This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Future High Streets Fund expression of interest'.


Future High Streets Fund
Call for Expressions of Interest
Application Form
Applicant Information
Bidding authority: London Borough of Merton
Area within authority covered by bid: Mitcham town centre
Bid Manager Name and position: Sarah Williams, Programme Manager Economy
Contact telephone number: 020 8545 3066
Email address: xxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx
Postal address: 9th Floor, Civic Centre, London Road, Morden, Surrey, SM4 5DX
Additional evidence, such as letters of support, maps or plans
should be included in an annex.
Applications to the Fund will be assessed against the criteria set out below. Further
information on the scoring criteria and their weighting will be published by the
department before the end of January 2019.
Submission of proposals:
Proposals must be received no later than 2359 on Friday 22 March 2019.
An electronic copy only of the bid including any supporting material should be
submitted to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx.
Enquiries about the Fund may be directed to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx.

SECTION 1: Defining the place
This section will seek a definition of the high street or town centre to be covered
within the bidding authority. Places should:
 Explain the high street/town centre geography
 Indicate the population of those living and travelling to this centre, how this
links to the wider economic area and its role in the lives of those within the
catchment area
1.1 Geographical area:
Include information setting out the extent of the high street/town centre area covered
in the proposal and a description of this centre.
Please include maps and supporting evidence as annex documents if required.
Please limit your response to 500 words.
Mitcham is a town within the London Borough of Merton, in south London. Located to
the east of the borough and connected by rail, tram and bus links; however, the tram
stops and train stations are situated a distance away from the town centre. The
nearest station is Mitcham Eastfields station (10 mins walk from the town centre),
which opened in 2008. The main form of public transport access to the town centre is
by bus.
The proposal covers the whole of the area designated as Mitcham town centre (see
Figure 1). The Centre of Mitcham generally consists of single sided shopping streets
and is relatively dispersed with long walking distances between shop frontages.
The proposal for Mitcham town centre covers three specific areas of the town centre,
which are shown in the maps in Figure 1:
1. Sibthorpe Road car park
This is a council owned car park on the west side of the town centre, with a total area
of approximately 0.3 hectares.
2. The ‘gateway’ to the north of the town centre on the approach from London
Road
This is an area of vacant land to the north of the town centre on the approach from
London Road, approximately 0.04ha which currently has a large billboard and some
grass.
3. Mitcham Fair Green, which hosts the market square and café
Mitcham Fair Green is the major open space asset of the town centre. This area
measures approximately 0.1 hectares.

1.2 Population and links to wider economic area:
Information on the population living and working in the town centre area, how the
area acts as a centre of social and economic activity and its links to the wider
economic catchment area.
With supporting evidence to include:
Resident and workplace population, travel to work catchment area, town centre
footfal , commercial space, retail activity, cultural activities, diversity of uses and
social/ historical importance of the centre
Please limit your response to 750 words.
Demographics
Mitcham is an important centre serving the wider population of the east of the
borough. It is not easy to find data for the specific Mitcham area and so the following
data includes Lower Super Output areas where any part is within 800m of Mitcham
Fair Green (see Figure 2).
The population in the Mitcham area consists of approximately 33,000 people, of
which there is a higher than average for England population aged under 10 years old
and aged between 25 and 45 years old. Compared to Merton as a whole Mitcham,
has a greater proportion of younger people and lower proportion of those aged 65
years and older. The area has relatively high population density due to the housing
type around the town centre largely consisting of multi-storey flatter blocks (see
Figure 6). Mitcham and has seen high increases in population over the past 10 years
due to new developments (see Figure 7).
The area is ethnically diverse compared to Merton as a whole with a 17% lower
proportion of white population and 16% of households for whom English is not the
main language according to the 2011 census. The Consumer Data Research
Company (CDRC) classifies the area as “Ethnicity Central” and “Multicultural
Metropolitans” (see Figure 8). This is reflected in the retail offering within the town
centre.
The 2011 census also reported a much higher proportion of lone parent households
in comparison to the whole of Merton and England (11.5% in Mitcham, 6.5% in
Merton and 7.1% in England). Figure 3 shows that Mitcham contains areas within the
most deprived indices of multiple deprivation, and has the highest rates of childhood
obesity in Merton (Figure 4). Figure 5 shows that there are higher levels of
unemployment in the area.
Historical importance
Mitcham is famous for many things – Cricket, the Fair, Lavender, Mitcham Common,
the Anglo-Saxon Cemetery, the industries along the River Wandle. Mitcham can
make a strong claim to have the country’s oldest cricket ground in continual use, with
good evidence that games were being played on the Cricket Green in 1685. Mitcham
clock tower was unveiled on Fair Green in 1898 to mark Queen Victoria’s diamond
jubilee.

