highly skilled workforce whilst meeting our climate obligations. 

•  We are already investing in the sector’s net zero transformation. In addition to our 
expanded, £75m Energy Transition Fund and £100m Green Jobs Fund, our £500m Just 
Transition Fund will support the north east and Moray to become one of Scotland’s 
centres of excellence for the transition to a net zero economy. 
•  Scotland’s first Just Transition Plan, being developed for a refreshed Energy Strategy, will 
set out how the economic and social impacts of transition will be managed.  
‘WINDFALL’  AND INVESTMENT ALLOWANCE TAX ANNOUNCEMENT  
We have been clear that a windfall tax should apply to all companies benefiting from 
significantly higher profits. 
•  A levy focussed only oil and gas companies, who are disproportionately based in 
Scotland, means Scottish industry is carrying the weight of UK-wide interventions. 
•  Oil and gas companies are not the only businesses that have profited during the 
pandemic and current crisis.  
•  A windfall tax should apply fairly to all companies benefiting from significantly higher 
profits.  
•  This would also ensure that Scottish industry does not carry a disproportionate burden of 
funding a UK-wide response. 
ELECTRICITY NETWORKS 
Top  Lines  
•  National Grid ESO has signalled the need for over £7bn investment in new transmission 
infrastructure in Scotland to meet Net Zero targets. 
•  It is vital that we continue to work together to enable these critical investments, while 
ensuring that the regulatory levers continue drive down costs and increase benefits for 
customers and communities. 
•  The Offshore Transmission Network Review (OTNR) presents an opportunity for UK and 
devolved administrations to coordinate effort to improve network infrastructure delivery. 
•  The Scottish Government has asked for a review of the grid system in the past. We are 
pleased to see this happen and it is essential that devolved administrations are involved 
in the decision making process. 
•  We must be agile in decision making and ensure that the OTNR enables rather than 
frustrates development.  
•  TNUoS charges remain a key barrier to Net Zero in Scotland.  
•  Ofgem’s own analysis suggests that by 2040 Scottish renewable & low carbon generators 
will be the only ones to pay a wider TNUoS charge, with all others include gas generators 
elsewhere in GB being paid credits.  
•  In a net zero world, it is counterproductive in the extreme to care more about where 
generation is situated than what type of generation it is. 
•  A new approach is needed here, rather than small modifications to methodologies.  

Background 
Electricity Network Development                                                                                                                               
•  Increased electrification will require significant investment in our electricity 
infrastructure to maintain resilience and increase the transfer capability between 
Scotland and the rest of the GB market. 
Offshore Networks 
•  The joint BEIS and Ofgem Offshore Transmission Network Review (OTNR)  is intended to 
make the right tactical interventions to support timely delivery of offshore and 
associated onshore network infrastructure while ensuring the right balance between 
environmental, societal and economic costs. 
•  The Holistic Network Design (HND) is one of the key outputs from this project. 
•  The output of the HND was delayed from its initial delivery date of January 2021 and is 
expected to be published in June 2022 and set out a vision for 2030 of the UK offshore 
and onshore network to meet 40 GW of offshore wind. 
•  NGESO has now published the draft HND which has included 10.7GW of Scotwind 
development. A follow up exercise will include the remaining ~14GW of capacity with 
remaining contracts updated by Q1 2023.  
Onshore Networks  
•  NGESO’s recent Network Options Assessment (NOA)  has signalled the need to invest 
over £7bn in Scotland’s onshore transmission infrastructure if we are to keep on the 
pathway to net zero.  The publication of the final HND in June will coincide with a revised 
NOA creating a blueprint of network investment required to meet 2030 targets.  
•  Scottish Government is working with SSEN, SPEN and NGESO through a Major Network 
Projects Group to develop a clear understanding of the scale and timing of new 
transmission investments needed, which will help us plan and resource accordingly. 
•  Ofgem is leading an Electricity Transmission Network Planning Review (ETNPR) which will 
consider opportunities to better coordinate, plan and deliver strategic onshore 
transmission network infrastructure in future.  
•  The output of this work would be a Centralised Strategic Network Plan (CSNP) which 
would replace the existing NOA process and result in National Grid taking on more of the 
strategic network planning activity that is currently undertaken by Transmission Owners.  
•  The Scottish Government is a member of the ETNPR strategic advisory group and further 
consultation on this project expected in Spring 2022.  
TNUoS Network Charging 
•  Transmission Network Use of Systems Charges  is a cost recovery tool used by National 
Grid ESO to recover the allowed revenue for the Transmission Owners across GB 
(National Grid, SPEN and SSEN). 
•  Revenue is  recovered from generation and demand customers across GB.  (around 
£800m is recovered from generators and £2.7bn from demand customers). 

Issues with existing charging regime for generators 
•  Generation that connects to the transmission network in Scotland will face higher 
charges through TNUoS due to the distance from the bulk of GB demand.  
•  The charging system was originally designed for a time when large fossil fuel power 
stations were built close to demand. Today, as we move to a smart, decentralised and 
renewables dominated energy system there is growing concern that the existing regime 
is no longer fit for purpose.  
•  A number of stakeholders have contributed evidence on that clearly set out the flaws 
and risks associated with the current TNUoS charging system. This has included 
contributions from Cornwall Insight, NERA Economic Consulting1, Aurora Energy 
Research and Renewable Infrastructure Development Group.  
•  The Scottish Government has repeatedly called for change and we believe that an 
abundance of comprehensive evidence has been provided over the years by various 
stakeholders that clearly set out the flaws and risks associated with the current TNUoS 
charging system.  
•  In response to Ofgem’s recent call for evidence, the Scottish Government has questioned 
whether the existing methodology is aligned with net zero and has called a full review of 
TNUoS is that includes the locational element of the charges. 
Ofgem TNUoS charges review 
•  Ofgem published a call for evidence on TNUoS in October 2021 recognising that 
stakeholders were concerned with the TNUoS methodology and its outputs.  
•  In February 2022 Ofgem committed to a TNUoS task force that would consider shorter 
term fixes for issues such as the stability and predictability of the TNUoS charge. The 
absolute value of TNUoS is not in scope for this work. 
•  On 30 May, Ofgem provided an update on the TNUoS task force. Following the steps laid 
out in February 2022, they have stated that progress has been made on the agreed areas 
of focus which include identifying the root causes of unpredictability of TNUoS charges 
and an examination of input data for the model used to calculate locational element of 
the TNUoS charges to ensure they remain cost reflective.  
 
 

 
1 Assessing the Cost Reflectivity of Alternative TNUoS Methodologies (nera.com) 


ANNEX C 
 
BIOGRAPHIES 
 
David Cairns, Vice President, Equinor.  
 
David has been Vice President at Equinor since August 2019, and 
is responsible for Equinor’s UK Government relations. Before 
joining Equinor, David was the British Ambassador to Sweden 
(2015-19) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office’s Director 
for the Nordic Baltic Network. In his career in the Foreign Office 
he also served in Japan as the Director for Trade and Investment, 
and in Geneva as the Head of the UK’s WTO delegation. He 
studied Japanese at Oxford, worked in investment banking in 
Tokyo and London before joining the FCO, and was Vice-Chairman of the Japan Society 
(2011-15). 
 
 
 
From: [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Sent: Thursday, June 16, 2022 9:43 AM 
To: [Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Subject: RE: URGENT - Briefing Request - Cab Sec Meeting with Equinor, 16 June 
2022 09:00 - 09:30 
 
Hi all 
 
Just finished the meeting with Equinor. Some high level points for us to be aware of: 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
Regards 
 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
 
 

In response to item 12) 10/08/2022 Video conference with Equinor, Nicola 
Sturgeon MSP (First Minister), Ministerial engagements travel and gifts 
 

1.  FM Briefing – Call with Equinor – 10 August 2022 
 
BRIEFING FOR THE FIRST MINISTER 
 
MEETING WITH EQUINOR 
 
Wednesday 10th August 2022 
 
Key message  •  The Scottish Government’s position is clear that unlimited 
extraction of fossil fuels is not consistent with our climate 
obligations. This is why we have consistently called on the UK 
Government, to urgently re-assess all approved offshore oil 
and gas licenses where drilling has not yet commenced, 
against our climate commitments. 
•  We recognise that Oil and Gas continues to play an important 
role in our energy mix, and our economy. 
•  But we must focus on how to accelerate the development of 
new sources of energy, with associated new jobs so that we 
can move away from oil and gas more quickly, with a 
presumption as far as possible against new development.  
•  Scotland’s first Just Transition Plan, being developed for a 
refreshed Energy Strategy, will set out how the economic and 
social impacts of transition will be managed.  
What 
Meeting with Equinor who published on 4th August: 
•  Economic analysis on their Rosebank Oil Field Project 
•  The Environmental Statement on Rosebank Field – now subject 
to a formal public consultation. 
Why 
Equinor have asked for a call with the First Minister to provide an 
update on the progress of their Rosebank Field which will be 
shortly due for Final Investment Decision by the company.  
Who 
•  Anders Opedal, President and CEO, Equinor 
•  David Cairns, Vice President Political and Public Affairs – Global 
CCOM PPAG,  
•  Jose Frey-Martinez, Chief of Staff, Equinor 
Where 
Virtual meeting – Microsoft Teams 
When 
Wednesday 10th August, at 15:30 
Likely themes  Oil and Gas, and offshore licensing  
Media  
N/A 

