This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Request for policy document on older people in the Borough'.



 
Health and Wellbeing Board
29 June 2020
 
Report of the Director of Public 
Health
Disproportional Impact of Covid-19 in Brent
Wards Affected: 
All
Key or Non-Key Decision: 
Non-Key
Open or Part/Fully Exempt:
(If exempt, please highlight relevant paragraph 
Open 
of Part 1, Schedule 12A of 1972 Local 
Government Act)
No. of Appendices:
None
Background Papers: 
None
Dr John Licorish
Contact Officer(s):
Consultant Public Health
(Name, Title, Contact Details)
Community and Wellbeing Department
1.0
Purpose of the Report
1.1
The Chair of the Board requested a report specifically related to Covid-19 and 
the disproportionalities.
2.0
Introduction 
2.1
Covid-19
Covid-19 is the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, severe acute 
respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Coronaviruses are a set 
of viruses that are among the causes of common colds in Human Beings. 
They have also caused outbreaks of more serious illnesses Severe Acute 
Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome 
(MERS). The viruses are also found in other mammals. 
The disease can present with no symptoms, mild symptoms or as a severe 
illness leading to hospitalisation and in some cases death. In England by the 
17th of June 2020, the Department of Health and Social Care stated there 
were 157,797 laboratory confirmed cases of Covid-19. In England, the Office 
of National Statistics, up to 15th of June 2020, reported 45,432 deaths.  

The burden of Covid-19 however is not shared equally in the society. 
Individuals within Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) ethnicity, male 
Sex, older age, and already diagnosed with multiple underlying issues are all 
at increased risk of dying. Unsurprisingly those who lived in deprived areas 
also bear the brunt of the disease. 
These inequalities are not new and there is evidence that Covid-19 has in 
some case increased them.
2.2
Data 
The key to understanding the impact of Covid-19 and any infectious disease 
outbreak is data on the individuals who contract the disease and their health 
outcomes. This needs to be complete and timely. Unfortunately, Brent has 
been hampered by not having all the information that is required to mount an 
appropriate response from the time of the first Covid-19 cases until now. This 
is not a Brent specific issue and instead relates to how systems are organised 
and information parameters and flows which are largely centrally determined.   
2.2.1  Brent Cases Information
Measure
Availability 
Source 
Limitation
Number of cases  diagnosed 
Daily 
Official 
Only covers those 
with laboratory confirmed 
Government  who have been 
Covid-19 in Brent 
Covid-19 
tested mostly 
website 
those who have 
been hospitalised
Breakdown of cases by 
Not Available
Ethnicity 
Breakdown of cases by Age 
Not Available 
Breakdown of cases  by 
Not Available 
Ethnicity 
Breakdown of cases by 
Not Available 
address/electoral ward 
Breakdown by socioeconomic 
Not Available 
status 
2.2.2  Brent Covid-19 Hospitalisations Information 
No hospitalisation data is currently available for Brent patients with Covid-19 
with respect to number of cases, ethnicity address, age, sex or other 
parameters.

2.2.3  Brent Deaths Information 
Unfortunately, some residents have succumbed to Covid-19. There are three 
potential sources of information for deaths:
 NHS Digital and Trust Data for those who die in hospital
 Office for National Statistics
 Brent Registrar’s Office data   
Measure
Availability 
Source 
Limitation
Number of deaths  
Daily 
Official 
Until recently only covers 
diagnosed with 
Government 
those who have been 
laboratory confirmed 
Covid-19 
tested mostly those who 
Covid-19 
website 
have been hospitalised
Number of deaths with 
Weekly
Office for 
Guidance around death 
Covid-19 mentioned on 
National 
certification changed 
the death certificate 
Statistics 
after the pandemic and 
Website
deaths may not have had 
Covid-19 mentioned  
Number of deaths in 
Weekly
Office for 
Guidance around death 
care homes, hospitals 
National 
certification changed 
and other places
Statistics 
after the pandemic and 
Website
deaths may not have had 
Covid-19 mentioned  
Breakdown of deaths  
Not Available
by Ethnicity in Brent
Breakdown of deaths  
Available 
Office for 
Not always up to date 
by Age and sex  in 
National 
Brent
Statistics 
Website
Breakdown of deaths  
Not Available 
by Ethnicity 
Breakdown of deaths  
Published on  Office for 
Not always up to date 
by location in Brent  
two 
National 
occasions 
Statistics 
since the 
website 
pandemic 
started 