Local Accessibility to shops and services
Mitcham is heavily reliant on buses as the main form of public transport for access
from surrounding areas. Whilst the centre of the town has a PTAL of 5, it drops
sharply to 2 and below within 500m (see Figure 9). As you reach localities towards
Pollards Hill, Tooting and Colliers Wood there is limited access to a town centres by
public transport, and so is more car dependent. Figure 10 shows that it is more than
20 minutes travel to the nearest major centre (Wimbledon) by public transport,
therefore the services that Mitcham town centre provides are vital for the local
population.
Commercial space and vacancy rates
The retail catchment area for Mitcham extends up towards Tooting, Streatham,
Wimbledon, Morden, Sutton and Croydon (see Figure 11). CDRC classifies Mitcham
as a “Primary food and secondary comparison, urban value destination” (see Figure
12). It is a “Metro Suburb” (Figure 13) and the 2017 Workplace Zone classification
shows high levels of self-employment and part-time workers as part of a heavily
multicultural workforce (Figure 14).
Workplace population
There are very few workplaces within the town centre itself. Nearby on Willow Lane
Industrial estate (20 mins walk), Vestry Hall (5 mins walk) and Wandle Valley
Resource Centre (5 mins walk). Figure 15 shows that there are 1,720 jobs within 5
mins of public transport to Mitcham town centre. There are 3,185 jobs within 10 mins
and 7,149 within 15 minutes of public transport journeys. However, there is very little
lunch time offer in the town centre – only Greggs, Morrison’s, Asda or Lidl – and so
local workers generally do not visit the town centre. As part of Rediscover Mitcham,
the public toilets were converted into a small café, but it is not sufficient to support
the town centre demand.
Cultural activities
The Fair Green, Mitcham, derives its name from the fair, which was held there on
12th-14th August each year until 1924. There is a common belief that Mitcham Fair
was established under a charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I. The Mitcham
Carnival now takes place on Mitcham Common every summer and is a hugely
popular community event for all ages.
Active voluntary organisations
Mitcham has an active and engaged community. There are 17 registered
organisations just within Figges Marsh ward, in which the town centre is located.

SECTION 2: Setting out the chal enges
Clear description of the issues and challenges facing this area.
This section will seek a description of the issues and structural challenges facing the
high street or town centre area to be covered within the bidding. Places should:
 Describe the key challenges facing the area
 Provide evidence to support this argument (additional sources can be
included in annexes). Set out why this place would benefit more from moving
forward to co-development than other places within the area
We wil  not accept bids covering town centre areas that are not facing
significant chal enges.
2.1: Chal enges
We recognise that each place wil  see different chal enges. Supporting evidence on
the chal enges facing areas could cover the fol owing:
• Proportion and/or number of vacant properties
• Openings/closures of commercial units
• Diversity of uses in the town centre area
• Resident/customer surveys
• Pedestrian flows and footfal  trends
• Evidence of congestion and air quality
• Perception of safety and occurrence of crime
• State of town centre environmental quality including provision of green spaces
• Accessibility
• Housing demands
Why Mitcham town centre?
The rationale of choosing this area over others in the borough is a combination of the
social and economic challenges that it faces. Mitcham and surrounding wards in the
east of Merton have higher levels of deprivation than the west of the borough. Once
a thriving Surrey village, the South London town of Mitcham has slowly seen its
identity buried in recent decades by post-war, industrial and suburban development.
Its once bustling town centre has suffered in more recent times from the combined
pressures of internet retail, out of town shopping centres and the overall economic
climate.
Mitcham Town Centre, as a local shopping centre and community hub, has been on
the decline for many years. Transport hubs in Mitcham were positioned outside the
centre, the public realm was in desperate need of improvement combined with a lack
of quality shops, a poorly attended and low quality market have all contributed to a
lack of vibrancy. The area was left sterile with a sterile appearance but with a visible
increase in street drinking, crime and anti-social behaviour.
Retail offer
It is well acknowledged that people visit town centres to meet friends and socialise in
cafes and restaurants, and use leisure and entertainment spaces rather than only
shopping. Given the pace and scale of change in how we shop and socialise over

