This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Stability Ops'.



 
Army Secretariat 
Army Headquarters 
IDL 24 Blenheim Building 
Marlborough Lines 
Andover 
Hampshire, SP11 8HJ 
United Kingdom 
 
 
 
Ref: Army/Sec/Doctrine/FOI2020/12929 
E-mail: 
xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx 
Website:    www.army.mod.uk  
Dr Emma L Briant  
17 November 2020 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx  
 
Dear Dr Briant, 
 
Thank you for your email of 24 November in which you requested a copy of the Army Field Manual 
Tactics for Stability Operations.  I am treating your correspondence as a request for information 
under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000.  
 
A search for the information has now been completed within the Ministry of Defence, and I can 
confirm that the information in scope of your request is held and is attached.  Under section 16 
(Advice and Assistance) of the Act, please be advised that if you have any questions or comments 
on the manual, you are invited to contact the editors at the Land Warfare Centre.  Their details are 
in the fly leaf of the manual.   
 
If you have any queries regarding the content of this letter, please contact this office in the first 
instance.  Following this, if you wish to complain about the handling of your request, or the content 
of this response, you can request an independent internal review by contacting the Information 
Rights Compliance team, Ground Floor, MOD Main Building, Whitehall, SW1A 2HB (e-mail CIO-
xxxxxx@xxx.xx). Please note that any request for an internal review should be made within 40 
working days of the date of this response.  
 
If you remain dissatisfied following an internal review, you may raise your complaint directly to the 
Information Commissioner under the provisions of Section 50 of the Freedom of Information Act. 
Please note that the Information Commissioner will not normally investigate your case until the 
MOD internal review process has been completed. The Information Commissioner can be 
contacted at: Information Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, 
SK9 5AF. Further details of the role and powers of the Information Commissioner can be found on 
the Commissioner's website at https://ico.org.uk/. 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
Army Secretariat 
 
Encl 



FOI2020/12929
 
 

FOI2020/12929
HANDLING INSTRUCTIONS & CONDITIONS OF RELEASE 
 
COPYRIGHT 
 
The information contained within this publication is British Crown Copyright and the intellectual 
property rights belong exclusively to the Ministry of Defence (MOD). Material and information 
contained in this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system and transmitted for 
MOD use only, except where authority for use by other organisations or individuals has been 
authorised by the officer whose details appear below. 
 
SECURITY 
 
This OFFICIAL document is issued for the information of such persons who need to know its 
contents in the course of their duties. Any person finding this document should hand it to a British 
Forces unit or to a police station for its safe return to the MOD, Def Sy, Main Building, Whitehall, 
LONDON SW1A 2HB with particulars of how it was found. This information is released by the 
United Kingdom Government to international organisations and national governments for defence 
purposes only. The information must be afforded the same degree of protection as that afforded to 
information of an equivalent classification originated by the recipient organisation or nation, or as 
required by the recipient organisation or nation’s security regulations. The information may only be 
disclosed within the Defence Departments of the recipient organisation or nation, except as 
otherwise authorised by the UK MOD. This information may be subject to privately owned rights. 
 
 
DISTRIBUTION 
 
Academic release only. 
 
CONTACT DETAILS 
 
Suggestions for change or queries are welcomed and should be sent to SO1 Stabilisation, 
Stabilisation Team, Warfare Branch, Land Warfare Centre, Imber Road, Warminster BA12 0DJ. 
 
Telephone +44(0)1985 22 2031. 
 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
PREFACE 
Army Field Manual (AFM) Tactics for Stability Operations is the primary source of doctrine for the 
UK land contribution to stability operations from 2017 until the early 2020s. Building on the 
foundations laid by higher-level NATO and Defence doctrine, it provides the philosophy and 
principles that guide land forces’ approach to stability operations.  
AFM Tactics for Stability Operations is required reading for all staff officers and land force 
commanders from sub-unit upwards. They must explain the doctrine to their subordinates and 
ensure that the whole land force operates in accordance with its principles. It is also useful for 
allies, joint staffs, civil servants, contractors and civilians working alongside land forces.  
Unless otherwise specified, all definitions used in AFM Tactics for Stability Operations are 
consistent with those of Army Doctrine Publication (ADP) Land Operations 2017 and NATO Al ied 
Administrative Publication (AAP) 06, NATO Glossary of Terms. 
This publication stems from ADP Land Operations and forms the overarching guidance for the 
span of stability operations. The different types of stability operation wil  be covered in detail in 
Parts 1 – 5 as outlined in the schematic below. Delivery of the Parts wil  follow the publication of 
this AFM in 2017/18. The Stability Tactics Handbook wil  be held as a live publication on the Army 
Knowledge Exchange (AKX) and wil  comprise a number of tactics, techniques and procedures 
(TTPs).  
 
 
ii 
 

FOI2020/12929
Structure of the AFM. As the overarching publication, AFM Tactics for Stability Operations has 
three parts, A-C. 
Part A establishes the context in which stability operations take place and informs on the 
fundamentals of land doctrine. 
Chapter 1 describes the role of the state in maintaining its own stability within the wider 
context of the international system. This includes examining the elements of a stable 
state and what causes them to break down. It also discusses how instability can lead to 
violent intra-state conflict and the need to understand the causes to frame a successful 
intervention.  
Chapter 2 addresses the Full Spectrum Approach and the role of Government. It 
provides commanders at all levels with a bridge to Joint Doctrine Publication 05 – 
Shaping a Stable World: the Military Contribution (JDP 05). This is required because 
deployments on stability operations wil  generally require a higher level of 
understanding than the standard ‘two up’ on more conventional combat operations. 
Chapter 3 examines the UK military approach to stability operations. 
Chapter 4 summarises the relationship between combat and stability operations. 
Part B describes the fundamentals of land doctrine for stability operations. 
Chapter 5 covers the ten principles of stability operations. 
Chapter 6 explains the four operations themes, warfighting, security, peace support 
and defence engagement (DE) and provides a framework for understanding the 
context and dynamics of conflict.  
Chapter 7 gives an overview of the types of stability operations. They are not mutually 
exclusive and are often executed concurrently with other types of operation within the 
mosaic of conflict. 
Part C provides generic guidance on how stability operations can be planned and executed. 
Detailed coverage of the specific types of stability operation can be found in Parts 1-5 of this 
AFM. 
Chapter 8 describes the operating environment in which stability operations are likely 
to occur with implications for the application of Integrated Action. 
Chapter 9 provides a detailed description of the stability activities. 
Chapter 10 concerns the orchestration and execution of the stability activities across 
the corps, divisional, brigade and battlegroup levels of command. The annexes offer an 
overview of the land response to immediate threats to human security likely to be 
encountered on stability operations. 
This manual continues the evolution in land forces’ doctrine, using ADP Land Operations 2017 as a 
framework. The AFM complements joint doctrine through reference to JDP 05. Where possible, it 
also complements NATO doctrine and while not exhaustive, the linkages to key NATO and joint 
publications are shown overleaf.  
 
 
iii 
 



FOI2020/12929
Stability Operations Doctrine Hierarchy 
 
 
NATO  
AJP-3.16 
AJP-3.22 
 
AJP
Security Force 
-3.4 
Stability 
 
NA5CRO 
 
Assistance 
Policing 
edil
 

 
O
T
 
A
AJP-3.4.4 
AJP-3.4.5 
N
 
AJP-3.4.1 
AJP-3.4.2 
AJP
Counter 
Stabilisation & 
-3.4.9 
 
Peace Support 
NEO 
CIMIC
Insurgency
 
 
Reconstruction 
 
   
 
JOINT  
JCN 1/14 
JDP 05 
JDN 1/15 
 
Defence Joint 
Shaping a 
Defence 
 
Operating Concept 
Stable World 
Engagement 
 
 
 
nei
 
rt
LAND  
ADP Land 
 
Operations
oc
 
D
 
nt 
oi
 
J
 
AFM Tactics for Stability Ops (TFSO)

 
AFM Warfighting Tactics 
an
 
 
nd
 
La 
 
K
 
AFM TFSO Part 1 
AFM TFSO Part 3
U
AFM TFSO Part 2
 
AFM TFSO Part 4 
AFM TFSO Part 5
Counter Irregular 
 
Humanitarian 
 
 
Peace Support 
Stabilisation  
Capacity Building 
Activity 
 
 
 
Assistance  
 
 
Legend
JCN – Joint Concept Note 
CIMIC – Civil-Military Cooperation 
ADP – Army Doctrine Publication 
JDN – Joint Doctrine Note 
NEO – Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations 
AFM – Army Field Manual  
JDP – Joint Doctrine Publication 
 
AJP – Allied Joint Publication 
NA5CRO – Non-Article 5 Crisis Response Operations 
 
iv 

FOI2020/12929
CONTENTS  
 
FOREWORD 

 
 
PREFACE 
ii 
 
 
PART A – STABILITY OPERATIONS: CONTEXT 
A-1 
 
 
Introduction 
A-1 
 
 
CHAPTER 1 – DELIVERING STABILITY 
1-1 
 
 
 
Security 
1-1 
 
Governance and the Rule of Law 
1-3 
 
Social and Economic Development 
1-5 
 
Political Settlement 
1-6 
 
Regional and External Influences 
1-7 
 
Societal Relationships 
1-8 
 
Achieving Stability 
1-8 
 
State Resilience 
1-9 
 
 
CHAPTER 2 – THE GOVERNMENT APPROACH 
2-1 
 
 
The National Security Strategy and Strategic Defence and Security 
2-1 
Review 
 
Building Stability Overseas Strategy 
2-2 
 
Conflict, Stability and Security Fund 
2-2 
 
Relationship between Stability, Stabilisation and Stability Operations 
2-3 
 
HMG’s Approach to Stabilisation 
2-4 
The Full Spectrum Approach and the Combined, Joint, Inter-agency, 
2-7 
Intra-governmental and Multinational Environment 
 
The Stabilisation Unit 
2-10 
 
The Role of the Military 
2-11 
 
Graduated Response 
2-11 
 
Conflict Sensitivity 
2-12 
 
 
CHAPTER 3 – THE UK MILITARY APPROACH 
3-1 
 
 
 
UK Defence Doctrine 
3-1 
 
Defence Joint Operating Concept 
3-1 
 
JDP 05 Shaping a Stable World: the Military Contribution 
3-1 
 
ADP Land Operations 2017 
3-2 
 
Operations Themes and Types of Operation 
3-2 
 
Integrated Action 
3-3 
Consequence Management 
3-4 
 
 
CHAPTER 4 – COMBAT AND STABILITY OPERATIONS 
4-1 
 
 
 
The Application and Threat of Force 
4-1 
 
Combat 
4-1 
 
Stability Operations 
4-1 
 
Operating Environment 
4-2 
 
 
PART B – FUNDAMENTALS OF STABILITY OPERATIONS 
B-1 
 
 
 
Introduction 
B-1 
 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
CHAPTER 5 – PRINCIPLES OF STABILITY OPERATIONS
 
5-1 
 
 
 
Introduction 
5-1 
 
Principles of War 
5-1 
 
Principles of Stability Operations 
5-1 
 
 
CHAPTER 6 – OPERATIONS THEMES AND STABILITY 
6-1 
 
 
 
Introduction 
6-1 
 
Warfighting 
6-1 
 
Security 
6-1 
 
Peace Support  
6-2 
 
Defence Engagement 
6-2 
 
 
ANNEX A: THE LAND CONTRIBUTION TO DEFENCE ENGAGEMENT 
6A-1 
 
 
 
Context 
6A-1 
 
 
CHAPTER 7 – TYPES OF STABILITY OPERATIONS 
7-1 
 
 
 
Types of Stability Operations 
7-1 
 
 
PART C - DELIVERY 
C-1 
 
 
CHAPTER 8 - THE OPERATING ENVIRONMENT 
8-1 
 
 
 
Building Stability Overseas 
8-1 
 
Understanding 
8-1 
 
Transition and Stability Operations 
8-2 
 
The Security-Development Nexus 
8-5 
 
Threats to Stability Operations 
8-5 
 
Legitimacy and Force 
8-6 
 
Audiences, Actors, Adversaries and Enemies  
8-8 
 
Audiences 
8-9 
 
Local, Regional and National Authorities 
8-10 
 
Military Forces 
8-10 
 
Commercial Actors 
8-12 
 
The Media 
8-12 
International Organisations, Non-Governmental Organisations and 
8-13 
Human Security 
 
 
CHAPTER 9 – STABILITY ACTIVITIES 
9-1 
 
 
 
Security and Control 
9-3 
 
Support to Security Sector Reform 
9-6 
 
Support to Initial Restoration of Services 
9-12 
 
Support to Interim Governance Tasks 
9-17 
 
 
ANNEX A: DEMOBILISATION, DISARMAMENT, AND REINTEGRATION 
9A-1 
 
 
 
 
CHAPTER 10 – ORCHESTRATING AND EXECUTING STABILITY 

10-1 
OPERATIONS 
 
 
 
The Corps and the Division 
10-1 
vi 

FOI2020/12929
 
The Brigade 
10-8 
 
The Battlegroup 
10-15 
 
 
ANNEX A: WOMEN, PEACE AND SECURITY AND GENDER 
10A-1 
MAINSTREAMING 
 
 
 
Context 
10A-1 
 
Definitions and Descriptions 
10A-2 
 
Conflict-Related Sexual Violence 
10A-3 
 
The International Response 
10A-5 
Improving Operational Effectiveness by Mainstreaming a Gender 
10A-8 
Perspective 
 
Gender Balance on Operations 
10A-9 
 
Operational Planning and Preparation 
10A-9 
 
Disrupting and Reporting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence 
10A-10 
 
Sexual Exploitation and Abuse 
10A-12 
 
 
APPENDIX 1 TO ANNEX A: REPORTING WITH A GENDER 
10A1-1 
PERSPECTIVE 
 

 
ANNEX B: CHILDREN AND ARMED CONFLICT 
10B-1 
 
 
 
Definitions 
10B-1 
 
Child Soldiers 
10B-1 
 
Schools in Conflict 
10B-4 
 
Tactical Responses 
10B-5 
 
 
ANNEX C: HUMAN TRAFFICKING 
10C-1 
 
 
 
Definitions 
10C-2 
 
Tactical Responses 
10C-2 
 
 
ANNEX D: CULTURAL PROPERTY PROTECTION 
10D-1 
 
 
 
Objectives 
10D-5 
 
Responsibilities 
10D-2 
 
Military Infrastructure and Cultural Property 
10D-3 
 
Best Practice 
10D-4 
 
 
 
 
vii 

FOI2020/12929
PART A – STABILITY OPERATIONS: CONTEXT 
 
Introduction 

Part A – Context 
 
►  Delivering stability 
A-01. Part A provides the context from which flow the 
►  The Government approach 
►  The UK military approach 
fundamentals of stability operations. Central to Part A is the 
►  Combat and stability operations 
idea that stability operations, as conducted by land forces, 
represent only a fraction of the ways supporting the ends of 
Part B – Fundamentals of 
state stability.1  
Stability Operations 
 
Principles of stability operations 
A-02. Part A describes in detail the other actors land forces 
Operations themes and stability 
must understand, partner or support to promote the ends of 
Types of operation 
stability, not least those involved in political processes 
Part C – Delivery 
promoting stability. Implicit, is the importance of land forces 
Operating environment 
being able to operate efficiently among the people as well as 
Stability activities 
Orchestrating and executing 
on the battlefield. 
stability operations 
 
 
A-03. Part A complements AFM Warfighting by emphasising 
that both combat and stability operations may be required within a particular operations theme.2 
Stability operations should not be seen as distinct from combat because enemies and adversaries 
may seek to block the path to stability or may hold a different vision as to what stability entails. 
Crucially, executed well, stability operations can help to prevent and reduce violent conflict 
threatening stability before, after or during the conduct of combat operations.  
 