Measure
Availability 
Source 
Limitation
Breakdown by 
Not available 
socioeconomic status 
but can be 
in Brent
approximated 
using known 
health 
geography 
Rate per 100, 000 
Published on  Office for 
Available
individuals accounting 
two 
National 
for age structure 
occasions 
Statistics  
since the 
pandemic 
started
2.2.4 Brent resident deaths at Hospitals
Measure
Availability 
Source 
Limitation
Number of deaths 
Weekly
NHS Digital 
Includes all deaths 
at local hospital 
of hospital 
trusts
patients, Brent’s 
deaths are not 
separated out 
Number of deaths 
Weekly 
Office for National  Delay in 
at all hospitals
Statistics 
publication due to 
registration 
Breakdown by 
Not available 
ethnicity, age, sex, 
socioeconomic 
deprivation 
2.2.5 London Northwest University Healthcare NHS Trust data 
London Northwest were asked to provide our data in relation to Brent residents. We 
have been analysing all our Covid-19 data in collaboration with Public Health 
England. The data for Brent alone is shown below. Of note, we do not have access 
to any data for Brent patients admitted directly to other hospitals. The data is also not 
yet complete in that we do not yet have all the outcomes for patients transferred to 
other hospitals following admission to London Northwest; outcomes are included 
where known. 
The demographics of all the Covid-19 cases admitted to London University 
Healthcare NHS Trust in March and April 2020 is shown below.

Brent
Cases
%
Sex
Female 
204
35.7%
Male
368
64.3%
Age
0-9
4
0.7%
10-19
2
0.3%
20-29
8
1.4%
30-39
29
5.1%
40-49
61
10.7%
50-59
84
14.7%
60-69
114
19.9%
70-79
119
20.8%
80+
152
26.6%
Ethnicity
White
121
 21.1
Mixed
3
0.5
Asian
222
38.7
Black
108
18.9
Other
29
5.1
Unknown
90
15.7
Deprivatio 1 (most 
101
15.4
n quintile
deprived)
2
186
28.3
3
222
33.8
4
104
15.8
5 (least 
44
6.7
deprived)
The ‘unknown’ represent a significant proportion in which no ethnicity is recorded, 
usually because the respondent declined to state their ethnicity. The majority of 
patients were over 40 years old. 
The outcome of these patients is shown below. 
Total 
No. ITU 
%
Ventilation
%
Number of 
%
cases
admissions
deaths
Sex
Female 
199
20
10.0
6
2.9
63
30.6
Male
334
67
20.0
34
9.2
86
24.6
Age
0-9
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
10-19
2
1
50
1
50
0
0
20-29
8
2
25
0
0
0
0
30-39
29
5
17.2
3
10.3
1
3.5
40-49
61
16
26.2
5
8.2
5
8.2
50-59
84
23
27.4
14
16.7
12
14.3
60-69
114
28
24.6
12
10.5
26
22.8
70-79
119
10
8.4
4
3.4
46
38.7
80+
152
2
0.1
1
0.7
74
48.7
Ethnicity
White
121
5
4.1
46
22.4
41
33.9
Mixed
3
0
0
1
0.5
1
33.3
Asian
222
31
14.0
73
35.6
59
26.6
Black
108
20
18.5
50
24.4
32
29.6
Other
29
9
31.0
8
3.9
8
27.6
Unknown
90
22
24.4
27
13.2
23
25.6


Of note, the mortality in all ethnic groups is comparable and non-white ethnicities did 
not have a higher mortality, unlike the higher mortality shown in non-white ethnicities 
in national studies. PHE explain they group the ethnicities to provide larger numbers 
for analysis. However, we can also share the following more detailed breakdown of 
deaths;
The discharge destination is shown below. Note the data is incomplete as the 
outcome for some patients transferred from London Northwest to other hospitals for 
specialist care is not completely available. 

