This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'JSP 510. International Defence Training'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
JSP 510  
International Defence Training 
 
Part 2: Guidance 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19)  
 

Foreword 
 
This Part 2 JSP provides guidance in accordance with the policy set  out  in  Part 1 of  this 
JSP.  It  provides  policy-compliant  business  practices  which  should  be  considered  best 
practice in the absence of any contradicting instruction. However, nothing in this document 
should discourage the application of sheer common sense. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
i                             JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

Preface 
 
How to use this JSP 
 
1. 
JSP  510  is  written  for  all  those  involved  in  the  organisation,  planning,  resourcing, 
marketing, administration and delivery of International Defence Training (IDT). It seeks to 
explain  MOD’s  views  on  International  Security  Cooperation  and  describes  how  IDT 
supports MOD’s objectives through  Defence Tasks as set by Defence Strategic Direction 
(DSD), as well as its place within the International Defence Engagement Strategy (IDES). 
It explains the MOD Organisation, the various processes and responsibilities of the staffs. 
The JSP is not designed to be a source document for the various courses and training on 
offer, as this function is fulfilled by the IDT and Defence Academy training catalogues and 
websites. 
 
2. 
The JSP is structured in two parts: 
 
a. 
Part  1  -  Directive,  which  provides  the  direction  that  must  be  followed  in 
accordance  with  statute  or  policy  mandated  by  Defence  or  on  Defence  by  Central 
Government. 
 
b. 
Part 2 - Guidance, which provides the guidance and best practice that will assist 
the user to comply with the Directive(s) detailed in Part 1. 
 
Further Advice and Feedback – Contacts 
 
3. 
The owner of this JSP is DE Strat ITP. For further information on any aspect of this 
guide, or questions not answered within the subsequent sections, or to provide feedback 
on the content, contact: 
  
Job Title/E-mail 
Project focus 
Phone 
<redacted> 
ITP 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
ITP 
<redacted> 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ii                             JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 9 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 31 link to page 33 link to page 34 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 41 Contents 
 
Preface ......................................................................................................... ii 
Glossary ...................................................................................................... iv 
Useful Contacts ........................................................................................ viii 
 
1  IDT Management .................................................................................... 1 

Offers of Training ................................................................................ 1 
Security Clearance ............................................................................. 1 
United Kingdom Entry and Exit ......................................................... 3 
Jurisdiction ......................................................................................... 6 
Charging for Training ......................................................................... 6 
Refunds and Cancellations ................................................................ 8 
Reports and Returns .......................................................................... 9 
 
2  Joining Standards ................................................................................. 11 

Pre-Course Preparation ..................................................................... 11 
English Language Standards ............................................................ 11 
Medical Standards ............................................................................. 11 

 
3  Student Administration ........................................................................ 14 

Feeding .............................................................................................. 14 
Accommodation ................................................................................ 15 
Movement .......................................................................................... 16 
Allowances ........................................................................................ 18 
Healthcare ......................................................................................... 19 
Managing Student Performance ...................................................... 20 
Protocol ............................................................................................. 22 
Health & Safety ................................................................................. 23 
 
Annex A: LOTA Template .......................................................................... 26 
Annex B: Visiting Forces Act .................................................................... 28 
Annex C: English Language Standards and Training ............................. 30 
 
iii                             JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

Glossary: Abbreviations 
 
The  abbreviations  listed  below  are  intended  for  use  specifically  within  the  terms  of  this 
manual for dealing with International Defence Training matters. 
 
ACDS 
Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff 
ACSC  
Advanced Command and Staff Course 
ADFELPS  
Australian Defence Forces English Language Profiling System 
AH 
Assistant Head 
ALOR  
Advisory Level of Release 
ARITC  
Army Recruiting & Initial Training Command 
BMEC  
Basic Military English Course 
BPSS  
Baseline Personnel Security Standard 
BRNC 
Britannia Royal Naval College (Dartmouth) 
CBRN 
Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear 
CIO 
Chief Information Officer 
CIS  
Communications & Information System 
CRL 
Catering Retail & Leisure 
CSA 
Certificate of Security and Assurance 
CSSF 
Conflict Stability and Security Fund 
CSSRA  
Countries to which Special Security Regulations Apply 
DA 
Defence Attaché(s) or Adviser(s) 
DAB 
Defence Accounting & Budgeting 
DAF  
Defence Assistance Fund 
DBS 
Defence Business Services 
DCLC 
Defence Centre for Language and Culture (DEFAC) 
DE&S  
Defence Equipment & Support 
DEFAC 
Defence Academy 
DE STRAT 
Defence Engagement Strategy 
DFID  
Department for International Development 
DFM  
Director Financial Management 
DIN  
Defence Instructions & Notices 
DIPR  
Defence Intellectual Property Rights 
DIPS 
Director International Policy & Security 
DPA 
Daily Personal Allowance 
DRACL 
Defence Requirements Authority for Culture and Language 
DSAE  
Defence School of Aeronautical Engineering 
DSD 
Defence Strategic Direction  
EEA  
European Economic Area 
EEUX 
Europe and EU Exit 
EEZ  
Exclusive Economic Zone 
ELT  
English Language Training 
EOD  
Explosive Ordnance Disposal 
ESCAPADE 
Enhanced Security Cooperation Activity Plan App for Defence 
Engagement 
EU 
European Union 
FAB  
Forward Allocation Baseline 
FCO  
Foreign & Commonwealth Office 
FMP&D 
Rep Financial Management Policy & Development -Repayment 
FOI  
Freedom of Information 
iv                             JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

FOST  
Flag Officer Sea Training 
GB  
Great Britain 
GNI 
Gross National Income 
GP  
General Practitioner 
HCSC  
Higher Command and Staff Course 
HMG  
Her Majesty’s Government 
HOCS 
Head Office and Corporate Services 
IDES 
International Defence Engagement Strategy 
IDT  
International Defence Training 
IDT (A) 
International Defence Training (Army) 
IDT (RAF) 
International Defence Training (Royal Air Force) 
IDT (RN)  
International Defence Training (Royal Navy) 
IELTS  
International English Language Testing System 
INM  
Institute of Naval Medicine 
IPS  
International Policy & Strategy 
ISO 
International Standards Organisation 
ITP 
International Training Policy 
IVCO 
International Visits Control Office 
JI 
Joining Instructions 
JITG 
Joint Intelligence Training Group 
JSCSC  
Joint Services Command and Staff College (Shrivenham) 
JSP 
Joint Service Publication 
LOTA 
Letter of Training Arranged 
LWC  
Land Warfare Centre 
M&A  
Messing & Accommodation 
MALT  
Military Aviation Language Training 
MDWSC  
Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context 
MOD  
(UK) Ministry of Defence 
MOU 
Memorandum of Understanding 
NATO  
North Atlantic Treaty Organisation 
NHS 
National Health Service 
NSC  
National Security Council 
OGD 
Other Government Department(s) 
OST 
Operational Sea Training 
PAYD  
Pay As You Dine 
PfP  
Partnership for Peace 
PME 
Periodical Medical Examination 
PSyA 
Principal Security Adviser 
RAF 
Royal Air Force 
RCDS 
Royal College of Defence Studies (Part of DEFAC) 
RM  
Royal Marines 
RMAS 
Royal Military Academy Sandhurst 
RMYOC 
Royal Marine Young Officer Course 
RN  
Royal Navy 
RTA 
Reciprocal Training Agreement  
Sec Pol & Ops 
Security Policy & Operations  
SFA 
Services Family Accommodation 
SLA 
Single Living Accommodation 
SOFA 
Status of Forces Agreement 
SOTR 
Statement of Trained Requirement 
v                             JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

SOTT 
Statement of Training Task 
sS 
Single-Service 
STANAG  
(NATO) Standardisation Agreement 
STTT  
Short Term Training Team 
TLB  
Top Level Budget 
UIN  
Unit Identification Number 
UK 
United Kingdom 
UKVI 
United Kingdom Visas and Immigration 
UN  
United Nations 
VAT  
Value Added Tax 
VFA 
Visiting Forces Act 
WCA 
Warm Clothing Allowance 
 
vi                             JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Glossary: Terms and Definitions 
 
The  definitions  given  in  this  glossary  are  intended  for  use  specifically  within  the  terms  of 
this  manual  for  dealing  with  International  Defence  Training  Matters.  Some  terms  shown 
below may be more precise or particular than when used for general purposes and defined 
elsewhere. 
 
Conflict Stability and 
The  Conflict,  Stability  and  Security  Fund  (CSSF)  supports 
Security Fund (CSSF) 
work  to  reduce  the  risk  of  conflict  or  instability  in  countries 
 
where the UK has key interests. The CSSF’s strategic direction 
 
is set by the National Security Council (NSC) and is guided by 
the  priorities  set  out  in  the 2015  Strategic  Defence  and 
 
Security Review and the UK Aid Strategy. Its objective is to put 
this strategic direction into action on the ground by drawing on 
the  most  effective  combination  of  defence,  diplomacy,  and 
development assistance at the government’s disposal. 
Defence Assistance Fund  The  Defence  Assistance  Fund  (DAF)  is  a  MOD  fund  that 
(DAF) 
should  be  used  to  fund  activities  to  meet  UK  Defence 
Engagement  objectives  and  priorities  set  out  in  the  IDES 
Regional  and  Country  strategies.  It  is  managed  by  DE  Strat 
with  elements  disaggregated  to  regional  branches.  Given  the 
relatively small amount of funding available, alternative funding 
options should be explored before DAF. 
Enhanced Security 
ESCAPADE  is  a  unique  platform  where  information  on  all 
Cooperation Activity Plan  current,  future  and  past  Defence  Engagement  (DE)  activity  is 
App for Defence 
captured and visualised in one place,  providing a Recognised 
Engagement 
Engagement Picture (REP). 
(ESCAPADE) 
Forward Allocation 
An  annual  committee  chaired  by  DE  Strat  to  prioritise  and 
Baseline 
allocate  places  on  Tier  1  courses.  It  is  attended  by  key 
(FAB) 
stakeholders: IPS Directorates, Single Services, JFC, and key 
providers such as Defence Academy. 
Tier 1 Course 
International Defence Training course regarded as having high 
Defence Engagement Value, where demand exceeds capacity. 
Places  on  Tier  1  courses  are  allocated  with  reference  to  the 
IDES and by using the FAB process. 
Tier 2 Course 
International Defence Training course with recognised Defence 
Engagement  Value  where  demand  often  exceeds  supply. 
Prioritisation  of  course  places  is  managed  by  MOD  Head 
Office through the IPS Branch Programmers. 
Tier 3 Course 
Courses  which  are  not  categorised  as  Tier  1  or  2.  Single 
service  IDTs  routinely  manage  and  allocate  places  without 
recourse to MOD Head Office. 
vii                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 
 

 
Useful Contacts 
 
Enquiries  about  IDT  and  applications  for  Tier  2  and  Tier  3  courses  and  other  training 
requirements,  including  Short  Term  Training  Teams,  should  be  addressed  in  the  first 
instance to: 
 
Navy 
 
Website: http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/IDT    
International Defence Training (Royal Navy) 
Room 137a, Phoenix Building, Whale Island, Portsmouth, Hants, PO2 8ER 
 
Section  
Telephone 
Email  
SO1 IDT(RN) 
<redacted> 
 
<redacted> 
SO2 IDT(RN) South West 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
Liaison 
SO2 IDT(RN) 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
 
SO2 IDT(RN) Wider Markets 
<redacted> 
 
<redacted> 
SO3 IDT(RN) 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
IDT  1A  (D)  &  IDT  1A1  (E1)  <redacted> 
<redacted> 
EEZ(UK),  MWS,  MWC,  HMS 
 
Collingwood,  Phoenix,  Diving  <redacted> 
E1 Post Currently Gapped 
support, HMS Sultan, INM and 
PJHQ 
IDT  1B  (D)  &  IDT  1B1  (E1)  <redacted> 
<redacted> 
INT(O)  and  RMYOC  (BRNC 
Dartmouth,  CTCRM), Aviation, 
RMSOM,  HMS  Raleigh,  RN  <redacted> 
E1 Post Currently Gapped  
Submarine 
School, 
HMS 
Drake, RM Tamar – 1 AGRM 
 
Army  
 
Website: https://www.army.mod.uk/who-we-are/our-schools-and-colleges/international-
defence-training-army/ 
International Defence Training (Army) 
HQ LWC, Bldg 370, Trenchard Lines, Upavon, SN9 6BE 
 
Section  
Telephone 
Email  
SO1 IDT(A) 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
SO2 Plans 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
SO2 Trg 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
SMI Trg 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
SO2 Ops (incl RMAS, RSME) 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
SO3a (RSA, ARMCEN, CPU, 
TBC 
Post Currently Gapped 
Fire Trg, SUBHAN) 
viii                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
SO3b (ACSC, SCHINF, 
<redacted> 
Post Currently Gapped 
DCLPA) 
SO3c (JITG, RSMS, 2MI,           <redacted> 
<redacted> 
AACEN, ATG(A), Op Law) 
77 Bde, DCSU, DHET, DCLC, 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
ITG 
SO3d (Cranfield University all 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
cses, DEFAC) 
MDWSC, SSLP, BISL, ODSC, 
<redacted> 
Post Currently Gapped 
ACSC(R), ICSC, DCTS 
 
RAF 
 
International Defence Training (RAF) 
Hunter Block, Head Quarters Air Command, RAF High Wycombe, Bucks HP12 4LZ 
 
Section 
Telephone 
Email 
Head IDT (RAF) 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
 
SO1 IDT (RAF) 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
IDT(RAF)1 - International 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
Projects 
IDT(RAF)1B - Rest of the 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
World Team Leader 
IDT(RAF)1C - Middle East and  <redacted> 
<redacted> 
North Africa Team leader 
IDT(RAF)13 - Business and 
<redacted> 
Post Currently Gapped 
Finance Manager 
 
Defence Academy 
 
Website: http://www.defenceacademy.mod.uk/  
SO1 Defence Engagement, Tel: 0044 1793 314875 
Initial point of contact for enquiries for all DEFAC delivered courses 
 
DRACL 
 
DRACL Rqts2, Tel: 0044 1793 785899 
Initial point of contact for English Language equivalences.  
 