A-04. Chapter 1 describes the role of the state and its government in maintaining stability. This 
includes examining the elements of a stable state and what causes them to break down. It also 
discusses how instability can lead to violent intra-state conflict and the need to understand the 
causes to frame a successful intervention. Chapter 2 addresses the Full Spectrum Approach and 
the role of Her Majesty’s Government (HMG) in promoting stability. It provides commanders at all 
levels a bridge to JDP 05, as deployments on stability operations will generally require a higher 
level of understanding than the standard ‘two up’ on more conventional combat operations. 
Chapter 3 examines the UK Military Approach while Chapter 4 summarises the relationship 
between combat and stability operations. 
 
 
 
 
 
I cannot envisage a conflict where there wil  be no role for stabilisation 
 
operations, but equal y, stabilisation is highly likely to involve combat. 
 
 
 
General Richard Dannatt 
 
 
1 State stability is defined in para 1-01 and stability operations in para 2-14. 
2 The operations themes are: warfighting, security, peace support and defence engagement. See page 3-2, para 3-16. 
Part A-1 
 


FOI2020/12929
Chapter 1. Delivering Stability 
 
1-01. HMG defines a structurally stable state as that which 
Delivering Stability 
possesses ‘political systems which are representative and 
•  Security 
legitimate, capable of managing conflict, change and other 
•  Governance and the Rule of Law 
pressures (both internal and external) peacefully. This means 
•  Social and economic development 
societies in which human rights and rule of law are respected, 
•  Political settlement 
basic needs are met, security established and opportunities for 
•  Regional and external influences 
social and economic development are open to all.’3 In the realm 
•  Societal relationships 
of stability operations, however, it is important to understand that 
•  Achieving stability 
this is but one view of the stable state. This will be discussed in 
•  State resilience 
more detail below. 
 
1-02. Security, governance and the rule of law, and social and economic development are 
inextricably linked – stability is generally determined by how they interact. Critically, this interaction 
is held together by societal relationships, influenced by regional and external factors and enabled 
by an overarching political settlement as outlined below:4 So stability can be maintained within a 
functional national state or polity (see p 1-3); but is also built from people with resilient communities 
and businesses, and a regional and global community that addresses transnational issues which 
impact a country’s stability and development. An effective approach for external intervention is one 
which engages at each of these levels where relevant, underpinned by regular contextual 
analysis.5  
 
 
 
Figure 1-1. The stable state model (JDP 05) 
Security 
 
1-03. Security is part of the foundation on which stability is built, alongside economic and 
infrastructure development, political settlement, societal relationships, governance and the rule of 
law. Security has traditionally been understood as national security, concerned with territorial 
integrity and the protection of the institutions and interests of the state from both internal and 
external threats. Increasingly, however, the understanding of security has broadened to include the 
notion of human security, emphasising the protection of individuals, their communities, and their 
resources for survival.6 
 
1-04. Human Security. Human security is the collective expression of legitimate individual and 
group needs required to maintain authority and stability in democratic states. Characteristics are 
 
Building Stability Overseas Strategy, dated 2011, page 5. 
4 JDP 05, para 2.17. 
5 Department for International Development (DFID) Building Stability Framework, 2016. 
6 For example, see Barry Buzan’s People, States and Fear: The National Security Problem in International Relations
1-1 

FOI2020/12929
described in Table 1-1 below and selected themes and land tactical responses are discussed in 
the annexes to Chapter 10. Part 2 to this AFM covers the protection of civilians in detail. 
 
Human security is characterised by: 
Human security is threatened by: 
The availability of essential commodities such 
Political/ ideological tensions 
as water, medical aid, shelter and food 
Broader environmental security 
Environmental events 
Freedom from persecution, want and fear 
Racial, ethnic or religious tensions 
Protection of cultural values7 
Poverty, inequality, criminality and injustice 
Responsible, representative and transparent 
Competition for, and/or access to, natural 
governance 
resources 
 
Corrupt and inept governance 
 
Table 1-1. Human security: characteristics and threats 
 
1-05. The Security Sector. A poorly managed or dysfunctional security sector hampers 
development, discourages investment and may perpetuate poverty and corruption.8 Similarly, it 
may act as a serious cause of popular grievance as well as undermining the legitimacy of the state. 
 
1-06. In liberal democracies, the security sector is typically employed to protect the basic survival 
needs of both the state and its population. In addition to securing territory, borders, key 
installations and legitimate sources of revenue, the state can meet the legitimate political, 
economic, societal, religious and environmental needs of individuals and groups. An effective 
security sector underpins the state’s ability to govern and maintain law and order. This supports the 
stability necessary to encourage essential investment required for economic growth and the 
prevention of poverty. 
 
1-07. Alternatively, a government may choose to use the security sector to protect its own interests 
and position. The security sector may also be used as a matter of deliberate policy, to forcibly 
exclude groups from positions of political power or compel them to submit to the existing political 
status quo. This may fuel discontent, but balanced against other elements, may still create a stable 
state in the sense that it is not subject to immediate turmoil and change. This situation is common 
within autocratic states. 
 
1-08. A weak security sector and the loss of the state’s monopoly on the legitimate use of force 
has wide implications, not least an increase in the freedom of action offered to enemies and 
adversaries.9 In some cases these groups may be able to convince the population that they offer a 
better source of security, as was managed by the Taliban in certain areas of Afghanistan or Boko 
Haram in Nigeria. In some cases, the UK may choose to favour certain non-state actors in 
contravention of a state's wishes, especially if that state is threatening stability and the UK's 
interests. Security Sector Reform (SSR) is discussed in detail in Chapter 9. 
 
 
Defining State and Non-state Actors
10 
 
Understanding the construct of a state is important when understanding how land forces can 
support efforts to promote state stability. The state is the principal unit for exercising public 
 
7 Note that some cultural values and practices may be at odds with International Human Rights Law. Commanders 
should seek mission specific guidance on how to approach/report these issues. Examples include Female Genital 
Mutilation and forced marriage. 
8 The subject of corruption is covered in detail in Part 1 of this AFM. 
9 There is increasing understanding and evidence supporting that over 80% of a population's security and justice needs 
are in fact provided by non-state actors, certainly in more 'traditional' societies, and arguably even in Western liberal 
countries (neighbourhood watch, shopping mall guards, train attendants, all supported increasingly by technology rather 
than people) - see e.g. Albrecht, P et al (eds) Perspectives on Involving Non-State and Customary Actors in Justice and 
Security Reform 
(2011, p3). Western support upsetting this intricate web of social contracts threatens the societal 
relationships noted in Figure 1-1. 
10 Building Peaceful States and Societies: a DFID practice paper 2010, page 12. 
1-2 

FOI2020/12929
authority in defined territories in modern times. It is also the central structure in international 
relations. The state consists of: 
 
(a) institutions or rules which regulate political, social and economic engagement across a 
territory and determine how public authority is obtained and used (e.g. constitutions, laws, 
customs). These may be formal or informal. 
 
(b) organisations at the national and the sub-national level which operate within those rules 
(e.g. the executive, legislature, judiciary, bureaucracy, ministries, army, tax authorities). 
 
government refers to the specific administration in power at any one moment (the governing 
coalition of political leaders), while the state is the basis for a government’s authority, legality, and 
claim to popular support. The state provides the edifice [complex system of beliefs] within which a 
government can operate. 
 
Non-state actors 
include civil society organisations (CSOs)11 and the private sector, as well as 
traditional authorities, and informal groupings such as social networks and religious communities. 
In some cases, non-state actors may oppose governments through both violent and non-violent 
means. They may even challenge the notion of a particular state. Non-state actors are an 
important factor in the rule of law system as part of the checks and balances, and governance of 
state-centric power 
  
 
Governance and the Rule of Law 
 
1-09. A stable state has a sustainable political structure that permits the peaceful resolution of 
internal contests for political power. It sometimes provides public goods, which may, in some 
polities, even include the provision of welfare, education or healthcare, but always, at a minimum, 
the resolution of disputes which parties themselves cannot resolve. This is achieved by the state 
exerting effective control or influence over its population and territory in a manner that is viewed as 
broadly legitimate by the overwhelming majority of those governed.12 This may not always be the 
case; it is important to recognise that governance can be applied through persuasion; 
administration; and compulsion. The level of economic investment within and into a country relies 
heavily on legitimate government and good governance to enforce the rule of law, securing private 
property and contracts and guarding against corruption. 
 
 
Polities 
 
A polity is any kind of political entity that is organised. It is a group of people who are collectively 
united by a self-reflected cohesive force such as identity and who have a capacity to mobilise 
resources. Like a state (which is also a polity), it does not need to be a sovereign unit. For 
example, a militia in Libya or a tribe in Somalia may perhaps be said to be polities, just as much as 
Afghanistan is, but the Pashtun people may not be. 
 
Public goods 
 
Public goods are those things that are in the collective interest of all in a society. Public goods tend 
to be services, such as state education or justice, common infrastructure such as roads and utilities 
grids, or a condition, such as the rule of law or a regulated market. Public goods may be provided 
by the state, the private sector or civil society organisations. 
 
11 Civil society organisations (CSOs) include such groups as registered charities, NGOs, community groups, women’s 
organisations, faith-based organisations, professional associations, trade unions, social movements, business 
associations, and advocacy groups. 
12 The concept of legitimacy is explored in: Weigand, Florian, "Investigating the Role of Legitimacy in the Political Order 
of Conflict-torn Spaces
" , ERC and LSE International Development paper, April 2015. 
1-3 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
1-10. While the rule of law has no universally agreed definition,13 it is nonetheless fundamental to 
what the UK deems to be ‘good’ government. Rule of law is essentially the principle ‘that all 
persons and authorities within the state, whether public or private, should be bound by and entitled 
to the benefit of laws publicly and prospectively promulgated and publicly administered in the 
courts.’14 In the context of interventions overseas, it is also important to consider that rule of law 
may be upheld through informal societal mechanisms and behaviours. 
 
1-11. The precise form and practice of the rule of law will vary from polity to polity depending on 
the social, cultural and political context of a particular society and may include informal societal 
mechanisms of dispute resolution, of association and rules of behaviour. For HMG and the United 
Nations (UN), but not necessarily all states, the rule of law includes human rights and also refers to 
the ends that a society values that are generally agreed to be desirable in a fair, open and 
democratic society.15  
 
1-12. ‘Good’ rule of law systems will tend to abide by the following four principles:- 
 
a. 
The laws are clear, publicised, stable and just; are applied evenly and protect 
fundamental rights, including the security of persons and property. 
 
b. 
The government and its officials and agents, as well as individuals and private entities, 
are accountable under the law. 
 
c. 
The process by which the laws are enacted, administered and enforced is accessible, 
fair and efficient. 
 
d. 
Justice is timely, and delivered by competent, neutral and fair processes and people.16 
 
1-13. The opposite of the rule of law is the ‘rule of man’, where arbitrary and unpredictable rule is 
in force, individual rights are not respected and those with power are above the law. While it is very 
often violent, chaotic and repressive, a ‘rule of man’ state can also be viewed as broadly legitimate 
by those it governs, as long as it maintains general order and is capable of engendering in the 
governed the belief that such a rule and its institutions are appropriate and proper for that society. 
Minimal rule of law allows, however, an elite to capture wealth and power, make laws in their own 
interests and corrupt public goods to private ends with impunity. Rule of law is thus intimately 
related to the legitimate use of force in society as people must obey the law because there is a 
credible threat of enforcement. Equally, the law must be seen to deserve their respect because of 
its legitimacy and fairness.17 A concept of the rule of law is a necessary precondition for a definition 
of corruption. 
 