Total 
Discharge 
%
Discharg
%
Still 
%
cases
home
e care 
inpatient 
home
as of April 
30

Sex
Female  199
104
52.3
8
4.0
1
0.5
Male
334
199
59.6
9
2.7
5
1.5
Age
0-9
4
4
100
0
0
0
0
10-19
2
1
50.0
0
0
0
0
20-29
8
6
75.0
0
0
0
0
30-39
29
24
82.8
1
3.4
1
3.4
40-49
61
43
70.5
1
1.6
2
3.3
50-59
84
52
61.9
0
0
2
2.4
60-69
114
65
57.0
2
1.8
1
0.9
70-79
119
61
51.3
3
2.5
0
0
80+
152
50
32.9
10
6.6
0
0
Ethnicity
White
121
54
44.6
9
7.4
0
0
Mixed
3
2
66.7
0
0
0
0
Asian
222
126
56.8
1
0.5
2
0.9
Black
108
55
50.9
2
1.9
0
0
Other
29
7
24.1
1
3.4
0
0
Unkno
90
12
13.3
2
2.2
4
4.4
wn
We have looked at all deaths from Covid-19 in London Northwest by age and 
number of comorbidities. Note this is data from all Boroughs. 
Age profile of deaths across London Northwest inpatient sites
Age
30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69
70-79
80-89
90-99
100+
Percentage  0%
3%
5%
13%
27%
34%
13%
0%
of deaths
The age profile of mortality is shown above. Most deaths occurred in those over 50 
years old.
Number of pre-existing conditions
Pre-
existing 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8+
Total
conditions
Percentage 
2
100
of deaths
%
11% 19% 23% 22% 12%
7%
2%
2%
%
The number of pre-existing comorbidities in those who died is shown above. Most 
deaths occurred in those with multiple comorbidities. 
   

Research undertaken and planned
London Northwest University Healthcare NHS Trust is committed to providing the 
best possible care to our population. As part of this commitment pride ourselves on 
contributing to research, so our current and future patients can receive the most 
current treatment.  We are proud of our contribution to the Recovery Covid-19 trial. 
Our Research and Development and Infectious Disease teams have worked really 
hard on this multi-arm trial and have recruited 100 patients. There have already been 
some important results, showing that dexamethasone (a steroid) reduced deaths by 
one third in ventilated patients and by one fifth in patients receiving oxygen. Overall, 
dexamethasone reduced the 28-day mortality rate by 17%. This research has given 
our patients access to cutting edge new treatments and both Remdesivir and 
Dexamethasone are now available for Covid-19 patients at the Trust.
We also recruited 200% of our recruitment target and 10% of all UK recruitment on 
the Gilead studies of Remdesivir, which is an extraordinary result. We have also 
recruited more than 700 people onto the ISARIC descriptive study.
We are particularly aware of the multi-ethnic and multicultural nature of the 
population we serve, which is reflected in our staff. As a Trust we have invested time 
and resource to support collection of a comprehensive dataset of clinical factors as 
well as outcomes in Covid and a number of research questions are being evaluated. 
This includes
 A descriptive analysis of patients admitted with Covid-19 across the Trust and 
their outcomes, in association with Public Health England
 An evaluation of predictive factors for severe disease in patients hospitalised 
with Covid-19 at Northwick Park Hospital
 A cohort study of Ethnicity, diabetes and risk of severe Covid-19 across the 
Trust
One of our infectious diseases doctors is developing a research collaborative with 
other hospitals that serve similarly diverse communities, to maximise the ability to 
detect influences on outcome of ethnicity and other factors.
2.2.6 Brent resident deaths at Care Homes
Measure
Availability 
Source 
Limitation
Number of deaths 
Weekly
NHS Digital 
Delay in reporting 
at Care Homes 
due to death 
registration  
Number of deaths 
Weekly 
NHS Digital 
Delay in 
reported to CQC
publication due to 
reporting system 
Breakdown by 
Not available 
ethnicity, age, sex, 
socioeconomic 
deprivation 


3.
COVID-19 in Brent 
3.1 
Cases 
Brent has the second highest number of confirmed cases in London 1491. It is 
to be noted that earlier in the outbreak and pandemic there were limitations in 
obtaining tests hence many cases would have been missed. There are also 
limits in asymptomatic individuals obtaining testing. The cases confirmed data 
is therefore, largely driven by hospitalised cases.
When we look at the rate per 100,000 individuals taking into account the 
different age profiles of the London Boroughs Brent has the second highest 
number of Covid-19 associated deaths for every 100, 000 individuals. 
These deaths were originally only recorded in hospitals but later deaths in all 
settings were published by ONS. This data now includes deaths where Covid-
19 is mentioned on the death certificate



3.2
Progress of the Epidemic
When epidemiologist study infectious diseases, they look at the number of 
new cases per day and use a graph to show how this varies. This chart is 
called an Epi curve. 
This Epi curve shows that the peak number of cases occurred in the 
beginning of April 2020.