Supporting 
Andy Hogg, Deputy Director Energy Industries Division,  
official 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
Attached 
Annex A - Meeting Summary 
documents 
Annex B – Scotland’s oil and gas statistics 
Annex C – Equinor Background 
Annex D – Rosebank Field  
Annex E – Biographies 

Meeting Summary  - ANNEX A 
On 4 August Equinor published economic analysis for its Rosebank project – 
which setting out the following metrics: 
•  Expected investment of £8.1bn over the life of the multi-million-barrel field – with 
more than three-quarters of which (78%) will be spent in the UK. 
o  Around £4.1bn of which will be spent developing the field, alongside 
£3.6bn in OPEX, with decommissioning costs estimated around £400mn. 
•  At peak, Rosebank is expected to employ up to 1,600 direct, full-time equivalent 
(FTE) jobs, nearly 1,200 of which will be UK-based. 
•  Estimated GVA amounts to some £24.1 billion over the field’s life – or £2.1 billion 
annually at its peak – equivalent to 1% of the Scottish GDP, according to analysis 
prepared by Wood Mackenzie and Shetland-based Voar Energy on behalf of the 
operator. 
•  Fewer workers will be needed once operational in 2026, Equinor anticipates the 
need for nearly 300 FTE roles over its 25-year life, 90% of which it says are likely 
to be UK-based. 
•  Equinor have also published their Environmental Statement on the field (now out 
for formal public consultation) with a Final Investment Decision on the project 
expected in Q1 of 2023. 
•  Approval from the Offshore Petroleum Regulator for Environment and 
Decommissioning (OPRED) is needed before the project can move to the next 
stage. 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
Scottish Government’s headline position:  
 
The Scottish Government’s position is clear that unlimited extraction of fossil 
fuels is not consistent with our climate obligations. This is why we have 
consistently called on the UK Government, to urgently re-assess all approved 
offshore oil and gas licenses where drilling has not yet commenced, against 
our climate commitments.  
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
SG OCEA Analysis states: 
•  The UK overall production is currently 1.5 million barrels per day and Rosebank’s 
expected  average additional production is across its (24 years) lifetime will be 
roughly around 2.8% of UK production. Equinor’s figures above focuses solely 
on the peak production of the field over 4 years resulting in their estimate 
that Rosebank could account for around 8% of the UK’s oil production. 


On 5 August Campaign group Uplift claimed that investing in the field means 
that Equinor will pay £834m less in tax to the UKG under the Energy Profits 
Levy (EPL) . 
•  Greenpeace UK have also said: "We will fight Rosebank every step of the way, and 
urge the government to crack on with quick, cheap solutions that will actually help 
in the cost-of-living crisis and the climate emergency - renewables, home insulation 
and heat pumps." 

•  Greenpeace has already have brought a legal challenge with the Scottish Courts 
against the North Sea Transition Authority (industry regulator) over the planned 
Shell Jackdaw development in the North Sea. 
Decarbonisation of the Rosebank Field 
•  Platform electrification is a vital part of cutting emissions in the North Sea and 
reaching net zero and is a core component of the industry and UKG agreed North 
Sea Transition Deal. 
•  Within the NSTD, the oil and gas industry has committed to reduce offshore 
emissions by 50% in 2030, set on a 2018 baseline. 
•  Officials understand that Equinor hopes to lower the operational emissions of the 
project by adapting the FPSO for electrification, using power either from the 
onshore grid or directly from renewables schemes – with one option potentially 
being a dedicated floating wind scheme. 
•  On 4 August Arne Gurtner, senior vice president for UK and Ireland offshore at 
Equinor stated that Rosebank will be ‘one of the most energy efficient production 
units on the continental shelf – it will already be that without electrification, but we 
are also committed to bringing electrification forward,”
 but that the operator “has 
not yet decided on the solution yet…” 

The UK Government has failed to set out a clear policy position on climate 
checkpoints [the UKG consultation closed on 28 February with an 
announcement on the Checkpoint expected in early Autumn).    
•  As  such,  there  is  no  context  to  consider  the  emissions  impacts  of  any 
development.  However, we welcome Equinor’s plans to electrify production on the 
Rosebank Field, reducing emissions from production, which would be an important 
consideration in the climate compatibility assessment.    
•  Equinor is an important partner in Scotland’s energy transition.    
•  Scottish  Government  have  previously  welcomed  Equinor’s  investment  into 
Scotland  in  Hywind  Scotland,  the  world’s  first  floating  offshore  wind  farm  and 
Equinor’s partnership with SSE to produce power with carbon capture and storage 
in Peterhead. 
•  We will continue to work with Equinor to maximise investment across all parts of 
the energy supply chain to deliver jobs in Scotland.  
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)]  
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 

Mr Gurtner stated “The project has matured all along from when we first came into the 
license as operator. We have used somewhat more time to optimise the concept, both 
commercially but also towards a more low-carbon solution which fits which fits to our 
own Equinor strategy.”  “The EPL is a very, very important boundary condition which 
we have been following very closely, but it hasn’t directly influenced the project 
maturation in this phase.”
 
 
‘WINDFALL’  AND INVESTMENT ALLOWANCE TAX ANNOUNCEMENT  
While the fiscal regime is reserved to Westminster, I’ve made clear that I support 
a windfall tax. But I also made the point that there are companies beyond the Oil 
& Gas sector making large profits right now. 
•  A windfall tax should apply fairly to all companies benefiting from significantly 
higher profits. This would also ensure that Scottish industry does not carry a 
disproportionate burden of funding a UK-wide response. 
•  That is why we are calling on the UK Government to extend the windfall tax to all 
companies benefiting from significantly higher profits through the pandemic and 
energy crisis – as well as scrapping VAT on energy bills. 
 
 

Annex B – Scotland’s Oil and Gas Statistics 
 
Oil and Gas Production 
•  In 2019, 93.5% of Scotland’s primary energy (encompassing all of Scotland’s 
indigenous production and imports) was oil and gas (62.2% oil, 29.5% gas and 
2.5% petroleum products). 
•  In 2019, Scotland produced an estimated 54.0 million tonnes of oil equivalent 
(mtoe) of crude oil and natural gas liquids (NGLs) (equivalent to 628 TWh). 
Scotland accounts for 95.2% of total UK crude oil and NGLs production.  
•  Scotland produced 23.2 mtoe of natural gas in 2018 (equivalent to 270 TWh), 
although this has dropped for each of the last three years. It accounts 
for 62.1% of total UK gas production. 
•  Oil and gas make up 76.5% of all Scottish consumption. In 2018/19, the 
approximate sales value of oil and gas produced in Scotland is estimated to have 
been £25 billion.  
•  The oil and gas sector on average supports up to 40% of all Scottish jobs directly 
and across the supply chain. It is expected to generate £16 billion in GVA, 
supporting 82,000 jobs in 2021.  
 
Reserves 
•  The North Sea Transition Authority (NSTA) estimate for proven and estimated UK 
reserves as at end 2020, is over 11 billion barrels of oil equivalent, of which 4.4 
billion had been sanctioned.  
•  The NSTA estimates without the development and discovery of new fields, the 
current reserves would sustain domestic production from the UKCS to 2030. 
However, with development production could be sustained for another 20 years.   
 
Emissions from UKCS 
•  In 2019, 19.2 MtCO2e GHGs were emitted from upstream oil and gas operations. 
Emissions from activities in the Scottish zone of the North Sea provides an 
indicative estimate of around 15.4 MtCO2e (80%). 
 
Imports and Exports 
•  Of all of Scotland’s primary energy generated via oil and gas, more than four 
fifths (81.1%) of it was exported in 2019, with only about a tenth (11.5%) 
domestically consumed. 
•  Turnover of Scottish offshore oil and gas exports stands at £24.5 billion in 2018, 
of which £16.0 billion is exported to the rest of the UK and £8.4 billion exported 
to the rest of the world. 
•  The proportion of imports in total Scottish oil and gas has risen from 3% in 1998 
to 21% in 2019. The proportion of total Scottish Oil and Gas that is exported has 
remained relatively stable at 88% in 1998 to 81.1% in 2019. 

•  Domestic production has a lower carbon intensity than a number of potential 
import substitutes. The NSTA have estimated gas extracted from the UKCS has an 
average emission intensity of 22 kgCO2e/boe; whereas imported LNG has a 
significantly higher average intensity of 59 kgCO2e/boe. 
 