 
13 Keene, S. Afghanistan UK Rule of Law Interventions: Lessons Identified, Stabilisation Unit, 24 March 2016, para 1.4. 
14 Lord Bingham of Cornhil ’s The Rule of Law, (London, 2010). 
15 DFID Rule of Law Policy Approach, 12 July 2013. 
16 Adapted from principles set out by the World Justice Project and Lord Bingham of Cornhil ’s The Rule of Law, (London, 
2010). 
17 DFID Rule of Law Policy Approach, 12 July 2013. 
1-4 

FOI2020/12929
 
An understanding of the many different models that exist internationally for internal security, 
policing and criminal justice is essential. But those models cannot be considered in isolation 
because what works in one country will not necessarily work in another which may have 
different traditions. It is therefore critical for SSR strategy to take full account of the history, 
culture and inherited practices of the country or region in question. The strategy also needs to 
be informed by the views and aspirations of the local population. 
 
Sir John Chilcot, The Iraq Inquiry (2016) 
   
 
1-14. Governance generally refers to 'all of processes of governing, whether undertaken by a 
government, market or network, whether over a family, tribe, formal or informal organization or 
territory and whether through the laws, norms, power or language.18 A government that is founded 
upon a theoretically stable political settlement can still be undermined by poor governance and 
good governance can theoretically exist without a fair political settlement. The more inclusive a 
state’s political settlement is, the more resilient it is likely to be in the face of maladministration. A 
sustainable political structure will not be completely free of corruption or significant governance 
inefficiencies. Corruption or inefficiency may not become causes of instability if the population 
considers them as either acceptable or inevitable. Poor governance, which is often characterised 
by corruption and contributes to weak rule of law, provides a significant opportunity for both internal 
and external actors to a state to exploit the failings in its political settlement. Such exploitation 
erodes wider societal relationships and can destabilise the state. 
 
 
Supporting Formal and Informal Justice Systems in Nigeria
19 
 
In Nigeria, the rules governing people’s daily interactions are established through formal and 
informal institutions and at various levels (international, federal, state, community, religious and 
tribal). The majority of Nigerian citizens tend to rely on traditional leaders, customary courts or 
community-based security providers as their first port of call.  
 
Department for International Development (DFID) Nigeria is working with a range of different 
security and justice service providers. These include the formal court system and alternative 
dispute resolution mechanisms (such as citizen mediation centres) to promote access to justice, 
the Nigeria Police Force, and selected informal policing structures (such as ‘neighbourhood watch’ 
arrangements). Improving the capacity of informal policing structures has enabled them to work 
within the law, and increased their respect for human rights. Integrating their roles within the 
operations of the formal police has helped them become more accountable to the communities 
they serve. DFID also supports the training of traditional rulers and customary court judges in the 
use of simplified procedural guidelines to help guarantee fair hearings.  
 
 
Social and Economic Development 
 
1-15. A stable state is likely to have the necessary economic and industrial base, to keep pace with 
societal demands and withstand unexpected changes in circumstances. Many so called 
‘developing countries’ are confronted by enduring economic problems, despite holding natural 
resources, such as: failing infrastructure; rising unemployment; insecurity; and competition from 
illicit (criminal) economies.20 These factors also make them more vulnerable in the event that 
natural disasters occur. 
 
 
18 Bevir, Mark (2013). Governance: A very short introduction. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. 
19 Building Peaceful States and Societies: a DFID practice paper 2010, page 30. 
20 A developing country, also called a less developed country or underdeveloped country, is a nation or sovereign 
state with a less developed industrial base and a low Human Development Index (HDI) relative to other countries. 
1-5 

FOI2020/12929
1-16. The way in which economic opportunity and benefit is distributed across identity groups can 
also have a key impact on stability. States and communities are more stable when different groups 
are included in the benefits of economic growth. Economic exclusion can worsen grievances which 
fuel violent conflict, especially when combined with other group inequalities.21  
 
1-17. In developing and unstable countries, unemployment and underemployment are likely to be 
high. Many of the basic social service delivery functions provided by the state in developing 
countries - such as health, education, water and sanitation - may increasingly be delivered by civil 
society organisations and the private sector, or rely upon substantial international aid. Such aid can 
be both financial and functional, with international and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) 
directly delivering public services which, wrongly presented, can further degrade the legitimacy of 
the state. In extreme circumstances, even non-state armed groups may directly deliver such 
services (e.g. Daesh), constituting an even more direct challenge to state legitimacy and the basic 
functions expected of the state may depend upon substantial international aid. 
 
1-18. Fragility in the economic sector impacts in the decisions of international and domestic 
commercial investors, from the multinational corporations to the modest market stall holder. 
Investors lose confidence when they are unable to make financial decisions based on calculated 
risk. 
 
 
Economic Development in a Crisis: Providing Opportunities for Displaced Populations.
22 
 
Jordan has assumed a heavy burden through hosting refugees from the conflict in Syria, which has 
imposed severe stress on its economy and host communities. A new paradigm to promote 
economic development was needed for both Jordanians and refugees. 
 
The 2016 Syria Conference established a new approach to support Jordan’s growth agenda while 
maintaining stability. This included improved EU market access, creating jobs for Jordanians and 
refugees while supporting the post-conflict Syrian economy. It enabled Syrian refugees to apply for 
work permits and set up new businesses. 
 
 
Political Settlement 
 
1-19. A stable state delivers security, governance and economic development through a legitimate 
political settlement. A political settlement is best summed up as the forging of a common 
understanding, usually between political elites, that their best interests or beliefs are served 
through consent to a framework for administering political power.23 This common understanding 
may take the form of an accepted process for brokering power as wel  as being an end-point. 
Political settlements are often subject to constant renegotiation and may even tolerate a low level 
of violence as part of their working. In essence, political settlements are in place wherever those 
with the power to threaten state-structures [or social structures] forego that option either for reward 
(which may simply be personal security), for the sake of belief, or to wait for an opportunity to 
become the government overseeing the existing structures.24 Like the rule of law or governance, it 
can be achieved through informal agreements as well as formal institutions. 
 
1-20. While formal and informal power-sharing mechanisms can make an important contribution to 
ending conflicts and creating short-term stability, they are often difficult to sustain. Understanding a 
political settlement requires an understanding of the incentives that encourage elites to abide by 
the political settlement. Intervening armed forces, despite their intentions, can often influence or 
 
21 DFID Building Stability Framework, 2016. 
22 Ibid. 
23 See Bell, C 2015 'What we talk about when we talk about Political Settlements: Towards Inclusive and Open Political 
Settlements in an Era of Disillusionment'
 Political Settlements Working Papers, no. 1, Political Settlements Research 
Programme. 
24 States in Development: Understanding State Building, DFID working paper, 2008, p.7. 
1-6 

FOI2020/12929
destabilise a local or national political settlement unintentionally by virtue of their latent ability to 
apply violence. Their actions or their presence can also impact elite incentives, without the force 
realising it. 
 
1-21. In theory, the more open and inclusive the settlement, the less likely it is that conflict will 
arise from political, ethnic or ideological tensions. For this to be the case, however, a settlement 
has not only to be inclusive but to be perceived to be fair. Social identities play an important role in 
a political settlement- see Societal Relationships, para 1-24. If the social identity of the area 
encompassed by a political settlement is too weak or has to contend with too many strongly-held, 
local identities, then its very inclusiveness may damage it. Agreeing unified strategies when actors 
have different political and ideological perspectives is problematic and can lead to population 
groups demanding change. Primacy of political purpose is a fundamental principle of stability 
operations and will be covered in detail in Part B, Chapter 5. 
 
 
The Evolution of the Political Settlement in Kenya
25 
 
With a mandate from the African Union and the support of the UN, Kofi Annan mediated a post-
election agreement in Kenya in early 2008 to rearticulate the political settlement and make it 
broader and more inclusive. The agreement led to a coalition government based on power sharing 
among different ethnic groups. This is proving to be a coalition under strain, built on a stagnant 
political settlement which has yet to address the underlying grievances within Kenyan society. In 
the long run, the fundamental fault lines in Kenyan society (e.g. ethnicity, regional identity, the 
distribution of land ownership) will need to be accommodated in the underlying political settlement 
if peace is to be sustained. 
  
 
Regional and External Influences 
 
1-22. States are more stable when they are able to benefit from external opportunities and 
peacefully manage regional threats and shocks. Conversely, fragile states are particularly 
vulnerable to transnational threats. Violent extremist and terrorist ideologies, transnational 
organised crime, illicit financial flows and international corruption challenge the stability of both 
state and regional-level institutions. Climate change is a “threat multiplier”, accelerating pressures 
on fragile states and challenging their capacity to manage change. Significant commodity price 
shocks, or major flows of ‘hot’ money, can also have destabilising effects. 
 
1-23. A country’s regional environment can reinforce or undermine its stability. Migratory and 
refugee flows can generate instability and trigger conflict as they increase competition over 
resources and economic opportunities. Arms flows are a significant indicator of conflict risk. In 
contrast, regional integration, trade bloc accession and the diffusion of institutional norms through 
regional organisations can be powerful stabilising factors. 
 
 
Burma: a Regional Perspective
26 
 
Burma has suffered from decades of conflict. Ethnic armed groups fight with the government for 
rights and autonomy, but also for control over the illicit jade, timber and drugs businesses. In this 
context, external drivers of conflict are extremely powerful. Neighbouring countries provide: 
markets for illegal trade (e.g. $30 billion of mostly illicit jade export); shelter for armed groups; arms 
and; facilities money laundering. 
 
 
 

 
25Building Peaceful States and Societies: a DFID practice paper 2010, page 24. 
26 DFID, Building Stability Framework, 2016. 
1-7 

FOI2020/12929
Societal Relationships 
 
1-24. A stable state has a population that is bound together by a combination of social, cultural, 
economic and ideological factors
. This evokes a sense of loyalty to the state and to each other 
and provides the shared identity that is fundamental to achieving a political settlement. 
 
1-25. The societal status quo can be challenged by many things, including; perceived inequalities 
in political power, economic opportunity, and access to services (including security and justice), 
based on identity (ethnicity, religion, caste, geography, gender, etc.); large scale migration; and 
inter-state tension where religion or ethnicity spans the borders. Any such break down of this 
societal bond risks undermining the political settlement and disrupting the security, economic and 
governance sectors. 
 
 
State Legitimacy and State-society Relations
27 
 
Issues of legitimacy lie at the heart of state–society relations. States are legitimate when elites and 
the public accept the rules regulating the exercise of power and the distribution of wealth as proper 
and binding. States can rely on a combination of different methods to establish their legitimacy, 
including international recognition, performance (e.g. economic growth, service delivery), ideology, 
procedural forms (e.g. democratic procedures), or traditional authority. Building legitimacy is a 
primary requirement for peace, security and resilience over the long term. 
 
For example, the authoritarian Suharto regime in Indonesia was tolerated by citizens as it delivered 
on basic services (primarily health and education) and the development of rural constituencies. As 
soon as it became apparent that personal politics and advancement began to replace these 
concerns, the government began to lose legitimacy, which ultimately brought about its downfall. 
 
 
Achieving Stability 
 
1-26. 'Structural stability' (as defined in para 1-01 above), in a given state, is the longer-term goal 
to which all stability operations contribute. It is important to understand that such operations cannot 
deliver this longer-term stability in themselves. They can, however, play an important role in 
countering different elements of instability that a state or region may be facing at any given time. 
 
1-27.  In the short term, external coalitions and alliances may take significant responsibility for 
delivering security, essential services and economic opportunity. But central to the success of 
stability operations is the extent to which they support the emergence - through non-violent political 
processes - of legitimate authorities capable of doing this themselves, leading societies on the 
longer-term journey to structural stability. 
 
1-28. The transition of responsibility to these partner-nation political authorities may be a lengthy 
process. Ideally, transition should be conditions based and not simply based on political timelines; 
there is no value in handing over responsibility for a state function if it cannot be sustained and 
developed further. Transition across the state is therefore likely to vary as it will be dependent on 
the adversary threat, mix of actors and availability of resources. 
 
1-29. There will be situations where transition is accelerated due to the political imperative. This 
may come from the partner state as it starts to lose legitimacy in the eyes of the population or from 
external governments keen to see the contribution scaled down. For example, the withdrawal 
timelines from Iraq and Afghanistan were largely set by political direction and were not necessarily 
based on operational level conditions. For such reasons, coalitions should be planning for 
transition right from the start of all military operations. 
 
 
27 Building Peaceful States and Societies: a DFID practice paper 2010, page 16. 
1-8 

FOI2020/12929
State Resilience 
 
1-30. One of the key indicators of a genuinely stable state is the ability to anticipate, and 
contend with, strategic shocks
 – in other words, its level of resilience. Shocks generally result in 
degradation or collapse of one, or more, of the elements required for stability (as illustrated in 
Figure 1-2) putting the remaining elements under increased pressure.28 Shocks could come about 
through events such as: 
 

a. 
violence (either from within that state itself or from external intervention/contagion); 
 
b. 
a major natural disaster, including a health emergency; 
 
c. 
mass inflows of refugees or migrants; 
 
d. 
economic crisis; or 
 
e. 
contests for the transition of power. 
 
1-31. Weakness in any one element could lead to the erosion and subsequent failure of another. 
Where insecurity and conflict are not already present, this erosion can set the conditions for it to 
occur and may result in a fracture of the political settlement that regulates key societal and state 
relationships. Contextual variations notwithstanding, a fragile state could rapidly break down as 
shown in Figure 1-2. 
 
1-32. No single measure of state resilience exists. Instead, metrics tend to be developed by 
organisations with interests by sector. For example, DFID has created mechanisms for measuring 
state resilience to food shortages. 
 
 
 
28 Shocks are described in detail in DCDC. (2014) Strategic Trends Programme: Global Strategic Trends – Out to 2045
Shrivenham, Ministry of Defence. 
1-9 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
Figure 1-2. Breakdown of the stable state model (JDP 05) 
 
State-level Shocks 
 
Type of shock 
Examples and Impact 
 
Violence – internal or 
Balkans. In 1990, member republics of the Socialist Federal 
external  
Republic of Yugoslavia, such as Slovenia and Croatia, demanded 
greater autonomy. When this was refused by Serbia, violence broke 
out across the region leading to a decade of instability. 
 
