Dear General Medical Council,

Can you please disclose how many of the doctors who are registered with the GMC are known to be involved in Cosmetic (Aesthetic) Practice:
either
1. Part time
or
2. Full time

Yours faithfully,

Pieter

FOI, General Medical Council

Thank you for getting in touch. Please note this is an automated email.

 

We’ll get back to you as soon as we can with a further acknowledgement.
You’ll usually hear from us on the next working day, but it might take a
little longer during busy periods.

 

In the meantime, if you want any further information about the GMC, please
visit our website.

 

 

Thank you

 

Information access team

General Medical Council

Email: [GMC request email]

Telephone: 0161 923 6365

Working with doctors Working for patients

The General Medical Council helps to protect patients and improve medical
education and practice in the UK by setting standards for students and
doctors. We support them in achieving (and exceeding) those standards, and
take action when they are not met.

show quoted sections

Matthew McCoig-Lees (0161 923 6579), General Medical Council

Dear Pieter

 

Information Access Request F18/9432/MM

 

Thank you for your email, which I have considered under the Freedom of
Information Act 2000.

 

I think you may be able to get the information that you need using our
data explorer tool. The link for this is below:

 

[1]https://data.gmc-uk.org/gmcdata/home/#/

 

Using this, I can see that there are 1172 doctors who have their
speciality registered as plastic surgery, for example. There are other
specialities that you may feel are related to Cosmetic Practice which you
can search.

 

However, I should point out that just because a doctor is registered as a
plastic surgeon, does not mean that’s the field in which they work, either
exclusively or at all and there are some doctors who are not on the
register in a speciality which may be relevant who are employed to do
cosmetic work.

 

We hold no other information that would be relevant to your question that
is not reflected In the data in the data explorer tool regarding the
registration types of Doctors.

 

As to your question on full and part time work, the GMC does not hold data
on the hours that Doctors work so I am unable to answer that question.

 

I hope you find this information useful. If you have any queries about
this, or need anything further, please contact me on the details below.

 

Kind Regards

 

Matt

 

Matthew McCoig-Lees

Information Access Officer

Information Access Team

General Medical Council

3 Hardman Street

Manchester

M3 3AW

Email: [2][email address]

Website: [3]www.gmc-uk.org

Tel: 0161 923 6579

 

show quoted sections

Dear Matthew McCoig-Lees (0161 923 6579),

Thank you very much for your quick response.
I had a look at the "data explorer" app but could only find information on Plastic Surgeons.

I am actually interested in doctors who practise "non-surgical" cosmetic procedures.
Do you have any data on them?

Yours sincerely,

Pieter

Matthew McCoig-Lees (0161 923 6579), General Medical Council

Dear Pieter

I'm sorry we don’t have information that is just limited to Dr's who practice non-surgical cosmetic procedures.

There are other specialities that would cover cosmetic/ aesthetic practice such as Otorhinolaryngologists but that would include surgical procedures and I suspect would be mostly or almost entirely be surgical procedures.

Kind Regards

Matt

Matthew McCoig-Lees
Information Access Officer
Information Access Team
General Medical Council
3 Hardman Street
Manchester
M3 3AW
Email: [email address]
Website: www.gmc-uk.org
Tel: 0161 923 6579

show quoted sections

Dear Matthew McCoig-Lees (0161 923 6579),

Thank you for your answers so far but can you please clear up the following issue, in the Public Interest, about Registered Doctors involved in Cosmetic Practice. The statutory framework of medicine in the UK is that State-registered medical doctors may only offer to the Public treatments that are approved and authorised by the State (i.e. the GMC). Whereas, Non-registered medical doctors may offer all treatments that are naturally possible, except if the patient is unable to give their consent.

WHEN

Medical malpractice is a legal cause of action that occurs when a medical or health care professional DEVIATES FROM STANDARDS in his or her profession, thereby causing injury to a patient. As Statute prevails (in respect of the legal aspect of medicine in the UK - ‘standards’ is determined by the GMC - (the reasonable body of opinion)) the medical practitioner, if registered, is obliged to treat the public as directed by the Government Agent and may not deviate.

The GMC also knows that there is no statutory requirement for a doctor to be registered with the GMC to be able to legally practice medicine (or cosmetics) in the UK. In addition, the GMC is statutorily incapable to regulate or advice on Cosmetic Practice without knowingly overstepping it’s remit and acting ultra vires.