 
 

 
 

Annex C – Equinor Background 
Background 
 
•  Equinor is a Norwegian multinational energy and petrochemicals company with 
worldwide revenues of $90.92 billion USD. With nearly 21,126 people employed 
worldwide in 2021 and approximately 650 employees in the UK.  
•  They produced on average 2,079 Million barrels of oil equivalent (boe) per day.  
•  The company is vertically integrated – i.e. it is active in exploration, production, 
refining, distribution, petrochemicals and trading. Equinor is present in around 30 
countries around the world, operating in North and South America, Africa, Asia, 
Europe - and Norway. 
•  Equinor have three British onstream projects; Mariner, Utgard and Barnacle. 
Mariner production began in 2019, with over £6 Billion of investment supporting 
an estimated 700 jobs.  
•  Equinor every year typically supplies 20-22 Billion cubic metres of natural gas to 
the UK which covers over 25 % of UK gas demand. Their Yorkshire storage facility 
provides around 11% of the UK’s storage capacity.  
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
Recent Developments 
 
•  16th June 2022 – Equinor and Centrica’s latest agreement to deliver additional 
supplies to the UK adds around 1 billion cubic meters (bcm) per year to Equinor’s 
existing, bilateral contract with Centrica and brings the total volume under the 
contract above 10 bcm per year. 
 
Equinors Energy Transition 
 
•  They have an ambition to power 5 Million UK homes by their UK wind farms by 
2030.  
•  Equinor operate three UK offshore wind farms; Dudgeon and Sheringham Shoal, 
and Hywind Scotland, off the coast of Peterhead, Scotland. 
•  Hywind Scotland’s five turbines came online in 2017 and with 30 MW capacity 
they can generate enough electricity to power around 36,000 Scottish homes. 
•  Dogger Bank will be completed in 2026. The 3.6GW project will be capable of 
providing around 5 million UK homes with renewable electricity, creating around 
200 jobs.  
•  The North Sea region will play a key contribution in Equinor’s global ambition to 
increase its renewables capacity to 12 – 16GW by 2035, around 30 times what it is 
today. 

•  In Aberdeenshire in Scotland, they are collaborating with SSE Thermal to develop 
Peterhead Carbon Capture Power Station which is expected to start operations by 
2027. 
 
 
 
 

Annex C – Rosebank Oil Field 
Rosebank Oil Field  
The Rosebank field is located in the Faroe-Shetland Channel,  125 kilometres from 
the closest UK coast on Shetland. The field is the largest pre-Field In Development 
(FID) project in the UK. Production from the Rosebank conventional oil development 
project is expected to begin in 2025 and continue until 2049.  
Production is forecast to peak in 2028 at approximately 92 Thousand barrels per day 
(kbpd) of crude oil and condensate and 74 Million cubic feet per day (Mmcfd) of 
natural gas. The field is owned by Equinor (40%), Suncor Energy (40%) and Siccar 
Point (20%). The field is expected to recover 368.7 Million barrels of oil equivalent 
(Mmboe), comprised of 325.32 Million barrels of oil (Mmbbl) of crude oil & 
condensate and 260.24 Billion cubic feet (bcf) of natural gas reserves (oil 88.24%, gas 
11.76%).  
1.  Key facts 
•  The UK overall production is currently 1.5 million barrels per day and Rosebank’s 
expected  average additional production is across its (24 years) lifetime will be 
roughly around 2.8% of UK production. To note that Equinor’s analysis focuses 
solely on the peak production of the Field over 4 years resulting in their 
estimate that Rosebank could account for around 8% of the UK’s oil 
production. 

•  If 369 Millions of barrels of oil are sold at the average oil price over the past five 
financial years ($62.75) this would result in an estimate of £23.1 billion 
undiscounted value added from oil sold. 
2.  Economic impact 
Rosebank could benefit from the UK Government’s £3 billion tax allowance for fields 
deeper than 3,280 feet and with more than 180 million barrels of reserves, a key 
factor in the investment decision in the field. 
3.  Environmental impact 
4.  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)]  
 
 
 



Annex E – Biographies 
 
Anders Opedal, President and CEO, Equinor – since 2 
November 2020 
 
Opedal joined Equinor in 1997. From 2018-2020 he held the 
position as Executive Vice President Technology, Projects and 
Drilling. From August to October 2018, he was Executive Vice 
President for Development, Production Brazil and prior to this 
Senior Vice President for Development, Production International Brazil. He also held 
the position as Equinor’s Chief Operating Officer. In 2011 he took on the role as 
Senior Vice President in Technology, Projects and Drilling; where he was responsible 
for Equinor’s NOK 300 billion project portfolio. From 2007-2010 he served as Chief 
Procurement Officer.  
 
He has held a range of technical, operational and leadership positions in the 
company and started as a petroleum engineer in the Statfjord operations. Prior to 
Equinor, Opedal worked for Schlumberger and Baker Hughes. 
 
Education: MBA from Heriot-Watt University and master's degree in Engineering 
(sivilingeniør) from the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH) in Trondheim. 
 
David Cairns, Vice President Political and Public 
Affairs, Equinor.   
 
After joining the FCO in 1993, David Cairns served in 
Japan as Second Secretary Commercial and in Geneva 
as the Head of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) 
Section. He has also held a number of positions based 
in London.   
 
From 2015 -2019, David was the UK Ambassador to 
Sweden.  In 2019, David took up his current role as VP President Political and Public 
Affairs at Equinor. 
 
 
 

2.  Readout Equinor 10 August 2022 
 
Equinor 
Wednesday 10 August, 15:30 
Microsoft Teams 
 
Present: First Minister 
 
    Anders Opedal, Equinor 
 
    David Cairns, Equinor 
 
    Jose Frey-Martinez, Equinor 
 
    SG Officials 
 
•  Anders welcomed the meeting to discuss the Rosebank field. The Rosebank 
Environmental Statement was due to be published on 12 August. Due to 
OPRED error this was published on 4 August. 
•  Equinor want to be an energy transition company but they see a clear for 
continued investment in oil and gas during the transition.  
•  They are focusing on 3 priority areas to help address concerns: climate 
change, energy security and just transition. 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
•  First Minister welcomed the engagement and acknowledged the approach 
around addressing environmental considerations. FM outlined the importance 
of oil and gas companies also considering how to reduce emissions from the 
use of their products (scope 3 emissions)  
•  First Minister agreed on importance of oil and gas in just transition, particularly 
the skills transfer. The transition will not happen overnight. SG position is not 
currently saying that new drilling should never go ahead but that the Climate 
Compatibility Checkpoint process should go ahead to ensure consistency with 
the Paris Agreement. UKG have not set out the CCC process for fields 
already licensed. Scottish Government are undertaking analysis work as part 
of the revised Energy Strategy to look at Scotland’s energy needs. UKCS is a 
mature basin and looking at what is required and will consider everything in 
context of that.  
•  There is no simple position and want to ensure proper assessment 
undertaken. Individual field assessments are fine but they need to be 
considered as part of the bigger picture.  
•  Anders advised Equinor are an open and transparent company and know 
there will be a lot of debate around the field, a lot of NGOs are not supportive. 
The report published by the EIA did not consider geopolitics and the same 
debate is happening in Norway. 
•  Norwegian Minister met with EU last week to discuss. They are going to 
continue engagement with NGOs and politicians. 
•  First Minister stated that the key decision lies with UKG. Scottish Government 
are trying to look at production in totality and assess compatibility with the 
Paris 1.5 degrees. Trying to take a responsible approach as the climate crisis 
is real. 

•  Anders asked about differing view on Brexit in Scotland and dialogue between 
SG and EU on energy. 
•  First Minister confirmed there continues to be dialogue with the EU particularly 
around hydrogen as an example. Formal dialogue with the EU is now more 
complex given UK Govt approach to Brexit. 
•  Anders asked if there was any advice on Rosebank as they want to avoid a 
polarised debate. 
•  First Minister suggested they don’t dismiss any opinions and ensure they 
engage properly and on the totality of the issues this raises. Suggested 
Equinor may want to encourage UKG to introduce CCC at development 
phase as this would help make case and demonstrate compatibility.  
•  It was agreed that engagement would continue. 
 
 
 

In response to item 16) 02/05/2023 Video conference with Equinor, Humza 
Yousaf MSP (First Minister), Ministerial engagements travel and gifts 
 
1.  Note of meeting between First Minister & Equinor 020523 
 
Note of meeting between First Minister, Humza Yousaf, and Equinor on 2 May 2023 
 
Attendees: 
Humza Yousaf, First Minister 
Anders Opedal, CEO Equinor 
Arne Gürtner, Senior VP UK and Ireland 
David Cairns, VP Political and Public Affairs, Equinor 
Kersti Berge, Director, Energy and Climate Change, SG 
Andrew Hogg, Deputy Director Energy Industries Division, SG 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)]  
 
 
First Minister thanked Anders Opedal for his congratulatory letter on Mr Yousaf’s 
appointment as First Minister. His early engagement with the sector is a clear 
indication of the important role for oil and gas companies like Equinor in the energy 
transition. Recognising that decisions on new exploration and production of oil and 
gas are for the UK Government to make, he invited Equinor to set out their plans for 
Scotland. 
 