the last 10 years, it is impossible to predict all the changes we might welcome in the
next 10 years. This means that the ground floors of commercial developments need
to be flexible to accommodate everything from a soft play area for children to food
stalls to flexible offices, while having active, attractive and accessible frontages.
At present Mitcham does not offer any/enough of these factors that will be the
lifeblood of high streets in the future and it is difficult to see how, without intervention,
this can be achieved. The variety of use classes within the town centre is limited,
with more than c.50% retail, followed by c.15% professional services (see Figure
16). Bookmakers, charity shops and off licenses (selling high strength alcohol)
dominate the area, making it unattractive for visitors. Figure 17 is a visual
representation of the most common uses within the town centre, the most common
being hairdressers, vacant, funeral directors, charity shops, chemists and estate
agents.
Vacancy rates
Vacancy rates in Mitcham in 2017 were the highest in Merton – 7.5%, compared to
3.4% in Morden and 4.3% in Wimbledon. Figure 18 shows the trends in Mitcham
compared to other town centres in Merton – Wimbledon and Morden, London and
nationally. Between 2008 and 2017, Mitcham has had higher vacancy rates than
both Mitcham and Morden. Since 2014, vacancy rates have been lower but in 2017,
they were still higher than in London.
Town centre footfal
Mitcham faces specific challenges to the economic vitality of its high streets. The
town has low pedestrian numbers, there is a lack of a busy ‘core area’, little activity
after dark and the negative impact of heavy traffic around. Car dominance around
the town centre is evident and understandable given the poor public transport
accessibility of many of the areas outside of Mitcham. To the east of the town centre
the Pollards Hill area is one of the most poorly connected areas in Merton and
Census data shows that it has a very high proportion of car ownership, with at least
one car per household.
The car parks in Mitcham town centre all lie on the periphery and are generally
associated with large supermarket stores (Morrison’s, Asda and Lidl). With the main
attractors for weekly shopping needs, being on the periphery with their own car parks
it is understandable that few retail patrons pass through the town centre on foot. This
behaviour also relates to the aforementioned poor retail offer.
Detailed analysis was carried out for the Rediscover Mitcham project (see Figures
19, 20 and 21) after it was identified that the pedestrianisation and positioning of
transport hubs outside the centre gradually reinforced the sterility and isolation of the
town centre, with key roads carrying heavy through traffic elsewhere and investment
and business channelled to neighbouring areas instead. Today the footfall is still
considered low for the reasons mentioned earlier relating to accessibility and the
retail offer.
Night-time offer and crime