Major Natural 
Haiti. On 12 Jan 2010, a devastating earthquake with a magnitude 
Disaster – including a  of 7.0 struck Haiti, killing more than 160,000 and displacing close to 
health emergency 
1.5 million people. Six months after the quake an estimated 20 
million cubic metres remained, making most of the capital 
impassable with thousands of bodies left in the rubble. The number 
of people in relief camps after the quake reached 1.6 million, and 
almost no transitional housing had been built. Most of the camps 
had no electricity, running water, or sewage disposal. Crime in the 
camps was widespread, especially against women and girls.29 
 
 
29 See United Nations. (22 Feb 2010). Report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Stabilization Mission in 
Haiti, New York, United Nations.  
1-10 

FOI2020/12929
Mass inflows of 
Lebanon. As of 1 Mar 2016, 4.7 million people had fled the war in 
refugees or migrants 
Syria as refugees. In Lebanon, this meant that one in five people 
were Syrian refugees. By fleeing the violence in their own country 
refugees destabilised neighbouring countries.30 This destabilisation 
can lead to other shocks, such as violence. 
 
Economic crisis 
Venezuela. The collapse in the price of oil in 2015 created 
economic shocks in a number of oil-producing states. Venezuela 
was particularly badly affected with export revenue greatly 
diminished. The government was unable to import as much food 
leading to increasing violence on the streets. 
 
Contest for the 
Libya. Following the removal of the Gaddafi regime in 2011, Libya 
transition of power 
was plunged into violence as rival militias and armed factions vied 
for control. This led to a breaking down of the functions of the state, 
greatly impacting upon human security. 
 
 
Table 1-2. Types of shock with examples 
 
 
 
30 See Mercy Corps. https://www.mercycorps.org/articles/iraq-jordan-lebanon-syria-turkey/quick-facts-what-you-need-
know-about-syria-crisis . 
1-11 

FOI2020/12929
Chapter 2. The Government Approach 
 
2-01. This chapter outlines how HMG uses stability 
The Government Approach 
operations as a tool to support its strategic objectives. It 
•  NSS & SDSR 
identifies the key strategies and policies and provides the 
•  Building Stability Overseas Strategy 
foundation for the use of land forces conducting stability 
•  Conflict, Stability and Security Fund 
activities. 
•  Relationship between stability, 
 
stabilisation and stability operations 
The National Security Strategy (NSS) and Strategic 
•  HMG’s approach to stabilisation 
Defence and Security Review (SDSR)31 
•  Full Spectrum Approach 
 
•  Stabilisation Unit 
2-02. The combined NSS and SDSR (2015) serves as a 
•  Role of the military 
strategic framework document that looks at security 
•  Graduated response 
holistically, enabling cross-Government policy to reflect the 
•  Conflict sensitivity 
UK’s security priorities and objectives. It considers the UK’s 
 
place within the international order, outlining the strategic thinking required to underpin its actions 
over the next five years. Although the UK remains relatively secure, international events, many 
unexpected, have led to greater insecurity and uncertainty.  
 
2-03. There are three high-level, enduring and mutually supporting National Security Objectives 
(NSO) listed within the NSS and SDSR:  
 
a. 
NSO 1Protect our people – at home, in our overseas territories and abroad, and to 
protect our territory, economic security, infrastructure and way of life. 
 
b. 
NSO 2Project our global influence – reducing the likelihood of threats materialising 
and affecting the UK, our interests, and those of our allies and partners. 
 
c. 
NSO 3Promote our prosperity – seizing opportunities, working innovatively and 
supporting UK industry. 
 
2-04. These objectives are threatened by amongst others:  
 
a. 
International terrorism affecting the UK or its interests. 
 
b. 
An international military crisis between states, drawing in the UK and its allies as well 
as other states and non-state actors. 
 
c. 
Risk of major instability, insurgency or civil war overseas. 
 
d. 
A significant increase in the level of organised crime affecting the UK. 
 
e. 
Short to medium term disruption to international supplies of resources essential to the 
UK. 
 
2-05. The eight missions given to the Armed Forces in the NSS and SDSR are the ways to 
achieve the three NSOs and prevent the aforementioned risks undermining the UK’s wider 
security. Three of these might involve land forces participating in stability operations: 
 
a. 
Reinforce international security and the collective capacity of our allies, partners and 
multilateral institutions. 
 
b. 
Support Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Response (HADR), and conduct rescue 
missions.32 
 
31 NSS and SDSR 2015 – A Secure and Prosperous United Kingdom, dated Nov 2015. 
32 See Part 3 to this AFM. 
2-1 

FOI2020/12929
 
c. 
Conduct operations to restore peace and stability. 
 
2-06. Land forces will, however, rarely operate in isolationSeamless cooperation between the 
military and civilian agencies
 is essential in stabilising fragile states, using all the tools of 
national power available, coordinated through the National Security Council (NSC).  
 
Building Stability Overseas Strategy 
 
2-07. Sitting beneath the NSS and SDSR, the Building Stability Overseas Strategy (BSOS) is an 
integrated cross-Government strategy to address instability and conflict overseas. It focuses on 
strengthening cross-Government cooperation and improving performance through three mutually 
supporting pillars: 
 
a. 
Early warning through the anticipation of instability and potential triggers of conflict. 
 
b. 
Rapid crisis prevention and response through appropriate and effective action to 
prevent a crisis or stop it spreading or escalating. 
 
c. 
Investment in upstream prevention to help build robust, legitimate states capable of 
managing tensions and shocks and lower the likelihood of instability and conflict. 
 
2-08. The 2010 SDSR committed the Government to produce the Building Stability Overseas 
Strategy
, which is one of several strategies stemming from the 2010 NSS. It is aligned with related 
strategies, notably the Counter Terrorism Strategy (CONTEST), the Organised Crime Strategy, the 
Cyber Crime Strategy, and the International Defence Engagement Strategy (IDES). It takes into 
account the Government’s strategies in areas such as proliferation and arms control, energy 
security, and climate change and resource competition, which it complements. The 2015 NSS and 
SDSR
 also promoted the role of Defence in building stability overseas. 
 
Strategic Defence 
and Security 
Review 2010 (SDSR 
2010)
International 
Building Stability 
Counter Terrorism 
Organised Crime 
Cyber Crime 
Defence 
Overseas Strategy 
Strategy 
Strategy
Strategy
Engagement 
(BSOS)
(CONTEST)
Strategy (IDES)
 
 
Figure 2-1. Strategic Defence and Security Review 2010 and complementary strategies 
 
Conflict, Stability and Security Fund 
 
2-09. The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) replaced the Conflict Pool in April 2015, as 
part of a new, more strategic approach to enhancing the delivery of our national security 
interests
. The CSSF is one of two funding instruments (along with the Prosperity Fund), which 
operates on a similar cross-Government basis overseen by the National Security Advisor.  
 
2-10. The Fund is shaped by a reformed strategy and prioritisation process which produces a more 
streamlined, less layered, structure with a clearer line of sight from NSC decisions and to 
programme priorities, and greater alignment between UK security interests and conflict prevention 
goals. The Fund contains a blend of Official Development Assistance funding and Non-Official 
Development Assistance resources. These programmes can fund a range of activities, from SSR 
and training to projects implemented by grassroots NGOs and civil society organisations, so long 
as they are aligned with a NSC strategy. 
2-2 

FOI2020/12929
 
2-11. The CSSF is now one of the world’s largest mechanisms for addressing conflict and 
instability
.33 Its programmes deliver against over 40 cross-Government strategies set by the NSC. 
Together, these activities help to secure the UK, promote peace and stability overseas and 
contribute directly to the NSS and SDSR’s objectives. The fund is designed as a flexible resource 
and supports peace processes for example; supporting Colombia by tackling organised crime 
(counter-narcotics) in the Caribbean, helping Ukraine to build its resilience to withstand external 
threats, funding the deployment of British personnel on UN peace support operations, and has 
supported reforming of police forces and militaries in some of the world’s most chal enging 
environments.  
 
CSSF allocation of funds 
2016/17 (£millions) 
 
•  Peacekeeping & Multilateral 
385.7 
 
•  Regional/Country Strategies 
577.8 
 
•  Security & Defence 
150 
 
•  Delivery Support, including the Stabilisation Unit & National School of  13.5 
Government International 
 
TOTAL 
1127 
 
 
Table 2-1. CSSF allocation of funds for 2016/17 totalling £1.13Bn34 
 
Relationship between Stability, Stabilisation and Stability Operations 
 
2-12. The term stabilisation has varying meanings and connotations depending on different 
perspectives within national and international communities. UK and NATO definitions vary, as 
shown in the below box. Nonetheless, the variations are minimal; both focus on the promotion of 
legitimate political authorities using integrated civilian and military actions to set the conditions for 
(but not achieve) longer term stability. Where our shared interests and values coincide, we will act 
with others using NATO doctrine as a common reference. The definition of stabilisation, therefore, 
for all UK military doctrine should be consistent with that used within Allied Joint Publication-3.4.5, 
Allied Joint Doctrine for Military Support to Stabilization and Reconstruction. The civilian definition 
is taken from HMG’s Approach to Stabilisation, dated 2014. Note that the term stabilisation in a UK 
context is equivalent to stabilization and reconstruction in a NATO context. 
 
NATO definition (military) 
UK national perspective (HMG) 
 
 
Stabilization is an approach used to 
Stabilisation is one of the approaches used in 
mitigate crisis and promote legitimate 
situations of violent conflict which is designed to 
political authority, using comprehensive 
protect and promote legitimate political authority, 
civilian and military actions to reduce 
using a combination of integrated civilian and military 
violence, re-establish security, end social, 
actions to reduce violence, re-establish security and 
economic, and political turmoil…and set 
prepare for longer-term recovery by building an 
the conditions for long-term stability.35 
enabling environment for structural stability.36 
 
 
33 It should be noted too that half (approximately £6bn per year) of DFID’s aid expenditure is now spent in unstable and 
conflict affected states, contributing directly to the NSC strategies for those countries. Note that DFID’s budget is distinct 
from the CSSF. 
34 Conflict Stability and Security Fund 2015 /16 and settlement for 2016 /17: Written statement - HCWS123 delivered by 
Ben Gummer (Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General) on 21 Jul 2016. 
35 Allied Joint Publication-3.4.5, Allied Joint Doctrine for Military Support to Stabilization and Reconstruction
36 The UK Government’s Approach to Stabilisation, dated 2014, page 1. 
2-3 

FOI2020/12929
2-13. Stabilisation is, however, not an end in itself. To bring about structural stability, stabilisation 
needs to be applied with other approaches, including longer-term state building and peacebuilding 
as described by DFID.37 The stabilisation approach is intended to provide sufficient stability to 
initiate an inclusive political settlement and begin to address the primary drivers of violent conflict. 
Stabilisation is the first step towards progress in state building and peacebuilding in very insecure 
environments.38  
 
2-14. Stability Operations. Stability operations can be described as multifunctional operations 
that encompass those military activities contributing to conflict prevention and resolution and crisis 
management, or serve humanitarian purposes, in the pursuit of strategic objectives. 
 
2-15. In a land context, stability forms the ends, the different types of stability operations the ways 
and land forces the means. 
 
HMG’s Approach to Stabilisation 
 
2-16. The UK Government’s Approach to Stabilisation complements BSOS and explains why and 
when the UK engages in stabilisation and sets out how the stabilisation approach links to other 
tools and approaches used in situations of violent conflict. 39 Stabilisation is applied in politically 
messy, violent, challenging and often non-permissive environments in which the legitimacy of the 
state and political settlement is likely to be contested, and in which other types of stability 
operations are unfeasible. The central challenge of stabilisation is to bring about some form of 
political settlement in a pressured and violent context, to create an environment where longer-term 
peacebuilding and state building processes may have a chance of success.40 JDP 05 identifies 
three pillars of stabilisation: 
 
a. 
P1 – Protect political actors, the political system and the population. The 
stabilisation approach explicitly enables the deployment of land forces to generate and 
maintain security through the application and threat of force. This may require coercive 
(military) as well as political intervention, whilst working towards addressing the causes of 
underlying tensions. This may also involve active pursuit of groups who refuse to take part in 
a non-violent political process. In some contexts, for example if the UN judges that a state is 
in breach of its international commitments or poses a threat to wider peace and security, an 
external military presence can be deployed to reduce the threats posed by unaccountable 
state security forces, whose actions can undermine a political settlement and the security of 
the population. Stabilisation is not about stopping violence and restoring the status quo, it is 
about shifting incentives, capabilities or opportunities for an inclusive political settlement to 
emerge. 
 
P1 – Likely Military Tasks 
Static protection 
of key sites and infrastructure; e.g. market places, government 
buildings, military depots, power stations, strategic bridges, 
media outlets, refugee camps, natural resources, airports, 
ports etc. 
Persistent security 
in areas secured and held; e.g. intensive patrolling and check 
points. 
Targeted action 
against adversaries; e.g. search or strike operations. 
Population control 
for example, curfews and vehicle restrictions. 
Protection of specific 
of key politicians/government functionaries, civilian 
individuals/groups 
reconstruction and stabilisation personnel (international and 
domestic), aid workers, etc. 
 