Mr Opedal stressed that the purpose of the call was introductory, to initiate a 
constructive working relationship. Equinor had started as a Norwegian oil and gas 
company but had expanded geographically and into renewables, hydrogen and 
carbon capture. Their approach to Scotland was a microcosm of this reality; 
investing in oil and gas while also supporting a transition. This maintains jobs and 
energy security. [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial 
information)] 
 
Mr Opedal expects Equinor’s next big investment in oil and gas to be at Rosebank. 
Within Equinor, Rosebank is not being considered in isolation, but as part of a totality 
of balanced investment in the company’s strategic priorities: producing oil and gas 
with lower emissions through electrification; investing in renewables; and supporting 
CCUS.  In the context of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Equinor believe that Norway 
and Scotland both have a duty to support energy security in the rest of Europe. 
 
First Minister set out the importance of ensuring climate obligations are met; 
recognised the role Scotland plays in global energy security and emphasised the 
importance of a just transition. He is determined the workers of the North East will 
not suffer the effects deindustrialisation of the 1980s inflicted on the mining and steel 
communities. There is huge economic  potential in renewables, but it has to be a 
partnership approach. A Just Transition. 
 
Mr Opedal stressed the importance of a just transition for the employees of oil and 
gas companies, and also those in the supply chain. This was a good fit for Scottish 
Government priorities and Equinor was working closely with Scottish Government 
already. 

 
First Minister emphasised the importance of lowering emissions and hoped Equinor 
would demonstrate what it was doing to lower emissions and how profit from oil and 
gas would be invested in renewable alternatives. 
 
First Minister reiterated that he would be firm on climate obligations, but saw Equinor 
and other energy companies as partners and wanted to take a partnership approach 
going forward. 
 
Mr Opedal thanked the First Minister for his time and said he was keen to invite him 
to Norway, though in many senses their work here demonstrates the range of their 
activity. [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Equinor aims to replace cash flow from oil and gas with low carbon profit and as a 
company also have a Net Zero ambition. The process will take time, but transition is 
the direction of travel. 
 
Mr Gürtner gave some examples to demonstrate that commitment to transition – 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
First Minister thanked Equinor for the kind invitation to visit Norway and asked them 
to keep in touch, stating the FM or Ministers would be happy to meet Mr Opedal in 
person when he next visits Scotland.  
 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
 
 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2.  Briefing – 02052023 – First Minister – Equinor 
 
BRIEFING FOR THE FIRST MINISTER 
Meeting with Equinor CEO Anders Opedal 
02/05/2023 

Key message  We are committed to a just transition for Scotland’s energy sector 
and ensuring we take workers with us on our journey to net zero. 
We will not do to the North East what Margaret Thatcher did to 
our mining and steel communities. 
Our focus, as outlined in the draft Energy Strategy and Just 
Transition Plan, must be meeting our energy security needs, 
reducing emissions and ensuring a just transition for our oil and 
gas workforce as North Sea resources decline. 
Unlimited extraction of fossil fuels is not consistent with our 
climate obligations and is not the solution to the energy price 
crisis. 
Scotland’s natural resources, which include strong and consistent 
wind resource, along with our established expertise in oil and gas, 
skilled offshore workforce, excellent port structure and strong 
innovation hub, make Scotland one of the best places in the 
world to develop offshore wind and its supply chain. 
What 
Introductory meeting 
Why 
Equinor has requested an introductory call and will provide an 
update on its Rosebank Field, a final investment decision 
announcement for which is expected soon. 
Who 
Anders Opedal, President and CEO, Equinor  
David Cairns, Vice President Political and Public Affairs, Equinor 
Marit Berger Rosland, lawyer, Equinor 
Where 
Virtual Meeting, Microsoft Teams 
When 
02 May 2023, 15:30 – 16:00 
Likely themes  Oil and gas, and offshore licensing  
Energy Strategy and Just Transition Plan  
Media  
N/A 
Supporting 
Kersti Berge, Director, Energy and Climate Change 
official 
Andrew Hogg, Deputy Director Energy Industries Division  
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
[R
  edacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Attached 
Annex A - Meeting Summary 
documents 
Annex B - [Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal 
communications)] 
Annex C – Readout, FM meeting with Anders Opedal 10/08/22 
Annex D- Equinor Background 

Annex E  - Rosebank Field 
Annex F – Electrification 
Annex G – Offshore Wind Top Lines 
Annex H - Biographies 

Annex A – Meeting Summary  
Equinor have requested an introductory call and to provide an update on their 
progress with their Rosebank Field, a final investment decision announcement for 
which is due imminently. 
Rosebank is waiting on Final Investment Decision, an announcement is 
expected in the first half of 2023. Rosebank is owned by Equinor (80%) and 
Ithaca (20%), Equinor recently doubled its share by buying Suncor’s UK 
business, including their 40% stake in Rosebank.  
•  First oil is expected in 2026, with the field anticipated to have a 25-year lifespan. 
•  Rosebank is the biggest field waiting on FID and is in comparison twice the size of 
Cambo.  Further detail on the field can be found in Annex F.  
On 4 August 2022 Equinor published economic analysis for its Rosebank project 
– which set out the following metrics: 
•  Expected investment of £8.1bn over the life of the multi-million-barrel field – with 
more than three-quarters of which (78%) will be spent in the UK. 
o  Around £4.1bn of which will be spent developing the field, alongside 
£3.6bn in OPEX, with decommissioning costs estimated around £400mn. 
•  At peak, Rosebank is expected to employ up to 1,600 direct, full-time equivalent 
(FTE) jobs, nearly 1,200 of which will be UK-based. 
•  Estimated GVA amounts to some £24.1 billion over the field’s life – or £2.1 billion 
annually at its peak – equivalent to 1% of the Scottish GDP, according to analysis 
prepared by Wood Mackenzie and Shetland-based Voar Energy on behalf of the 
operator. 
•  Fewer workers will be needed once operational in 2026, Equinor anticipates the 
need for nearly 300 FTE roles over its 25-year life, 90% of which it says are likely 
to be UK-based. 
 
Equinor published their Environmental Statement on the field in August (which 
was issued for public consultation between August and September 2022). 
•  Approval from the Offshore Petroleum Regulator for Environment and 
Decommissioning (OPRED) is needed before the project can move to the next 
stage. 
•  OPRED followed up Equinor on a number of areas including: 
o  to “clarify how the proposed development will support the various NSTD 
policies and commitments, identifying what fraction of UKCS emissions the 
proposed development will contribute in those years that have NSTD 
commitments, and how the proposed development aligns with Equinor 
Net Zero ambitions.”;  
o  a lack of info on what will happen to the gas export line for Rosebank, 
which goes via the Magnus platform, when Magnus is due to cease 
production in the early 2030s; 

o  Clarity on how Equinor intends to ensure a viable line is available to avoid 
flaring or venting of gas, which harms the environment. 
 
Rosebank was discovered in 2004, and is not subject to the UK Government 
climate compatibility checkpoint.  
•  Scottish Government has called for the checkpoint to be strengthened and to 
apply to fields like Rosebank that are not yet in production.  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
•  The Scottish Government is consulting, through the draft ESJTP, on criteria to 
include in a strengthened checkpoint. 
 
Electrification of Rosebank 
•  Equinor have said that Rosebank will be “electrification-ready” when production 
starts in 2026, but electrification, which would reduce production emissions will 
likely only be possible around 2030 due to consenting delays.  
•  Electrification would lower the emissions associated with the production of oil 
and gas from the Rosebank field, which will already be at the lower end of the UK 
Continental Shelf (UKCS) operation as older fields are much more emissions 
intensive than new ones. (UKCS average emissions intensity is 20 kg/boe; 
Rosebank pre-electrification will be 12 and 3 with electrification from shore, using 
Equinor data). 
•  Timelines for electrification will depend on permits and consenting to take a cable 
from shore to the Rosebank field, or, if Rosebank is to be electrified as part of a 
wider West of Shetland electrification programme, then the permits and 
consenting for that. 
 
Previous Engagements 
 
Former FM met with Anders Opedal, Equinor on 10 August 2022 following the 
publication of the economic analysis for Rosebank. A full readout of this call can be 
found in Annex C. 