3.3
Geographical Distribution of Deaths
As mentioned earlier the burden of disease and its worst outcome death is not 
distributed evenly and that is also the case in Brent. 
The graph above shows the death rates using geographical units the ONS 
deaths occurring in each Middle Super Output areas and we compare them to 
electoral wards. The highest rates are in Harlesden and areas of Stonebridge 
and Barnhill.
4.
Public Health England Report and its Conclusions
4.1
Ethnicity 
ONS analysed 12,000 COVID deaths comparing death certificates to census 
data with the following findings:
When taking into account age in the analysis: 

Black males are 4.2 times more likely to die from a COVID-19-related 
death than White males;

Black females are 4.3 times more likely to die from a COVID-19 related 
death than White females.
In the analysis, socioeconomic circumstances or deprivation was also 
analysed. 
Deprivation includes looking at the income levels, housing, education and 
other similar factors of the area individuals live as this has an impact on health 
and disease and Covid-19. The more deprived the greater the risk from dying. 
As BAME populations tend to be more deprived, it is important to adjust for 
the influence of deprivation in looking at the impact of ethnicity. Doing so 
allows us to compare the risk of a deprived back male with a deprived white 
male and we find:
   


Black males are 1.9 times more  likely to die from a COVID-19-related 
death than White males;
The figure is the same if you compare a well-off black male with a well-off 
white male
The same scenario for black women:  

Black females are 1.9 times more likely to die from a COVID-19 related 
death than White females.
People of Bangladeshi and Pakistani, Indian, and Mixed ethnicities also had 
statistically significant raised risk of death involving COVID-19 compared with 
those of White ethnicity. After taking into account age and socioeconomic 
circumstances or deprivation: 

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic group males are 1.8 times more likely to 
die from a COVID-19-related death than White males;

Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic group females are 1.6 times more likely 
to die from a COVID-19-related death than White females.
Public Health England review also found increased risk of dying from those 
not born in the UK as opposed to those born in the UK. It is unclear whether 
this accounts for some of the ethnic differences.
Health inequalities between ethnic groups were entrenched before COVID 19 
but it is possible that COVID is widening these.
4.2
Age and Sex
Covid-19 has caused increased risk of death in males and in the older 
population in England. In the graph of deaths registered up until 5th June 
2020, males are indicated in blue and those in females in orange. The death 
rate taking into account the age distribution of the population  is 109.6 deaths 
per 100, 000 for males  whereas for females it is 62.5 deaths per 100,000 
individuals based on ONS data for deaths occurring up until May 31st 2020.

Provisional Deaths from Covid- 19  registered up to 5th June
 
12000
10753
10000
9079
9193
8000
6234
6000
4584
4000
3003
2448
1578
2000
2
2
312 197
0
1 to 14 years
15 to 44 years
45 to 64 years
65 to 74 years
75 to 84 years 85 years and over
4.3
Occupational Risk 
The Public Health England notes that occupations with close contact to 
individuals such as health care workers have increased risk of dying from 
Covid-19. A review of 119 NHS deaths has shown disproportionately high 
numbers from BAME communities. Male workers in manual occupations also 
have higher risk of dying form Covid-19. 
4.4
Co-Morbid conditions
Individuals with pre-existing conditions and particularly those with multiple 
conditions are at increased risk of dying from Covid-19. Diabetes plays a 
particular risk. NHS England funded study has shown that the increased risk 
of dying in hospitals with Covid-19 for an individual with Diabetes is 1.81 times 
more likely when compared to individuals without Diabetes. The Public Health 
England Review also found that Diabetes Mellitus was present on 21% of the 
death certificates with Covid-19. There is also some evidence that poor 
outcomes with Diabetes were noted with less well controlled disease 
4.5
Socioeconomic Deprivation 
The Public Health England found that deaths in the most deprived areas were 
double those in the least deprived areas. Survival in those from deprived 
areas was lower than those from most affluent areas even after adjusting for 
age, sex and ethnicity.   