The town centre only has 2 pubs and 2 restaurants, but they are of poor quality and
patronage is low because of high levels of anti-social behaviour, public order,
robbery, violence and sexual offences, and street drinking (see Police.uk). Between
February 2018 and January 2019 1,262 crimes were reported in the ward of Figges
Marsh, in which Mitcham town centre is located. Figures 22 and 23 show that Figges
Marsh has the highest crime rate of all wards in Merton. The most common crimes
reported were violence and sexual offences, followed closely by anti-social
behaviour. Figures 24 and 25 show the crime rate is up to 50% higher in Figges
Marsh compared to Merton and England. 26% of crime related to anti-social
behaviour and the anti-social behaviour rate for the whole borough is 17%. This
crime is well documented in local press and is evident when you walk around that
area of the town centre.
Mitcham town centre’s consumers
Figures 26 and 27 give a flavour of the population living immediately adjacent and
around Mitcham town centre. The most common classification of residents around
the town centre as “vulnerable communities” – which includes those who are likely in
lower paid jobs, may not have access to a car, or live in social housing (see Annex D
for detailed information). The next most common classifications are “vulnerable
pensioners”, “on a budget” and “students and young professionals”. There is a small
area of “prosperous professionals”, but they are the minority. In comparison to the
Wimbledon area, which is majority “prosperous professionals” and “students and
young professionals”, it could be argued that the local buying power is reflective of
the current state of the town centre.
2.2: Rationale for selecting town centre area
Set out your rationale for choosing this town centre area as opposed to other centres
within your local authority, and why this area is most in need. Please limit your
response to 500 words.
While Mitcham boasts some excellent local shops as well as national chains, the
overall sense is that Mitcham has suffered in relation to nearby towns and this has
been reflected in the gradual decline of the town centre. High streets across the
country are under pressure due to competition from out of town shopping centres,
the growth of internet retailing and from the overall economic climate.
Mitcham also faces specific challenges such as low pedestrian numbers in some
parts of the town, the lack of a busy ‘core’ area, little activity after dark and the
negative impact of heavy traffic around the main shopping centre. Until recently, the
absence of a railway station had also reduced its attractiveness as a commuter town
which has in turn meant that investment and business has gone elsewhere. A
successful town needs a vibrant and attractive centre. The centre is the heart of the
town and is the identity people think of when deciding about whether to visit, live or
invest in the area.
Merton’s housing target has increased from 411 to 1,328 in the draft London Plan.
The area around Mitcham has the potential to accommodate housing growth. Major
development sites that have already been identified include the regeneration of

Eastfields and Ravensbury estates. New homes are also proposed at Benedict
Wharf on Hallowfield Way, at Tamworth Lane and a variety of smaller sites across
the neighbourhood. In line with the London Plan, which prioritises residential
development above shops in town centres, the town centre sites will be able to
accommodate apartments, providing a contrast to the surrounding terraces and
semi-detached houses.
Merton’s 2018 Call for Sites received huge interest for Mitcham, with 19 site
proposals across the area (see Figure 28), including two sites within the town centre
boundary. One is Sibthorpe Road Car Park, owned by the council and proposed for
mixed-use redevelopment. The other, a 1-hectare site in single ownership within the
town centre boundary proposed for mixed-use redevelopment. These sites provide
an opportunity to modernise and revitalise a significant amount of Mitcham town
centre’s business floorspace, and provide new households to help increase footfall
and local spend in the town centre.
Section 1.2 introduced the relative deprivation of the area compared to other parts of
Merton. One rationale for choosing Mitcham town centre for this bid is in recognition
of the NPPF ambition to “take account of and support local strategies to improve
health, social and cultural wellbeing for all”, including access to healthier food,
healthier behaviours, reductions in health inequalities and enhancing the physical
and mental health of the community.
In supporting and future proofing Mitcham, town centre there is an opportunity to
improve both the economic wellbeing and social wellbeing of its residents and
visitors.

SECTION 3: Strategic ambition
This section will seek evidence of the level of ambition from the local authority,
support from stakeholders and evidence that the local authority is well-placed to use
the Future High Street Fund to tackle these challenges in a way that will fit with wider
existing plans. Local authorities should:
 Set out a high-level vision for improving their area and how this links with
need expressed in Section 2
 Demonstrate how this ambition will align with other funding streams (public or
private)
 Cover how investment from government will support the area and help
overcome these challenges
 Demonstrate engagement with and support from local stakeholders including
other tiers of local government, if applicable (supporting evidence of this
support such as letters should be attached as an annex)
 Show how this will link to wider strategic plans, including the Local Plan and
Local Industrial Strategies e.g. around housing and local growth
 Provide an estimate of how much revenue funding they would need to support
the development of their strategic vision and business case for a specific
proposal
This phase relates to defining places and challenges and we therefore are not asking
for specific project proposals at this stage.
However, if a local authority has been working on a specific project that they
feel is deliverable in the short term if they were to receive capital funding at an
early stage, we invite them to make that clear here. While the details of the
project wil  not be considered in our decision-making at this stage, we may
consider fast-tracking these projects during co-development.
We will not accept bids that do not provide sufficient evidence of support from local
stakeholders.
3.1 Town centre vision and ambition for change
Set out your vision for regenerating your high street and how this links with the
chal enges outlined in section 2. Please limit your response to 750 words.
Mitcham town centre’s vision is to boost the range and quality of shops, services and
leisure activities in Mitcham by improving the public realm and streetscene, bringing
more people into the town centre and making it easier for people to get to and
around Mitcham. More people using the town centre will have a knock-on social and
environmental bonus, including greater support for existing local businesses,
allowing them to expand and support new jobs and training. Improvements to the
business offer, leisure opportunities, shops and services will reduce the need for
surrounding residents to travel further afield.
Residents have raised that they feel Mitcham town centre does not have the same
range and quality of offer compared to other local town centres like Wimbledon and