Annex B –  
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)]

Annex C – Readout, FM meeting with Anders Opedal, 10 August 2022 
 
 
Present: First Minister 
 
    Anders Opedal, Equinor 
 
    David Cairns, Equinor 
 
    Jose Frey-Martinez, Equinor 
 
    SG Officials 
 
•  Anders welcomed the meeting to discuss the Rosebank field. The Rosebank 
Environmental Statement was due to be published on 12 August. Due to 
OPRED error this was published on 4 August. 
•  Equinor want to be an energy transition company but they see a clear for 
continued investment in oil and gas during the transition.  
•  They are focusing on 3 priority areas to help address concerns: climate 
change, energy security and just transition. 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
•  First Minister welcomed the engagement and acknowledged the approach 
around addressing environmental considerations. FM outlined the importance 
of oil and gas companies also considering how to reduce emissions from the 
use of their products (scope 3 emissions)  
•  First Minister agreed on importance of oil and gas in just transition, 
particularly the skills transfer. The transition will not happen overnight. SG 
position is not currently saying that new drilling should never go ahead but 
that the Climate Compatibility Checkpoint process should go ahead to ensure 
consistency with the Paris Agreement. UKG have not set out the CCC process 
for fields already licensed. Scottish Government are undertaking analysis work 
as part of the revised Energy Strategy to look at Scotland’s energy needs. 
UKCS is a mature basin and looking at what is required and will consider 
everything in context of that.  
•  There is no simple position and want to ensure proper assessment 
undertaken. Individual field assessments are fine but they need to be 
considered as part of the bigger picture.  
•  Anders advised Equinor are an open and transparent company and know 
there will be a lot of debate around the field, a lot of NGOs are not supportive. 
The report published by the EIA did not consider geopolitics and the same 
debate is happening in Norway. 
•  Norwegian Minister met with EU last week to discuss. They are going to 
continue engagement with NGOs and politicians. 
•  First Minister stated that the key decision lies with UKG. Scottish Government 
are trying to look at production in totality and assess compatibility with the 
Paris 1.5 degrees. Trying to take a responsible approach as the climate crisis is 
real. 

•  Anders asked about differing view on Brexit in Scotland and dialogue between 
SG and EU on energy. 
•  First Minister confirmed there continues to be dialogue with the EU 
particularly around hydrogen as an example. Formal dialogue with the EU is 
now more complex given UK Govt approach to Brexit. 
•  Anders asked if there was any advice on Rosebank as they want to avoid a 
polarised debate. 
•  First Minister suggested they don’t dismiss any opinions and ensure they 
engage properly and on the totality of the issues this raises. Suggested 
Equinor may want to encourage UKG to introduce CCC at development phase 
as this would help make case and demonstrate compatibility.  
•  It was agreed that engagement would continue. 
 
 
 

 

Annex D - Equinor Background 
Equinor is a Norwegian multinational energy and petrochemicals company with 
worldwide revenues of £72.8 billion (approx. US$90.9). With nearly 21,126 
people employed worldwide in 2021 and approximately 650 employees in the 
UK.  
•  Produce on average 2,079 Million barrels of oil equivalent (boe) per day.  
•  Are a vertically integrated company – i.e. it is active in exploration, production, 
refining, distribution, petrochemicals and trading. Equinor is present in around 30 
countries around the world, operating in North and South America, Africa, Asia, 
Europe - and Norway. 
•  Equinor have three British onstream projects; Mariner, Utgard and Barnacle. 
Mariner production began in 2019, with over £6 Billion of investment supporting 
an estimated 700 jobs.  
•  Equinor every year typically supplies 20-22 Billion cubic metres of natural gas to 
the UK which covers over 25 % of UK gas demand. Their Yorkshire storage facility 
provides around 11% of the UK’s storage capacity.  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Recent Developments 
•  16th June 2022 – Equinor and Centrica’s latest agreement to deliver additional 
supplies to the UK adds around 1 billion cubic meters (bcm) per year to Equinor’s 
existing, bilateral contract with Centrica and brings the total volume under the 
contract above 10 bcm per year. 
•  23rd March 2023 – Equinor released its latest annual report, announcing it made 
approx £18.2 billion ($22.7 billion) in post-tax profits in 2022, having paid £36 
billion ($45 billion) in corporate taxes globally. Equinor also produce 2 million 
barrels of oil equivalent per day in 2022, and has reduced emissions by 30% 
relative to 2015, with the goal of reaching a 50% reduction by 2030. 
Equinor’s Energy Transition Plan  
•  Equinor commits to: reducing operated greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 
2030, from a 2015 baseline; reducing the net carbon intensity, including emissions 
from the use of sold products, by 20% by 2030 and 40% by 2035; Allocating more 
than half of their gross capital expenditure to renewables and low carbon energy 
by 2030; and deploying renewables, CCS and hydrogen while improved the 
carbon and methane efficiency of oil and gas production. 
•  Equinor developed the world’s first floating offshore wind farm off the coast of 
Aberdeen, the 30 MW Hywind Scotland. The windfarm consists of 5 Siemens 
6MW turbines, and was fully commissioned in 2017. According to Equinor, the 
floating wind farm has achieved the highest average capacity factor of all UK 
offshore windfarms each year since it started production. 
•  Equinor operate three UK offshore wind farms; Dudgeon and Sheringham Shoal, 
and Hywind Scotland, off the coast of Peterhead, Scotland. 

•  Hywind Scotland’s five turbines came online in 2017 and with 30 MW capacity 
they can generate enough electricity to power around 36,000 Scottish homes. 
•  Dogger Bank will be completed in 2026. The 3.6GW project will be capable of 
providing around 5 million UK homes with renewable electricity, creating around 
200 jobs.  
•  Equinor where unsuccessful in its bids for the ScotWind leasing round. 
•  In Aberdeenshire in Scotland, they are collaborating with SSE Thermal to develop 
Peterhead Carbon Capture Power Station which is expected to start operations by 
2027. 


Annex E - Rosebank Field 
The Rosebank field is located in the Faroe-Shetland Channel,  125 kilometres from 
the closest UK coast on Shetland. The field is the largest pre-Field In Development 
(FID) project in the UK.   
 
Production is scheduled to begin in October 2026, and continue until 2051. In total, 
299 million barrels of oil and 140 billion cubic feet of gas are estimated to be 
recovered, amounting to 323 million barrels of oil equivalent (mmboe). Oil 
production is forecast to peak at 63 thousand barrels per day (kbpd) in 2032, and 
peak gas production is expected to occur in 2027, at 33 million cubic feet per day 
(mmcfd). The field is owned by Equinor (80%), who operate the site, and Ithaca 
Energy (20%). 
 
 
Key facts 
•  As is the case with Cambo, Rosebank is located in one of the harshest environments 
in the UKCS and if sanctioned, will be one of the first UK fields developed in water 
depth of more than 1,000 metres. 
•  The  Rosebank  oilfield  is  estimated  to  contain  around  323  mmboe  that  can  be 
extracted over 25 years until 2051.   
•  Rosebank could contribute on average around 2.4% of total UK production across 
the  lifetime  of  the  field.  However,  Equinor  analysis  suggests  Rosebank  could 
provide 8% of total UK production at its peak. 
1.  Economic impact 
•  Across the lifetime of the field, Rosebank will support significant employment with 
an average of 450 UK-based full time direct, indirect and induced jobs. Peak UK 
based employments is expected to occur in Q3 2025, with a total of 1,200 direct, 
indirect and induced jobs being created as a result of Rosebank production. 
•  Over the lifetime of the project, Rosebank could generate up to £24.1 billion of 
gross value add (GVA).  
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 

•  Equinor calculate that Rosebank will generate £8.1 billion of direct investment, of 
which £6.3 billion is likely to be invested in UK-based businesses. 
 
 
2.  Environmental impact 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
 
 
 

Annex F – Electrification 
Power generation, which typically comes from gas and diesel generators 
offshore, accounts for around two-thirds of an installation’s emissions (NSTA). 
•  Electrification seeks to replace that generation with clean electricity via renewables, 
though it is costly and technically challenging. 
•  NSTA  have  stated  that  the  goals  of  the  North  Sea  Transition  Deal  (NSTD) 
committing the industry to a 50% cut in emissions by 2030, cannot be met without 
reducing power-related emissions significantly. For existing assets, electrification 
is viewed as the only option to meet those goals. 
•  There are various electrification options discussed by  industry, with the three most 
viable options potentially being: 
o  power  from  shore,  whereby  the  O&G  installation  would  be  connected 
directly to the onshore grid via a cable link; 
o  power  from  interconnectors,  whereby  a  direct  cable  link  would  be 
established between the O&G installation and the national grid of another 
country); and  
o  power from offshore wind farms, comprising a direct connection between 
existing or planned offshore wind farms and O&G installations. 
•  However,  there  remain  a  number  of  technological,  commercial  and  regulatory 
approaches still to be resolved on any final solution. 
Equinor is yet to decide on the means of electrification for Rosebank, though it 
has publicly stated that it will invest £80 million on the Knarr floating 
production, storage and offloading unit (FPSO)  electrification ready. 
•  Using  lower-carbon  electricity  is  expected  to  drastically  slash  the  emissions 
intensity of the field to 3kg of CO2 per barrel of oil equivalent (boe), well below the 
UK benchmark of 20kg CO2/ boe in 2020. 
Innovation and Targeted Oil and Gas (INTOG) offshore wind leasing round
We are committed to ensuring secure, reliable and affordable energy supplies 
within the context of long-term decarbonisation of energy generation.
   