37 Building Peaceful States and Societies: a DFID practice paper, 2010, page 14. 
38 Ibid., page 36, para 86. 
39 The UK Government’s Approach to Stabilisation, dated 2014, page 1. 
40 While NATO refers to 'Stabilization and Reconstruction' operations, the UK government's position is to call this type of 
intervention Stabilisation, and to prioritise the political aspect of the challenge. 
2-4 

FOI2020/12929
Support indigenous 
both State and non-State 
security providers 
 
b. 
P2 – Promote, consolidate and strengthen political processes. The stabilisation 
approach focuses on incentivising agreements between political actors and finding workable 
alternatives to violent contest. When there is a political imperative to act, particularly to 
protect civilians, there may be insufficient knowledge or entry points to influence the political 
process in the immediate term. Failure to subsequently incentivise and support political 
processes is highly likely to undermine the chances of overall mission success. 
 
 
NATO Operation to Protect Civilians in Benghazi, Libya
 
 
While this intervention altered the balance of power, the ability of new political players, 
including the National Transitional Council was overestimated. Despite elections, a political 
settlement remained elusive and there was no monopoly on the use of force within the 
country following the end of Gadhafi’s rule. 
 
 
Activities to foster a political process will be carried out in partnership with other governments 
and multilateral partners. In some instances, comparative advantage will lie with those 
external actors who have the ability to persuade or compel local actors to come to the table. 
In other contexts, the neutral ‘good offices’ of multilateral bodies such as the UN wil  be 
sought out to facilitate. Priorities include the de-escalation of conflicts through the negotiation 
and facilitation of ceasefires, the establishment of conflict management and resolution 
structures; support for peace processes, including political outreach and negotiated 
reconciliation; and support for interim constitutional processes. 
 
P2 – Likely Military Tasks 
Provision of a secure 
for negotiations 
environment  
Protection and freedom 

for those engaging in political processes 
of movement  
Protecting sites  

where political processes take place, e.g. polling stations. 
Identifying  
interlocutors and spoilers 
Monitoring  
of ceasefires, peace agreements, etc. 
 
c. 
P3 – Preparing for longer-term recovery. At whatever stage of a crisis stability 
operations are conducted, the focus must remain on supporting political processes which are 
inclusive and robust enough to negate the need for violent contestation, and the 
corresponding emergence of legitimate political authorities. Any support to infrastructure 
repair, service delivery, economic development and other longer-term recovery objectives 
should only be conducted to the extent that they directly support these political processes 
and authorities, are based on a deep understanding of the conflict dynamics (see para 2-30), 
and incorporate planning for transition to local authorities. Conducting such activities directly 
may seem like a good way of demonstrating good will and progress, but they are unlikely to 
be sustainable in the absence of a broader political settlement, and may well prove 
counterproductive. For example, direct military delivery of essential services, infrastructure 
repair and humanitarian assistance is fraught with risk and the chances of doing harm are 
high; 
 
(1) 
Militarising humanitarian assistance can significantly undermine the 
independence, neutrality and impartiality associated with humanitarian aid that civilian 
agencies rely on for their security and access.41  
 
41 Note that the military can also suffer from association with NGOs perceived to be performing badly by local 
populations. 
2-5 

FOI2020/12929
 
(2) 
Substituting state service delivery is unsustainable and may directly undermine 
the legitimacy of the state/local authorities. 
 
(3) 
Delivering projects (including Quick Impact Projects) can frequently be 
destabilising and create divisions within and between communities, for example 
undermining the local economy through over-pricing. 
 
(4) 
Those who win contracts may well be the representatives of the corrupt 
elites/criminals/warlords/old regime who ostensibly, we aim to confront. 
 
(5) 
Institutional governance transformation takes time. 42 
 
In a stabilisation context, early engagement in the security sector is unlikely to produce 
sustainable arrangements, but it can provide time and space for a political authority to gain 
legitimacy or acceptance. Security Sector Stabilisation (SSS) helps to provide a basis for 
other stabilisation activities and a bridging activity towards longer-term recovery including 
SSR.43 SSS is also important for transforming relationships between different actors, 
particularly between different armed and unarmed groups. The process by which new 
temporary security arrangements are designed and implemented can be used to build or re-
set relationships between different groups. 
 
P3 – Likely Military Tasks 
Maintain security 
ensure freedom of movement and protection of key actors, 
locations and infrastructure to allow others to deliver 
humanitarian assistance and basic services, and create the 
space and confidence for economic activity to restart 
Support 
water, sanitation, health, power etc. 
restoration/delivery of 
essential services  
Support repair of key 

hospitals, schools, clinics, bridges, markets etc. 
infrastructure  
Support delivery of 

medical, logistic, protection 
emergency 
humanitarian assistance 

 
2-17. Stabilisation can be summarised by four key characteristics: 
 
a. 
Stabilisation is planned and implemented with an overtly political outcome in 
mind. All activities in fragile and conflict-affected states need to have a clear political 
purpose and underpinned by a shared understanding of how the planned activity is to deliver 
a shift away from the current instability. 
 
b. 
Stabilisation is an integrated, civilian led approach, which unifies effort across 
HMG. Even when there are military-led and implemented tasks, their application should 
occur in the context of an operationally civilian-led, politically engaged, stabilisation 
approach. 
 
c. 
Stabilisation is both flexible and targeted. Any support to infrastructure repair, 
service delivery, economic development and other longer term recovery objectives should 
only be conducted to the extent that they directly support political processes and authorities. 
They should be based on a deep understanding of the conflict dynamics ('conflict sensitive', 
see paragraph 2-30), and should incorporate planning for transition to local authorities. 
 
42 A mechanism for coping with all these challenges is covered under the subject of conflict sensitivity later in the 
chapter. 
43 See Security Sector Stabilisation, Stabilisation Unit, 2014. 
2-6 

FOI2020/12929
 
d. 
Stabilisation mandates will be transitory but cannot be short-term in outlook. It is 
important to ensure that opportunities to build local capacity and promote local ownership 
during stabilisation interventions are taken, given the clear advantages these will bring during 
and after transition from violent conflict. 
 
2-18. These four characteristics are reflected in the principles of stability operations for the land 
environment described in Part B, Chapter 5 of this publication. 
 
The Full Spectrum Approach and the Combined, Joint, Inter-agency, Intra-governmental and 
Multinational (CJIIM) Environment 
 
2-19. Successful strategy requires an inter-agency approach to integrate the application of the 
military, economic and diplomatic instruments of power
, at all levels of command and 
throughout the campaign. Ultimately, states resort to the use of force when diplomatic and 
economic power cannot achieve the outcome required. When military power is used, it is in 
conjunction with the other two. It is, therefore, important to understand which agencies function at 
the operational level, how they will affect the tactical level, and the impact they will have on the 
conduct of operations. The CJIIM environment includes supranational organisations, for example 
the UN; Government departments other than the MOD; national intelligence agencies; partner 
nation or other indigenous partners; NGOs; humanitarian groups; private security companies; other 
contractors; and commercial organisations. Usually, a single department will be nominated to lead 
the effort, based on the nature of the crisis or intervention. AFM Command describes how land 
forces should operate within multinational command structures and the CJIIM environment more 
broadly. 
 
2-20. The 2015 NSS and SDSR describes our UK response to crisis, conflict and instability as one 
which wil  use all the tools of national power available (diplomacy, defence, development, 
intelligence, etc.), coordinated through the NSC. It describes this variously as an ‘integrated’, 
‘whole-of-government’, and ‘full spectrum’ approach. This is complemented by our intent to 'invest 
more in our alliances, build new stronger partnerships, and persuade potential adversaries of the 
benefits of cooperation, to multiply what we can achieve alone’. In this publication we wil  use the 
term Full Spectrum Approach to describe this concept. Similarly, NATO doctrine describes a 
comprehensive approach in which military and non-military actors contribute with a shared 
purpose, based on a common sense of responsibility, openness and determination. This is 
facilitated by civil-military cooperation, which applies at the strategic, operational and tactical 
levels.  
 
2-21. Essentially the above terms describe the same method; that of the UK using the full 
spectrum of civil-military, whole-of-government, levers of power in an integrated manner in pursuit 
of a common (NSC approved) strategy, in collaboration with international al iances. It recognises 
that using the full range of knowledge, skil s and assets of government departments in a mutual y 
reinforcing manner wil  have far greater impact than departmental priorities being delivered in silos.  
 
2-22. Today, a wider array of government departments than ever before is engaged in delivering 
the UK’s Ful  Spectrum Approach to conflict and instability. Not least, this is driven by the ever 
increasing link between overseas instability and domestic UK stability (through radicalisation, 
terrorism, migration, cyber, organised crime, and threats to energy security). But for any overseas 
stability operation, the presence of these government departments at what the military terms the 
strategic, operational and tactical levels varies enormously (note that civilian departments do not 
refer to or generally recognise these levels). To understand how to best work with partners to 
deliver the Ful  Spectrum Approach, land forces need to understand this reality. 
 
2-23. On overseas operations, the key government departments in theatre tend to be the FCO 
(diplomacy/politics), MOD/British Armed Forces (defence/security) and DFID (development). 
Intelligence agencies are of course also present, and where migration, radicalisation and organised 
crime are major issues of UK concern, the Home Office and National Crime Agency are 
2-7 

FOI2020/12929
increasingly present (largely at the capital level). Regarding the three major departments, presence 
and working practices are as follows. 
 
2-24. The FCO is focused on promoting British interests overseas and works primarily at the state-
to-state level. It employs around 14,000 personnel, of which just one third are UK citizens, spread 
around 160 countries (and London). Most embassies contain only a handful – sometimes just one 
or two – UK staff, bolstered by locally employed staff. They focus on national capitals and largely 
on the formal political systems that exist within each country. Most decision-making and planning 
sits with policy makers in London, whilst ambassadors and high commissioners enact those 
decisions overseas.44 
 
2-25. DFID is focused on poverty reduction and humanitarian assistance. It has around 3,000 
personnel (about half of which are based in London). Half of its £12bn (in 2016) annual budget is 
spent in unstable and conflict-affected states. In these contexts much of its work is focused on 
building stability, as without this platform it recognises that poverty reduction is exceptionally 
difficult to achieve. Decision making in DFID is largely devolved to country level, with the DFID 
Country Head having a great deal of autonomy. DFID is primarily a funding agency (a ‘donor’), and 
hence most of its implementation is conducted through partners; IOs (such as the UN), NGOs 
(both international and national), private contractors and, where considered feasible, through host 
national governmental bodies. From a UK staff perspective, permanent presence tends therefore 
to be concentrated at the capital level. DFID has a strong network of influence and knowledge 
down to the tactical level, but this is through third parties who wil  likely have very different attitudes 
towards cooperation with UK land forces. In contested environments this ambivalence may well 
stem from a need to appear neutral, for both security and access reasons.45  
 
2-26. The MOD/British Armed Forces are focused on the use or threat of force. Of the three key 
overseas-facing departments/organisations it is by far the largest with wel  over 200,000 personnel 
(including military and civilians). It has, theoretical y, a very strong presence at the strategic, 
operational and tactical levels: in particular, the military represents the only UK department in 
which personnel are dedicated to operating at the tactical level. 
 
2-27. In terms of resources at the strategic level, therefore (Whitehall and in-country capital level), 
all relevant departments are well represented. But at the operational (sub national) and tactical 
levels in particular, the UK system struggles to resource a fluently balanced political, economic and 
security approach. The security resources (the military) are less than comfortably aligned with the 
economic/development resources (DFID’s implementing partners); and there are no formal political 
means (FCO) at this level at all. Furthermore, in terms of unity of command, at no level does the 
mechanism exist for formally subordinating personnel from one department to another. This means 
that decision-making at every level must be driven by consensus, and is why inter-departmental 
integration is won or lost in term of relationships – which is a high risk approach to C2. 
 
2-28. In some theatres (Afghanistan) we have responded to this chal enge by establishing sub 
national integrated teams (Provincial Reconstruction Teams, for example). PRTs have been the 
exception, not the rule, and it should not be assumed they wil  exist in new theatres. Another 
response has been the increasing introduction of civilian staff into military headquarters (HQs) on 
operations and exercise (Stabilisation, Humanitarian, Political, Gender, Strategic Communications, 
Cultural, and Security and Justice advisers, to name but a few). Sometimes these staff are direct 
representatives of key government departments. More usually they are experts (see para 2-32) 
with a strong working knowledge of political, economic and security dimensions of the environment 
and good links with Other Government Departments (OGDs) and international and national 
partners. 
 
2-29. Physical presence is not the only constraint to integrated working. Time horizons and 
approaches to planning are very different too. The FCO does not have a strong planning culture; 
 
44 For further info on the FCO see https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/foreign-commonwealth-office. 
45 For further info on DFID see https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-international-development.  
2-8 


FOI2020/12929
core work tends to be driven by short-term priorities driven by fast changing political realities. In 
contrast DFID tends to adopt a much longer time horizon, using multi-year programmes and 
projects to nudge what might need to be generational change. The military is the only part of the 
UK system that studies campaigning, but operational y wil  often focus on gains achievable in a six-
month deployment.  
 
2-30. At the operational and tactical level, integrated working means all personnel having a true 
understanding of: the UK’s ‘operational system’; integrated strategies and campaign plans; how 
each department operates and how to liaise effectively. For the military, one consequence of this in 
the context of stability operations may be that appropriate limits of exploitation may well need to be 
defined by non-military means. For example, if success relies on military progress being aligned 
with political and developmental input, the military may need to advance operationally at no greater 
speed than other departments (or their international and national partners) can follow.  
 
 
 
 
Figure 2-3. Key departments supporting the Full Spectrum Approach 
 
 
UK’s Humanitarian Assistance Response to the Ebola Virus Disease 
 
HMG’s humanitarian response to the Ebola Virus Disease was led by a DFID 2* supported by an 
Army 1*. The MOD deployed 750 personnel to help with the establishment of treatment centres 
and an Ebola Virus Disease Training Academy. Royal Fleet Auxiliary ARGUS was also deployed to 
provide crucial aviation support to the region enabling manoeuvre of medical teams and aid 
experts. The UK committed to delivering more than 1,400 treatment and isolation beds to combat 
the disease, protect communities and care for patients. 
 
