This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Adverse vaccine reactions being reported between 2005 and January 2021'.



 
 
Ms Melissa Smith 
 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx   
 
 
MHRA 
151 Buckingham Palace 
  Road 
London 
SW1W 9SZ 
 
United Kingdom 
 
www.gov.uk/mhra 
 
 
 

24th February 2021 
Dear Ms Smith, 
 
FOI 21/129 
 
Thank you for your FOI request dated 2nd February 2021, where you requested the following 
information: 
 
•  Total number of ADR reports in association with a vaccine between 01/01/2005 and 31/01/21 
Of these reports, how many were not serious? 
•  Of these reports, how many were serious? 
•  Total number of ADR reports in association with a vaccine between 01/01/2005 and 31/01/21 
in children under the age of 10, between 10 and 18, and in adults 19+. 
 
The MHRA continuously monitors the safety of vaccines through a variety of pharmacovigilance 
processes including the Yellow Card scheme. As part of our signal detection processes all adverse 
reaction reports received by the Yellow Card scheme are individually assessed and cumulative 
information reviewed at regular intervals. 
 
When considering the spontaneous Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) data, it is important to be aware 
of the following points: 
 
•  A reported reaction does not necessarily mean it has been caused by the vaccine, only that 
the reporter had a suspicion it may have. Each year, millions of doses of routine vaccines are 
given in the UK alone, and when any vaccine is administered to very large numbers of people, 
some recipients will inevitably experience illness following vaccination. The fact that symptoms 
or events occur after use of a vaccine, and are reported via the Yellow Card scheme, does not 
in itself mean that they are proven to have been caused by the vaccine. Underlying or 
concurrent illnesses may be responsible and such events can also be coincidental. 
 
•  It is also important to note that the number of reports received via the Yellow Card scheme 
does not directly equate to the number of people who suffer adverse reactions and therefore 
 



 
cannot be used to determine the incidence of a reaction. ADR reporting rates are influenced 
by the seriousness of ADRs, their ease of recognition, the extent of use of a particular drug, 
and may be stimulated by promotion and publicity about a drug. Reporting tends to be highest 
for newly introduced medicines during the first one to two years on the market and then falls 
over time. 
 
Any emerging evidence relating to possible risks associated with vaccines and medicines, is 
carefully reviewed and, if appropriate, regulatory action would be taken if any serious risks were 
confirmed. 
 
 
I can confirm we have received a total of 80,182 spontaneous UK suspected ADR reports in relation 
to vaccines for all ages in respect to the time frame of 01/01/2005 to 31/01/2021. Of these, 47,496 
reports were considered serious and 32,686 were classed as non-serious. With regards to 
seriousness, an ADR report is considered ‘serious’ according to two criteria; firstly, a reported 
reaction can be considered serious according to our medical dictionary. Secondly, whether the 
original reporter considers the report to be serious whereby they can select based on 6 criteria when 
filling out a Yellow Card report.  
 
A breakdown by age as requested is provided in Table 1. With regards to the breakdown by age, it 
is important to note that the age of the patient is not a mandatory field when submitting a Yellow 
Card report and is therefore not always provided. 
 
 
Table 1 - UK spontaneous suspected adverse drug reaction reports associated with a vaccine reported 
between 01/01/2005-31/01/2021, broken down by age. 
 
Patient Age (years) 
Number of Reports 
<10 
14,262 
10-18 
13,229 
19+ 
47,458 
Unknown  
5,233 
 
As the data reported to the Yellow Card scheme does not necessarily refer to proven side effects, 
you should refer to the product information which can be found here: 
https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/ for details on the possible side effects of vaccines available in 
the UK. 
 
If you are dissatisfied with the handling of your request, you have the right to ask for an internal 
review. Internal review requests should be submitted within two months of the date of this response; 
and can be addressed to this email address. 
 
 
 
 



 
Yours sincerely, 
 
FOI Team, 
Vigilance and Risk Management of Medicines Division 
 
The MHRA information supplied in response to your request is subject to Crown copyright. The FOIA only 
entitles you to access to MHRA information. 
 
For information on the reproduction or re-use of MHRA information, please visit 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reproduce-or-re-use-mhra-information/reproduce-or-re-use-mhra-
information 
 
If you have a query about this email, please contact us. If you are unhappy with our decision, you may ask for 
it to be reviewed. That review will be undertaken by a senior member of the Agency who has not previously 
been involved in your request. If you wish to pursue that option please write to the Communications 
Directorate, 4-T, Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, (via this email address). After that, if 
you remain dissatisfied, you may ask the Information Commissioner at: 
 
The Information Commissioner’s Office 
Wycliffe House 
Water Lane 
Wilmslow 
Cheshire 
SK9 5AF 
 
Copyright notice 
The information supplied in response to your request is the copyright of MHRA and/or a third party or parties, 
and has been supplied for your personal use only. You may not sell, resell or otherwise use any information 
provided without prior agreement from the copyright holder.