•  The  transition  to  net  zero  will  require  rapid  decarbonisation  across  the  energy 
sector including Scotland’s long-standing oil and gas industry.  
•  Innovation  and  Targeted  Oil  and  Gas  decarbonisation  (INTOG)  offshore  wind 
energy leasing and sectoral marine planning process is unique and a world’s first 
aimed at supporting decarbonisation of oil and gas assets.   
•  We welcome the Crown Estate Announcement made on the 24 March 2023 of the 
successful  13  INTOG  applicants,  which  will  be  offered  exclusivity  to  develop 
offshore wind in Scotland's seas.    
•  The area of seabed covered by the IN projects is just over 139km2 and by the TOG 
projects  1534km  2,  and  the  Exclusivity  Agreements  will  cover  projects  with  a 
proposed capacity of up to 499MW for IN and 5GW for TOG. 
•  INTOG projects will help deliver the oil and gas sector’s decarbonisation targets in 
the NSTD.   

[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 

Annex G – Offshore Wind Top Lines 
Scotland’s natural resources, which include strong and consistent wind 
resource, along with our established expertise in oil and gas, skilled offshore 
workforce, excellent port structure and strong innovation hub, make Scotland 
one of the best places in the world to develop offshore wind and its supply 
chain. 
•  As of December 2022, Scotland has 2.2 GW of operational offshore wind. In the 
pipeline there is 2.8GW under construction, 1.1GW awaiting construction, and 4.2 
GW of projects in planning ahead of the ScotWind and INTOG projects. 
•  ScotWind  reflects  very  significant  market  ambition  for  offshore  wind  in  Scottish 
waters – almost 28GW across 20 projects, and the INTOG leasing round could add 
a further 5.5GW of capacity. 
•  This means that subject to planning and consenting decisions and finding a route 
to market, we have a current reported potential pipeline (subject to change) of over 
38 GW of offshore wind projects.  
•  When  projects  which  are  awaiting  construction,  under  construction  or  already 
operational are added to this the total potential capacity reaches over 40GW – the 
equivalent to produce enough electricity annually to power every home in Scotland 
for 17 years, or every home in the UK for over a year and a half. 
•  Our Offshore Wind Policy Statement (2020) set out the Scottish Government’s 
ambition for 8-11 GW of offshore wind in Scotland by 2030.  We recognise that 
this now needs to be reviewed in light of the market ambition expressed in 
response to the ScotWind leasing round. We are using the draft Energy Strategy 
and Just Transition Plan (ESJTP) to consult on increasing this ambition. We are 
also consulting on setting an ambition for 2045. 
 
The Innovation and Targeted Oil and Gas (INTOG) offshore wind leasing round 
is the next step in realising another world leading opportunity for Scotland’s 
energy transition: helping both decarbonise our existing oil and gas operations 
while helping our offshore wind sector to expand, innovate and deliver on our 
ambition to be a renewables powerhouse.
   
•  Crown Estate Scotland announced on 24 March 2023 the 13 projects out of a 
total of 19 applications that have been offered Exclusivity Agreements in the 
leasing round. 
•  The announcement from Crown Estate Scotland not only indicates that INTOG will 
provide a significant contribution to the public purse but ensure the continuing 
growth and development of Scotland’s offshore expertise and wider supply chain, 
supporting a true just transition for our energy sector. 
 
The conclusion of the ScotWind offshore wind leasing auction and the clearing 
process is a huge vote of confidence in Scotland. 


•  ScotWind is the first devolved leasing round for offshore wind development in 
Scottish Waters, and the first leasing round in Scotland in a decade. ScotWind is 
the world’s largest commercial round for floating offshore wind and puts 
Scotland at the forefront of offshore wind development globally. 
•  ScotWind reflects very significant market ambition for offshore wind in Scottish 
waters - almost 28GW across 20 projects, and has delivered over £750m in 
revenues to the public purse in initial lease option awards.  
•  In addition, ScotWind will raise several billion pounds more in rental revenues 
when projects become operational.  
•  ScotWind promises to be transformational in delivering wider economic supply 
chain benefits to help power Scotland’s green recovery in communities across 
Scotland. We welcome the commitment of developers to invest an average 
projection of £1.4 bn in Scotland per project, which equates to more than £28bn 
across the 20 ScotWind offshore wind projects. 
•  We are working to realise ambitions for the offshore wind supply chain in 
Scotland through The Scottish Offshore Wind Energy Council (SOWEC). The 
Offshore Wind Collaborative Framework Charter, announced in May 2022, will 
help forge effective partnerships to deliver on supply chain potential. 
•  Industry, development agencies, and SG have been working together to develop 
a Strategic Investment Model (SIM) which will facilitate delivery of the 
commitments agreed in the Collaborative Framework Charter in line with the 
2021 Strategic Investment Assessment recommendations.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 




Annex H - Biographies 
 
Anders Opedal, President and CEO, Equinor – since 2 
November 2020 
 
Opedal joined Equinor in 1997. From 2018-2020 he held the 
position as Executive Vice President Technology, Projects and 
Drilling. From August to October 2018, he was Executive Vice 
President for Development, Production Brazil and prior to this 
Senior Vice President for Development, Production International Brazil. He also held 
the position as Equinor’s Chief Operating Officer. In 2011 he took on the role as 
Senior Vice President in Technology, Projects and Drilling; where he was responsible 
for Equinor’s NOK 300 billion project portfolio. From 2007-2010 he served as Chief 
Procurement Officer.  
 
He has held a range of technical, operational and leadership positions in the 
company and started as a petroleum engineer in the Statfjord operations. Prior to 
Equinor, Opedal worked for Schlumberger and Baker Hughes. 
 
Education:
 MBA from Heriot-Watt University and master's degree in Engineering 
(sivilingeniør) from the Norwegian Institute of Technology 
(NTH) in Trondheim. 
 
David Cairns, Vice President Political and Public Affairs, 
Equinor.   
 
After joining the FCO in 1993, David Cairns served in Japan 
as Second Secretary Commercial and in Geneva as the Head 
of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Section. He has also held a number of 
positions based in London.   
 
From 2015 -2019, David was the UK Ambassador to Sweden.  In 2019, David took up 
his current role as VP President Political and Public Affairs at Equinor. 
 
 
 
Marit Berger Rosland 
 
Marit Berger Røsland is a Norwegian politician for 
the Conservative Party. She served as Norway's Minister of 
European Affairs from 2017 to 2018, as a member 
of Solberg's Cabinet. 
 

Marit is a lawyer in Equinor’s legal department and also chair of Norwegian Institute 
for Human Rights.  
 
 
 
 

In response to item 17) 08/11/2023 Scottish Parliament meeting with Equinor 
UK Ltd, Humza Yousaf MSP (First Minister), Lobbying Register 
 
1.  Note – FM meeting with Equinor and [Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 8 

November 2023 
 
Meeting between Arne Gürtner (Senior Vice President, Equinor), [Redacted – 
(Not in Scope)] and the First Minister, 8 November 2023.  
 
•  The FM noted the context to the meeting being correspondence received 
expressing disappointment in the Scottish Government’s response to the 
consenting of the Rosebank field. He set out that this response reflected 
concerns around the rigour of the UK Government’s climate compatibility 
checkpoint approach in the context of domestic and global climate obligations 
and lack of clarity around energy security implications when oil is mainly 
exported. 
 
•  The FM also noted a shared recognition of the need for the energy transition to 
be just and the clear understanding on part of Scottish Government that this 
could only be realised in partnership with industry. He challenged current 
attendees, and the oil & gas industry more widely, to set out more detail on what 
it’s contribution to the transition would look like in practice. 
 
•  Industry attendees noted that their concerns around the Rosebank response 
were around consistency and tone. They also set out concerns that both the 
North Sea oil & gas and offshore wind sectors were currently in states of crisis, 
meaning that signals at this time were particularly important for investor 
confidence. In response to the FM’s challenge, they expressed the view that the 
pace of transition away from fossil fuels should be set from the demand side. 
They also noted that oil & gas produced from the UK Continental Shelf only 
comprises a small percentage of global production and that many of the 
companies involved could easily move elsewhere, with associated impacts for 
supply chain businesses. 
 
•  The FM agreed with the points around the importance of investor confidence, the 
need for fundamental market reform in support of the energy transition and 
focussing on supply chain companies. He also agreed that reducing demand for 
fossil fuels was a vital element of transition, but queried whether the evidence 
was clear that this would be enough to deliver on global climate goals. He set out 
responding to the climate crisis must be the key overall priority, given the severity 
and existential nature of the challenge it poses.  
 
•  Attendees welcomed the meeting and agreed to maintain open lines of 
communication. 
 
ENDS 
 
2.  Briefing – 08112023 – First Minister – [Redacted – (Not in Scope)] and 
Equinor 
 

BRIEFING FOR THE FIRST MINISTER 
Meeting with [Redacted – (Not in scope)] and Equinor 
08/11/2023 

Key message  •  We  are  committed  to  a  just  transition  for  Scotland’s  energy 
sector.  
•  That  means  simply  stopping  all  future  oil  &  gas  activity 
overnight  would  be  wrong.  We  have  never  suggested  this 
should  be  the  case.  It  could  threaten  energy  security  while 
destroying the very skills we need to transition to the new low-
carbon economy. 
•  However,  we  must  also  acknowledge  the  reality  and  urgent 
imperative  of  responding  to  the  global  climate  crisis.  Any 
further extraction and use of fossil fuels must be consistent with 
Scotland’s  climate  obligations  and  Just  Transition 
commitments. 
 