Royal College of Defence Studies 
 
Royal College of Defence Studies, Seaford House, 37 Belgravia Square, London, SW1X 8NS 
Head of Member Services RCDS, Tel: 0044 207 915 4804 
MOD Contacts 
Telephone 
Email 
DE STRAT PR AH 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
ix                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
DE STRAT ITP;   
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
Policy, JSP510, FAB, OCSG, 
CSSF/DAF Budget 
DE STRAT ITP 1; 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
Policy, JSP 510, FAB 
tables/Costs 
DE STRAT IA AH; 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
MOU Policy 
HO&CS Finance DG Sec Pol 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
BM1 
 
Repayment Contacts 
Telephone 
Email 
DFin Strat FMPA Finance 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
Policy AHd 2  
DFin Strat FMPA Finance 
<redacted> 
<redacted> 
Policy 2b  
x                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
1  IDT Management 
 
Offers of Training 
 
Basis of Offer 
 

 
1. 
International  Defence  Training  (IDT)  is  the  arrangement  of  formal  training  and 
education, for military personnel or civilians, on a government to government (G2G) basis 
in  support  of  Defence  Engagement  objectives.  UK  Armed  Forces  training  is  widely 
recognised  as  being  of  the  highest  quality  and  in  many  areas  is  world  leading.  IDT  is 
largely  delivered  in  the  UK  in  Defence  Training  establishments,  but  can  also  consist  of 
training  teams  from  those  training  establishments  delivering  effect  overseas  when 
required.  
 
2. 
Any arrangement for foreign private individuals (who are not sponsored/supported by 
their  government)  to  receive  training  in  UK  MOD  establishments  is  not  IDT  and  must  be 
subject  to  a  commercial  contract  under  Wider  Markets  rules.  Similarly,  if  training  is  to be 
delivered to a civilian contractor or other non-governmental third party, for or on behalf of a 
foreign military, then this should be contracted under commercial arrangements even if this 
is in pursuit of, or aligns with, UK Defence Engagement objectives. Where doubt over the 
basis of agreement  exists,  clarification and guidance will be given by DE Strat ITP in the 
first instance. 
 
Letters of Training Arranged (LOTA)  
 
3. 
When a training place in a UK establishment has been agreed, the IDT staff will send 
a  LOTA  to  the  requesting  authority,  usually  a  national  ministry  or  relevant  armed  forces 
arm or service. The LOTA contains the key details of what training is to be delivered and of 
the  terms  and  conditions  to  which  the  accepting  country  agrees  in  return.  To  ensure 
compliance  with  key  requirements  and  consistency  of  approach,  a  common  LOTA 
template is to be used by all IDT staffs. The LOTA must be clear and unambiguous and is 
not  to  be  ‘cluttered’  with  additional  detail  which  can  be  contained  in  separate  Joining 
Instructions.  When  IDT  is  partially  or  fully  funded  by  the  UK,  the  LOTA  acceptance  pro 
forma must also be signed by the relevant IPS desk officer or the UK DA in-country. A copy 
of the LOTA template is at Annex B. 
 
Country-Specific Arrangements 
  
4. 
Where RTAs or MOUs with specific countries exist that have provision for IDT, these 
should be referred to in the LOTA. Any concerns over inconsistencies in provisions are to 
be addressed to DE Strat ITP in the first instance. 
 
Security Clearance 
 
5. 
All International Students are subject to the following requirements unless specifically 
exempted. 
 
6. 
Issue  of  an  individual  CSA.  The  assurance  must  be  valid  for  the  duration  of  the 
course in order to: 
 
a. 
permit access to the Defence Estate; and  
1                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
b. 
permit access to protectively marked information up to the level of Official. 
  
7. 
Confirmation  that  the  sending  country’s  ALOR  is  at  least  cleared  to  the  proposed 
level of the course.  
 
8. 
IDT staffs are to ensure that international students attending UK courses have been 
granted  an  appropriate  security  clearance  by  their  parent  government  for  access: 
 
a. 
to  the  protectively  marked  information  necessary  for  attendance  on  a  specific 
course; and/or where appropriate 
 
b. 
to the establishment where the course is delivered.  
 
9. 
Exceptionally, in the absence of a CSA, IDT staff may accept an assurance from the 
relevant British Embassy that the student’s identity has been verified to a level equivalent 
to the requirements contained in HMG’s Baseline Personnel Security Standard (BPSS). 
   
10.  On  receipt  of  the  CSA/BPSS,  the  IDT  is  to  forward  the  Certificate  (with  a 
recognisable  photograph  of  the  student)  to  the  receiving  unit  and,  when  required,  the 
appropriate  PSyA.  A  copy  should  be  sent  to  DE&S  IVCO  if  the  student  will  visit,  or  be 
attached to, a MOD HQ establishment or X-List defence contractor during the period of the 
course. 
 
11.  The  student  is  not  to  have  access  to  the  course  until  the  PSyA  has  given  security 
approval. Separate sS or establishment security instructions may also be applicable, which 
may  restrict  the  student’s  access  within  the  establishment  where  the  course  is  being 
provided.  
 
Visits to other MOD Establishments or Sites 
 
12.  Where  visits  to  other  sites  are  planned  as  part  of  the  course  syllabus,  the  training 
establishment  must  obtain  the  appropriate  visit  clearance  through  the  IVCO.  The  initial 
security certificate provided by the relevant PSyA may be used to assist the granting of the 
clearance.  Where  overseas  students  are  attached  to  Defence  establishments  during  the 
course,  the  training  provider  is  to  ensure  that  these  establishments  are  given  details  of 
planned  visits  or  attachments,  and  of  the  level  of  security  access  allowed.  This  must  be 
undertaken in sufficient time for the necessary consultation to take place with all interested 
parties  prior  to  students  attending  the  course.  The  appropriate  PSyA  is  to  be  advised  of 
action taken in this respect. 
 
Advisory Levels of Release (ALOR) 
  
13.  The ALOR  provides  an  advisory  (as  opposed  to mandatory)  level  of  release  for  UK 
MOD information and material to other countries. Students should normally only be invited 
to attend MOD courses that are within the ALOR level assigned to their country of origin. A 
potential student  may be cleared to a security level by his/her own country that  is higher 
than  the  level  specified  for  that  country  by  the  ALOR.  In  circumstances  where  the 
protective marking of a course exceeds the ALOR level assigned for the student’s country, 
and the IDT or IPS desk officer believes that there are extenuating grounds for the student 
to attend the course (see JSP 440), then IDT staff should submit a request for clearance to 
the  owner  of  the  information/material  used  on  the  course  via  the  appropriate  PSyA.  If  a 
2                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
training  establishment  refuses  to  accept  a  student  funded  by  MOD  on  security  grounds, 
the sS IDT is to inform the relevant IPS desk and ITP staff immediately.  
 
Communications & Information Systems (CIS) 
 
14.  When access to a CIS network is required in order for the student to partake fully in 
the  course,  advice  is  to  be  sought  from  the  appropriate  PSyA  and  the  accreditor  of  the 
system in accordance with JSP 440. 
 
Access to Establishments  
 
15.  Once  the  sponsored  student  has  been  positively  identified  as  part  of  the  course 
arrivals process and the appropriate PSyA approval has been provided for them to attend 
the  course,  they  should  be  afforded  access  to  the  establishment  where  the  particular 
course is being undertaken.  
 
Access to Arms, Ammunition & Explosives 
 
16.  International students may only have access to materiel of this nature when required 
as part of a recognised course, and then only under appropriate supervision. 
 
Countries to which Special Security Regulations Apply (CSSRA) 
  
17.  Students  from  CSSRA  countries  should  normally  to  be  escorted  at  all  times. 
However,  where  this  is  considered  to  be  impractical  or  unreasonable,  the  advice  of  the 
appropriate PSyA must be obtained as to whether the requirement to escort  must only be 
applied while the CSSRA student is in the ‘working environment’. Students from countries 
identified  as  representing  a  substantial  threat  to  British  interests  in  the  UK  are  to  be 
escorted when advised to do so by the appropriate PSyA. Where necessary a G6 Security 
sweep must be conducted after students from specific countries have completed a course 
and departed. 
 
Retention of Course Material by Students 
 
18.  As a general rule, no course material protectively marked higher than Official is to be 
permanently  retained by  international  students.  Exceptionally,  students  may  be  permitted 
to retain course material protectively marked above  Official if specifically approved by the 
owner of the material and authorised by the Security Officer at the training establishment. 
If  material  higher  than  Official  is  authorised  to  be  retained  it  must  be  forwarded  to  the 
student through appropriate channels via the British Embassy or High Commission in the 
country concerned. 
 
United Kingdom Entry and Exit 
 
19.  Requirements  for  International  students  to  enter  the  UK  will  depend  on  their 
nationality and length of stay. Failure to obtain and present appropriate documentation at 
the  point  of  entry  to  the  UK  may  result  in  a  student  being  delayed  or  refused  entry  by  a 
Border Force Officer.  
  
20.  Securing  of  visas  for  students  (where  required)  is  the  responsibility  of  the  sending 
nation and should be arranged with the FCO visa section in-country. UK Defence Sections 
will assist and advise their nations on specific requirements as necessary. Comprehensive 
3                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
detail can be found on the UKVI website: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-
visas-and-immigration.
  
 
21.  At the discretion of the UK DA in-country or the relevant IPS desk officer, the cost of 
visas  required to attend courses in  the UK, including checks required for these visas, for 
UK-funded international students from eligible countries may be covered by DAF or CSSF. 
Defence Sections are to ensure that visa costs are charged to the correct UIN shown on 
the ESCAPADE reference.  
 
Types of Visas 
  
22.  There are four main types of entry certificate/visa that apply to international students 
attending IDT in the UK: 
 
a. 
Armed  Forces  Training  Exemption.  International  military  students  from 
countries  covered  by  the  Visiting  Forces  Act  1952  and  subsequent  Designation 
Orders are exempt from immigration control. VFA country students should present a 
national  passport  endorsed  with  an  ‘exemption  from  control’  stamp.  Commonwealth 
and NATO forces should present a passport and their military identity card issued by 
their own military authority. In all cases it is advisable that the student carries an IDT 
invitation  letter  from  the  MOD  training  establishment.  A  list  of  VFA  countries  and 
NATO members is at Annex C. 
 
b. 
Course F.  A Course F visa is required by international students from countries 
which  are  not  covered  by  the  VFA  and  who  are  subject  to  immigration  control.  It  is 
essential that those who are subject to immigration control apply for the correct entry 
clearance  under  Part  9  of  Appendix  Armed  Forces  –  Armed  Forces  subject  to 
Immigration Control. Entry clearances will be endorsed “Course F” when the training 
is  to  be  with  UK  forces.    If  coming  to  the  UK  for  more  than  6  months,  the  entry 
certificate/visa  issued  by  the  Visa  Section  of  the  British  Embassy  or  High 
Commission will be valid for 30 days. Once in the UK the student will be required to 
collect their Biometrics Residency Permit within 10 days (see para 22). The ‘Course 
F’  visa  will  restrict  the  type  of  work  the  student  can  do  in  the  UK.  Any  work 
undertaken  must  be  related  to  their  military  visit/study.  Detailed  guidance  can  be 
found 
at: 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/armed-forces-subject-to-
immigration-control. 
 
c. 
Government  Authorised  Exchange.  Non-military  government  officials  from 
non-EEA  countries  attending  longer  Defence  Academy  courses  (e.g.  RCDS  and 
ACSC)  who  are  not  eligible  for a  Course  F Visa  may  be  covered by  the Academy’s 
Sponsor  status  for a Government Authorised  Exchange  scheme  under Tier  5  of  the 
Points Based System. 
 
d. 
Student  Visas.  Some  international  students  may  have  to  enter  the  UK  on  a 
Student  visa.  If  a  Defence  training  establishment  intends  to  enrol  (on  a  course  6 
months or longer) a student who will enter the UK on a regular Student visa, or who 
will leave a training establishment to remain in the UK as a student, there will then be 
a  requirement  for  this  student  to  apply  for  entry  under  Tier  4  of  the  Home  Office’s 
Points Based System. 
 
4                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Biometric Residence Permit 
 
23.  From  2015,  a  phased  change  in  the  issue  of  Biomentric  Residence  Permits  was 
introduced.  On  approval  of  a  visa  granting  Leave  to  Enter  for  more  than  6  months,  a 
vignette  will  be  issued,  permitting entry  into the  UK  within  30 days  of  the  intended  travel 
date.  Biometric  Residence  Permits  must  be  collected  from  a  pre-selected  Post  Office 
within 10 days of arrival in the UK.  
 
Dependants 
 
24.  With  the  exception  of  EU/EEA  nationality,  dependants,  spouses,  civil  or  unmarried 
partners  and  dependants  of  members  of  foreign  armed  forces  are  not  exempt  from 
immigration control and will be subject to the requirement  for biometric identifiers. If their 
nationality requires it, or they are coming to the UK for longer than 6 months, dependants 
should  apply  for  entry  clearance  under  Part  10  of  Appendix  Armed  Forces.  Detailed 
guidance  can  be  found  at:  https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-
armed-forces-dependants.
 
 
Duration of Visa 
  
25.  Defence sections in the UK Embassies overseas must ensure that when international 
students  are  attending  more  than  one  course  in  the  UK,  their  passports  and  visas  cover 
the  entire  period  of  training,  including  any  days  between  the  course  end-date  and  the 
student's return home. 
 
Travel to other Countries 
 
26.  IDT staff will ensure that LOTA and/or JI make clear requirements for entry in to other 
countries where the relevant course includes such travel. 
 
Extensions 
 
27.  Should an extension of stay be required it will be the responsibility of the international 
student to apply for such an extension. Although the onus is on the  international student, 
course  managers  must  remind  international  students  of  their  responsibility  in  all  cases 
where  the  period  of  training  is  extended.  Visa  charges  for  extensions  of  stay  will  be 
incurred by the student  or his/her national authority  unless prior authorisation  is given by 
ITP staff for charging these either to the DAF or CSSF. 
 
Multiple Entry Visas 
 
28.  There  may  be  some  courses  which  require  multiple  entry  visas,  and  this  should  be 
made  clear  in  the  LOTA  and  in  the  JI.  Where  possible,  the  JI  should  state  whether 
students  will  depart  the  UK  during  the  course  to  return  at  a  later  date  to  resume  their 
studies.  Examples  of  when  there  may  be  a  requirement  for  multiple  entry  visas  are 
courses  that  involve  visits  to  third  countries  or  those  courses  that  have  long  periods  of 
block  leave  during  which  international  students  might  be  expected  to  travel  home.  If  the 
destination of overseas activities is unknown when a course begins, and visas are required 
for overseas visits as part of the course, it is the responsibility of the training establishment 
to ensure that students have obtained the correct visas. 
 