The Training Academy achieved its mission of training over 4,000 healthcare workers, logisticians 
and hygienists including Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces and prison staff. The military had 
the capacity and resources at high readiness able to react in a timely manner, in the view of DFID: 
‘No contractor could have undertaken this role.’ Over 1600 National Health Service (NHS) staff, 
deployed to West Africa to help those affected by Ebola. Deploying NHS personnel were trained at 
the Army Medical Services Training Centre in York. 
 
The UK continues to play a leading role, particularly in Sierra Leone where, due to its strong 
bilateral links, it chose to focus its efforts as the framework nation. A $664.65 million package of 
direct support was committed to help contain, control, treat and ultimately defeat Ebola.  
2-9 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
The Stabilisation Unit46 
 
2-31. The Stabilisation Unit is an operational cross-departmental agency whose purpose is to help 
HMG respond to crises and address the causes of instability overseas. It is a uniquely integrated 
civil-military operational unit, with core staff members from ten government departments, including 
serving military and police officers. It is the Government’s centre of expertise and best practice for 
stabilisation, conflict, security and justice, and is designed to be agile, responsive and well 
equipped to operate effectively in high-threat and high-risk environments. It supports the NSC 
departments but does not take ownership of individual crises or policies. Humanitarian and 
consular crises remain the preserve of DFID and the FCO respectively. The Stabilisation Unit is 
funded by the CSSF, and is answerable to the NSC (Officials). 
 
2-32. The NSS and SDSR 2015 recognises the Stabilisation Unit’s role in supporting more 
effective cross-Government crisis response, stabilisation and conflict prevention in fragile states. In 
this capacity, the Stabilisation Unit may engage in:  
 
a. 
a rapidly evolving crisis where the NSC and Cabinet Office is driving coordination and 
the pace of activity is frenetic; 
 
b. 
an ongoing crisis where our Government’s activity, though high profile, is at a more 
normal pace or until central coordination mechanisms are established; or 
 
c. 
upstream prevention, in respect of ‘watch-list’ type countries, where there is cross-
departmental interest and the potential for focused support. 
 
2-33. The Stabilisation Unit supports the Full Spectrum Approach to stabilisation, conflict and 
instability in a number of different ways:  
 
a. 
Analysis. Supporting the Government’s analysis at a regional, national or sub-national 
level (including joint analysis of conflict and stability). 
 
b. 
Crisis planning and developing strategy. Participating in crisis planning processes 
and developing response strategies. 
 
c. 
Programme development, review and evaluation. Supporting programme 
development, scoping, review and evaluation. Where strategically important and practically 
feasible, conducting detailed programme and project design. 
 
(1) 
Technical assistance. Providing direct support to Government officials or key 
multilateral partners. This includes being the UK’s hub for international policing support 
to fragile and conflict-affected states. 
 
(2) 
Deployments. Finding the right people, with the right experience, and deploying 
them safely, with the right equipment, to the right place at the right time. 
 
d. 
Lesson learning and knowledge. Capturing, analysing and sharing across 
government evidence of what works, to inform future conflict and stabilisation planning and 
response. 
 
e. 
Training. Delivering cross-Government training on: conflict, stability and security; 
security and justice; women, peace and security; conflict sensitivity and monitoring and 
evaluation. Participate in departmental/military training courses and exercises. 
 
 
46 JDP 05, paras 3.34 to 3.38. 
2-10 

FOI2020/12929
f. 
Surge capacity. Providing surge capacity and backfilling support to departments 
working in, or on, fragile and conflict affected states. 
 
2-32. The Stabilisation Unit also controls the Civilian Stabilisation Group – a pool of over 1,000 
civilian experts drawn from the public and private sectors. The Civilian Stabilisation Group has 
experts in stabilisation, governance, rule of law, livelihoods, communications, infrastructure, public 
finance, SSR and a myriad of other critical areas who work with local partners to assist a country’s 
recovery. The Group is made up of some 800 independent consultants (deployable civilian experts 
or ‘DCEs’), as well as over 200 civil servants, from over 30 departments, across all grades. The 
Stabilisation Unit can also call on a pool of serving police officers when required. 
 
The Role of the Military 
 
2-33. The military contribution to stability will be covered in the next chapter, but an explanation of 
where it fits into the Full Spectrum Approach is prudent within the context of the Government’s 
approach.  
 
2-34. In support of NSOs and rarely on a unilateral basis, the military provides critical capabilities 
that can support stability, tackle threats at source and respond to crises overseas. Examples 
include:47 
 
a. 
Regional and International Security Cooperation. In many circumstances, instability 
within a state or region can be reduced by partner governments and regional organisations 
with limited external support from the wider international community. 
 
b. 
Counter Weapons of Mass Effect Proliferation. Instability may be the catalyst for 
weapons of mass effect technology to fall into the hands of belligerent states or armed non-
state groups. In these cases land forces may become involved in counter-proliferation 
operations. 
 
c. 
Deterrence or Containment. Instability within a state may provide a haven for non-
state actors intent on attacking the UK, its allies or its interests. 
 
d. 
Building Stability in Support of Wider State building. In some circumstances, state 
instability engages the UK’s interests or obligations to such a degree that deterrence alone 
will be ineffective. 
 
Graduated Response
  
 
2-35. This variety of roles and capabilities offers HMG choices for how to use the military 
instrument of power in support of national security objectives. The scale of military commitment 
can range from providing a solitary advisor, a single unit, an aircraft or a ship to conduct 
international security cooperation, to deploying a sizeable joint force (see Figure 2-3). The least 
intrusive form of response, consistent with achieving national objectives and policy imperatives, will 
ordinarily be the goal.  
 
 
47 JDP 05, paras 3.30 to 3.31. 
2-11 


FOI2020/12929
 
Figure 2-3. The graduated range of military commitment48 
 
Conflict Sensitivity
49 
 
Conflict sensitivity means acting with the understanding that any initiative conducted in a 
conflict-affected environment will interact with that conflict and that such interaction will have 
consequences that may have positive or negative effects
 
 
2-36. The UK recognises that international interventions in fragile and conflict-affected states, 
including those specifically targeted at addressing conflict and instability, have the potential to 
inadvertently worsen the situation or cause harmful consequences. As such, in order to maximise 
the positive impact of its engagement on conflict and stability, the UK is committed to pursuing a 
conflict sensitive approach to its interventions. Land forces’ application of Integrated Action directly 
promotes conflict sensitivity by linking understanding to actions, effects and outcomes.50 
 
2-37. Key elements of conflict sensitivity are:  
 
a. 
Understanding the context (see JDP 04); 
 
b. 
Understanding the interaction between land forces’ engagement and the context; 
 
c. 
Acting upon understanding to avoid negative impacts (risks) and maximise positive 
impacts (opportunities). 
 
2-38.  'Do No Harm' (a term commonly applied in the field of sustainable development) is the 
minimal application of conflict sensitivity, where we simply aim to identify and minimise the 
negative effects of our interventions. Wherever possible, we should be aiming for a fuller 
application of conflict sensitivity, where we equally focus on maximising our positive impacts on 
existing conflict dynamics. 
 
2-39. Interventions can inadvertently exacerbate conflict or undermine prospects for stability by, for 
example, deepening divisions between groups, creating economic dependencies, entrenching war 
economies or by supporting elites with limited popular support. This tends to happen where there is 
a lack of in depth understanding of the context, inability to adapt approaches to a rapidly-changing 
situation or failure to identify and effectively manage the trade-offs between different objectives. In 
 
48 Ibid., page 70. 
49 Stabilisation Unit, Conflict Sensitivity – Tools and Guidance
50 ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 4. 
2-12 

FOI2020/12929
the context of stability operations, we might even be conflict actors ourselves when providing 
military support with actions which can, over the short term, be inherently destabilising as we seek 
to promote stability. 
 
 
Potential Negative Impacts of Intervention 
 
Selective support reinforces or creates grievances
. Programmes where the distribution of 
assistance mirrors cleavages in a conflict (geographically, politically, and socially) can fuel 
grievances and deepen the conflict (e.g. in Nepal, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka). Conflicts between 
communities may be fuelled over locations of projects and the hiring of labourers. 
 
Elite capture, diversion of resources to particular groups. Where leaders directly benefit from 
assistance, taking credit for it, or seeking to control who benefits, inequalities and patronage can 
be reinforced and inclusivity undermined (e.g. in Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo, South 
Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Sri Lanka).  
 
Reinforcing corruption, competition over aid resources, distorting the economy. Assistance 
can reinforce corruption through multiple layers of subcontracting, or generate competition and 
conflict over aid resources, often along factional, tribal or ethnic lines. A quick increase in aid can 
generate an aid economy that distorts the local economy. (e.g. Afghanistan, Iraq, South Sudan and 
Nigeria). 
 
Supporting political processes that are not inclusive. Striking a deal may be a priority in the 
short term, but the exclusion of key groups, such as women, may enhance grievance and lay the 
foundation for future conflict (Libya, South Sudan). 
 
Working with or bypassing the state. Working through a government or military that is (or is 
perceived to be) exclusionary, corrupt, or a party to the conflict can cause resentment and 
reinforce conflict actors. Not working through state can in some contexts be equally harmful (e.g. 
Mali, Lebanon, South Sudan, Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of Congo). 
 
 
2-40. Conflict sensitivity does not mean being risk averse. Instead, it entails adopting a deliberate 
and systematic approach to ensuring policy and intervention decisions are made on the basis of a 
robust and credible analysis of the context. It involves adopting a critical lens, testing and 
challenging assumptions about how we contribute to stability, identifying key trade-offs and 
dilemmas inherent in our actions and seeking the right balance between different objectives and 
approaches, benefits and harms, and categories of risk. 
 
2-41. Women, Peace and Security. The Women, Peace and Security agenda has, in recent 
years, emphasised the contribution women can make to the stabilisation process in conflict-
affected areas. Understanding the impact of a conflict on women and girls should be part of the 
effort to be conflict sensitive. The UK Government has committed to putting 'women and girls at the 
centre of all our efforts to prevent and resolve conflict, to promote peace and stability, and to 
prevent and respond to violence against women and girls. Building equality between women and 
men in countries affected by war and conflict is at the core of the UK’s national security and that of 
the wider world - it is necessary to build lasting peace'.51  
 
2-42. This commitment stems from the international community's increasing recognition of the 
different vulnerabilities to conflict experienced by women and girls, the impact on a society's 
prospects for post-conflict recovery and long-term stability caused by all forms of sexual and 
gender-based violence (against men as well as women), and the positive role women can play in 
building sustainable peace. This was articulated in 2000 through the UN's Security Council 
Resolution 1325 on Women Peace and Security, and has subsequently been strengthened 
 
51 UK National Action Plan on Women Peace and Security, 2014-2017. 
2-13 

FOI2020/12929
through many additional resolutions. The UK's National Action Plan for implementing our 
commitments related to this agenda includes many commitments specific to the military. But in 
parallel to these formal commitments, there is also a growing recognition across NATO, the UN, 
and the British military that adopting a gendered lens on stability operations can directly improve 
our operational effectiveness. It can improve our understanding of the context, our intelligence and 
our force protection, and impact directly on how we interpret our mandate and translate this into 
action at the strategic, operational and tactical levels. Annex A to Chapter 10 provides more detail 
on this agenda. 
 
2-14 

FOI2020/12929
Chapter 3. The UK Military Approach 
 
3-01. This chapter identifies 
The UK Military Approach 
doctrine that enables land forces 
•  UK Defence Doctrine 
to conduct stability operations and 
•  Defence Joint Operating Concept 
contribute to HMG’s strategic 
•  JDP 05 – Shaping a Stable World: the Military Contribution 
objectives (see stability operations 
•  ADP Land Operations  
doctrine hierarchy, page iv). 
•  Operations themes and types of operation 
 
•  Integrated Action 
UK Defence Doctrine52 
 
 
3-02. Conforming to the 2015 NSS and SDSR, UK Defence Doctrine outlines the broad philosophy 
and principles underpinning how Defence is employed, and is the foundation from which all other 
national doctrine is derived. 
 
3-03. It outlines the shape of the military instrument, it reinforces the combined, joint, inter-agency, 
intra-governmental and multinational (CJIIM) character of most operations and highlights the 
significance of Campaign Authority.53 
 
Defence Joint Operating Concept  
 
3-04. The Defence Joint Operating Concept (DJOC) provides the high-level vision and unifying 
conceptual thinking to help develop and employ the Armed Forces effectively in support of national 
policy and strategy; it will shape the next iteration of UK Defence Doctrine. It focuses on resetting 
them for engagement, deterrence and contingency. In the short term it provides a conceptual 
framework for the International Defence Engagement Strategy (IDES).54 
 
3-05. The DJOC emphasises that the Armed Forces must retain their warfighting excellence as 
the foundation for credibility and utility
. But must also be better able to contribute to the NSS 
and SDSR 
through actions short of war. This, amongst other ways, will be achieved by building 
partners’ capacity to tackle emergent threats at source and dissuading potential adversaries from 
pursuing undesirable courses of action. 
 
3-06. This resetting is achieved by introducing the concept of the Engaged Force to deliver the 
required increase in strategic understanding and the intended broader contribution to the NSS and 
SDSR
. These are forces forward engaged overseas to understand and shape the strategic context 
and operating environment. Alongside the Committed Force, they deliver the IDES and provide the 
strategic orientation required by the Responsive Force (i.e. Joint Expeditionary Force) to be 
appropriately configured.  
 
JDP 05 Shaping a Stable World: the Military Contribution 
 
3-07. The purpose of JDP 05, Shaping a Stable World: the Military Contribution is to provide 
context and guidance on how, and why, the military instrument of power can be used in support of 
national strategies for addressing instability, crisis and conflict overseas.55 
 
3-08. It explains how the military contributes to the core components of stabilisation described in 
The UK Government’s Approach to Stabilisation, providing the context for stability activities as a 
subset of tactical activities (see Figure 3-1 ). 
 