5.0
Conclusions for Brent
5.1
Risk Factors – Vulnerability 
5.1.1.  Co-morbidity 
Brent has a BAME population with high levels of Diabetes Mellitus in 
particular and other long-term conditions leading to increased Covid-19 risk.
The cessation of face-to-face appointments has led many individuals either to 
believe primary care is closed or not to engage with the alternatives present. 
A&E and urgent care attendances are decreased and there is anecdotal 
evidence of distrust in the community of the safety of the hospital with regard 
to contracting Covid-19.  
5.2 
Risk Factors – Exposure 
Brent BAME population are high users of public transport. Buses until recent 
measures by TFL were crowded as were bus stops in the Wembley and 
Harlesden area. 
Brent BAME communities have high levels of inter-generational living with 
those at risk including the elderly and those with long-term conditions being 
exposed more than those in smaller households. 
BAME communities have high attendance to temples, churches, mosques 
and other places of worship with large communal activities such as services, 
weddings and funerals. These were implicated in spread elsewhere and it is 
likely were these were factors in the early part of the epidemic 
BAME community members are less likely to be working from home and often 
in zero hour contracts or cash in hand situations therefore less likely to be 
able to social distance or self- isolate.
BAME community members are more likely to be frontline workers and less 
likely to be managers and able to influence their working conditions  
5.3
Underlying Determinants 
5.3.1 Socioeconomic Deprivation
Brent has some areas of stark socioeconomic deprivation. As can be seen 
from the map below:


The areas of highest rates of Covid-19 mortality are within those most 
deprived 
5.4
Care Homes
Covid-19 has the highest mortality rates in the older age group many of whom 
plus other individuals with vulnerabilities are found in Care Homes clients. In 
addition to the individual vulnerability of the clients. Managing Covid-19 
outbreak in care homes is difficult for a number of reasons:
 Mobility of Staff
 Visitors in and out the home 
 Entry of infectious patients from Acute Trust and elsewhere
 Managing isolation 
 Training levels of staff 
Brent through its Public Health and Adult Social Care Departments initiated a 
robust support mechanism to all aspects of operation including advice, 
training, staffing, infection control, testing, outbreak management as well as 
provision of PPE.
While any death is extremely unfortunate, this did mitigate some of the worst 
effects of Covid-19 despite the borough having the highest age standardised 
rate in London. 



In addition, the outbreak in Brent in Care Homes happened at the same time 
as the outbreak in the wider community.
Despite this, the current number of deaths per care home bed contrasted with 
the overall death rate.


5.5
Current Situation 
The lockdown in the UK commenced on the 23rd of March 2020. From the 10th 
of May 2020, there has been a gradual lifting of the lockdown. This has 
resulted in various parts of the economy returning to normal.
The government changed its Stay at Home slogan to “Stay Alert”
It is currently unknown how many individuals have been infected with Covid-
19. As a result Public Health England’ and the Office for National Statistics are 
undertaking antibody tests, which show whether an individual has contracted 
the disease. 
Latest results from Public Health England have indicated that between 12% 
and 18% of individuals in London have already been infected. Currently it is 
not known whether these antibodies protect against further illness. 
As a result, there is large population at risk of contracting the disease. This 
suggests that there is a risk of a second wave occurring after lockdown 
measures are lifted. 
In response, the Government has continued its Pillared testing strategy to 
ultimately allow anyone who needs a test to have it. In Brent, this has led to a 
local Covid-19 testing site in Harlesden in the area of greatest need. 
The Government has also instituted a Contact Tracing system, NHS Test 
Track and Trace. This system aims to allow for all individuals who are positive 
to be contacted and advised to isolate for 2 weeks. There is also an App 
which has been trialled in the Isle of Wight but not yet in widespread use. 

The public are still advised to follow national guidance, the current key 
messages are to social distance, maintain good hand hygiene, avoid public 
transport, work from home if you can and obtain a test if you have symptoms   
and self-isolate if you have been exposed to anyone with the virus.
In order to minimise the risk of a second wave of Covid-19 and to support the 
residents in Brent, who are some of the most at risk in the country, we 
continued to push out clear, consistent and hard-hitting messaging to remind 
people that Covid-19 is still a threat. 
In addition to supporting the core government messages, the council has 
recognised that locally we needed to provide a more targeted approach to 
support our residents. This includes using stronger messaging on roadside 
banners in high-risk areas and working closely with trusted community groups 
to target specific communities. 
Working with trusted local partners and community groups has meant that we 
can provide them with our key messages and they can repurpose and share 
them with their audiences in the most appropriate way. 
We’ve used all our usual corporate communications channels such as e-
newsletters and social media. We have also worked with local radio stations 
to hold phone-ins and have commissioned adverts to reach younger 
audiences.  
5.6
Current Situation 
5.6.1 Interventions to date: Brent Council 
The Council has a comprehensive communications plan which aims to protect 
the community including its most vulnerable members including: 
 People who are more at risk (see table below) including BAME residents
 Older people and people with underlying conditions
 People who are asked to self-isolate due to the new ‘track and trace’ 
system
 Younger people who may think the rules don’t apply to them but could be 
spreaders in their homes or communities
 Council staff and Members (including staff who are working from home 
and others that need to come into the office)
 The CCG through North West London have commissioned a Community 
Voices piece which will provide useful insight into the impact of Covid-19 
on the BAME community  
5.6.2 Interventions to date: Brent NHS CCG
 In the first weeks of the pandemic during March 2020, the CCG rapidly set up 
a COVID “Hot Hub” at Willesden Centre for Health and Care. The “Hot Hub” 
was set up to see patients who were not so sick that they needed to go to 
hospital, but had suspected COVID that needed monitoring in the community. 