5                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Immigration Health Surcharge 
 
29.  The  Immigration  Health  Surcharge  was  implemented  on  6  April  2015.  It  applies  to 
International Military or civilian students who are not exempt from immigration control and 
any accompanying dependants, who are visiting the UK for a period of over 6 months. A 
fee will be payable and will form part of the visa application process. 
  
30.  International  Military  students  with  private  healthcare  insurance  will  not  be  exempt 
from paying the surcharge.  
 
Jurisdiction 
 
Visiting Forces Act 
 
31.  International students are not generally subject to UK Service Law under the Armed 
Forces Act 2006 whilst in the UK, except for students from a Commonwealth country which 
remains subject to the provisions of the 1933 Commonwealth Act. 
    
32.  The  UK  civil  authorities  have  jurisdiction  to  deal  with  civil  and  criminal  offences 
committed by international students who will be subject to local civil and criminal law whilst 
in  the  UK  other  than  students  from  countries  subject  to  The  Visiting  Forces  Act  1952 
(VFA). 
  
33.  This  act  and  subsequent  Designation  Orders  grants  concurrent  jurisdiction  to 
designated countries over their service personnel on duty in the UK. This means that the 
military authorities of a designated country have the primary right to exercise jurisdiction in 
relation  to  offences  solely  against  the  property  or  security  of  that  State,  or  the  person  or 
property  of  another  member  of  its  military  or  civilian  personnel  or  a  dependant,  and  in 
relation  to  offences  arising  out  of  any  act  or omission  in  the  course  of  official  duty  (even 
when the interests of the UK or its citizens are affected). 
 
Overseas Training  
 
34.  Where  there  is  a  requirement  to  deploy  a  training  team  to  conduct  training  activity 
overseas  (for  example  the  delivery  of  EEZ  training),  attention  needs  to  be  drawn  to  the 
requirement to check whether there are adequate jurisdictional arrangements in place (in 
the form of a MOU or Status of Forces Agreement) to cover the training activity. Ministerial 
approval  and  associated  risk  mitigation  measures  may  be  required  if  no  jurisdictional 
arrangements  are  in  place  or  if  these  provide  inadequate  jurisdictional  cover  for  the 
planned activity, or if there is  insufficient time to secure such arrangements. Early advice 
should be sought from DE STRAT IA AH during the planning of  such training activities to 
permit the necessary action to be taken. 
 
Charging for Training 
 
35.  It is MOD policy that charges are levied for training and a key principle underpinning 
invoicing  policy  is  that  all costs  should  be  recovered  at  the  earliest  opportunity. 
Prepayment  for  training  is  the  ideal  solution,  but  it  is  recognised  that  some  nations  are 
unable  to  pay  until  training  has  been  delivered.  Insistence  on  prepayment  in  all 
circumstances is unrealistic and may add to MOD’s administrative burden. In exceptional 
cases invoices for training should be raised retrospectively, but only if the nation receiving 
training has a satisfactory payment record and there is minimal risk of default. 
6                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
36.  Each  sS  IDT  is  responsible  for  raising  requests  for  invoices  for  the  delivery  of  IDT. 
DBS  are  responsible  for  preparing,  sending  out  and,  where  necessary,  chasing  invoices 
for  the  delivery  of  IDT.  Each  LOTA  must  state  the  amount  and  basis  of  charge  for  the 
training provided, and the charge will usually be broken into two elements: 
 
a. 
The Tuition Charge. Calculated by the relevant sS IDT in conjunction with its 
own TLB Finance Officers. It will include the fixed and marginal costs of providing the 
training1  adjusted  where  applicable  by  any  authorised  abatement  below  full  cost 
recovery. 
 
b. 
Messing and Accommodation (M&A) Charge. The daily rate(s) applicable to 
the particular training establishment. 
 
37.  For courses lasting 12 months or less, charges will be quoted on a ‘per course’ basis, 
in  advance,  for  the  whole  period  of  the  course  (unless  countries  have  MOD-approved 
special arrangements). Where a course spans two financial years, the charge will be that 
set on the first day of training and will remain extant for the whole period of training. 
  
38.  Charges  quoted  for  courses  of  more  than  12  months’  duration  will  be  valid  for  the 
duration of the course. They should be invoiced by mutual agreement, or at 12 or 6-month 
periods, depending on the principles of accruals accounting. 
 
Flying Training 
  
39.  Charges quoted for flying training programmes are at a fixed course rate in force at 
the  time  training  is  booked  and predicted  to  be  the  optimum price  for  the duration  of  the 
agreement. Prices will be approved by IDT(RAF) and the Director of Flying Training within 
RAF No. 22 (Training) Group. Where it is not possible to complete a course or programme, 
it will be for IDT(RAF) to negotiate the final level of fees with the student’s DA. 
 
Operational Sea Training 
 
 
40.  Operational Sea Training (OST) is provided to overseas forces and other authorities, 
normally  on  a  charging  basis.  In  addition  to  the  normal  repayment  mechanisms  for  OST 
Charges  and  associated  Naval Base  support,  there  is a  reciprocal  mechanism  called the 
OST  Credit  Scheme  operated  by  Navy  Command  for  the  exchange  of  training  assets 
and/or  support  services.  The  current  OST  charging  arrangements  are  contained  in  a 
separate  supplement  and  can  be  found  in  the  International  Courtesy  Rules  and  OST 
Booklet published on the Defence Intranet. 
 
Payment Plans 
  
41.  When the training being offered is part of a major or high cost programme of lengthy 
duration, consideration may be given to the issue of a payment plan whereby invoices are 
raised  sequentially,  subject  to  approval  by  a  TLB  Senior  Finance  Officer.  In  these 
circumstances it is desirable that prepayment is secured for each phase of training. Where 
countries  have  a  past  record  of  default,  training  should  not  be  offered  other  than  on  a 
prepayment  basis,  and  students  should  not  be  accepted  until  that  payment  has  been 
received. However, advice must be sought from ITP staff and the relevant IPS desk officer 
 
1 See JSP 462 for guidance on cost recovery. 
7                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
before  such  action  is  taken  in  order  to  ensure  that  wider  Defence  interests  are  not 
compromised. 
 
Invoicing 
  
42.  The invoicing process is initiated by a Request to Invoice, submitted using WebIris. If 
the training activity has an Escapade serial number it must always be quoted. Invoices for 
cancellation charges are to be raised separately as required. 
 
Unpaid Invoices 
  
43.  If  a  country  fails  to  pay  it  is  the  responsibility  of  DBS  to  recover  payment,  not  the 
responsibility  of  sS  training  organisations,  commands  or  establishments.  DBS  will  action 
recovery  through  its  own  procedures,  directly  with  the  funding  authority.  Transfer  of 
payments received to the training establishment will be made upon receipt of payment by 
DBS. Should a debt remain unpaid, it is the responsibility of the DBS to consider additional 
action. DFM remains responsible for debt recovery policy. DBS is to ensure, when seeking 
recovery, that full details of the course code, course dates, student’s name, rank, Service 
number and parent Service are indicated on any correspondence.  
 
Failure to Pay 
  
44.  MOD  reserves  the  right  to  reallocate  a  training  place  to  another  country  or  to 
discontinue training when a country fails to pay invoices by the due date. 
 
Refunds and Cancellations 
 
45.  A  refund  of  pre-paid  tuition  and  M&A  charges  will  be  made  in  the  following 
circumstances: 
 
a. 
If MOD has to cancel a course (or postpone it for a lengthy period) a full refund 
of any pre-paid course fees will be made. 
 
b. 
If  MOD  has  to  curtail  a  course,  a  refund  to  the  value  of  the  uncompleted  time          
calculated to the nearest complete week will be made, rounded to the nearest £5. 
 
c. 
If accommodation cannot be provided, the appropriate accommodation charges 
will  be  refunded.  If accommodation has  been  provided  for  any  part  of  the  course,  a 
refund will be made to the value of the uncompleted time. 
 
d. 
A  pro-rata  refund  of  the  single  M&A  advance  payment  is  to  be  made  to  the 
paying  authority  (not  the  student)  when  an  international  student  is  subsequently 
given permission for their family to join them in SFA. 
 
e. 
Should  a  student  choose  to  live  in  private  accommodation  and  is  given 
permission  by  the  Commanding  Officer  of  the  training  establishment,  a  pro  rata 
refund of M&A charges will be made. 
 
f. 
Refunds to the value of any uncompleted time on a course will usually only be 
given  if  an  international  student  fails  to  complete  a  course  on  operational, 
compassionate, safety or medical grounds. 
 
8                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Cancellation 
  
46.  Cancellation  charges  may  be  levied  on  the  paying  authority  when  a  training  place 
has been accepted and is not subsequently taken up, unless the relevant IDT staffs have 
been advised of the cancellation at least 2 months prior to the start of the course. DBS will 
be informed of the cancellation by the IDT staffs  by an amendment  to the  DAB1 and will 
raise an invoice to the funding authority. The rates for cancellation charges are  calculated 
as follows: 
 
a. 
cancelled  within  1  week  of  start  date  (including  non-arrival  without  notice)  -  
100% of tuition price. 
 
b. 
cancelled within 2 weeks of start date - 80% of tuition price. 
 
c. 
cancelled within 3 weeks of start date - 55% of tuition price. 
 
d. 
cancelled within one month of start date - 25% of tuition price. 
 
e. 
cancelled within two months of start date - 15% of tuition price. 
 
47.  Where IDT staff are concerned that late cancellations charges might cause difficulties 
or disputes with countries they should refer to the appropriate IPS desk officer for direction 
and  guidance.  When  cancellation  charges  are  subsequently  not  fully  applied,  IDTs  may 
instead  charge  for  unrecoverable  expenditure  on  a  discretionary  basis,  ensuring  that 
Treasury  rules  on  recovery  of  marginal  costs  are  observed.  Cancellation  charges  should 
not normally be applied where training is funded by the CSSF or DAF other than to meet 
marginal cost recovery. 
 
Reports and Returns 
 
48.  IDT  staffs  are  to  ensure  they  regularly  update  the  central  IDT  database  and 
ESCAPADE  to  ensure  that  an  accurate  record  of  attendance  and  associated  data  is 
maintained. 
  
Freedom of Information Requests 
 
49.  Generally, the answers will be co-ordinated by the ITP staff when the question covers 
all three Services and it concerns training delivered in the UK by MOD establishments, but 
the single-Service training organisations will be the main sources of information. IDTs must 
ensure that their respective components of the IDT Database are current and accurate at 
all  times.  Requests  for  information  under  the  Freedom  of  Information  Act  (2000)  are 
usually  coordinated  by  ITP  staff.  It  is  incumbent  upon  the  single-Service  IDTs  to  ensure 
that  information  about  IDT  is  provided  in  an  accurate  and  timely  manner.  Queries 
regarding the destruction of historical information should be addressed in the first place to 
ITP  staff.  Where  specialist  guidance  concerning  the  FOI  Act  or  the  Data  Protection  Act 
(1998) is required, reference should be made to the Chief Information Officer-Corporate. 
 
Intellectual Property Rights   
 
50.   MOD  holds  a  substantial  quantity  of  valuable  material  and  information  generated 
through its various training programmes. The Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in much of 
9                            JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
this  information,  notably  its  copyright  and  confidential  content,  belong  to  the  Crown  and 
MOD. 
 
51.  MOD, through Defence IPR has the right and obligation to control the disclosure and 
use of its intellectual property, in particular through licence arrangements. In the context of 
IDT, this also includes the right to charge licence fees for its use by others. Increasingly, as 
UK  Armed  Forces  training  is  developed  and  delivered  through  commercial  partnering 
arrangements, the commercial partners and other third parties will own IPR relevant to the 
delivery of  IDT. This will affect  MOD’s  independent  right  to licence complete packages of 
training materials for IDT purposes, whether MOD itself delivers the training or whether the 
training is delivered through a commercial IDT delivery partner of MOD’s and / or the end 
user’s choice.  
 
52.  DIPR  holds  delegated  powers  to  licence  Crown  copyright  material  generated  within 
MOD  and  other  MOD  owned  IPR.  Any  requests  to  exploit  training  materials  for  IDT 
purposes  should  be  referred  by  IDT  staffs  to  DIPR  who  provide  advice  and 
recommendations  for  suitable  action.  DIPR  is  responsible  for  negotiating  the  terms  and 
conditions  of  any  licence  agreements  needed  to  support  IDT.  These  agreements  will 
primarily involve the licensing of Crown Copyright and commercially confidential material, 
but  patents,  database  rights,  material  registered  designs,  design  rights  and  trade-marks 
are all examples of other forms of IPR that could be licensed.   
 
53.  Where  a  decision  is  taken  that  charges  for  IDT  training  courses  for  international 
students  should  include  license  fee  elements,  these  fees  should  be  agreed  in  advance 
with DIPR. 
 
54.  Any  valuable  material  or  information  requested  by  a  foreign  National  Authority 
beyond that provided as normal course material should only be made available through a 
license  established  by  DIPR  with  the  end  user.  Occasionally  a  Memorandum  of 
Understanding may be established with the foreign NA instead. 
 
55.  Further  guidance  can  be  obtained  by  contacting  the  Defence  Intellectual  Property 
Rights team on xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
2  Joining Standards 
 
Pre-Course Preparation 
 
1. 
Before  undertaking  any  training  with  UK  Armed  Forces,  all  international  students 
must  meet  prescribed  standards  for  the  specific  course  which  must  be  detailed  in  the 
LOTA or more likely the JI. However,  subject to agreement with the IDT staffs, there may 
be circumstances where, for operational or political reasons, international students may be 
permitted  to  attend  without  meeting  the  specified  standards2.  In  such  circumstances  the 
risk  of  subsequent  problems  encountered  due  to  failure  to  meet  joining  standards  is  the 
responsibility of the student and his/her national authority. 
 
2. 
Failure to meet joining standards may result in  withdrawal, back-coursing or a need 
for additional training. If an international student attends a course without meeting its pre-
requisites  and  is  subsequently  withdrawn,  back-coursed  or  provided  with  additional 
training, any associated costs must be agreed with the sponsor. 
  