Colliers Wood. Local businesses tell us that the footfall and spend in Mitcham,
doesn’t provide enough funding to justify investing in their offer or premises.
The Rediscover Mitcham project transformed the town centre with a £7m investment
in improving public transport accessibility and investing in quality streetscape and
public spaces. The re-opening of London Road as a bus only street has halted the
decline created by a 1980s pedestrianisation project, now bringing 6,000 passengers
per day into the heart of the town centre. Fair Green is now busier and more
attractive to walk around. The new Mitcham Market Square supports a fledgling
market offer, which is the main focus of the Future High Streets Fund bid. More
people are now coming to Mitcham but the town centre business, jobs and leisure
offer is still less than its neighbours.
Our ambition for change is to improve the range and quality of the town centre offer
provide more and better quality workspaces and homes into the town centre to
support the local economy. There are five elements to the Future High Street Fund
proposal for Mitcham:
1.
Develop a high street strategy that builds upon the successful public realm
interventions. The strategy would set out a holistic vision for people, place and
prosperity, including healthy streets, asset management, planning policy and
practice, education and business and skills.
2. Improve the gateway to the town centre by acquiring vacant land to build much
needed new homes and workspaces within the town centre and improve the image
of the town centre as you approach it from the north end of London Road.
3.
Provide meanwhile uses workspaces for 5 years on the council owned
Sibthorpe Road car park, to bring creative businesses into the heart of the town
centre and transform it into a hub of activity. We propose to build a temporary/semi-
permanent structure for 5 years (similar to Crate UK and Pop Brixton) which will
have an anticipated blend of popular chains (30%), creative local start-
ups/entrepreneurs (40%) and shared workspace (30%). Within the area, we also aim
to provide a new community space, which will also help kick-start an evening
entertainment trade, which the residents of Mitcham have never previously enjoyed.
4.
Invest in Mitcham Fair Green Market to improve the town centre’s retail
offer and experience, strengthen the social value of the market and provide a place
for local creative industries to sell their products. Once their brands are successful
and local customer base developed, they will be encouraged to move into the local
vacant commercial premises. This will provide a vacancy at the project for a new
local start up to begin this same journey.
This conveyor belt approach is the long-term solution and will transform Mitcham
Town Centre. Local start-ups create their business in a low risk environment with
expert advice and guidance, the start-ups support the market (creating vibrancy),
once their business is established they move into a local shop and flourish (creating
as diverse and high quality range of shops in the area) which will give the local
people and commuters a town centre to frequent and enjoy on a regular basis.

5. Encourage cultural pop-up events such as busking and concerts within the
town centre, building on the legacy of Film Merton, which is creating pop-up cinemas
– part of the Mayor of London’s Cultural Impact Award.
Meeting future chal enges
The above proposal links with the challenges by:
bringing more people into the town centre in general to boost footfall and
spend, supporting businesses to improve the quality of their retail offer and reducing
vacancy rates
making the town centre more resilient to competition from other centres in
London, Mitcham must not seek to replicate these centres, but develop its own home
grown offer by extending the range of activities, showcasing local talent.
targeting the smal  spends – meanwhile uses and a greater diversity and range
of uses to encourage people working and living locally to buy lunch, visit a café,
spend a small amount more frequently in Mitcham. This has started with Rediscover
Mitcham with the enhanced bus services increasing footfall in the town centre, and
the Future High Streets Fund will continue this with investment in the market,
meanwhile uses and other high street infrastructure.
building +100 more homes and workspaces on key sites in and around Mitcham
town centre, providing much needed new housing for London and boosting the local
population, footfall and potential spending power in Mitcham.
3.2 Engagement and alignment of vision
Set out how your town centre vision aligns with other funding streams, both public
and private, including details of partnership working with the private sector in this
area.
Show how your vision fits with wider strategic plans such as housing, transport and
Local Industrial Strategies. Please limit your response to 750 words.
Mitcham town centre’s vision is to boost the range and quality of shops, services and
leisure activities in Mitcham by improving the public realm and streetscene, bringing
more people into the town centre and making it easier for people to get to and
around Mitcham. More people using the town centre will have a knock-on social and
environmental bonus, including greater support for existing local businesses,
allowing them to expand and support new jobs and training. Improvements to the
business offer, leisure opportunities, shops and services will reduce the need for
surrounding residents to travel further afield.
Funding stream Rediscover Mitcham
Started in 2014 and now on phase 6, Rediscover Mitcham is an ambitious, £7m
project to restore the heart of Mitcham. It represents Merton’s largest town centre
regeneration project to date. In strategic partnership with TfL, The Greater London