AND IF

1. The Medical Act 1983 requires that there shall continue to be a body corporate known as the General Medical Council having the functions assigned to them by this Act.… The pursuit by the General Council of their over-arching objective involves the pursuit of the following objectives— to protect, promote and maintain the health, safety and well-being of the public, to promote and maintain PUBLIC CONFIDENCE IN THE MEDICAL PROFESSION, and to promote and maintain PROPER PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS AND CONDUCT FOR MEMBERS of that profession.

2. Good medical Practice (the rules for doctors compiled by the GMC) as set out in “the duties of a doctor registered with the GMC” confirms that the GMC and medical practice is about wellbeing, health and care:
… Patients must be able to trust doctors with their lives and health. … Make the care of your patient your first concern…. Protect and promote the health of patients and the public…. Support patients in caring for themselves to improve and maintain their health…. Good doctors make the care of their patients their first concern… They do their best to make sure all patients receive good care and treatment that will support them to live as well as possible, whatever their illness or disability…. Good medical practice describes what is expected of all doctors registered with the General Medical Council (GMC).... You must provide a good standard of practice and care…. provide effective treatments based on the best available evidence… take all possible steps to alleviate pain and distress whether or not a cure may be possible… You must not express your personal beliefs (including political, religious and moral beliefs) to patients in ways that exploit their vulnerability …. You must give priority to patients on the basis of their clinical need …. The investigations or treatment you provide or arrange must be based on the assessment you and your patient make of their needs and priorities, and on your clinical judgement about the likely effectiveness of the treatment options…. If you are faced with a conflict of interest, you must be open about the conflict, declaring your interest formally, and you should be prepared to exclude yourself from decision making.

3. The distinction between Medical Practice and Cosmetic Practice is further supported by the fact that it is procedural and ethically incompatible to practice medicine and cosmetics simultaneously. Primum non / nil nocere is a Latin phrase used to describe medical practice that means "first, do no harm", in cosmetic practice, often harm is done.

4. Non-maleficence, which is derived from the maxim, is one of the principal precepts of bioethics that all medical students are taught in school and is a fundamental principle throughout the world. Another way to state it is that, "given an existing problem, it may be better not to do something, or even to do nothing, than to risk causing more harm than good." It reminds the medical care provider that they must consider the possible harm that any intervention might do. This is not a maxim of cosmetic practice.

5. The Hippocratic oath pledges: “I will use treatment to help the sick according to my ability and judgment, but never with a view to injury and wrong-doing. Neither will I administer a poison to anybody when asked to do so, nor will I suggest such a course. … Into whatsoever houses I enter, I will enter to help the sick, …” Again cosmetic practice does not adhere to this.

THEN
... AND THESE ARE MY QUESTIONS:

1. Why are registrants with the GMC allowed to perform non-surgical Cosmetic Procedures contrary to Section 1. Subsection (1B)3(c) of the Medical Act 1983.

2. Does the GMC not in fact direct members of the medical profession to deviate from “Good Medical Practice” by allowing Cosmetic Practice?

3. Why is the GMC, whilst it is statutorily incapable to regulate or advice on Cosmetic Practice without knowingly overstepping it’s remit and acting ultra vires, issuing guidelines on Cosmetic Practice: A profession outside the GMC’s field of experience and responsibility?

4. Is the GMC interfering with the, perfectly legitimate, over the phone prescription of “botox” (botulinum toxin) in an attempt to stake a claim to Cosmetic Practice in contravention of the 1983 Act?

Thank you for your patients and your diligence.

Yours sincerely,

Pieter

Matthew McCoig-Lees (0161 923 6579), General Medical Council

Dear Pieter

 

Thank you for your email. I can confirm that we do not hold any
information in relation to your questions that I am able to disclose under
the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

 

I would however like to confirm that the principles in our guidance for
doctors on cosmetic interventions are based on good medical practice.
Further information on our cosmetics guidance can be found on our
website-  [1]https://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/ethical_....

 

Kind Regards

 

Matt

 

Matthew McCoig-Lees

Information Access Officer

Information Access Team

General Medical Council

3 Hardman Street

Manchester

M3 3AW

Email: [2][email address]

Website: [3]www.gmc-uk.org

Tel: 0161 923 6579

 

 

show quoted sections

Dr David Waghorn left an annotation ()

Why is the GMC unable to confirm or deny its reasons for non-disclosure? Is it in the Public Interest? Why cannot the GMC say that registration is not required for Public access?

Looking for an EU Authority?

You can request documents directly from EU Institutions at our sister site AskTheEU.org . Find out more .

AskTheEU.org