3. 
Courses  that  require  international  students  to  take  tests  and  assessments  as  a 
precursor to starting the course must have comprehensive JI which explain the passing in 
test  requirements  and  standards.  IDT  staffs  should  be  prepared  to  plan  and  facilitate 
essential pre- course training to maximise passing in test success if it is required.   
 
English Language Standards 
 
4. 
In  order  to  gain  maximum  benefit  from  training,  international  students  will  almost 
always require a defined level of English. Some courses require a higher level of English 
than  others,  particularly  those  of  a  technical  nature  or  where  safety  is  a  major 
consideration. IDT staffs can withdraw students from training if their English is inadequate - 
the  originating  authority  will  remain  liable  for  all  course  fees3.  The  standard  of  English 
required expressed using the IELTS4 levels will be given in the LOTA.  
 
Evidence of Language Standard 
 
5. 
IDT  staffs  will  require  clear  proof  from  countries  that  their  personnel  attending  IDT 
have  the  required  standards  of  English  Language.  The  ‘default  setting’  is  for  the 
prospective student  to sit a  ‘General Training’ IELTS test  in their country and forward the 
certificate  showing  the  level  achieved  to  the  IDT  staff  prior  to  arrival  in  the  UK.  IELTS  is 
only one of many English Language assessment and testing systems and IDT may accept 
alternative  systems  scoring  where  they  can  be  mapped  across  to  an  IELTS  equivalency. 
Details on IELTS equivalencies are given at Annex C. 
 
Medical Standards 
 
General 
 
6. 
Candidates training with the UK forces must be in good health and physically fit and 
 
2  IDT  staffs  or  training  establishments  must  conduct  a  risk  assessment  to  confirm  that  any  relaxation  of 
joining standards is an acceptable risk to UK. 
3 This should be made clear in the course LOTA/JI. 
4 International English Language Testing System. 
11                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
robust enough to complete the course. Where training courses require specific medical or 
physical fitness standards, these will be detailed in the IDT training catalogues, LOTA and 
JI. Failure to meet stated health or fitness standards will usually result in the withdrawal of 
a student from training. 
 
Pre-Existing Medical Conditions 
 
7. 
International students must not attend UK defence courses if they have pre-existing 
medical conditions that will prevent them from undertaking training. Courses may require a 
medical examination on arrival at the training establishment and failure will usually lead to 
the  withdrawal  of  the student  from  the  course.  Failure  will  not  entitle  students  to medical 
treatment in order to bring them up to the appropriate standard. In every case students are 
expected to conform to UK military Medical Employment Standards. 
 
Medical Standards for Flying Training 
  
8. 
NATO  and  Air  or  Space  Interoperability  Council  (ASIC)  Countries.  Every 
international pilot  will arrive  in  the UK with documentary evidence from their own  Service 
certifying that they are medically and dentally fit for flying duties. These documents will be 
valid  for  no  longer  than  one  year  from  the  date  of  examination.  Such  evidence  will  be 
sufficient  to  permit  the  individual  to  commence  flying  duties  without  further  medical  or 
dental  examination.  Every  international  pilot  will  be  recalled  for  a  Periodic  Medical 
Examination (PME) and  Periodic Dental Inspection (PDI) at an appropriate future interval 
according  to  their  clinical  needs  and  disease  risk  for  as  long  as  they  remain  on  flying 
duties in the UK. These examinations will be conducted at the international pilot’s Station 
Medical Centre and Dental Centre, or equivalent facilities. 
 
9. 
Non-NATO  or  Non-ASIC  Countries.  Notwithstanding  that  every  international  pilot 
will  have  undergone  pilot  selection,  medical  examination  and  dental  assessment  in  their 
home  country  and  will  arrive  for  training  in  the  UK  with documentary  evidence  from  their 
own  Service certifying that  they are medically and dentally fit  for flying duties,  every pilot 
from a non-NATO or non-ASIC country will be required to attend a Medical Board at OASC 
RAFC  Cranwell  and  undergo  a  dental  assessment  at  their  Station  Dental  Centre  before 
commencing flying. The Medical Board will award every international pilot a Joint Medical 
Employment  Standard  (JMES)  and  will  apply  in-Service  retention,  rather  than  initial 
recruitment,  medical  selection  criteria.  In  the  event  that  a  pilot  is  not  awarded  a  JMES 
sufficient  to  complete  the  planned  flying  training,  the  international  pilot  will  be  referred  to 
his  home  nation.  International  pilots  will  be  recalled  for  a  PME  and  for  a  PDI,  to  be 
conducted  in  their  Station  Medical  Centre  and  Station  Dental  Centre  respectively,  at  an 
appropriate future interval according to their clinical needs and disease risk for as long as 
they remain on flying duties in the UK. 
 
10.  Medical  and  Dental  Examination Arrangements.  Since  medical  and  dental  staffs 
have  no  mechanism  to  call  forward  international  pilots  to  attend  Medical  Boards,  initial 
dental  assessments,  PME  or  PDI,  such  procedures  will  be  initiated  and  arranged  by 
training delivery unit staffs. 
 
Medical Standards for Classified Radiation Workers 
 
11.  Candidates attending courses  that involve the risk of exposure to radiation, such as 
for equipment used in aircraft Non-Destructive Testing are required to have been medically 
examined  by  a  qualified  doctor,  including  a  blood  test,  before  attending  the  course.  The 
12                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
student  will  need  to  carry  a  certificate  declaring  him/her  fit  for  radiological  work.  The 
certificate should state previous exposure to radiation and the student's current dose level. 
If no previous exposure has been taken, then this should also be stated on the certificate. 
A copy of the certificate is to be retained by the UK MOD to conform to its own Health and 
Safety obligations. 
 
Medical Standards and Screening for Candidates Participating in Diving Training 
 
12.  Occupational  health  dive  medicals  and  dental  inspections  are  required  for 
international  students  prior  to  commencement  of  diving  training  in  line  with  UK  Health  & 
Safety  Executive  requirements  (http://www.hse.gov.uk/diving/medical-requirements.htm). 
This medical screening is to be arranged through the local DPHC medical centre, and the 
international  student  should  receive  the  same  screening  as  a  member  of  UK  Armed 
Forces. Upon passing the medical, a certificate of Medical Fitness to dive is awarded and 
valid for up to 12 months. Failure to meet required medical standards is likely to lead to the 
withdrawal of the student from training. Individuals should arrive in the UK without any pre-
existing  medical  or  dental  treatment  needed  and  have  completed  a  full  medical 
declaration. Individuals who are found to be dentally unfit will be directed to seek treatment 
at  a  private  practice  at  the expense of  their  National Authority. The  MOD  is  not  liable  for 
medical  treatment  to  bring  the  candidate  up  to  the  correct  standard.  In  every  case, 
students are expected to conform to UK military Medical Employment Standards. 
 
13                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
3  Student Administration 
 
Feeding 
 
1. 
The meal provisioning policy for CRL/PAYD establishments can be found in JSP 456 
and the following should be noted:  
 
a. 
IDT students conducting training at Phase 1 training establishments will be fed 
in line with UK Phase 1 Recruits/Officer Cadets; 
  
b. 
IDT students conducting training at Phase 2 & 3 training establishments will be 
entitled to three (3) core meals a day; they also have access to the retail offer on a 
repayment  basis.  However,  students  must  be  made  fully  aware  that  any  individual 
expenditure  above  the  core  meal  entitlement  must  be  settled  by  the  student  at  the 
point of sale (POS) or prior to departure. Local arrangements may apply; 
 
c. 
Students  accommodated  in  an  Officers  or  Senior  Rates/Ranks  Mess  may  be 
required to pay a daily Extra Messing Charge (EMC) which is paid by the individual to 
the Mess accountant through the Mess Bill system; 
  
d. 
IDT students are to be charged the Non-Entitled Casual Meal Charge which is 
set  annually  by  DE&S  Commissioning  and  Monitoring  Organisation  (CMO)  and 
published  in  a  DIN  to  take  effect  from  the  beginning  of  each  financial  year.  The 
difference between the CRL claimable amount and the daily charged rate represents 
the recovery of costs/overheads to the Defence budget. Where students are funded 
or  part  funded  by  the  DAF  or  CSSF,  the  Director  of  Resources  shall  have  the 
discretion to apply the Entitled Meal Charge; 
 
e. 
Payment  of  messing  charges  is  required  in  advance,  along  with  the  tuition 
charges.  Exceptions  to  this  policy  are  international  students  from  NATO  countries 
and other countries by special agreement (see annually published IDT DIN) who may 
settle their own food bills locally, in arrears. It should be noted that locally paid food 
bills  attract  VAT  at  the  prevailing  rate.  Students  are  responsible  for  paying  for  their 
own food bills on non-residential courses. 
 
Dietary Requirements 
  
2. 
Commanding  Officers  of  training  establishments  are  to  ensure  that  their  catering 
staffs  are  aware  of  special  dietary  needs  due  to  the  different  cultural  backgrounds  of 
international  students.  They  should  ensure  that  at  least  one  dish  on  each  menu  is 
acceptable  to  those  whose  religion  bars  certain  food  products.  When  courses  involve 
periods  of  field  conditions,  appropriate  operational  ration  packs  (ORP)  should  be  made 
available to international students with special dietary requirements.  
 
IDT RAF Feeding 
 
3. 
Where international students’ bills are settled centrally by the training establishment, 
students  may  dine  off  the  full  menu  and  expenditure  is  to  be  averaged  out  over  the 
duration of the training course. Any excess over consumption and messing charges must 
be settled by the student prior to departure. 
  
14                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Exercises 
 
4. 
IDT  students  on  exercise  with  UK Armed  Forces  will  be  fed  under existing  exercise 
conditions.  It  should  be  noted  that  for  the  duration  of  the  exercise  the  CRL/PAYD 
contractor will not be eligible to claim for the students as they will be accounted for on the 
exercise account.  
 
Accommodation 
 
5. 
Whenever possible, international students are to be accommodated in Service Single 
Living  Accommodation  (SLA)  or  Service  Families  Accommodation  (SFA).  Training 
establishments  are  to  make  the  necessary  arrangements  for  booking  student 
accommodation as they do for UK students. 
 
6. 
Payment  of  accommodation  charges  is  required  in  advance  along  with  the  tuition 
charges,  unless  countries  have  MOD-approved  special  arrangements.  IDTs  are  to  set 
international students’ accommodation charges in accordance with the type and grade of 
accommodation allocated by the training establishment. JSP 368 is a guideline but may be 
subject to local contractual variations. 
 
7. 
IDT students may apply for SFA, subject to availability and funding. SFA may only be 
offered to married, accompanied international students on courses of six months duration 
or  longer,  and  then  only  for  periods  when  the  student’s  dependants  are  actually  present 
and co-resident with the student in the UK.  
 
8. 
Accommodation  charges  are  to  be  set  as  specified  in  JSP  368 and  the  annual  DIN 
published by Financial Management Policy & Development – Repayment (FMP&D – Rep). 
International students occupying SFA should be reminded that this is subject to the direct 
arrangement  between  the  student  and  DIO  and  that  the  payment  of  utilities  and  service 
bills is a personal responsibility. RCDS and ACSC accommodation charges are published 
in separate DINs. 
 
Establishment Stand-downs 
 
9. 
When  courses  of  instruction  include  a  period  of  block  leave  (e.g.  Christmas  or 
Easter), training establishments must detail in the JI any periods when the stand-down will 
result  in  a  lack  of  accommodation  services.  The  international  student  and  their  own  DA 
must  make  accommodation  arrangements  for  such  stand-down  periods.  However,  where 
possible,  the  training  establishment  should  provide  advice  to  the  student  about  finding 
local  accommodation.  For  shorter  stand-down  periods,  such  as  public  holidays,  training 
establishments are to ensure that appropriate messing facilities are maintained to cater for 
international students who remain on-site. 
 
Religious Worship 
 
10.  Facilities  for  religious  worship  should  be  made  available  where  possible.  Contact 
details for ministers of religion or equivalent should be made available. UK MOD respects 
the religious principles of all students attending courses and in some cases may consider 
making  special  provision  for  students  when  their  religious  requirements  impact  on  the 
delivery of training. Guidance in individual cases will be provided by ITP staff. 
15                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Damage to Accommodation 
 
11.  If  an  international  student  causes  damage  to  his  or  her  accommodation  through  a 
deliberate act, the student  will be responsible for the cost  of  repair.  Similarly,  exceptional 
costs incurred for cleaning accommodation facilities should also be charged to the student. 
If recovery of the debt from the individual student is impossible, the appropriate  Embassy 
or  High  Commission  is  responsible  for  the debt.  IDT  staff  should  inform  the  relevant  IPS 
desk  officer  when  an  invoice  is  to  be  raised  in  these  circumstances,  as  requests  for 
payment  for  repairs  to  accommodation  might  cause  difficulties  or  disputes  with  some 
countries.  
 
Movement 
 
General 
 
12.  The  costs  of  transport  to  the  course,  on  leaving  the  course  and  between  courses 
(unless  between  a  sequence  of  courses)  are  primarily  the  responsibility  of  the  sending 
country.  Travel  arrangements  whilst  on  leave,  or  other  non-duty  journeys,  are  the 
responsibility  of  the  student  and/or  their  national  authority.  International  students  living  in 
private  accommodation  are  responsible  for  their  own  transport  to  and  from  the  training 
establishment. 
 
UK Travel Allowance 
 
13.  Students  from  some  countries  entitled  to  UK  funding  may  be  provided  with  a  UK 
Travel  Allowance  to  assist  with  the  costs  of  return  travel  between  the  airport  and  the 
course location. Travel to and from the Airport to the college on arrival/departure from the 
UK  will  be  paid  by  the  training establishments  based  on actual  costs.  However,  in  cases 
where this proves impractical, these allowances may be paid by the UK Defence Sections, 
but  only  on  formal  notification  (to  the  relevant  single-Service  IDTs  or  RCDS)  that  this 
allowance has already been paid in-country. If a training establishment arranges transport 
for a student or group of students to/from the port of disembarkation, it  must pre-warn the 
relevant  Defence  Section  to  ensure  that  no  UK  travel  allowance  is  paid.  Also,  when  the 
host  government  organise  travel  to  and  from  the  port  of  disembarkation  to  training 
establishment no allowance will be paid. The maximum cost of £180 is the  working figure 
to be used and, if costs exceed this, written approval is required from ITP. 
 