Authority and The Heritage Lottery Fund, the project team reimagined Mitcham as a
prosperous, better-connected town centre, which would attract and sustain
businesses for people living, working and travelling through Mitcham. Its principal
aims were to improve accessibility to its core, Fair Green and surrounding streets, by
making pedestrian and cycle movement around the area easier.
Phase 6 of Rediscover Mitcham is proposed to enhance the southern gateway
towards the historic Three Kings Pond, Mitcham Common and the opportunities for
work in Croydon. While Rediscover Mitcham focusses on the pavements, roads and
planting, The Future High Streets Fund will compliment this by aligning the funding
streams for shopfront and other building improvements, creating a cohesive
streetscene and completing a whole place approach to public sector investment.
Merton’s Transport Strategy (Local Implementation Plan 3) is currently out to
public consultation. Based around the principles of healthy streets, it proposes a
significant increase in including walking, cycling and electric vehicle infrastructure,
helping to reduce carbon and improve air quality. The Future High Streets Fund
aligns with LIP3 as several projects are identified in and around Mitcham including
further dedicated cycling routes to boost local connections and reduce traffic
congestion.
The Future High Street Fund for Mitcham town centre aligns with Merton’s
emerging Local Plan and working with landowners and investors on the delivery of
key sites and associated infrastructure in and around Mitcham town centre. Close
working between the public and private sector on three key sites in Mitcham can
provide over 150 new homes within or on the edge of the town centre. Merton
Council is also working closely with its public sector partners on Cabinet Office’s One
Public Estate programme, in particular the provision of a new Local Care Centre with
the NHS at Wilson hospital and release land for 100+ homes on public sector land
near the town centre.
Clarion Housing Group has a long-term commitment to Merton as the owner of more
than 7,000 affordable homes including in and around Mitcham town centre at
Laburnum, Phipps Bridge and Sadlers Close. Clarion Housing Group is investing
£1billion in the borough in the regeneration of three housing estates; creating more
than 600 well-designed energy efficient homes at Mitcham Eastfields. The Future
High Street Funding bid for Mitcham town centre presents the opportunity to align
Clarion’s investment in their homes with improvements to the look, feel and quality of
Mitcham town centre, unlocking significant benefits for a much wider community.
3.3 Support for town centre vision
Provide details, including letters of support, for your vision from (where applicable):
• Other tiers of local government including Mayoral and non-Mayoral Combined
Authorities and county councils where applicable
Other local stakeholders including:
• Local Enterprise Partnerships
• Business Improvement Districts
• Private sector