Patients who had suspected COVID but were referred from 111 and from GP 
practices into the hub to be seen by a team of GPs and nurses and received 
an assessment. Pulse oximetry and oxygen was available on site and 
patient’s breathing was assessed. Those who were well enough to stay at 
home were provided with pulse oximeters to take home and make daily 
checks and then alert the hub if their oxygen saturations deteriorated. In this 
way, the hub enabled patients to stay well at home and to take some of the 
pressure off the Emergency Department and local hospitals during the period 
of peak demand. The Hot Hub is still in operation and is seeing a number of 
patients face to face. Some patients are monitored remotely and given advice 
with virtual consultations.  A few patients were seen at the hub and required 
conveyance to hospital in an ambulance. Figures to date are shown below 
and correspond with a rapid reduction in demand for services in line with the 
reducing number of cases. In the last week, it appears there has been a slight 
uptick in demand, which is possibly due to the relaxation of social distancing 
measures, but is too early to establish a trend. 
The Number of Patients Reviewed
(03/04/20 - 18/06/20)
80
16
No. of Patients Triaged
70
Linear (No. of Patients 
14
60
Triaged)
12
 Face
 to

50
10
40
8
s Triaged
 Face
30
6
20
4
 Seen
Patient 10
2
0
0
Patients
4/3/2020
4/5/2020
4/7/2020
4/9/2020
4/11/2020
4/13/2020
4/15/2020
4/17/2020
4/19/2020
4/21/2020
4/23/2020
4/25/2020
4/27/2020
4/29/2020
5/1/2020
5/3/2020
5/5/2020
5/7/2020
5/9/2020
5/11/2020
5/13/2020
5/15/2020
5/17/2020
5/19/2020
5/21/2020
5/23/2020
5/25/2020
5/27/2020
5/29/2020
5/31/2020
6/2/2020
6/4/2020
6/6/2020
6/8/2020
6/10/2020
6/12/2020
6/14/2020
6/16/2020
6/18/2020
6/20/2020
6/22/2020
6/24/2020
● Home visiting service for COVID patients: The COVID Hub has also been 
providing in-hours COVID home visiting to those patients who have been 
clinically triaged and deemed as requiring a home visit.  
● COVID Testing – in addition to facilities commissioned by central 
government, the CCG has commissioned its own COVID testing centre for 
key workers at the Hot Hub. This includes the antigen test (swabbing) and 
more recently rollout of the antibody test to establish if key workers in the 
health and care system have had COVID-19 in the past. This information is 
being fed upwards as part of a population study. 
● Care and nursing homes - the CCG has been working closely with the 
council and with the Enhanced Care Home Support team to provide an 
enhanced level of care to care homes during the pandemic. The Enhanced 
Care Home Team has been undertaking regular ward rounds, with daily calls 
to all care homes and fortnightly to all residential homes in Brent. This may 
take the form of a discussion (which may be by telephone or video call) with 