3-09. JDP 05 outlines how the UK seeks to help shape a more stable world as part of our national 
strategy and examines the military role within this. The publication recognises the deliberate shift 
 
52 JDP 0-01, UK Defence Doctrine, dated Nov 2014. 
53 Ibid, para 2.65. 
54 Joint Concept Note 1/14, Defence Joint Operating Concept, dated Mar 14, para 1. 
55 JDP 05, para 1. 
3-1 
 

FOI2020/12929
away from recent campaigns towards a more forward leaning and engaging approach. The need 
for cross-Government cooperation and understanding as part of the Full Spectrum Approach is 
fundamental. 
 
3-10. JDP 05 was developed concurrently with several new doctrinal and other, related Joint 
publications. In 2018, JDP 05 will be reviewed, consolidated and merged with a number of related 
Joint Doctrine Notes (JDNs). The primary focus of JDP 05 remains stabilisation (responding to 
situations of conflict and instability) but also considers the wider subject of stability. 
 
3-11. A variety of stakeholders were consulted in the publication including the FCO, DFID, the 
MOD and the Stabilisation Unit. It is important to understand, however, that JDP 05 is principally a 
military publication intended for a military audience. It is both consistent and coherent with the 
position of other stakeholders and, in particular, with The UK Government’s Approach to 
Stabilisation
 produced by the Stabilisation Unit. 
 
ADP Land Operations 2017 
 
3-12. ADP Land Operations builds on the foundations laid by UK Defence Doctrine to provide the 
philosophy and principles for the British Army’s approach to operations. As ‘capstone’ doctrine it 
provides an overview and a framework for understanding, which reinforced by this publication, 
establishes the doctrine for land forces delivering stability activity. 
 
3-13. The document outlines the NATO codification of operations themes, types of operation and 
tactical activities. This enhances and aids interoperability with allies and aiding understanding of 
the mosaic of conflict. Those relevant to land operations are shown in Figure 3-1 and will be 
expanded upon in Parts B and C. 
 
Operations Themes and Types of Operation 
 
3-14. Operations may be assigned or described in terms of particular contextual themes. These 
operations themes allow the general conditions of the operating environment to be understood, 
informing the intellectual approach, resources available (including force levels, rules of 
engagement (ROE) and force protection measures), likely activities required and levels of political 
appetite and risk. There are four themes, aligned to the functions of land power: warfighting
securitypeace support and DE.56 These themes provide a framework for understanding, in 
general terms, the context and dynamics of a conflict. A theme may be set at the strategic level and 
forms part of the narrative for operations, but this wil  not necessarily happen. As a conflict evolves, 
the thematic designation may change. It is important for the operational and strategic levels of 
command, informed by tactical commanders, to anticipate the need for any change. Within a single 
operations theme more than one type of operation wil  often occur simultaneously.  
 
 
56 AJP-01. Note that UK doctrine refers to DE which is largely the same as NATO doctrine’s description of peacetime 
military engagement
, but is not constrained to peacetime situations. United States doctrine use the term ‘security 
cooperation’. 
3-2 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
Figure 3-1. Operations themes, types of operation and tactical activities 
 
3-15. Within the operations themes, certain types of operation exist. They are not mutually 
exclusive and are often concurrent with other types of operation within the mosaic of conflict. As 
doctrinal definitions, they are neither designed nor do they necessarily correspond to UK Defence 
planning tools or assumptions.57 Rather, they aid analysis and articulation of complex missions and 
provide the essential gearing required to sequence a series of tactical activities to achieve 
operational objectives. Note that unlike NATO doctrine, ADP Land Operations includes an 
additional, discrete type of operation described as capacity building. Types of operation and 
operations themes are covered in more detail in Part B. 
3-16. Within all types of operation, land forces conduct all or some of a range of tactical 
activities
, often concurrently. The balance between the different activities varies from one 
operation to another over time. The four stability activities are described in Part C. 
Integrated Action 
 
3-17. Integrated Action describes how land forces orchestrate and execute operations in an 
interconnected world, where the consequences of military action are judged by an audience that 
extends from immediate participants to distant observers. Integrated Action requires commanders 
and staff to be clear about the outcome that they are seeking and to analyse the audience relevant 
to the attainment of their objectives. They then identify the effects that they wish to impart on that 
audience to achieve the outcome, and what capabilities and actions are available. These lethal and 
non-lethal capabilities may belong to the land force itself, or to joint, intergovernmental, inter-
agency, non-governmental, private sector and multinational actors involved in the operation. What 
is important is for commanders and staff to work out how to synchronise and orchestrate all the 
relevant actions to impart effects onto the audience to achieve the outcome.  
 
3-18. Where stability operations are concerned, land forces face the challenge of identifying all 
actors affecting the path to stability. Identifying the correct actions and effects to promote stability is 
dependent on creating a network of understanding within the operating environment.58 This can be 
 
57 ADP Land Operations 2017, para 2-16. 
58 JDP 04 – Understanding and Decision Making
3-3 
 

FOI2020/12929
achieved through the intelligent application of tools and resources and a careful approach to the 
allocation of supporting and supported roles. 
 
3-19. Throughout the phases of combat we understand the roles and hierarchy of the levers of 
Integrated Action and the capabilities to employ and orchestrate them are, largely, available to the 
Division. In stability operations it is more likely that information activity and capacity building will 
have greater primacy and that the capabilities will be available at lower levels of command.  
 
Consequence Management 
 
3-20. Consequence management is a process by which a headquarters plans for, and reacts to, 
the consequences of incidents and events which have a direct physical and psychological effect on 
people [audiences]. Headquarters must consider consequence management throughout the 
planning process and execution of operations. In the context of Integrated Action, consequence 
management provides a reactive mechanism to maintain progress towards desired outcomes 
following incidents. 59 
 
 
 
 
59 See ADP Land Operations, Chapter 9, Annex A – Understanding Risk. 
3-4 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 4. Combat and Stability Operations  
 
The Application and Threat of Force 
Combat and Stability Operations 
 
•  The application and threat of force 
4-01. The primary role of land forces is to fight and 
•  Combat 
therefore delivering lethal force is the purpose for which 
•  Stability operations 
they should be most prepared. Campaigns and operations, 
•  Operating environment 
however, generally rely on more than simply combating the 
enemy to be successful. While land forces can contribute 
to successful conflict resolution through the application of force or the threat of it, they must also be 
prepared to support non-lethal civilian-led initiatives. This can be achieved by supporting the Full 
Spectrum Approach, combining the three instruments of national power; diplomatic, economic and 
the military. 
 
Combat 
 
4-02. Combat cannot be considered in isolation from the other types of operation. It is vital, when 
preparing for combat, to consider how it might impact on other, perhaps subsequent, activities. It is 
also important that the build-up to combat does not gain unstoppable momentum. Conflict 
prevention, for example, through deterrence, is usually preferable to the consequences of 
committing to battle. Nonetheless, a force will only deter if it is militarily credible and this means 
being capable of combat. Combat occurs, or is liable to occur, in most of the operations described 
below. It is the intensity of the combat that varies. Intensity can be measured in terms of scale (size 
and numbers), longevity, rates of consumption and degrees of violence and damage. 60 
 
Stability Operations 
 
4-03. Stability operations may be conducted prior to, after, or during combat, supporting the ends 
of stability. While the military instrument may lead in combat operations, albeit within the Full 
Spectrum Approach, in stability operations the military instrument is typically a supporting element. 
This distinction is reflected in the principles of stability operations.61 These apply to all land stability 
operations, the balance of emphasis reflecting the nature of the specific task. While combat 
operations are largely enemy-centric, stability operations tend to involve the influencing of a wider 
range of actors. 
 
4-04. Given the significant complexity and challenges involved during stability operations, land 
forces often play a crucial role because they possess unique capabilities and capacities designed 
for such environments. Their key function is to provide a safe and secure environment for other 
actors to operate within. When other actors are unable to operate due to non-permissive 
environment it falls to the land forces to consider the broader aspects of stability activities. 
 
4-05. In stability operations the military should generally be employed in a supporting role, helping 
to resolve a violent chal enge to peaceful politics, usually by providing security. Most of the Army’s 
operations since 1945 have been stability operations, ranging from capacity building through UN 
peacekeeping to complex counter-insurgency (COIN). In higher-intensity stabilisation campaigns, 
although enemy force elements are small, for some force elements combat may be more or less 
continuous, and sometimes intense. Doctrinally, the use of force against adversaries in stability 
operations intends to gain and maintain, and deny the enemy, popular support.  
 
Operating Environment 
 
4-06. The nature and character of conflict are different. The fundamental nature of conflict does not 
change; it is adversarial, human and political. The character of conflict changes continuously, as a 
consequence of a number of factors, including the politics and technology of the age, and each 
 
60 ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 8, Annex C. 
61 These are the same as joint doctrine’s stabilisation security principles, with minor differences in wording to reflect the 
requirements of land operations See JDP 05, Shaping a Stable World.  
4-1 

FOI2020/12929
 
conflict’s unique causes, participants, technology and geography. When the UK is a participant, our 
particular political, economic, geographic and historical position becomes a factor in the character 
of the conflict that we experience. A single description of the character of contemporary conflict is 
not possible due to the variations described. Nonetheless, success on stability operations is 
dependent on understanding the factors that influence the conflict’s character and their 
implications. Parts 1-5 to this AFM provide guidance of the characteristics of the operating 
environment in which the different types of stability operations occur. 
 
4-07. Although land forces are inherently versatile, they must be adaptable to deal with new and 
changing situations. Future conflict cannot be predicted accurately, so land forces must prepare for 
the most complex and demanding operations but be able to adapt rapidly to specific operational 
requirements. Having adjusted to deal with the new situation, the force must adapt during conflict. 
Adversaries and enemies seek to deceive and surprise us, and themselves adapt: if we are to 
succeed we must adapt more quickly than they do. 
 
4-2 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
PART B – FUNDAMENTALS OF STABILITY OPERATIONS 
Introduction 
Part A – Context 
Delivering stability 
B-01. Part B provides the fundamentals of stability operations. The 
The Government approach 
ten principles of stability operations are covered in detail in Chapter 
The UK military approach 
5. In Chapter 6 the four operations themes, warfighting, security, 
Combat and stability operations 
peace support and DE are described from a stability perspective. 
Chapter 7 gives an overview of the types of stability operations 
Part B – Fundamentals of 
which are not mutually exclusive and are often executed 
Stability Operations 
►  Principles of stability operations  
concurrently with other types of operation within the mosaic of 
►  Operations themes and stability 
conflict.  
►  Types of operation 
 
Part C – Delivery 
Operating environment 
Stability activities 
Orchestrating and executing 
stability operations 
 
B-1 




FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 5. Principles of Stability Operations 
Introduction 
Principles of Stability Operations 
5-01. The principles of war constitute the fundamental basis 
for military activity and doctrine. They are pre

Introduction 
-eminent and 

apply across all campaigns and operations. The principles of 
Principles of War  

stability operations provide additional guidance to promote 
Principles of Stability Operations 
the ends of stability.62 The two sets of principles are not 
exclusive and wil  often be applied concurrently, across the operations themes, types of operation 
and tactical activities. 
 
Principles of War
  
 
5-02. The principles of war are listed below. With the exception of the master principle, which is 
placed first, the relative importance of each principle may vary according to context; their 
application according to judgement, common sense and intelligent interpretation: 
 
a. 
Selection and maintenance of the aim. 
 
b. 
Maintenance of morale. 
 
c. 
Offensive action. 
 
d. 
Security. 
 
e. 
Surprise. 
 
f. 
Concentration of force. 
 
g. 
Economy of effort. 
 
h. 
Flexibility. 
 
i. 
Cooperation. 
 
j. 
Sustainability. 
 
Principles of Stability Operations 
 
5-03. In enemy-centric combat operations the military is likely to be the supported element. The 
principles listed below provide a guide for understanding the supporting, population-centric role of 
the military when conducting stability operations.63 Note that at all times the primacy of political 
purpose provides the context for activity. 
 
a. 
Primacy of political purpose. 
 
b. 
Unity of effort. 
 
c. 
Understand the context. 
 
d. 
Foster partner nation governance and capacity. 
 
e. 
Prepare for the long term. 
 
62 ADP Land Operations 2017, pages 8C-5/6. 
63 Note that this role aligns with the support and engage functions of land power. 
5-1 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
f. 
Provide security for the population. 
 
g. 
Neutralise adversaries. 
 
h. 
Gain and maintain popular support. 
 
i. 
Anticipate, learn and adapt. 
 
j. 
Operate in accordance with the law. 
 
5-04. Primacy of Political Purpose. This principle informs all others and dictates the desired 
outcome, planning and conduct of the campaign. Military actions must always be subordinate to 
and aligned with the overall inter-agency, politically-led campaign. The political authority, which 
may be a UN Special Representative to the Security General, another international appointee or 
the partner nation government, wil  usually have overall responsibility for military operations. 
Depending on the operation, lower level representatives of the authority may play an important role 
in operations, even to the point of authorising military action. From a UK perspective, the in-theatre 
political lead is likely to be the ambassador or High Commissioner. The relationship between the 
UK political lead and the in-theatre military commander is therefore crucial, and can have a major 
impact on mission success. 
 
5-05. Primacy of political purpose necessitates that all tactical actions are aligned with the desired 
political end state. This is achieved by land forces understanding the context, maximising the 
benefits of unity of effort and preparing for the long term. In both combat and stability 
operations, land forces operate in support of legitimate political objectives. The campaign plan wil  
be rooted in the political narrative and as such should be at the forefront of the commander’s 
planning, implementation and assessment efforts, noting political direction can change course. 
Land forces are guided by political processes by means of the Ful  Spectrum Approach.  
 