• Community groups
Please limit your response to 500 words and include evidence of this support as an
annex where appropriate.
There has been extensive engagement with local stakeholders since 2012 for the
Rediscover Mitcham project and the vision for investment in the town centre is widely
supported.
Rediscover Mitcham is a £7million investment project supported by the council,
Transport for London, the GLA and Heritage Lottery Fund to provide new public
realm, bus capacity, rejuvenate Mitcham market and restore the heritage clock
tower. Local residents and businesses expressed a need to improve the image and
reputation of Mitcham town centre. The priorities raised during this engagement align
with the proposals put forward in this bid – making better use of redundant spaces in
the town centre and improving the market offer.
A survey run by Healthwatch Merton found that people want a better variety of
shops, a better social community, more cultural events and an improved food offer.
There was support for the type of improvements that LB Merton are proposing as
part of this bid – to bring creative workspaces into the town centre that could sell
their produce in the market – “quirky local produce, market with more interesting and
choice i.e. local produce, crafts”
Consultations run by LB Merton highlighted the key priorities of stakeholders
included making more of the market as the focal point of the town centre and better
use of redundant spaces, e.g. car parks. As part of our engagement, the council has
run a series of pop up markets and events including clothing and street food. The
events programme was successful and enjoyed by residents and visitors, this
included a valentine “love your market” event, Caribbean cooking in the market
square, hosting the Christmas lights “switch on” events and pop up children’s
cinemas. The purpose of this bid is to provide a longer-term, sustainable platform for
these events to establish and grow.
A three-month public consultation on Merton’s emerging Local Plan concluded in
January 2019. It includes several potential development sites in and close to
Mitcham town centre. Consultation feedback has reiterated the importance of
investment in Mitcham’s public realm, making it easier for people to walk and cycle
around the area and prioritising well designed attractive buildings to encourage
investment.
Clarion Housing Group is investing more than £1billion over the next 15 years in
Merton Regeneration Project, including the creation of more than 600 new homes at
Mitcham Eastfields. Clarion and Merton Council have worked closely together since
2013 on the community engagement, planning framework, urban design codes and
legal agreements necessary for the successful delivery of comprehensive
regeneration; created within a statutory Estates Local Plan. Clarion is a supporter of
Merton’s bid for the Future High Street fund for Mitcham to complement its
regeneration programme and ongoing investment in its other assets around
Mitcham.

The proposal also has support from the Cabinet Member for Regeneration –
Councillor Martin Whelton, Merton Chamber of Commerce and the local councillors.
Their letters of support are included in Annex B.
Support for this project comes from:
- Greater London Authority
- Merton Chamber of Commerce
- Merton Council Cabinet Member for Regeneration Housing and Transport,
Councilllor Martin Whelton
- British Independent Retailers Association (BIRA)
- Clarion Housing Group
3.4 Estimate of revenue funding needed
Provide details of how much revenue funding you need to develop project plans for
capital funding (including detailed business cases). Include estimated breakdowns of
how you would spend this revenue funding. Please limit your response to 500 words.
The council is making a funding bid for a total of £2million from the Future High
Streets Fund to deliver this bid
All of the figures are realistic estimates, a full business case in Phase 2 will
determine actual likely costs and funding required from the Future High Streets Fund
and LB Merton.
1. Acquisition of land for redevelopment for housing and workspaces
- land cost (including fees) - £750,000
- programme co-ordination, due diligence and reporting - £200,000 (£100,000 per
year for two years)
Total funding requested from the Future High Streets Fund – £750,000
Total funding from LB Merton - £200,000
2. Meanwhile uses: shops and workspaces on Sibthorpe Road car park for 5 years
- installation of temporary workspaces and management cost per annum - £500,000
(total £2.5million)
- programme management and marketing costs:  per annum – £100,000 for five
years (total = £500,000)
Total funding from the future High Street Fund – £2.5million
Total funding from LB Merton - £500,000
3. Market improvement and cultural activities – 5 years
- market manager cost per annum - £50k
- events programme cost per year - £100k
Total funding from FHSF – £500k
Total funding from LB Merton - £250k
Total FHSF funding – £3.75m
Total LB Merton funding - £1.2m



Annex A: The extent of the bid area
Figure 1: Map of Mitcham town centre and the site of key proposals
Future High Streets
Fund Bid area
Vacant land at
gateway to town
centre
Sibthorpe Road car
park
Mitcham Fair Green
Market



Annex B: The demographics of the population
Figure 2: Lower Super Output areas within 800m of Mitcham town centre (used for

demographic statistics in Section 1.2.
Figure 3: Index of multiple deprivation in and around Mitcham town centre showing
that Mitcham has some of the most deprived parts of the borough (2015 data).
(Source: CDRC 2019)