Flights 
 
14.  At the discretion of the UK DA in-country or the relevant IPS desk officer, the cost of 
return flights to attend courses in the UK for UK-funded international students from eligible 
countries may be covered by DAF or CSSF. All flight bookings must be economy class and 
any  request  for  business  class  flights  must  secure  written  approval  from  ITP  prior  to 
making any travel bookings. Defence Sections are to ensure that flight costs are charged 
to the correct UIN shown on the ESCAPADE reference. MOD will only pay for flight costs 
at the beginning and end of a course. 
  
Recess 
 
15.  The UK will only pay for a student to return to country during a course recess if the 
flight cost is less than the cost of paying DPA over that period
  
16                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Compassionate 
 
16.  Reimbursement  for  additional  flights  on  compassionate  grounds  is  exceptional  and 
will be considered and authorised by ITP on a case-by-case basis. 
 
Baggage Allowance 
  
17.  Excess  baggage  costs  are  the  responsibility  of  the  student  or  his/her  national 
authority unless they are UK funded and on courses over nine months. Defence Sections, 
when booking return flights for entitled students attending courses more than 9 months in 
duration,  can  book  one  additional  piece  of  baggage  up  to  23kg  (or  appropriate  Airline 
maximum weight). This discretionary allowance is only to be paid for the return part of the 
flight  on  completion  of  the  course.  This  allowance  cannot  be  transferred  to  family 
members. 
 
Dependants  
 
18.  International students may be accompanied by dependants  (normally a spouse and 
two  children  under  the  age  of  21)  when  they  attend  the  RCDS  and ACSC  courses.  The 
number of dependants whose flight and visa costs may be payable by the DAF or CSSF is 
limited to a maximum of 3 per student. Any additional dependants’ flight and visa costs are 
to  be  met  by  the  student.  If  a  student  chooses  to  be  accompanied  by  more  than  3 
dependants,  MOD  may  provide  their  accommodation  for  the  duration  of  the  course. Any 
costs for dependants who visit during the course are to be met by the student. The MOD 
will  not  cover  any  costs  for  dependants  arriving  after  the  start  of  the  course,  unless 
approval has been received from ITP. 
 
Driving in the United Kingdom 
 
19.  International students who wish to drive in the UK must have a driving licence that is 
valid for the duration of their stay and must identify the type(s) of vehicle to be driven. They 
must  also  comply  with  UK  age  restrictions.  There  are  two  categories  of  entitlement  that 
apply to international students wishing to drive in the UK: 
 
a. 
EU and European Economic Area (EEA).  All international students  from EU 
and  EEA  countries  are  permitted  to  drive  in  Great  Britain  (GB)  if  they  hold  a  valid 
national licence in their own country. 
 
b. 
Any other country. International students from all other countries can drive any 
small  vehicle  (e.g.  car  or  motorcycle)  listed  on  their  full  and  valid  licence  for  12 
months from when they last entered Great Britain (GB). If the duration of the course 
or training period exceeds 12 months and the student wishes to drive in the UK, then 
the student has up to 12 months to obtain a UK licence, but  is permitted to drive in 
the UK for one year from the time of the initial entry date into the UK, using their own 
licence. 
 
20.  Some  countries  impose  additional  restrictions  on  their  international  students 
regarding  the  owning,  hiring,  or  driving  of  motor  vehicles  whilst  under  training  in  the  UK. 
The  IDT  staffs  are  to  be  advised  if  the  international  student’s  National  Authority  has 
imposed  special  restrictions,  so  that  Commanding  Officers  of  the  training  establishments 
may be advised and, where practical, monitor compliance.  
 
17                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
21.  International students should ensure that their vehicles possess a valid certificate of 
insurance,  current  road  tax,  and,  for  vehicles  over  3  years  old,  an  MOT  Test  Certificate. 
International  students  should  ensure  they  comply  with  all  local  driving  rules  imposed  by 
Commanding  Officers  of  training  establishments.  Commanding  Officers  of  training 
establishments are to ensure that international students  are made aware of the penalties 
for driving in the UK whilst  under the influence of alcohol or drugs. International students 
must pay any fine imposed by UK civil courts resulting from a driving conviction or parking 
offence. 
 
Allowances 
 
General  
 
22.  Students funded or part-funded by the UK through the DAF or CSSF may be eligible 
for  allowances.  The  UK  may  also  fund  return  flights  to/from  the  UK  to  attend  training. 
However, where a Reciprocal Training Agreement (RTA) exists, or where there are specific 
Memoranda  of  Understanding  (MOU)  covering  the  provision  of  military  education  and 
training, the terms contained therein will prevail. 
 
Daily Personal Allowance (DPA) 
 
23.  A discretionary DPA of £5 per day is payable to students from those countries with an 
average annual Gross National Income (GNI) per capita of $5,400 or less (Source: World 
Bank 2015). This is not a rigid policy; certain selected countries with an average GNI over 
this  threshold  may  also  receive  allowances  due  to  their  priority  status.  For  courses  at 
BRNC,  where  free  laundry  services  are  unavailable,  the  rate  is  set  at  £7.50  per  day. 
Training establishments are responsible for the payment of DPA. 
 
24.  Attendance.  DPA is payable from the first day to the final day of a course, though it 
may be payable from an earlier date if the Joining Instructions stipulate attendance prior to 
the  first  day  of  a  course,  for  example  when course  registration  occurs  at  an earlier  date. 
When  there  is  a  short  and  reasonable  gap  between  two  elements  of  a  course,  or  linked 
courses,  for  example  between  a  period  of  English  language  training  and  the  start  of  the 
main course, DPA is payable for that intervening period. However, when a student chooses 
to arrive before or after the prescribed start and end dates of a course, DPA is not payable 
for those periods. 
 
25.  Recess  Periods.  A  higher  rate  of  DPA  may  be  payable  during  recess  periods 
(Christmas  etc.)  at  the  discretion  of  the  relevant  single-Service  IDTs,  but  only  in  cases 
where the training establishments are unable to provide accommodation. The rate of DPA 
that may be payable during recess periods is up to a maximum of £30 per day. Where it is 
more  cost-effective  to  do  so,  the  training  establishments  should  return  students  to  their 
own  countries  during  recess  periods.  When  a  higher  rate  of  DPA  is  to  be  paid  during 
recess periods it must be noted on ESCAPADE.  
 
26.  Overpayment of DPA.  When DPA has been overpaid in error it is the responsibility 
of the training establishment to recoup that overpayment, normally through a reduction in 
future  payments  of  DPA.  If  this  is  not  possible,  the  overpayment  is  chargeable  to  the 
training establishment’s UIN. 
 
27.  Frequency.    DPA  is  to  be  paid  to  the  student  on  a  monthly  basis  except  for  those 
attending RCDS and ACSC.  
18                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
28.  RCDS and ACSC.  Higher rates of DPA are payable to UK-funded students attending 
RCDS  and  JSCSC  (ACSC  only).  The  rates  depend  on  whether  the  student  is 
accompanied  or  single,  and  his/her  country  of  origin.  The  enhanced  rate  is  payable  to 
students from countries eligible for full UK funding. The rates payable from 1 April 2017 are 
tabulated below. 
 
DPA 
ACSC 
RCDS 
Enhanced Accompanied 
£49.20 
£72.80 
Standard Accompanied 
£34.90 
£58.50 
Enhanced Single 
£24.60 
£48.20 
Standard Single 
£17.45 
£41.05 
 
29.  The accompanied rate is payable on written application by the student. To qualify for 
the accompanied rate, dependants  must physically be present  in  the UK and co-resident 
with  the  student  in  his/her  accommodation  for  the  duration  of  the  course.  When  these 
conditions do not apply, the student is eligible only for the single rate. 
 
Warm Clothing Allowance (WCA)  
 
30.  A discretionary one-off Warm Clothing Allowance of £75 is payable to students from 
tropical countries when some element of the course falls during the winter period between 
October and May and the duration of the course is greater than 10 days.  WCA is payable 
usually  by  the  training  establishment,  however,  particularly  in  the  case  of  short  courses, 
the overseas Defence Sections have the discretion to pay the WCA locally prior to travel to 
the UK. Defence Sections must notify IDTs if WCA has been paid locally.  
 
Healthcare 
 
Entitlement at the Training Establishment 
 
31.  International  students  –  both military  and  civilian  –  taking  part  in  IDT  are  entitled  to 
the  same  level  of  emergency  and  non-emergency  healthcare  as  that  provided  by  the 
training  establishment  to  UK  armed  forces  trainees.  Treatment  beyond  the  scope  of  the 
establishment  facilities  will  be  referred  to  the  National  Health  Service  (NHS)  or,  where 
appropriate, to a private medical practice. When this occurs, IDT staffs must be informed 
and ensure that sending nations are made aware as treatment costs may be passed on to 
the relevant country.  
 
Entitlement to Dental Care at the Training Establishment 
 
32.  International  students  at  UK  training  establishments  should  receive  emergency 
treatment from military dental facilities if required. If non-emergency care is required and is 
available,  it  will  incur  a  charge  in  accordance  with  a  fixed  scale  of  charges.  Should  non-
emergency care not be available from military sources, application for treatment should be 
made to  an  NHS or  private practice  at  the personal  expense  of  the  student  or  his  or her 
National Authority.  Dependants  of  international  students  are  not  entitled to military  dental 
care and must register with an NHS or private practice to receive treatment. 
 
Entitlement to Emergency Treatment  
 
33.  Regardless of  residential  status  or  nationality,  emergency treatment  at  primary  care 
practices (a GP), or in Accident and Emergency departments or a Walk-in Centre providing 
19                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
services  similar  to  those  of  a  hospital  Accident  and  Emergency  department  will  be 
provided but may be charged, either through payment of the Immigration Health Surcharge 
in the case of longer courses, or directly following treatment in the case of shorter courses 
(under 6 months).   
 
Entitlement to Hospital Treatment – Longer Courses 
 
34.  Under  the  current  regulations,  anyone  who  comes  to  the  UK  to  pursue  a  full-time 
course of study of not less than six months’ duration, who is subject to immigration control, 
will  be  required  to  pay  an  Immigration  Health  Surcharge  (IHS)  (see  chapter  1,  para  27). 
They will then be entitled to free NHS hospital treatment in the UK. The surcharge will also 
apply  to  spouses,  civil  partners  and  children  (under  the  age  of  16,  or  19  if  in  further 
education)  if  they  are  living  permanently  with  the  student  in  the  UK  for  the  duration  of 
his/her course. For students from countries  covered under the Visiting Forces Act,  NATO 
countries,  those  within  the  EEA  and  for  those  countries  with  whom  UK  has  reciprocal 
healthcare  arrangements,  no  fee  will  be  payable,  and  treatment  will  be  provided  free  of 
charge. Dependants of exempt students are not covered under this arrangement and will 
be subject to the IHS.    
 
Entitlement to Hospital Treatment – Courses less than 6 Months 
 
35.  Students  studying  in  the  UK  for  less  than  six  months  from  countries  with  which  the 
UK  holds  bilateral  healthcare  agreements  will  only  be  entitled  to  free  NHS  hospital 
treatment  that  is  needed  promptly  for  a  condition  that  arose  after  their  arrival  in  the  UK. 
This exemption will apply to spouses, civil partners and children (under the age of 16, or 
19 if in further education) if they are living permanently with the student in  the UK for the 
duration of  his/her course. For those outside a bilateral healthcare arrangement, charges 
may be raised by the hospital. Once it has become clear that  charges will apply, the IDT 
should refer the case to the IPS desk officer, and repatriation should be considered if the 
student or his/her National Authority are unlikely to reimburse the cost.  
 
Entitlement to Healthcare – IDT Overseas 
 
36.  When on duty overseas as part of an IDT course, international students are entitled 
to  the  same  level  of  UK  Defence  Medical  Services  treatment  as  provided  to  them  in  the 
UK. International students are also entitled to medical and dental treatment whilst on duty 
when involved in IDT activities overseas in any country that is party to the NATO SOFA or 
PfP  SOFA.  IDT  activities  undertaken  overseas  in  a  country  without  any  reciprocal 
agreements  are  subject  to  the  regulation  of  that  overseas  country.  For  any  IDT  activity 
undertaken  overseas  in  a  country  that  does  not  have  any  reciprocal  agreements,  it  is 
advisable  that  adequate  medical  insurance  is  secured.  The  Commanding  Officer  of  the 
training  establishment  is  to  ensure  that  cover  is  provided  and  the  additional  costs  of  this 
cover should be included in the respective course tuition fees. International students must 
be advised that medical and dental insurance for ‘off-duty’ activities is not the responsibility 
of MOD. 
 
Managing Student Performance 
 
Conduct and Behaviour 
 
37.  All  international  students  are  expected  to  respect  the  rules  and  regulations  in  force 
locally,  together  with  the  traditions  and  customs  of  the  UK  Service  with  whom  they  are 
20                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
training. Training establishments should be aware that some of the UK’s military traditions 
may  be  alien  to  some  international  students.  International  students  are  expected  to 
conduct themselves in a manner appropriate to both their parent country and the UK and 
instances of misconduct must be treated sensitively at outset.  
 
38.  In  cases  of  trivial  misconduct  an  appropriate  member  of  the  directing  staff, 
counselling  the  individual  concerned,  would  be  expected  to  deal  with  the  issue.  This 
counselling should only take place after consultation with, and with the backing of, the IDT 
staff.  More  serious  breaches  of  conduct  must  be  reported  to  the  relevant  IDT  staffs  and 
direction  sought  on  how  to  proceed,  which  will  depend  on  the  nation  involved  and  the 
nature and severity of the misconduct. Matters involving the UK civil authorities are always 
to be brought to the attention of the IDT staffs in the first instance, who will then notify the 
appropriate IPS desk officer.  
 
Underperformance 
  
39.  Most students will be able to take part and perform to the expected standards during 
their  training.  In  some  circumstances  students’  performance  will  not  meet  expected 
standards and the UK Course Officer will need to agree a plan of action with the student 
designed to address any identified shortcomings. 
  
40.  Interviews. Dependent on the nature of the shortcoming, the UK Course Officer will 
in most cases interview the student to discuss the issue with them and set out what both 
sides  will  do  to  rectify  the  matter.  This  could  be  a  simple  and  informal  matter  such  as 
agreeing additional Physical Training work if a student is not passing basic assessments. If 
the  matter  is  more  serious  the  UK  Course  Officer  may  decide  to  issue  a  written  Formal 
Warning. 
 