What 
Meeting with [Redacted – (Not in Scope)] and Arne Gürtner of 
Equinor  
 
Why 
To discuss the Scottish Government response to Rosebank. 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] wrote to you on 2 October (Annex F
following comments made regarding Rosebank. You responded 
on 3 October and agreed to a meeting to discuss further.  
Who 
First Minister 
[Redacted - (Not in Scope)] 
Arne Gürtner, SVP UK & Ireland offshore Equinor 
 
Where 
First Minister’s Office, Scottish Parliament 
When 
Wednesday 8 November 2023, 13:15 – 13:45 
Likely themes  Scottish Government position on offshore oil and gas licensing 
and the impact of this on industry. 
Media  
N/A 
Supporting 
Susie Townend, Interim Deputy Director, Energy Industries 
official 
[Redacted Regulation 11(2) – (personal data of a third party)] 
Attached 
Annex A - Meeting Summary 
documents 
Annex B - Lines to Take 
Annex C - Equinor Background 
Annex D – [Redacted-Not in scope] 
Annex E  - Biographies 
Annex F -  [Redacted -Not in scope] 

Annex G – FM response to [Redacted – (Not in scope)]and 
Equinor – 3 October 
Annex H – [Redacted -Not in scope] 

Annex A – Meeting Summary  
 
Summary and background: 
Equinor and [Redacted – (Not in scope)] are the two main companies involved in the 
Rosebank oil & gas field license. [Redacted – (Not in scope)] wrote to you on 2 October 
following your comments expressing disappointment at the approval of the field and asked 
to meet to discuss this further. As Equinor is the key partner in Rosebank, it was proposed 
that a joint meeting would be beneficial.  
 
Recent Engagements: 
10 August 2022: 
Former FM met with Anders Opedal, Equinor following the publication of 
the economic analysis for Rosebank. 
2 May 2023:  You had introductory meeting with Anders Opedal, Arne Gürtner and David 
Cairns of Equinor. 
6 September 2023:
 Short meeting between Minister for Energy and Environment and 
Equinor.  
[Redacted -Not in Scope] 
 
Sensitivities: 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
•  On 05 November the UKG announced the intention to change offshore oil and gas 
licensing,  with  a  new  Bill  in  Kings  Speech  (7  Nov),  requiring  the  NSTA  to  invite 
applications for new production licenses on an annual basis. A round will only take 
place if two “net zero transition” tests are met: 1) The UK must be projected to import 
more oil and gas from other countries than it produces at home; 2) carbon emissions 
associated  with  UK  gas  production  are  lower  than  the  equivalent  emissions  from 
imported liquefied natural gas.  

Annex B: Lines to Take 
 
TOP LINES 
We are committed to a just transition for Scotland’s energy sector.  
•  That means simply stopping all & gas production overnight would be wrong. It 
could threaten energy security while destroying the very skills we need to 
transition to the new low-carbon economy. 
•  We also recognise and welcome the contribution  the oil & gas sector has made 
to Scotland’s economy and society.  
•  However, any new extraction of fossil fuels must be consistent with Scotland’s 
climate obligations. It must also ensure a planned and fair transition that leaves 
no one behind. 
•  Through our draft Energy Strategy and Just Transition Plan, we have set out a 
clear pathway to both deliver on global emissions reduction commitments and 
capitalise on the enormous opportunities offered by becoming a net zero 
economy.  
•  With so much at stake, it is vital that we take an evidence-based approach to the 
energy transition.  
•  That is why we are calling for a robust and transparent climate compatibility test 
to be applied to all new oil & gas developments. 
•  We have recently published analysis of consultation responses on the draft 
Strategy and Plan and are committed to publishing a final version by next 
summer. 
•  Our focus, as outlined in the draft Energy Strategy, is on meeting Scotland’s 
energy security needs, reducing emissions and ensuring a just transition for our 
oil and gas workforce as North Sea resources decline. 
 
Decisions on oil and gas exploration and licensing remain reserved to the UK 
Government.  
•  We have previously called on the UK Government to hold a four nations’ 
discussion to agree the Climate Compatibility Checkpoint process – a call which 
was ignored.  
 
CHANGES TO UKG OFFSHORE LICENSING PROCESS 
We continue to be disappointed by the lack of engagement and consultation by 
UK Ministers on changes to the oil and gas licensing process. 
•  Decisions on oil and gas exploration and production remain reserved to the UK 
Government.  However, these decisions have  huge implications here in  Scotland 
and also globally. 
•  Both  the  new  proposals  and  previous  announced  arrangements  for  UK  Climate 
Compatibility Checkpoints lack both transparency and rigour. We are left with no 
alternative but to conclude the UK Government simply isn’t serious on climate. 

•  We call, again, on the UK Government to hold a four nations discussion to agree a 
robust approach to Climate Compatibility Checkpoints for the oil and gas sector.  
•  Instead of licensing ever more fossil fuel extraction, now apparently on an annual 
basis,  the  UK  Government  should  be  encouraging  investment  in  renewables  to 
support our energy security and supporting a just transition for our energy sector 
and for Scottish households and businesses.   
 
 
 
 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(4)(e) – (Internal communications)] 
 
‘WINDFALL’ AND INVESTMENT ALLOWANCE TAX ANNOUNCEMENT 
 
The changes announced in June by the UK Government to the Energy Profits 
Levy (EPL) were brought in with no consultation or engagement with Scottish 
Ministers, and significantly lack detail on how the Energy Security Investment 
Mechanism proposal will be implemented.  
•  Our view at present is that the EPL’s investment allowance [which will continue to 
operate until 2028 or prices fall significantly] doesn’t do enough to future-proof 
energy supplies and promote green energy. 
•  I would be interested in your own views on what would be the most effective 
levers to incentivise investment in renewables. 
 
JUST TRANSITION & NORTH SEA JOBS 
Independent analysis conducted by EY shows that GVA and employment in oil 
and gas sector is forecast to decline in line with the North Sea basin decline. 
However, it also shows the considerable economic opportunity from renewable 
energy to Scotland’s economy.  
•  We need to harness the skills, talent, and experience located in the North East to 
support the buildout of low carbon technologies in Scotland. The Scottish 
Government is absolutely committed to a just transition, and ensuring we take 
workers with us on our journey to net zero. 
•  With the right support, the number of low carbon jobs is modelled to rise from 
19,000 in 2019 to 77,000 by 2050 as the result of a just energy transition, 
delivering a net gain in jobs across the energy production sector overall. 
•  In addition to energy production jobs, we expect significant potential for 
employment and economic benefits from the wider economy as we move to net 
zero – throughout transport, heat, and manufacturing sectors.    
•  Our world leading ScotWind leasing round is a key part of this. We strongly 
welcome commitments made by the successful developers to invest an average 
projection of £1.5 billion in Scotland per project, which equates to more than £28 
billion across the 20 projects and will help create thousands of new jobs. 

•  The Scottish government is absolutely committed to a just transition - and we are 
not waiting - we are already acting, for example, through our ten year £500 
million just transition fund, taking workers with us on our journey to net zero and 
working alongside trade unions.  
•  I would welcome more detail, including milestones on the pathway to a net-zero 
emissions economy by 2045, for how your companies are supporting Scotland’s 
just transition. 
 
SUPPLY CHAIN 
The Scottish Government is committed to supporting our oil and gas supply 
chain transition.  
•  In relation to Rosebank, Ithaca have stated that: “Project management and 
engineering activities will be performed mainly from Aberdeen and tree systems 
will be manufactured in Dunfermline”. 
•  The Scottish Government welcomes this. Our oil and gas workers, and their vital 
skills, will be essential to the transition. 
•  We also welcome the 50% UK content target agreed with industry in the North 
Sea Transition Deal. 
•  The oil and gas sector has a critical role to play in supporting the energy 
transition. Supporting its diversification into low carbon and renewable energy 
sectors is key to ensuring capacity is retained and developed in the service of 
Scotland’s energy transition.  
•  Scotland’s oil and gas supply chain already has expertise and experience which 
can service a low carbon and renewable offshore energy sector at home and 
abroad.   
•  On 17 October the First Minister announced up to £500 million investment to 
leverage private investment in ports, manufacturing and assembly work to 
support major supply chain opportunities to Scotland. 
•  The acceleration of our offshore renewables capabilities over the coming decade 
presents enormous economic opportunities which must be seized in order to 
secure a just transition for our energy sector and a fairer, greener Scotland for 
everyone. 
•  As part of the £500 million Just Transition Fund for North East and Moray, the 
Scottish Government has awarded the Energy Transition Zone £9.8 million to 
deliver an Energy Transition Fund and Supply Chain Pathway.  
 