Figure 4: Childhood obesity in and around Mitcham town centre showing that it is in
the highest deciles (2016 data). (Source: CDRC 2019)
Figure 5: Levels of unemployment in and around Mitcham town centre showing that
Mitcham has some of the most deprived parts of the borough (Census 2011 data).
(Source: Datashine)



Figure 6: Population density and urban/rural classification in and around Mitcham
town centre showing that the areas around the town centre are densely populated
(2011 data). (Source: CDRC 2019)
Figure 7: Population change 2011-2014 in and around Mitcham town centre showing it
as an area of population growth. (Source: CDRC 2019)



Figure 8: Area classifications in and around Mitcham town centre showing it as being
“Ethnicity Central” and “Multicultural Metropolitans” (2011 data). (Source: CDRC 2019)
Key categories in and around Mitcham:





Figure 9: Public Transport Accessibility Levels in and around Mitcham town centre.
(Source: Tfl WebCAT)
Figure 10: Public Transport travel times from Mitcham town centre to the nearest
Metropolitan centre and major centre. (Source: Tfl WebCAT)


Annex C: The economic characteristics
Figure 11: Estimated retail centre extent (red line boundary) and convenience retail

catchment (blue line boundary) for Mitcham town centre. (Source: CDRC 2019)



Figure 12: Retail centre typology of Mitcham town centre (2018 data).
(Source: CDRC 2019)
Mitcham as a primary food and secondary comparison, and urban value destination:




Figure 13: Classification of Workplace Zones in and around Mitcham town centre
showing that Mitcham is a metro suburb (2011 data). (Source: CDRC 2019)
Key categories in and around Mitcham:
1. Metro suburbs and Metro suburban distribution industries



Figure 14: Classification of Workplace Zones in and around Mitcham town centre(2017
data). (Source: CDRC 2019)
Key categories in and around Mitcham:



Figure 15: Number of jobs within Public Transport travel times to Mitcham town
centre. (Source: Tfl WebCAT)


Figure 16: Mitcham town centre use classes (Source: LB Merton Shopping Survey)
Mitcham town centre use classes
70%
60%
50%
40%
 of units of each use 30%
20%
entage
Perc 10%
0%
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2014
2016
2017
Retail
Professional services
Food and drink
Drinking establishments
Takeaways
Business
Public services
Other
Figure 17: Most common uses within the town centre (size of words reflects the number
of units with that use, i.e. Hairdressers are the most common in Mitcham town centre).
(Source: LB Merton Shopping Survey)



Figure 18: Vacancy rates in Mitcham town centre compared to other town centres in
Merton, national and London rates. (Source: LB Merton’s Monitoring database)
Figure 19: Town centre footfal - pedestrian analysis of Mitcham town centre October 2013
showing average hourly shop entries by section and activity

Figure 20: Town centre footfal - market visitors (2013)
Day
Time period
Entries
Hourly entries
Weekday
Set-up 7-10am
631
210
Weekday
Main opening 10am-4pm
2,389
398
Weekday
Wind-down 4-5.30pm
529
353
Total weekday
3,549
961
Saturday
Set-up 7-10am
228
76
Saturday
Main opening 10am-3pm
2223
445
Saturday
Wind-down 3-5pm
631
316
Total Saturday
3,082
837


Figure 21: Town centre footfal – model ed flows weekdays 7am-7pm (2013)



Figure 22: Crime in Mitcham town centre’s ward compared to other wards in Merton
(Source: Merton Data)
Figure 23: Crime rate by type in Mitcham town centre’s ward compared to other wards
in Merton (Source: Merton Data)



Figure 24: Crime rate per population in Mitcham town centre’s ward compared to
Merton and London (Source: Merton Data)
Figure 25: Crime rate by type in Mitcham town centre’s ward compared to Merton and
London (Source: Merton Data)



Annex D: The consumer characteristics
Figure 26: Consumer vulnerability in and around Mitcham town centre.
(Source: CDRC 2019)
Key categories in and around Mitcham:






Figure 27: Internet User Classification in and around Mitcham town centre.
(Source: CDRC 2019)
Key categories in and around Mitcham:



Figure 28: Cal  for sites received in Mitcham for Merton’s New Local Plan. (Source: LB
Merton 2019)