41.  Formal  Warnings.  A  Formal  Warning  sets  out,  in  writing,  the  student’s  failings, 
details  the  actions  required  to  remedy  them,  and  the  consequences  of  not  doing  so. 
Formal Warnings may follow repeated interviews or result  from a single  event. Examples 
of circumstances (alone or combined) that might warrant a Formal Warning include: 
  
a. 
a deterioration of standards of work. 
 
b. 
repeated  instances  of  misconduct  or  inefficiency  such  as  persistent  late 
reporting or unauthorised absence from training. 
 
c. 
behaviour  that  does  not  comply  with  the  standards  of  conduct  required  of  the 
student by the training establishments Commanding Officer.  
 
42.  In raising a Formal Warning, the UK Course Officer is to inform the student that they 
are  considering  placing  him/her  on  a  Formal  Warning.  This  must  be  done  orally  by 
interview  and  a  record  retained. At  the  interview,  the  UK  Course  Officer  is  to  explain  the 
nature of the alleged failings and offer the student the opportunity to comment and provide 
an  explanation.  Issues  of  fact  should  be  resolved  at  this  stage.  The  interview  is  to  be 
conducted with a third-party present and a record of interview maintained. The student is 
to be made fully aware of the range of sanctions that could  be awarded if his/her failings 
are  not  rectified. After  considering  any  new  facts,  including  the  student’s  representation, 
the  UK  Course  Officer  must  without  delay  confirm  their  decision  to  the  student  by  giving 
him/her  a  completed  copy  of  the  interview  form.  The  student  is  to  sign  a  copy  to 
acknowledge  that  they  have  received  it.  A  copy  of  the  student’s  representation  is  to  be 
21                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
attached  to  the  warning.  The  warning  starts  on  the  day  the  UK  Course  Officer  gives  the 
student the form and the terms of the warning are those contained in the form at that time
The Formal Warning must clearly identify the failings in performance or behaviour and set 
specific recovery targets and review dates 
 
Withdrawal from Training (RTU) 
   
43.  Voluntary Withdrawal. Where a student requests to be fully withdrawn from training, 
the  training  establishment  should  inform  the  IDT  staff  who  will  make  arrangements  and 
liaise as required. In some cases, pressure will come from the sending nation to retain the 
student and IDT staff are to ensure that the student and his/her national chain of command 
are able to discuss and agree on a course of action. The course officer should conduct a 
final interview with the student and record the decision and action taken. 
 
44.  Removal  from  Training.  In  some  cases,  it  may  be  necessary  to  remove  a  student 
from the course. Such course of action is seen as a last resort and usually after all other 
options have been considered. Removal is usually required where injury or illness makes 
removal essential or where the continued presence of a student presents an unacceptable 
safety or related training risk to themself or others. The authority for removal rests with the 
relevant  IDT  staff  2*  headquarters  (FOST,  HQ  LWC,  HQ  ARITC  or  22  Gp).  Where  a 
student is to be removed (for whatever reason) at the training establishment’s request, the 
removal  is  to  be  formally  reported  by  the  IDT  staff  to  the  country  concerned  (possibly 
through the IPS desk) with reasons for the removal. 
 
Welfare Support 
 
45.  International  students  are  entitled  to  the  same  level  of  welfare  support  as  that 
provided for their UK counterparts. Commanding Officers of training establishments should 
ensure  that,  if  required,  specific  welfare  support  is  made  available  to  international 
students.  Significant  welfare  problems  experienced  by  international  students  should  be 
reported to the relevant IDT staff for further consideration by ITP staff, the IPS desk officer 
and  the  relevant  foreign  DA.  Dependants  accompanying  international  students  are 
similarly  entitled  to  the  same  welfare  support  as  that  offered  to  dependants  of  UK 
personnel.  Welfare  support  services  should  be  detailed  in  JI  and  communicated  to  the 
international student as part of the course induction process.  
 
Outstanding Personal & Mess Bills 
  
46.  The  onus  rests  with  individual training  establishments  for  the  recovery  of  mess  bills 
from  international  students.  Messes  must  make  every  effort to  obtain  payment  before  an 
international  student  leaves  the  establishment.  If  local  measures  fail,  the  training 
establishment  must  immediately  report  the  debt  to  the  IDT  staffs  who  will  advise  on  the 
best  method  of  securing  payment.  If  payment  is  not  subsequently  received  on  the  due 
date, the matter is to be reported to the relevant IDT staff for further action. If necessary, a 
further  approach  by  the  IDT  staff  will  be  made  to  the  embassy  or  High  Commission 
concerned.  IDT  staffs  are  to  be  informed  immediately  if  payments  are  subsequently 
received. In the unusual event that a number of international students from one country fail 
to settle their bills, the relevant IDT staffs are to inform the appropriate IPS desk officer. 
 
Protocol 
 
47.  There  may  be  occasions  when  international  students  come  from  highly  prominent 
22                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
families.  It  is  MOD  policy  (unless  special  arrangements  have  been  agreed  with  the  FCO 
and  the  student’s  National  Authority  prior  to  the  acceptance  of  a  place  on  a  particular 
course)  that  international  students  on  all  UK  based  training  courses  will  be  afforded  the 
same privileges and respect as their UK counterparts but  no more. The following may be 
considered as exceptions to this policy: 
 
a. 
International  students  from  royal  households  or  those  who  have  special  titles 
conferred upon them are to be referred to by that title unless they personally indicate 
otherwise. 
 
b. 
International  students  from  royal  or  very  prominent  national  families  who  are 
considered to be vulnerable may have special provision made for their security whilst 
under  training.  Such  provision  is  to  be  agreed  between  the  FCO  (both  London  and 
UK Mission in country), the student’s London DA, the IDT staffs, the IPS desk officer 
and the Commanding Officer of the training establishment. Unless agreed otherwise, 
the  full  cost  of  such  security  measures  will  be  the  responsibility  of  the  international 
student or their own government. 
 
Health & Safety   
 
48.  All the provisions of the Health and Safety at Work Act that apply to UK personnel on 
courses apply equally to all international students. In particular, international students may 
be provided with the same level of UK screening or medical preparation as provided to UK 
personnel  on  those  or  similar  courses.  Commanding  Officers  of  training  establishments 
must ensure that normal Health & Safety briefings are fully understood by all international 
students.  Particular  attention  is  to  be  paid  when  Health  and  Safety  briefings  are  given 
about  unfamiliar  and  potentially  dangerous  equipment  and  hazardous  substances,  and 
about  students’  responsibilities  when  handling  this  equipment  or  these  substances.  In 
cases  where  the  Health  and  Safety  brief  needs  to  be  particularly  detailed,  Commanding 
Officers should consider having the brief translated into the language(s) of the international 
student(s).  
 
49.  Where  Commanding  Officers  have  strong  reason  to  believe  international  students’ 
actions  would  pose  a  threat  to  their  own  or  other  students’  safety,  they  should  refuse  to 
allow  individual  students  to  take  part  in  elements  of  training.  In  these  cases,  usual 
practices for managing misconduct should be followed, and IDT staff should be alerted. 
 
Accidents & Incidents 
  
50.  Injuries  of  a  minor  nature  will  be  dealt  with  by  Commanding  Officers  of  the  training 
establishments  as  part  of  the  Health  and  Safety  at  Work  routine.  Minor  losses  and 
damages to equipment which are easily recoverable (or written-off) are at the discretion of 
the  Commanding  Officers  of  the  training  establishment.  As  a  rule,  the  costs  of  minor 
damage should only be charged to the student or the national authority when the student 
is clearly responsible through an act of wilfulness or deliberate neglect. If it is proposed to 
charge  the  student  or  the  national  authority,  a  formal  statement  of  the  incident  must  be 
sent to the desk officer in IPS as there may be negative implications on the UK’s bilateral 
relationship with the country involved. 
 
Serious Injury or Equipment Loss 
 
51.  When  more  serious  injury,  death  or  loss  of  valuable  equipment  occurs,  a  formal 
23                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
investigation  (such  as  a  Board  of  Inquiry)  is  to  be  convened  by  the  appropriate  single-
Service  authority.  Such  investigations  of  accidents  or  incidents  are  the  responsibility  of 
MOD  but  the  government  of  the  international  student(s)  involved  is  entitled  to  have  an 
observer present at any inquiry. The observer will not have the freedom to cross-examine 
or to participate in any other way, and will not be present when the inquiry is deliberating 
its findings and recommendations. The observer will normally be no higher in rank than the 
President  of  the  Inquiry.  The  government(s)  of  the  international  student(s)  involved  will 
normally be provided with the relevant terms of reference, findings and recommendations 
of the accident/incident report. However, all other requests for specific information should 
be  made  through  the  appropriate  IDT  staffs  to  the  relevant  UK  authorities.  When  a 
government  has  stated  that  the  findings  and  recommendations  are  insufficient  for  its 
requirements  and  requests  further  disclosure,  the  advice  of  the  CI-CIO  Access  team 
should be sought prior to any release. 
 
Death or Serious Injury to Student 
 
52.  In  the  event  of  the  death  of,  or  serious  injury  to,  an  international  student,  the 
principles  underpinning  JSP  751  should  be  applied,  namely  that  action  must  first  and 
foremost  be  undertaken  as  quickly  and  sensitively  as  possible,  and  that  it  takes 
precedence  over  all  but  the  most  urgent  operational  and  security  matters.  In  cases  of 
death  in  particular,  the  wishes  of  the  next  of  kin  are  one  of  the  most  important 
considerations,  and  their  views  must  continually  be  sought  and,  where  possible,  their 
wishes  adhered  to.  The  responsibility  for  notifying  next  of  kin  rests  with  the  casualty’s 
Embassy  or  High  Commission.  Therefore,  it  is  essential  that  emergency  contact  details, 
including  out-of-hours  telephone  numbers  are  obtained  from  the  student  at  the 
commencement  of  a  course.  As  soon  as  a  serious  injury  or  death  is  reported,  the 
Commanding Officer should notify the relevant IDT and military police establishment. IDT 
staff should then immediately report the incident to the relevant IPS desk officer. The desk 
officer is then to provide guidance as to whether his/her own desk or the IDT should write 
to the student’s London-based Defence Attaché and any other authorities. If MOD or IDT 
staff  are  unavailable  within  a  24-hour  period,  the  Commanding  Officer  of  a  training 
establishment  should  endeavour  to  contact  the  student’s  national  authority  directly.  
 
Insurance 
 
53.  When  IDT  takes  place  as  a  Government  to  Government  arrangement,  under  the 
terms  of  a  Letter  of  Training  Arranged  or  an  MOU,  either  MOD  or  another  National 
Authority  will  have  accepted  liability  to manage and  settle  compensation  claims  for  injury 
or damage where appropriate. There would not normally be a requirement for the MOD to 
purchase  commercial  insurance  and  any  claims  arising  would  be  considered  by  the 
Department on a legal liability basis. 
 
54.  When IDT takes place for non-core MOD business purposes (e.g. income generation 
or  under  the  policy  of  selling  into  the  Wider  Markets)  commercial  insurance  must  be 
purchased  to  avoid  the  costs  of  compensation  for  injury,  loss  or  damage  falling  to  the 
Defence  Budget.  Advice  about  insurance  and  risk  reduction  may  be  obtained  from  the 
Senior  Claims  Officer  (Policy),  Directorate  of  Judicial  Policy,  Common  Law  Claims  & 
Policy, JSP 368, JSP 462, DFM’s website and from MOD’s insurance brokers, Willis Ltd, in 
accordance with 2008 DIN 08-014 - Insurance Arrangements for Charging Activities (Wider 
Markets and Repayment). It is the responsibility of training establishments and IDT staffs 
to  ensure  appropriate  insurance  cover  is  provided  when  delivering  IDT  on  a  commercial 
basis.  If  there  is  doubt  about  whether  a  particular  activity  is  Core  or  Non-Core  MOD 
24                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
business, the training establishment should contact their budget area, and ultimately their 
Senior Finance Officer for clarification. 
   
55.  It is advisable for all international students attending IDT to take out insurance cover 
in  respect  of  their  personal  liability  for  the  duration  of  that  training.  Students  should  take 
out insurance to protect themselves against claims for compensation for causing injury and 
damage to property, personal accident, loss or damage to luggage or personal belongings 
and items of equipment.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
ANNEX A: LOTA TEMPLATE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LETTER OF TRAINING ARRANGED (LOTA) TEMPLATE (SPECIMEN
 
OFFER OF TRAINING – COURSE TITLE 
 
Reference: 
 
A. 
«Booking_CustomerReference» 
B. 
JSP 510 International Defence Training Part 1 - Directive 
C.   JSP510 International Defence Training Part 2 - Guidance 
 
1. 
Further to Reference A, training for «Insert Country Name / Country Sub-Division 
Name»  is  now  formally  offered  as  detailed  at Annex A.  Notification  of  the  acceptance  or 
cancellation of this training must be confirmed to IDT(xx) by «Booking_AcceptByDate». 
If  the  place(s)  is/are  not  accepted  by  this  date,  IDT(xx)  reserves  the  right  to  re-allocate 
them.  The  place(s)  are  not  confirmed  unless  you  notify  us  by  the  date  given  above  by 
completing Annex B.  
 
2. 
Once  the  place(s)  on  the  course  have  been  accepted,  cancellation  fees  will  be 
payable  if IDT(xx) is not  notified of  a cancellation at  least 2 calendar months prior to the 
commencement of the course or if your student(s) fails to arrive at the course. Abatement 
of cancellation charges will only be considered if there are extenuating circumstances.   
 
3. 
The terms of pre-payment and other conditions of military training in the UK are set 
out in Reference C, Chapter 1, paras 35-47. Payment is due on receipt of the invoice.  In 
the unlikely event  that the UK MOD has to cancel, postpone for a long period, or amend 
training for which payment has already been received, a full refund will be made. 
 
4. 
Current charges for tuition and messing and accommodation are shown at Annex A. 
All  UK  MOD  charges  are  reviewed  annually.  Service  accommodation  will  usually  be 
arranged  at  the  training  establishment  for  the  duration  of  the  course.  Accommodation, 
messing  and  religious  facilities  at  British  military  training  establishments  are  provided 
primarily  for British  Service  personnel  and  it must  be  understood  that  it  will  not  generally 
be possible to provide overseas students with special facilities for their particular national 
or religious requirements. However, dining room menus will normally offer sufficient choice 
to cater for most religious and national requirements. 
 
