DSMA Notices

Martin James Keatings made this Freedom of Information request to Defence and Security Media Advisory Committee
This authority is not subject to FOI law, so is not legally obliged to respond (details).


This request has been closed to new correspondence from the public body. Contact us if you think it ought be re-opened.

The request was partially successful.

Martin James Keatings

Dear Defence, Press and Broadcasting Advisory Committee,

I wish to see a full list of DA-notices past and present ( including the date and reason) that this body has issued regardless of whether these notices still stand.

Yours faithfully,

M.Keatings

DSMA Secretary, Defence and Security Media Advisory Committee

1 Attachment

Dear Mr Keatings,

 

Thank you for your request on 'whatdotheyknow' for the following
information:

 

‘I wish to see a full list of DA-notices past and present (including the
date and reason) that this body has issued regardless of whether these
notices still stand.’

 

Although as a non-public body the Defence and Security Media Advisory
(DSMA) Committee is not subject to the Freedom of Information Act 2000 or
the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002, the DSMA Committee is
committed to practising a policy of maximum disclosure consistent with its
aim of preventing the inadvertent public disclosure of information that
would compromise UK national security, and that its advice is sought and
given in confidence. 

 

The Defence Advisory (DA) Notice System which you refer to was in use from
1993, when it replaced the D-Notice System which had been in use since
1912, until 2015 when it was replaced by the current DSMA Notice System. 
An outline history of the DSMA Notice System since 1912 is [1]here and
Secrecy and the Media – the Official History of the D Notice System by
Nicholas Wilkinson is a book length history from the beginnings of the
system before 1912 up to 1997.

 

The five DA Notices in use between 2000 and 2015 are [2]here in full.  A
summary of the 1971, 1982 and 1993 D-Notices and DA Notices are attached,
taken from the official history of the D-Notice System.  The current
standing DSMA Notices, in full, are available [3]here.  For the many
pre-1971 D-Notices please refer to the official history or the public
records in the National Archives. 

 

The aim of the DSMA Notice System is to prevent inadvertent public
disclosure of information that would compromise UK military,
counter-terrorist and intelligence operations, methods, or capabilities;
put at risk the safety of those involved in such operations; or lead to
attacks that would damage the critical national infrastructure and/or
endanger lives.  The system is voluntary, it has no legal authority and
the final responsibility for deciding whether or not to publish or
broadcast rests solely with the editor or publisher concerned.

 

DSMA Notices are issued by the DSMA Committee, which replaced the Defence,
Press and Broadcasting Advisory Committee you refer to in 2015.  Like its
predecessors, this is an independent, advisory body composed of media
representatives, including editors of national and regional newspapers,
periodicals, news agencies, broadcasters, digital news, and book
publishers, and senior civil servants representing government departments
concerned with national security.

 

The DSMA Committee Secretariat also offers advice to editors and
journalists on specific matters, normally following their requests for
advice, and, if necessary, may occasionally issue specific DSMA Notice
advice in a letter to editors, in confidence, to clarify the application
of the standing Notices to a specific matter.  These clarifications are
summarised in the six-monthly committee meetings promulgated on the DSMA
website for the past ten years [4]here.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Group Captain John Alexander | Second Deputy Secretary | Defence and
Security Media Advisory Committee| [5][DSMA request email]  | [6]www.dsma.uk

 

 

 

show quoted sections