Dear Her Majesty's Treasury,

Can you confirm the following please:

1. That the United Kingdom is Operating in Bankruptcy?
2. Which year was this first recorded?
3. That the Bills of Exchange Act 1882 (as amended) a Law of the United Kingdom?
4. That payment by any of the methods within this act has to be accepted by the one who raises the liability?

Yours faithfully,

Norman-Paul: of the Hinks Family

Enquiries, CEU - HMT, Her Majesty’s Treasury

Dear Mr Hinks,

Thank you for your Freedom of Information request. I write to confirm receipt of your request and to let you know that it is receiving attention. If you have any enquiries regarding your request do not hesitate to contact us.

Regards

Jhenene Simpson | Correspondence & Enquiry Unit, HM Treasury, 2/W1, 1 Horse Guards Road, London, SW1A 2HQ |

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http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk

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Norman: Hinks

Dear Enquiries, CEU - HMT,

You have failed to respond to my request.

by law, you should normally have responded promptly and by 19 May 2011.

I am therefore requesting an internal review.

Yours sincerely,

Norman: Hinks

Norman: Hinks

Dear Her Majesty’s Treasury,

Please pass this on to the person who conducts Freedom of Information reviews.

I am writing to request an internal review of Her Majesty’s Treasury's handling of my FOI request 'Confirmation Requested'.

There has been no response to this FOI. Her Majesty's Treasury has broken the law.

A full history of my FOI request and all correspondence is available on the Internet at this address:
http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/co...

Yours faithfully,

Norman: Hinks

responses, FOI - HMT, Her Majesty’s Treasury

Dear Mr Hinks

I'm sorry that there has been a delay in responding to your request. We
are not treating your query under the Freedom of Information Act as it is
not a request for recorded information. However we have tried to respond
to your statements. The Treasury policy team for this area have provided
the following responses.

1. That the United Kingdom is Operating in Bankruptcy?

No
2. Which year was this first recorded?

N/A
3. That the Bills of Exchange Act 1882 (as amended) a Law of the United
Kingdom?

Yes
4. That payment by any of the methods within this act has to be accepted
by the one who raises the liability?

It is a matter for the prospective parties to a contract to stipulate
whatever form of payment they wish, and there is no obligation on the
person who raises the liability to accept any particular method of
payment. Some methods of payment (e.g. some coins and some banknotes)
constitute "legal tender" under English law. However the implication of a
method of payment being "legal tender" is a narrower, more technical one
than is often supposed. The implication is simply that a debtor cannot
successfully be sued for non-payment of a debt if he makes payment into
court in legal tender. The methods of payment mentioned in the Bills of
Exchange Act (bills of exchange, cheques and promissory notes) are not, in
any event, legal tender.

HM Treasury | Information Rights Unit |1 Horse Guards Road | SW1A 2HQ
P Please consider the environment before printing this email.
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