5. 
Original  Certificates  of  Security  and  Assurance  (Annex  C)  and  two  passport-size 
photographs for each student must reach this office no later than the date shown at Annex 
A. In addition, UK Home Office regulations require overseas students arriving in the United 
Kingdom  to  carry  with  their  personal  documents  a  statement  giving  the  location  and 
duration  of  their  training  (a  copy  of  Annex  A  and/or  Joining  Instructions  will  suffice). 
Students should be prepared to produce this statement for identification on entry to the UK 
or  into  military  establishments.  Students  cannot  be  accepted  for  training  until  all 
necessary documentation has been received. 
 
6. 
Arrangements should be made for students to sit the General Training IELTS test, in 
accordance with Reference C, Annex C.  
 
7. 
It  is  essential  that  international  students  (excluding  EEA  nationals)  must  have  the 
correct  visas.  Military  students  not  covered  by  the  Visiting  Forces  Act  and  subsequent 
26                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
Designation  Orders  should  have  a  Category  F  visa.  The  visas  must  be  current  for  all 
courses covered by this offer and for any travel overseas undertaken as an integral part of 
the course (s). Individual schools may request visas of longer duration. This will be shown 
in the Joining Instructions. 
 
8. 
Should  you  have  any  queries  regarding  the  training  offered,  please  contact  the 
undersigned  at  the  address  or  telephone  number  above,  quoting  the  relevant  IDT(xx) 
Serial number shown in Annex A. 
 
«IDTOfficer_IDTOfficerName» 
 
Annex: 
 
A. 
Details of Training Offered 
B. 
Certificate of Acceptance of Pre-Payment Training with the British Army 
C. 
Certificate of Security and Assurance 
 
Distribution: 
 
Action: 
 
«ActionAddress_AddressName1» 
 
Information: 
 
«InfoAddress_AddressName1» 
 
 
 
 
 
 
27                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
ANNEX B: VISITING FORCES ACT 
 
COUNTRIES DESIGNATED UNDER SECTION 1 OF VISITING FORCES ACT (1952) 
 
VFA Countries 
Antigua & Barbuda 
Australia 
Bahamas 
Bangladesh 
Barbados 
Belize 
Bermuda 
Botswana 
Brunei 
Canada 
Cameroon 
Cyprus 
DR Congo 
Dominica 
Fiji 
Gambia 
Ghana 
Grenada 
Guyana 
India 
Jamaica 
Kenya 
Kiribati 
Lesotho 
Malawi 
Malaysia 
Maldives 
Malta 
Mauritius 
Mozambique 
Namibia 
Nauru 
New Zealand 
Nigeria 
Pakistan 
Papua New Guinea 
Samoa  
St Kitts and Nevis  
St Lucia  
St Vincent  
Seychelles  
Sierra Leone  
Singapore  
South Africa  
Solomon Islands  
Sri Lanka  
Swaziland  
Tanzania  
Tonga  
Trinidad and Tobago  
Tuvalu  
Uganda  
Vanuatu  
Zambia 
Zimbabwe 
 
 
List  of  Countries  Designated  by  the  Visiting  Forces  Designation  Order  1997,  1998, 
2008, 2010, 2016, 2017, 2018 to which the Provisions of the Visiting Forces Act 1952 
Apply 

Albania 
Algeria 
Armenia 
Austria 
Azerbaijan 
Belarus 
Bosnia-Herzegovina 
Bulgaria 
Croatia  
Czech Republic 
Estonia 
Finland  
Georgia 
Hungary 
Ireland 
Jordan 
Kazakhstan 
Kyrgyzstan 
Latvia 
Lithuania 
Macedonia 
Moldova 
Montenegro 
Morocco 
Oman 
Poland 
Romania 
Russia 
Saudi Arabia 
Serbia 
Slovakia 
Slovenia 
Sweden 
Switzerland 
Tajikistan 
Turkmenistan 
Ukraine 
Uzbekistan 
 
28                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
List of the Member Countries of NATO 
Albania  
Belgium  
Bulgaria  
Canada  
Croatia  
Czech Republic  
Denmark  
Estonia  
France  
Germany  
Greece  
Hungary  
Iceland  
Italy  
Latvia  
Lithuania  
Luxembourg  
Montenegro  
Netherlands  
Norway  
Poland  
Portugal  
Romania  
Slovakia  
Slovenia  
Spain  
Turkey  
United States of America 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
29                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
ANNEX C: ENGLISH LANGUAGE STANDARDS AND TRAINING 
 
1. 
ACDS  (Commitments)  is  the  Senior  Responsible  Owner  (SRO)  and  Training 
Requirements  Authority  (TRA)  for  Culture  and  Language  (C&L)  within  Defence.  The 
Defence  Requirements  Authority  for  C&L  (DRACL)  acts  as  the  TRA’s  agent  and  is  the 
Defence  custodian  of  the  C&L  capability  including  general  English  Language  Training 
(ELT) with a measurable output. DRACL supports the C&L governance structure, bringing 
rigour  to  C&L  through a  Defence  Systems Approach  to Training  (DSAT)  and  by  ensuring 
that ELT standards are in line with the NATO Standardisation Agreement (STANAG) 6001.   
 
2. 
The Defence Centre for Languages and Culture (DCLC) is the lead Training Provider 
of  ELT  in  Defence.  DCLC  manages  delivery  of  ELT,  both  in-house  and  in-country,  for 
around  one  thousand  foreign  students  per  year.  In  addition  to  this,  the  RN  and  the  RAF 
also provide ELT to foreign students using more localised delivery options. 
 
3. 
In accordance with Defence Culture and Language Policy, as outlined in 2017DIN03-
004,  NATO  STANAG  6001  is  the  overarching  framework  for  language  proficiency.  It  is 
sponsored by the NATO  Bureau for International Language Coordination (BILC) which is 
the principal international forum for military language training discussion. STANAG 6001 is 
the default standard for foreign language training in Defence and also for ELT delivered by 
and on behalf of UK Defence.  
 
4. 
Military personnel under training at DCLC at the Defence Academy, Shrivenham are 
assessed  internally  and  externally  by  assessments  which  are  based  upon  the  STANAG 
6001.  The  awarding  body  is  the  Ministry  of  Defence  Languages  Assessments  Board 
(MODLAB), consisting of the Defence Requirements Authority for Culture and Languages 
(DRACL)  and  an  external  contractor.  As  with  foreign  languages,  DCLC’s  English 
Language  Wing  (ELW)  operates  primarily  using  NATO  STANAG  6001  criteria  in  its 
teaching and assessment.  
 
5. 
Defence acknowledges that recognition and use of STANAG 6001 is limited to NATO 
and its aspirant nations. For candidates from non-NATO countries the International English 
Language  Training  System  (IELTS)  is  the  default  option  for  language  testing.  IELTS  is  a 
general, non-military system of assessment developed and used by the British Council. It 
has almost worldwide currency and should be used to assess the suitability of candidates 
from areas such as the Middle East, Asia and South America.    
 
6. 
Foreign students entering UK ELT courses who are below the required input standard 
risk failing to achieve the required output standard, where this is formally articulated.  
 
Alternatives to IELTS  
 
7. 
In cases where taking an IELTS test is impractical, the requirement can be waived by 
prior agreement with the IDT and the training establishment. In such cases the originating 
authority is responsible for ensuring that the prospective student possesses the necessary 
standard  of  English,  for  example  through  an  alternative  test  such  as  the  Common 
European  Framework  (CEF)  or  the Australian  Defence  Force  English  Language  Profiling 
System (ADFELPS).   
 
8. 
NATO  BILC  does  not  recognise  any  formal  mapping  between  the  STANAG  6001 
framework  and  other  language  proficiency  frameworks.  The  tables  shown  at Appendix  1 
show  suggested  equivalencies  between  the  various,  highly  complex  systems.  These 
30                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
equivalencies  are  currently  under  review  by  DRACL.  Any  questions  regarding  English 
Language equivalencies should be directed to DRACL. 
 
Administration of International English Language Test Standard (IELTS)    
 
13.  The LOTA will stipulate the IELTS  score that a student needs to achieve in order to 
attend UK training, and will also indicate the number of students for whom the UK will pay 
to  undertake  the  test.  The  serial  number  of  the  LOTA  must  be  quoted  on  all 
correspondence  and  when  booking  the  IELTS  test  with  the  British  Council.  Student 
assessments  and  serial  numbers  will  be  passed  to  the  IDT  by  the  British  Council  or  UK 
Defence  Section.  The  British  Council  will  also  forward  IELTS  test  report  forms  to  the 
student and the bidding country's MOD. IDT staff will review the IELTS results and advise 
the bidding agency whether the student has achieved the minimum score for entry to the 
course. 
 
Exclusions from IELTS test requirement  
 
14.  The following categories of student need not take an IELTS test: 
 
a. 
those whose first language is English. 
 
b. 
those  who  originate  from  a  NATO  nation  and  who  can  provide  evidence  of 
NATO STANAG qualifications. 
 
c. 
those  who  are  returning  for  training  within  2  years  of  taking  a  test,  as  long  as 
the IELTS requirement is not at a higher level.  
 
Taking the IELTS Test  
 
15.  If  a  prospective  student  is  required  to  take  an  IELTS  test,  he/she  can  contact  the 
British Embassy or High Commission or the British Council. The British Council conducts 
IELTS assessments  in most countries; further details can be found on the British Council 
website.  If  the  student  is  UK-funded,  the  cost  of  an IELTS  assessment  is  payable  by  the 
Defence Section in-country, but the UK will be liable to pay for only one IELTS assessment 
per  training  place.  Results  of  IELTS  tests  are  normally  issued  within  2  weeks  of  the  test 
date. 
 
Funding of Additional Language Training 
 
16.  When  a  UK-funded  student  requires  additional  ELT,  a  bid  for  extra  funds  must  be 
submitted to the manager of the proposed funding source through the IPS desk officer and 
the ESCAPADE serial amended accordingly. 
 
Providers of English Language Training 
 
17.  Should  a  prospective  international  student  require  additional/refresher  language 
training  before  undertaking  a  course,  there  are  a  number  of  options.  The  single-Service 
IDTs can provide further advice. 
 
18.  The  British  Council  in  country  may  have  training  facilities.  This  is  most  suitable  for 
refresher  training  immediately  prior  to  a  student's  departure  for  the  UK  and  is  usually  a 
cheaper option than training the student in the UK.  
31                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

 
19.  As the lead Training Provider of ELT in Defence DCLC in Shrivenham specialises in 
full-time,  high-intensity,  language  courses.  Its  training  design  and  delivery  follow  the 
Defence  Systems  Approach  to  Training  (DSAT)  which  is  mapped  on  to  the  ISO  9001 
international  quality  management  standard.  DCLC  can  provide  bespoke  ELT  courses  on 
application.  IDT(A)  can  provide  further  details.  DCLC  also  has  oversight  of  the  ELT 
provided at: 
 
a. 
Britannia  Royal  Naval  College  (BRNC)  Dartmouth.  BRNC  offers  ELT  courses 
through its commercial training partner Babcock. IDT(RN) can provide further details.  
 
b. 
Defence  School  of  Aeronautical  Engineering  at  RAF  Cosford.  DSAE  offers 
technical and military ELT. IDT(RAF) can provide further details.  
 
20.  Private language schools in the UK vary considerably in standard, although they can 
be cost effective.  MOD cannot recommend one private school over another, and IDT will 
not administer students’ private language training.  
Appendix 
 
1.    Provisional Language Proficiency Equivalence Tables. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
32                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
APPENDIX 1 TO ANNEX C: PROVISIONAL LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY 
EQUIVALENCE TABLES 
 
IELTS 9-BAND SCALE 
 
Score 
Skill Level 
Description 
Has  fully  operational  command  of  the  language:  appropriate, 
Band 9 
Expert user 
accurate and fluent with complete understanding. 
Has  fully  operational  command  of  the  language  with  only 
Very good 
occasional  unsystematic  inaccuracies  and  inappropriacies. 
Band 8 
user 
Misunderstandings  may  occur  in  unfamiliar  situations.  Handles 
complex detailed argumentation well. 
Has  operational  command  of  the  language,  though  with 
occasional  inaccuracies,  inappropriacies  and  misunderstandings 
Band 7 
Good user 
in some situations. Generally handles complex language well and 
understands detailed reasoning. 
Has  generally  effective  command  of  the  language  despite  some 
Competent 
inaccuracies,  inappropriacies  and  misunderstandings.  Can  use 
Band 6 
user 
and  understand  fairly  complex  language,  particularly  in  familiar 
situations. 
Has  partial  command  of  the  language,  coping  with  overall 
Modest 
meaning  in  most  situations,  though  is  likely  to  make  many 
Band 5 
user 
mistakes. Should be able to  handle basic communication in own 
field. 
Basic  competence  is  limited  to  familiar  situations.  Has  frequent 
Band 4 
Limited user  problems  in  understanding  and  expression.  Is  not  able  to  use 
complex language. 
Extremely 
Conveys  and  understands  only  general  meaning  in  very  familiar 
Band 3 
limited user 
situations. Frequent breakdowns in communication occur. 
No  real  communication  is  possible  except  for  the  most  basic 
Intermittent 
information  using  isolated  words  or  short  formulae  in  familiar 
Band 2 
user 
situations  and  to  meet  immediate  needs.  Has  great  difficulty 
understanding spoken and written English. 
Essentially has no ability to use the language beyond possibly a 
Band 1 
Non-user 
few isolated words. 
Did not 
Band 0 
attempt the 
No assessable information provided. 
test 
  
Adapted from: www.ieltsessentials.com/global/results/ielts9bandscale. 
 