the care home manager to discuss whether they have any concerns regarding 
clinical care and support for their residents. The service also offers general 
co-ordination support and liaison with the relevant GP practice or community 
service. The local authority has been offering close management support for 
care homes where staff members have become ill. The CCG has put in place 
a testing programme for care homes, with regular proactive COVID screening 
to ensure that asymptomatic carriers are identified and asked to self-isolate. 
● Weekly bulletins and twice weekly Silver Command meetings - the CCG 
has established a weekly bulletin and twice weekly silver command meetings 
with Primary Care Network directors to understand the issues of general 
practice and to assist with matters such as ordering Personal Protective 
Equipment, and updates on availability of services in the acute sector. 
● Redeployment of Staff - a number of CCG staff have been redeployed 
across the sector, mainly to acute providers. Several staff were redeployed 
into clinical roles in the Nightingale hospital at the Excel Centre and to 
rehabilitation units near Heathrow airport. Josefa Baylon (Head of Urgent 
Care) became the site manager for the Nightingale Hospital. Some staff were 
redeployed to the COVID incident centre at Marylebone Road.
6.
Next Steps
6.1
Recommendations from the National Report: ‘Beyond the Data’  
Recommendations from the PHE report ‘Beyond the Data: Understanding the 
Impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities’:
6.1.1. Mandate comprehensive and quality ethnicity data collection and recording as 
part of routine NHS and social care data collection systems, including the 
mandatory collection of ethnicity data at death certification, and ensure that 
data are readily available to local health and care partners to inform actions to 
mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on BAME communities.
6.1.2. Support community participatory research, in which researchers and 
community stakeholders engage as equal partners in all steps of the research 
process, to understand the social, cultural, structural, economic, religious, and 
commercial determinants of COVID-19 in BAME communities, and to develop 
readily implementable and scalable programmes to reduce risk and improve 
health outcomes.
6.1.3. Improve access, experiences and outcomes of NHS, local government and 
Integrated Care Systems commissioned services by BAME communities 
including: regular equity audits; use of Health Impact Assessments; 
integration of equality into quality systems; good representation of black and 
minority ethnic communities among staff at all levels; sustained workforce 
development and employment practices; trust-building dialogue with service 
users.
6.1.4. Accelerate the development of culturally competent occupational risk 
assessment tools that can be employed in a variety of occupational settings 
and used to reduce the risk of employee’s exposure to and acquisition of 

COVID-19, especially for key workers working with a large cross section of 
the general public or in contact with those infected with COVID-19.
6.1.5. Fund, develop and implement culturally competent COVID-19 education and 
prevention campaigns, working in partnership with local BAME and faith 
communities to reinforce individual and household risk reduction strategies; 
rebuild trust with and uptake of routine clinical services; reinforce messages 
on early identification, testing and diagnosis; and prepare communities to take 
full advantage of interventions including contact tracing, antibody testing and 
ultimately vaccine availability.
6.1.6. Accelerate efforts to target culturally competent health promotion and disease 
prevention programmes for non-communicable diseases promoting healthy 
weight, physical activity, smoking cessation, mental wellbeing and effective 
management of chronic conditions including diabetes, hypertension and 
asthma.
6.1.7. Ensure that COVID-19 recovery strategies actively reduce inequalities caused 
by the wider determinants of health to create long term sustainable change. 
Fully funded, sustained and meaningful approaches to tackling ethnic 
inequalities must be prioritised.
6.2
Brent Specific Suggestions
6.2.1 Short Term Brent Specific Actions based on our findings:
Actions
By Who
By When
Data:
London North 
1 month

West Acute 
Mandate ethnicity data collection in all 
Trust
aspects of NHS and Social Care interaction 
both Covid-19 related and otherwise 
including testing and contact tracing 
Council 
interventions
Performance 
End of data 
 Regular reporting to all partners in the health  Team
collection 
care system
Co-Morbid Conditions and Diabetes
 Improve Diabetes Control in all patients with  Brent CCG
3 weeks 
particular reference to BAME. This could be 
effected by monitoring HBA1C of all patients 
not measured recently or with poor control 
using disease registers and a digital recall 
system
 Diabetes awareness in BAME communities 
Brent Public 
4 weeks
in Brent via outreach 
Health
 Diabetes testing in BAME communities in 
Brent CCG
4 weeks
Brent via outreach or self-testing

