All caps surname

n.r.b. made this Freedom of Information request to General Register Office

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Dear General Register Office, Looking through the birth certificates of my family, I noticed that the surname is allays written in all capital letters, What is the explanation for this.

Yours faithfully,

n.r.b.

please reply to this address

[email address]

Dear General Register Office,

Please be advised that I have not received a response, to 'All caps surname', I would appreciate a reason for the delay.

Yours faithfully,

n.r.b.

Hughes Selwyn,

Thank you for your enquiry concerning surnames as recorded in birth
registers.

When a birth is registered the surname is always recorded in capital
letters to make sure that this is clearly distinguishable from the
forename(s). It is important that the details in the entry are as clear as
possible and allow for no misunderstanding, and one of the ways we can
achieve this is to show the surname in this way.

I hope this answers your query.

Selwyn Hughes
Communications Manager
Identity and Passport Service | General Register Office | Communications
and Business Support | Room 109 Smedley Hydro | Trafalgar Road | Southport
| PR8 2HH

T: 0151 471 4242 | M: 07724 108 566 | E: [email address]
To find out more about the General Register Office, visit
[1]www.direct.gov.uk/gro

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Dear Hughes Selwyn,

Thank you for your response of my e-mail "all caps surname" I would be able to see the logic in your explanation if the all caps reasoning where to apply to the full name, in other words all capitalisation, however this is only applicable to the surname which tends to render your logic inconsistent, some might say invalid, is this your opinion or is this a factual official view

Are there any other reasons for the explanation "all caps surname", please let me know.

Yours sincerely,

n.r.b.

Sent a follow up to General Register Office again.

Hughes Selwyn,

Dear nrb,

Thank you for your email of 29 March, following my reply to your query on
capital letters used in surnames in register entries.

The distinction we are trying to achieve is to make it clear which of the
names recorded is the surname. That is why the surname only is in capital
letters. I hope this clarifies the postion.

Yours sincerely

Selwyn Hughes
Communications Manager
Identity and Passport Service | General Register Office | Communications
and Business Support | Room 109 Smedley Hydro | Trafalgar Road | Southport
| PR8 2HH

[email address]
To find out more about the General Register Office, visit
[1]www.direct.gov.uk/gro

show quoted sections

Communications via the GSi may be automatically logged, monitored and/or
recorded for legal purposes.

References

Visible links
1. file://www.direct.gov.uk/gro

Dear Hughes Selwyn.

Thank you very much your response, I am pleased that you clarified your answer to my question, I take it from your response, you seem to be indicating that is the only reason for "all caps surname", just to make it absolutely clear, can you confirm that there are no other reasons.

Yours sincerely,

n.r.b.

Hughes Selwyn,

Dear n.r.b.

No, that's the only reason we ask registrars to record the information
in that way.

Selwyn Hughes
Communications Manager
Identity and Passport Service | General Register Office | Communications
and Business Support | Room 109 Smedley Hydro | Trafalgar Road |
Southport | PR8 2HH
[email address]
To find out more about the General Register Office, visit
www.direct.gov.uk/gro

show quoted sections

brian ovens left an annotation ()

Yeah, but who makes them use this procedure in this way, the Government?

Kaleb left an annotation ()

And how does capitis diminutio minima, civiliter mortuus, thus fit into this factor?

n.r.b. left an annotation ()

Capitis Diminutio Minima, Civiliter Mortuus, is usually taken to mean 'loss of liberty, civilly dead' formalised from Roman Law, of three orders.
Capitis Minima = minimal loss of rights (John Doe)
Capitis Media = partial loss of rights (John DOE)
Capitis Maxima = full loss of rights (JOHN DOE)
Minimal loss of rights, means that the subject has most, but not all his or hers inalienable right intact.