33                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
UK DEFENCE STANAG-CEF-IELTS READ-ACROSS SCALE 
 
STANAG SLP5 
CEF6 
IELTS7 
4  (Expert) 
C2  (Proficient User, Mastery) 
8.08.5  (Very Good (towards 
Expert) User) 
3+ 
C1  (Proficient User, Effective 
7.07.5  (Good (towards Very 
Operational Proficiency) 
Good) User) 
3  (Professional) 
B2+ (Independent User, Vantage+) 
6.0, 6.5  (Competent (towards 
Good) User) 
2+ 
B2  (Independent User, Vantage) 
5.5  (Modest (towards 
Competent) User) 
2  (Functional) 
B1  (Independent User, Threshold) 
4.04.55.0 (Limited-Modest 
User) 
1  (Survival) 
A2  (Basic User, Waystage) 

                        
At SLP1 it is difficult to assign a reliable IELTS grade because of a paucity of consistent 
and coherent usage of the target language. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5 In accordance with the NATO STANAG 6001, NATO Standardisation Agency. 
6  In  accordance  with  the  Common  European  Framework  of  Reference  for  Languages:  Learning,  teaching, 
assessment (Sixth printing, 2004), Council of Europe/CUP. 
7 In accordance with the International English Language Testing System (http://www.ielts.org/). 
34                           JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LISTENING EQUIVALENCES 
 
STANAG SLP 
CEF 
IELTS 
understands  all  forms  and  styles 
has  no  difficulty  in  understanding 
has  fully  operational  command  of  the 
of  speech  used  for  professional 
any  kind  of  spoken  language…  live 
language 
with 
only 
occasional 

purposes… 
including 
official  C2  or broadcast, delivered at fast native  8.0, 8.5  unsystematic 
inaccuracies 
and 
policies,  lectures,  presentations, 
speed  with  colloquialisms  and  some 
inappropriacies;  misunderstandings  may 
negotiations etc.  
regional variation. 
occur in unfamiliar situations (8).  
can  follow  some  unpredictable 
can  recognise  a  wide  range  of 
has 
operational 
command 
of 
the 
turns of thought… in informal and 
idiomatic 
expressions 
and 
language, 
though 
with 
occasional 
3+  formal 
speech… 
recognizes  C1  colloquialisms… can follow extended  7.0, 7.5  inaccuracies; generally handles complex 
nuances, 
humour, 
emotional 
speech  when  not  clearly  structured 
language  well  and  understands  detailed 
overtones of speech.  
and when relations are implied.  
reasoning (7). 
can  readily  understand  language 
can  understand  standard  spoken 
has  generally  effective  command  of  the 
that  includes…    hypothesis, 
language,  live  or  broadcast…  on 
language  despite  some  inaccuracies… 

supporting  opinion,  stating  and  B2+  familiar 
and 
unfamiliar 
topics  6.0, 6.5  can  use  and  understand  fairly  complex 
defending  policy,  argumentation, 
normally  encountered  in  personal, 
language, 
particularly 
in 
familiar 
elaboration etc. 
social, working, academic life.   
situations (6).  
shows some ability to understand 
can  follow  extended  speech  and 
 
the 
essential 
points 
of 
complex  lines  of  argument…  in 
No  IELTS  descriptors  exist  for  ‘point 
2+  conversations  among  educated 
B2 
reasonably  familiar  topics  and  when 
5.5 
five’:  this  level  is  above  IELTS  5.0,  but 
native 
speakers… 
general 
the  direction  of  the  talk  is  sign-
below IELTS 6.0.  
subjects, broadcasts etc.  
posted by explicit markers    
can  reliably  understand  face-to-
can  understand  the  main  points  of 
has  partial  command  of  the  language, 
face speech in a standard dialect, 
clear  standard  speech  on  familiar 
coping  with  overall  meaning  in  most 
4.0, 

delivered  at  a  normal  rate  with 
B1 
matters…  e.g.  work,  school,  leisure 
situations  (5);  basic  competence  is 
4.5, 5.0 
some repetition and rewording. 
etc, including short narratives.  
limited  to  familiar  situations…  frequent 
problems in understanding (4).  
can 
understand 
concrete 
can 
understand 
phrases 
and 
 
utterances,  simple  questions  and 
expressions  related  to…  very  basic 
At  SLP1 it is difficult to assign a reliable 

answers, 
and 
very 
simple 
A2 
personal  and  family  information,   
IELTS grade: see IELTS table for grades 
conversations…  about  everyday 
shopping, 
local 
geography, 
at 3.0 and below. 
needs. 
employment… in clear, slow speech.     
 
35 
JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SPEAKING EQUIVALENCES 
 
STANAG SLP 
CEF 
IELTS 
uses  the  language  with  great 
has  a  good  command  of  idiomatic 
speaks  fluently  with  only  occasional 
precision,  accuracy  and  fluency 
expressions  and  colloquialisms… 
repetition  or  self-correction;  hesitation  is 

for  all  professional  purposes 
C2 
can convey finer shades of meaning  8.0, 8.5  usually 
content-related… 
uses 
including  the  representation  of 
by  using  a  range  of  modification 
paraphrase, 
idiomatic 
vocabulary 
official policy/points of view.  
devices.   
effectively as required (8).  
readily 
produces 
extended 
can  express  him/herself  fluently  and 
speaks at length without noticeable effort 
discourse…  from  such  areas  as 
spontaneously,  almost  effortlessly; 
or  loss  of  coherence;  uses  a  range  of 
3+  economics, 
culture, 
science, 
C1 
has  a  good  command  of  a  broad  7.0, 7.5  connectives  and  discourse  markers…  
technology,  as  well  as  from 
lexical  repertoire…  little  obvious 
frequently 
error-free, 
though 
some 
his/her professional field.  
searching for expression.  
problems persist (7).  
demonstrates…  the  ability  to 
can  use  the  language  fluently, 
is willing to speak at length, though may 
effectively  understand  face-to-
accurately  and  effectively  on  a  wide 
lose  coherence  at  times  due  to 

face speech delivered with normal  B2+  range 
of 
general, 
academic,  6.0, 6.5  occasional  repetition,  self-correction  or 
speed  and  clarity  in  a  standard 
vocational,  leisure  topics…  adopting 
hesitation… 
generally 
understood 
dialect.  
an appropriate level of formality. 
throughout (6).    
can  communicate  in  informal  and 
can  use  the  language  fluently, 
 
formal conversations on practical, 
interact with a degree of fluency and 
No  IELTS  descriptors  exist  for  ‘point 
2+  social  and  everyday  professional 
B2 
spontaneity… with good grammatical 
5.5 
five’:  this  level  is  above  IELTS  5.0,  but 
topics… 
some 
imprecise 
control  without  much  sign  of  having 
below IELTS 6.0
vocabulary.   
to restrict what he/she says.  
can  describe  people,  places  and 
can 
enter 
unprepared 
into 
produces  simple  speech  fluently,  but 
things;  can  narrate  current,  past 
conversation on familiar topics… e.g. 
more  complex  communication  causes 
4.0, 

and  future  activities;  can  state 
B1 
family,  hobbies,  work,  travel,  current 
problems  (5);  links  basic  sentences,  but 
4.5, 5.0 
facts, compare and contrast.  
events…  can  exchange,  check  and 
with  repetitious  use  of  connectives, 
confirm information. 
some incoherence (4).  
can speak at the sentence level… 
can  communicate  in  simple  and 
 
may  produce  strings  of  simple, 
routine  tasks  requiring  a  simple  and 
At  SLP1 it  is difficult to assign a reliable 

short 
sentences 
joined 
by 
A2 
direct  exchange  of  information  on   
IELTS grade: see IELTS table for grades 
common linking words… frequent 
familiar  and  routine  matters  to  do 
at 3.0 and below. 
errors. 
with work and free time. 
 
36 
JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
READING EQUIVALENCES 
 
STANAG SLP 
CEF 
IELTS 
can  understand…  almost  all 
can understand a wide range of long 
has  fully  operational  command  of  the 
cultural references and can relate 
and  complex  texts,  appreciating 
language 
with 
only 
occasional 

a specific text to others within the 
C2 
subtle distinctions of style, implicit as  8.0, 8.5  unsystematic 
inaccuracies 
and 
target  culture…  demonstrates  a 
well as explicit meaning…in abstract, 
inappropriacies;  misunderstandings  may 
grasp of nuance. 
complex, literary texts.  
occur in unfamiliar situations (8).  
recognises…  humour,  emotional 
can  understand  in  detail  lengthy, 
has 
operational 
command 
of 
the 
overtones,  nuances  of  written 
complex  texts,  whether  or  not  they 
language, 
though 
with 
occasional 
3+  language… can read between the 
C1 
relate  to  his/her  area  of  speciality…  7.0, 7.5  inaccuracies; generally handles complex 
lines  and  distinguish  between 
provided that difficult sections can be 
language  well  and  understands  detailed 
different styles.  
re-read.    
reasoning (7). 
can 
readily 
understand… 
can  adapt…  speed  of  reading  to 
has  generally  effective  command  of  the 
hypothesis,  supporting  opinion, 
different  texts  and  purposes…  and 
language  despite  some  inaccuracies… 

argumentation, 
clarification,  B2+  use  appropriate  reference  sources  6.0, 6.5  can  use  and  understand  fairly  complex 
elaboration etc… can get the gist 
selectively.   
language, 
particularly 
in 
familiar 
of higher level texts.  
situations (6).  
can  understand…factual  news 
can  read  with  a  large  degree  of 
 
items,  editorials  in  periodicals 
independence;  has  a  broad  active 
No  IELTS  descriptors  exist  for  ‘point 
2+  intended  for  educated  native 
B2 
reading 
vocabulary, 
but 
can 
5.5 
five’:  this  level  is  above  IELTS  5.0,  but 
readers,  personal  and  some 
experience  some  difficulty  with  low 
below IELTS 6.0
professional correspondence. 
frequency items.  
can 
read 
straightforward, 
can read straightforward factual texts 
has  partial  command  of  the  language, 
concrete,  factual  texts…  people, 
on  subjects  related  to  his/her  field 
coping  with  overall  meaning  in  most 
4.0, 

places, 
things; 
narration 
in 
B1 
and  interest  with  a  satisfactory  level 
situations  (5);  basic  competence  is 
4.5, 5.0 
current,  past  and  future  e.g. 
of comprehension. 
limited  to  familiar  situations…  frequent 
biographical data, notices, letters. 
problems in understanding (4). 
can  read  very  simple  connected 
can  understand  short,  simple  texts 
 
written  material…    unambiguous 
containing… 
high 
frequency 
At  SLP1 it is difficult to assign a reliable 

texts  directly  related  to  everyday 
A2 
vocabulary;  can  understand  short,   
IELTS grade: see IELTS table for grades 
survival, 
workplace, 
currency, 
simple  texts  on  familiar  matters, 
at 3.0 and below. 
people, places. 
everyday, job-related language.  
 
 
37 
JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WRITING EQUIVALENCES 
 
STANAG SLP 
CEF 
IELTS 
demonstrates  strong  competence 
can  write…  clear,  smoothly  flowing, 
covers  all  requirements  of  the  task 
in…formulating  private  letters, 
complex  texts  in  an  appropriate  and 
sufficiently;  manages  all  aspects  of 

job-related  texts,  reports,  opinion 
C2 
effective  style,  and  in  a  logical  8.0, 8.5  cohesion  well;  uses  a  wide  range  of 
pieces,  policy  documents;  can 
structure  which  helps  the  reader  to 
structures;  makes  only  very  occasional 
express nuances.  
find significant points. 
errors or inappropriacies (8).  
usually  organises  extended  texts 
can  write…  clear,  well-structured 
presents  a  clear  purpose…  with  a 
well,  conveys  meaning  effectively 
texts 
on 
complex 
subjects, 
consistent  and  appropriate  tone;  uses 
3+  and  produces  writing  stylistically 
C1 
emphasising  the  relevant  salient  7.0, 7.5  less  common  lexical  items  with  some 
appropriate  for  the  audience  and 
issues,  expanding  and  supporting 
awareness  of  style  and  collocation; 
topic.   
points of view at some length.  
frequent error-free sentences (7).   
can  convey  abstract  concepts 
can  successfully  synthesise  and 
presents  and  adequately  highlights  key 
when 
writing 
about 
complex 
evaluate  information  and  argument 
features/bullet  points…  but  details  may 

topics  e.g.  economics,  culture,  B2+  from a number of sources.  
6.0, 6.5  be irrelevant or inaccurate; makes some 
science,  technology,  as  well  as 
errors  in  spelling  which  do  not  impede 
his/her professional field.  
communication (6).  
can  write  acceptably  and  provide 
can  write  clear,  detailed  texts  on  a 
 
considerable 
detail 
when 
variety  of  subjects  related  to  his/her 
No  IELTS  descriptors  exist  for  ‘point 
2+  narrating, 
describing, 
stating 
B2 
field of interest. 
5.5 
five’:  this  level  is  above  IELTS  5.0,  but 
facts,  comparing  and  contrasting, 
below IELTS 6.0
and instructing.  
can  write…simple  personal  and 
can  write  straightforward  connected 
generally  addresses  the  task,  but  the 
routine 
workplace 
texts  on  a  range  of  familiar  subjects 
format  may  be  inappropriate  in  places; 
4.0, 

correspondence 
e.g. 
facts, 
B1 
within  his/her  field  of  interest  …by 
vocabulary is minimally adequate for the 
4.5, 5.0 
memos,  brief  reports,  private 
linking  a  series  of  shorter,  discrete 
task  (5);  attempts  to  address  the  task; 
letters, everyday topics.  
elements sequentially. 
errors recur (4). 
can  write  to  meet  immediate 
can write a series of simple phrases 
 
personal  needs…  lists,  short 
and  sentences  linked  with  simple 
At  SLP1 it is difficult to assign a reliable 

notes,  postcards,  filling  out  forms 
A2 
connectors e.g. and, but, because.  
 
IELTS grade: see IELTS table for grades 
and  applications…  can  write 
at 3.0 and below. 
short, simple sentences.  
 
38 
JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19) 

                                                                                                                          
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
APPROXIMATE IELTS-ADFELPS8 READ-ACROSS SCALE 
 
IELTS 
ADFELPS 
9.0 
 
8.5 
 
8.0 

7.5 

7.0 
7.5 
6.5 

6.0 
6.5 
5.5 

5.0 
5.5 
4.5 





 

 
 At these levels it is difficult to assign a reliable IELTS grade. 
 
 
 
8 The Australian Defence Force English Language Profiling System:  ‘an English language proficiency rating 
system… to describe the levels of English required for target courses conducted by the Australian Defence 
Forces’ (http://www.ditc.net.au/).  
                                                         39  
JSP 510 Pt 2 (V7.2 Feb 19)