SKILLS 
Our oil and gas workers, and their vital skills, will be essential to the transition. 
•  We need to harness the skills, talent, and experience located in the North East to 
support  and  accelerate  the  buildout  of  low  carbon  technologies  if  Scotland  to 
realise the full benefits of the energy transition. 
•  Robert Gordon University’s most recent report ‘Powering Up The Workforce’ (2023) 
shows that Scotland has enormous energy potential – with a workforce ‘goldilocks 

zone’ between 2024 and 2028 when the supply chain capability can be developed 
so that the transferability of the offshore energy workforce is optimised. 
•  Previous RGU research (2021) highlighted that a majority of offshore workers could 
be delivering low carbon energy by 2030 and that more than 90% of the UK’s oil 
and  gas  workforce  have  medium  to  high  skills  transferability  –  they  are  wel  
positioned to work in adjacent energy sectors. 
•  RGU’s Making the Switch report (2022) highlights the potential for the North East 
region to become a net zero global energy hub that supports existing oil & gas 
roles into the renewables and low carbon roles of the future.   
 
Our £500m Just Transition Fund is providing financial support to help energy 
workers reskill  and to build confidence in the potential for a just transition.  
•  As part of this Fund, we are backing a new energy transition skills hub which will 
train 1000 people in the next 5 years.  
•  Indeed,  the  UK  Government  has  refused  to  even  match  our  £500  million  Just 
Transition Fund, despite the over £400 billion (in today’s money) that has flown to 
the Treasury from North Sea oil since the 1970s. 
•  Our National Strategy for Economic Transformation sets out our ambition that, by 
2032,  Scotland  will  be  an  international  benchmark  for  how  an  economy  can 
transform itself, de-carbonise and rebuild natural capital. 
 
 

Annex C - Equinor Background 
Equinor (formerly StatOil) is a Norwegian multinational energy and 
petrochemicals company with worldwide revenues of £72.8 billion (approx. 
US$90.9). With 21,936 people employed worldwide in 2022 and more than 650 
employees in the UK. The Government of Norway owns 67% of Equinor. 
•  [Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
•  Are a vertically integrated company – i.e. it is active in exploration, production, 
refining, distribution, petrochemicals and trading. Equinor is present in around 30 
countries around the world, operating in North and South America, Africa, Asia, 
Europe - and Norway. 
•  Equinor have three recently onstream projects in the UKCS: Mariner, Utgard and 
Barnacle. Mariner production began in 2019, with over $7.7 Billion of investment 
supporting an estimated 700 jobs.  
•  Equinor every year typically supplies 20-22 Billion cubic metres of natural gas to 
the UK which covers 27% of UK gas demand. This supply comes both from 
Equinor’s operations both on the UKCS and the Norwegian Continental Shelf 
(NCS). 
 
[Redacted Regulation 10(5)(e) – (confidentiality of commercial information)] 
Recent Developments 
•  16th June 2022 – Equinor announced Q3 2023 results showing that it had made a 
post-tax profit of $2.73 billion. This is down from $6.72 billion in post-tax profits 
reported from the same quarter last year, but up slightly from the $2.25 billion 
reported last quarter. Equinor attribute this to the fall in natural gas periods from 
the highs of last year.  
•  30th October 2023 – Equinor announced that it has signed a new five-year long 
supply agreement with Germany’s major energy company RWE. 
•  30th October 2023 – The North Sea Transition Authority (NSTA) awarded 27 new 
hydrocarbon exploration licenses. Equinor has been named as one of the 
successful bidders (Reuters (2023): UK regulator awards 27 oil, gas exploration 
licenses). 
 
Equinor role in Rosebank 
•  Rosebank reached Final Investment Decision in September 2023. Rosebank is 
owned by Equinor (80%) and [Redacted – (Not in scope)] (20%), after Equinor 
doubled its share by buying Suncor’s UK business, including their 40% stake in 
Rosebank. Gas from this field will be exported via a new build 85 km pipeline tied 
into the existing West of Shetland Pipeline System (WoSPS) onwards to the 
Sullom Voe Terminal (SVT). Over the course of its 25 year lifespan, Rosebank is 
currently expected by Wood Mackenzie to produce a total of around 324 millions 
of barrels of oil equivalent  (mmboe), which is the combined measure for both 

liquids and gas production, comprised of 299 mmboe of oil and 25 mmboe of 
gas (92.5% oil, 7.5% gas). 
•  Media reports since Rosebank approval have suggested that Equinor’s ownership 
and the tax allowance structures around UK licensing mean that much of the 
economic benefit from Rosebank will flow to the Norwegian Government. 
 
Equinor’s Energy Transition Plan  
•  Equinor commits to: reducing operated greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 
2030, from a 2015 baseline; reducing the net carbon intensity, including emissions 
from the use of sold products, by 20% by 2030 and 40% by 2035; Allocating more 
than half of their gross capital expenditure to renewables and low carbon energy 
by 2030 (from 14% in 2022); and deploying renewables, CCS and hydrogen while 
improved the carbon and methane efficiency of oil and gas production. 
 
Equinor, Offshore Wind and Low-Carbon Solutions 
•  Equinor operates three windfarms in the UK: Sheringham Shoal, Dudgeon and 
Hywind Scotland. Hywind Scotland was the world’s first floating offshore wind 
farm, powering the equivalent to 36,000 homes in the UK. 
•  The Dogger Bank offshore windfarm is due to be completed in 2026 when it will 
then power the equivalent of 6 million UK households. 
•  Equinor currently has 749 MW of installed offshore wind capacity in the UK, and 
has the ambition to power the equivalent of 7 million UK homes by 2030. 
•  In Aberdeenshire in Scotland, Equinor is collaborating with SSE Thermal to 
develop the proposed 910 MW Peterhead Carbon Capture Power Station, which 
could be operational as early as 2027. This could capture on average 1.5 MtCO2 
per year, 5% of the UK Government’s 2030 target for CCS. 
•  Equinor have a 33.3% stake in the Norwegian Northern Lights CCUS project. The 
first phase of the Northern Lights Development with a storage capacity of 1.5 
million tonnes per annum is 80% funded by the Norwegian government and is 
part of the Longship Project. Carbon capture and storage operations are 
scheduled to begin in 2024. 
 

Annex D  
[Redacted – (Not in scope)] 
 
  
 


Annex E - Biographies 
 
[Redacted – (Not in Scope)] 
 
Arne Gürtner, Equinor Senior Vice President UK and Ireland 

Based in Equinor’s UK operations headquarters 
in Aberdeen, Arne leads an organization of more 
than 1000 employees currently supporting 
Equinor’s UK and Ireland upstream activities. 
These include the Mariner development on the 
United Continental Shelf, which started 
production in August 2019 cross UK-Norwegian 
border developments including the Utgard and 
Barnacle fields, as well as a partner-operated 
interest in the Corrib gas field in Ireland. 
 
As well as a board variety of leadership roles 
across Equinor, including his previous position of 
VP for Technical Excellence in a global business function, Arne has been leading a 
large variety of disciplines ranging from environmental, drilling and petroleum 
technology within research and technology as well as operations on the Norwegian 
Continental Shelf. 
 
He holds a PhD in marine technology from the Norwegian University of Science and 
Technology. 
 
 


Annex F: [Redacted – (Not in scope)] 
 
[Redacted – (Not in scope)] 
 

Annex G: First Minister response to  Equinor and [Redacted – (Not in scope)] 
3 October 2023 
 
Dear Arne and [Redacted – (Not in scope)], 
 
Since the approval of Rosebank last week, there has been significant media and political 
interest in the Field and how it will support Scotland and the UK’s energy security needs, 
supporting jobs and continued investment in the energy supply chain. 
 
I have always maintained that Scotland’s focus must now be on meeting our energy security 
needs, reducing emissions and delivering affordable energy supplies, whilst ensuring a just 
transition for our oil and gas workforce as North Sea resources decline. To achieve that, we 
need to harness the skills, talent and experience located in the North-East to support the 
build-out of net zero technologies in Scotland. We are already acting, for example, through 
our 10-year £500 million Just Transition Fund for the North East and Moray, to enable that 
transition. 
 
The Scottish Government recognises the role that Scotland, and particularly the North East, 
can play in ensuring that we continue to be at the forefront of energy transition across the 
world. That is why we welcome the work conducted by companies operating across the oil 
and gas sector to diversify into low carbon and renewables.  
 
The role of companies such as Equinor and [Redacted – (Not in Scope)] operating in the oil 
and gas sector, will be essential in making a just transition possible. We remain committed to 
a net zero future, and we will use every power at our disposal to support sustainable 
economic growth and maximise the opportunities of the green economy. 
 
I would be pleased to meet with you both to discuss further. Please liaise with my Private 
Secretary at xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxx who will assist in identifying a mutually convenient date. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Annex H: [Redacted – (Not in scope)]  
 
[Redacted – (Not in scope)]