Actions
By Who
By When
Co-Morbid Conditions 
Brent CCG
 We will need to accelerate the work that we have 
started regarding long-term conditions as we know 
that these increase the risk factors for a poor 
outcome following COVID-19 infections – for 
example diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, 
heart conditions and asthma are all co-morbidities 
that affect COVID-related outcomes. We will need 
to put a greater emphasis on prevention and 
lifestyle, working hand in hand with the Public 
Health Department
Covid Testing 
 For the time being, the Hot Hub will remain in place,  Brent CCG
albeit at reduced capacity, so that it is ready for any 
second wave or resurgence in cases
 Services are being reconfigured across the STP 
Brent CCG
area to ensure that testing takes place in healthcare 
facilities prior to elective surgery and that people are 
encouraged to “talk before you walk”, in order to 
screen out any potential COVID symptoms before 
people pitch up at a healthcare facility. High risk, 
potentially COVID patients are being segregated 
from lower risk non-COVID pathways.
BAME Engagement
 Improve access of BAME communities to primary 
Brent CCG
3 weeks
care including registration campaign to improve 
awareness of non-face to face options for service 
 Improve access of registering of all homeless 
improve awareness of non-face to face options for 
Brent CCG
3 weeks
service in BAME communities to primary care 
including
 CCG communications team will work closely with 
the local authority communications team to 
Brent CCG
emphasise the importance of accessing services 
early if Brent residents or workers have symptoms. 
Brent Council
We will need to promote the availability of testing 
and the fact that hospitals do have enough capacity 
to see patients. The communications teams also 
need to promote messages on social distancing and 
reducing risks.  

Actions
By Who
By When
Health Literacy
 Targeted Health literacy campaign in BAME 
Brent Council
4 weeks
communities in culturally appropriate forms 
considering the underlying health belief models and 
behaviours across faith and ethnic groups  
 Covid-19 communications media campaign with 
NHS and Council communications working together  Brent Council
4 weeks
including GP communications    
CCG
 LNWT Campaign with BAME communities to let 
communities know the Trust is open and safe to 
attend
LNWT
4 weeks
 Use current and recently generated insights by 
community groups and the system to tailor further 
responses
Brent Public 
4 weeks 
Health 
Occupational Health
 Support other organisations in the borough with 
Brent Public 
4 weeks
frontline workers in ensuring risk assessments for 
Health
BAME and all other workers with regard to 
managing the risk of Covid-19
 We have been putting in place risk assessments for 
all of our healthcare staff across the NWL STP 
area, which includes BAME risk factors, age and 
Brent CCG
co-morbidities and ensures that the highest risk 
staff are kept away from the high risk environments
6.3
Mitigation Measures
The evidence suggests COVID-19 is largely a manifestation of underlying 
health inequalities and socioeconomic deprivation. As a result, the solutions to 
it lie with addressing these two issues. There are also some issues related to 
the system response such as ethnicity monitoring, increasing health literacy 
and long-term condition management, which are again not Covid-19 specific 
issues but reflect underlying inequalities.

7.
Process for developing the medium and long-term actions
1. Bring Health and Social Care closer together to address health inequalities:
 Health in All Policies programme including health impact assessment for 
Council programmes and projects 
 Jointly funded and commissioned projects and work streams
2. Long- term conditions community health promotion programmes to be 
commissioned to 
 Promote self-care 
 Develop Stonebridge/Harlesden Intervention:
Bridge Park Health Living Centre
The Healthy Living Centre aims to address underlying social determinants which 
are contributing to poor health such as social isolation, exercise and community 
cohesion. The key to Healthy Living Centres are working with the community and 
using established services the council and other providers have to target the 
neediest communities.
PH Led Recovery College
The aim of the PH Led Recovery College is to help build support systems, 
provide confidence with integrating back into the community and strive to remove 
the stigma associated with mental and physical health.
The offer of courses/training programmes that will encourage residents to be 
active in their own self-care and wellbeing, learn how to counteract and manage 
their conditions, and, equip themselves with the tools to live a happy and fulfilling 
life. The college will follow an educational model that seeks to give people the 
tools and skills to become architects of their own recovery or to support someone 
else with their journey.
3. Monitoring and reporting of ratios of BAME staff representation at all levels of 
Council and Trust as large BME employers in the borough at all levels 
including senior management. Include plans to address the disparity such as 
targeted fast track programmes 
4. Health Equity Audits, including BAME and deprivation measures, to be 
mainstreamed throughout the health and social care system.   
5. Assess the health impacts of Covid-19 on the community 
6. The conversion of the Central Middlesex Hospital site into Diabetes and Long 
Term Conditions open access centre for Harlesden, Stonebridge and the 
surrounding area
The NHS and the council will commission a piece of work around health 
inequalities manifested by Covid-19 and the underlying structural 
determinants. 
This will be will be reported back to the Health and Wellbeing Board with an 
Action Plan.

Report sign off:  
Phil Porter
Strategic Director Community Wellbeing