5-06. While a campaign plan maps the critical path, conflicting pressures and the daily frictions of 
operating at the tactical level wil  be significant and should not be underestimated. Stability 
activities may meet their military objectives but if they are conducted in isolation and at odds with 
political objectives, the results may be counter-productive.  
 
5-07. Unity of Effort. Al  agencies, military and civilian, international and partner nation must be 
encouraged to co-operate if stability is to be successfully achieved. In a military context, the latter 
provides the desired outcome for Integrated Action. The need to cooperate means that within the 
security line of operations, the activities of the other actors, particularly those with intelligence and 
security responsibilities, should be coordinated down to at least unit level. Coterminous military, 
police and government boundaries, with cooperation committees at each level of authority, are 
commonly used to achieve unity of effort. From a UK perspective, the in-theatre political lead is 
likely to be the Ambassador or High Commissioner. The relationship between this UK political lead 
and the in-theatre military commander is therefore crucial, and can have a major impact on mission 
success. 
 
5-08. Unity of effort reinforces the primacy of political purpose and supports prepare for the 
long term
 principles. Stability activities are characterised by their cross-Government and inter-
agency nature but relationships between organisations have no agreed template. The unity of 
command experienced in warfighting is unlikely to pervade in stability missions. If the organisations 
operating within the CJIIM environment achieve unity of effort, their collective progression 
towards the desired political end-state stands a greater chance of success.  
 
5-09. Coherence in planning resulting from Integrated Action at both operational and tactical levels 
offers a number of advantages: effective analysis and shared understanding of a situation; 
deployment of national resources (including civilian expertise) and focused use of military 
resources.  
5-2 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
5-10. Stability operations wil  therefore provide extra challenges to the tactical commander as 
disparate organisations with a variety of philosophies, motivations and cultures operate in the 
same battlespace. Unity of effort seeks to corral this expertise and ensures all efforts and activity 
work toward a common end. While a commander may wish to coordinate these efforts, some 
organisations may be reluctant to comply with the military for reasons of impartiality and force 
protection. Uncoordinated activity and disagreement wil  present structural and conceptual gaps – 
opportunities adversaries wil  exploit. 
 
5-11. Understand the Context. To ensure that the military campaign, operations and tactical 
activities are consistent with the political purpose, the historical, regional and political context of the 
situation must be understood. Without an adequate understanding of the physical, threat, human 
and information environments land forces wil  be unable to influence effectively the relevant 
audiences, actors, adversaries and enemies (A3E). Understanding, and the intelligence networks 
and cultural expertise that underpin it, has to be built over time, and involve significant cooperation 
with other agencies. Understanding the gender relations at play in the operating environment 
(relative power and influence of women and men, both formal and informal, and vulnerabilities) is 
becoming an increasing focus for NATO and UN militaries, as we increasingly recognise how such 
understanding can improve our operational effectiveness. 
 
5-12. Contributions to wider political, security and economic development activity wil  be grounded 
in our understanding of the context, underpinning our Integrated Action. To influence actors’ 
behaviour we must first understand their motivations. There are clear operational imperatives to 
understanding the physical terrain (manoeuvre) and the enemy (application of force) in a 
warfighting context. In stability operations the need to understand the broad range of actors 
affecting stability is equal y vital. 
 
5-13. Any opportunity to immerse in relationship-building should be exploited.64 Once deployed, the 
engage function of land power wil  promote a firm knowledge and understanding of the context. 
This is a continuous collection process managed and integrated in the same way 
information/intelligence is maintained on the adversary. Deployed units, commanders and staff 
officers wil  become more adept at understanding the broad and complex nuances of sociology, 
regional influences, geography, local politics, local economic pressures and language.  
 
5-14. Engaging with key local leaders, tribal or societal groups wil  foster good relations, avoid 
misunderstandings and reduce the consequences of conflict amongst the people. Accessing the 
knowledge and influence of women must not be overlooked (they generally constitute 50% of the 
population), and may require additional approaches to harness, such as the use of engagement 
teams. At the tactical level it is likely there wil  be more opportunities to collect information on the 
population in which we operate than an adversary who may wish to remain covert. Both groups 
must be understood and this should not be left to ‘cultural specialists’. Understanding the context is 
every soldier’s responsibility. Partner nation security forces and the population wil  also need to 
understand British soldiers and build positive relationships. This may be over short periods of 
deployment and under stressful conditions.  
 
5-15. Foster Partner Nation Governance and Capacity. The force must help to develop the 
partner nation’s ability to govern effectively, as demanded by the campaign plan. In the security 
sector this is likely to include the capability needed to conduct effective and appropriate security 
and stability operations. 
 
5-16. Governments function by maintaining their monopoly on the use of force. In fragile states this 
authority may be eroded or non-existent in the eyes of partner nation audience. To develop 
governance capacity, commanders and soldiers must first understand the context. Fostering 
partner nation governance and capacity wil  also mean providing security for the population and 
gaining and maintaining popular support. Governance is undermined by the perception or reality of 
 
64 Examples include upstream capacity building activity, DE or pre-deployment reconnaissance. 
5-3 

FOI2020/12929
 
corruption, greed, incompetence, bias disregard for the rule of law and disenfranchisement.65 
Therefore, one aim of a campaign should be to foster indigenous authority and capacity, through 
military and other capacity building, economic support and diplomatic activities. 
 
5-17. The approach commanders and soldiers take to foster authority and build indigenous 
capacity is vital to success. Indeed, campaign authority is dependent on it. Opportunities and 
activity wil  range across the stability activities (see Part C). At all times, commanders should seek 
sustainable local solutions to issues affecting stability. Information activities should convey the 
growing capacity of partner nation organisations, building legitimacy and authority for the partner 
nation government. Cultural differences and attitudes towards local methods should not be allowed 
to fester but understood and accommodated. Corruption or behaviour which threatens the authority 
of the partner nation (such as sexual violence conducted by its armed forces) should be actively 
discouraged. The approach should therefore be honest but firm with every opportunity taken to 
connect the audience to the legitimate government.  
 
5-18. Prepare for the Long Term. Attaining stability in conflict-affected states is likely to be a slow 
and difficult process. Planning must be objective and long-term in outlook based on a thorough 
understanding of the operating environment. Following combat operations, land forces may only be 
permitted to conduct stability operations for a short period. Enemies and adversaries may exploit 
this weakness by emphasising their own enduring presence. Not all deployments are preceded by 
a crisis or combat operations. Part 5 to this AFM describes how security capacity building (a part of 
DE) can provide persistent engagement in support of long-term SSR projects and stability. 
 
5-19. In a security context, given the limited duration of interventions, land forces must aim to 
support developments on which successor international and partner nation authorities and forces 
can build. At the tactical level, this can be enabled through the development of effective 
relationships with actors supporting long-term stability, especially partner nation personnel. The 
disruptive effect of limited operational tour lengths should be overcome through well constructed 
handover plans, staggered postings and, where possible, continuity staff. 
 
5-20. Provide Security for the Population. The first duty of any government is to provide security, 
including human security, for its people. Where the partner nation is unable or unwil ing to protect 
the population, land forces may be called upon to intervene as part of the Ful  Spectrum Approach. 
If not, enemies and adversaries can exploit this weakness for their own ends. 
 
5-21.  Typically, land forces can deliver security through security and control activities (short-term) 
and through support to SSR (longer-term). Land forces support to the restoration of essential 
services and interim governance wil  also benefit the security of the population, albeit less directly. 
In the context of Integrated Action, actions taken to improve security, and their effects, have the 
potential to influence the behaviour of the population for the better, reducing the influence of 
enemies and adversaries. In turn, enhanced security is likely to improve the prospects for long-
term stability. Selecting the correct security actions and effects relies entirely on gaining a thorough 
understanding of the population (see JDP 04: Understanding). 
 
5-22. Neutralise Adversaries. The neutralisation of adversaries, and their supporters, can occur 
in a number of ways including deterrence, defeat, dispersal, disarmament or absorption into 
legitimate security forces, political movements and society. Armed forces play a significant role in 
neutralising adversaries. Depending on the circumstances this can include combined arms 
manoeuvre operations, raids, patrols, searches, precision attacks and through a contribution to 
demobilisation, disarmament, and reintegration (DDR) efforts. To be effective and to avoid 
undermining the security of the population, the military contribution to the neutralisation of 
adversaries requires considerable understanding of the operating environment, including accurate, 
actionable intelligence. 
 
5-23. The principles of understand the context and anticipate, learn and adapt guide us in 
undermining adversaries and weakening their resolve. Neutralisation then paves the way for 
 
65 Note that corruption may be part of the fabric of some societies. 
5-4 

FOI2020/12929
 
maintaining popular support, providing space to develop partner nation security forces. This may 
ultimately lead to the transition of security responsibility to partner nation government structures. 
History suggests security cannot be achieved solely through the presence of military forces. The 
stability activities do not focus on the destruction of the enemy. Set in the context of Integrated 
Action, their collective pressure (over time) aims to isolate and neutralise enemies and adversaries 
who prevent us from achieving our mission, giving space for political processes that may 
incorporate them. 
 
5-24. While significant combat operations may take place in the physical domain, we may see a 
powerful contest for domination of the information environment. The adversary wil  employ 
information activity in a similar way to land forces in order to influence the behaviour of the 
population. The extensive use of social media sites to attract recruits, publicise events and 
dissipate their message across international boundaries is one example. The adversary must not 
be allowed to gain legitimacy in the eyes of the population. The military force wil  therefore be 
required to kill or capture those individuals who cannot be reconciled and neutralise the remainder 
such that they become irrelevant (attack the network). There must be no safe havens or locations 
where the adversary can prepare and regenerate fighting power. In the context of insurgency, safe 
havens often exist across international boundaries and may be difficult for the tactical commander 
to influence from within his own resources. Armed forces must operate in accordance with the law 
and the upmost care taken not to be drawn into actions which may be counterproductive or 
undermine the credibility of the mission.  
 
5-25. Gain and Maintain Popular Support. In stability operations, the state, its security forces 
and intervening external actors (civil and military) are in competition with adversaries for the 
support of the people. The side that succeeds in gaining the support of the people, and denies that 
support to the other side, is likely to win in the long term. Gaining and maintaining support depends 
in part on providing security, but it also depends significantly on the day-to-day conduct of the 
authorities, their security forces and international partners, and their impact on people's daily lives. 
 
5-26. The application of this principle is made possible by understanding and providing security for 
the population. Nonetheless, security by itself is not enough to make the population support its 
government. The simplest way military units can lose popular support is by operating outside the 
law. Any erosion of legitimacy for the mission is damaging, be that caused by collateral damage, 
maltreatment of prisoners, or sexual exploitation. At best, the loss of support may be irreversible 
but in the worst instance it can serve as motivation to armed adversaries.  
 
5-27. On entry to theatre, land forces may not be popular, credible or particularly well understood. 
Those actors it wishes to influence such as the population, partner nation security forces, key 
leaders and reconcilable adversaries must be given the opportunity to assess our actions and 
motivations in a positive way. Information activities wil  underpin this effort by imparting an effective 
narrative which appeals to the population. But in the end, in stability operations it is our daily 
conduct which must remain exemplary. With the power of social media, misdemeanours by 
individual soldiers can have a profound effect on our wider legitimacy in the eyes of the population, 
but also in the eyes of the international community and our domestic audience at home. On 
stability operations, every soldier is an ambassador as well as a soldier. 
 
5-28. While the land force commander’s approach may be to ‘under-promise and over-deliver’ in 
the initial stages of a mission, the pace of transition demands support for the partner nation 
security forces. It is this popular support that generates consent amongst the population and 
support for the narrative. With positive momentum commanders can expect spins-offs such as a 
flow of actionable intelligence, increased recruiting for the partner nation security forces, reduced 
violence and a rising acceptance of a legitimate government.  
 
5-29. No operation is without unexpected or negative incidents. In these instances commanders 
must attempt to mitigate the loss of popular support by employing rehearsed and credible 
consequence management procedures which must include expeditious information activity. While 
the definition of this principle has focused on in-theatre support, tactical actions have the potential 
5-5 


FOI2020/12929
 
to adversely impact on popular support at home. There is potential scope for conflict between 
national security priorities and maintaining public support for operations that require sustained 
effort over a protracted period. This is often the case in peace support or counter insurgency 
operations. The longer such an operation endures the more information activities remain on the 
crucial path. 
 
5-30. Anticipate, Learn and Adapt. The effective force improves all aspects of its performance 
throughout the campaign. This requires formal systems to look for new ways of doing things, and 
learn lessons from effective and ineffective practice. The ideas and lessons must be disseminated 
to benefit the whole force, which requires the capacity to adjust doctrine, training, equipment and 
other aspects of capability. The Operations Process supports this effort (see AFM Command). 
 
 
Figure 5-1. The Operations Process 
 
5-31. Land forces’ ability to react to dynamic threats and emerging tactics of our adversaries is 
underpinned by understanding. To successfully neutralise those individuals or groups who oppose 
the mission requires a mind-set that is prepared to question, inquire and review all tactical actions. 
At the operational level a campaign plan wil  identify key decision points and risks to the operation. 
It wil  establish the critical information needed to inform progress and robust measures of 
performance (MOP) and measures of effectiveness (MOE).66 This flow of information to 
commanders allows the combined force to adapt (at the operational level) to changing 
circumstances. Deployed civilian support from Operational Analysts (OAs) and Scientific Advisors 
(SCIADs) reinforces our ability to accurately identify ‘success and risk’. The process is entirely 
scalable and applicable at the tactical level and reflects human nature to assess what works and 
where a change of approach is required. Subconsciously or through more formalised processes 
our adversaries wil  be reviewing their own actions and take every opportunity to reinforce success 
and capitalise on our mistakes; their survival depends upon it.  
 
5-32. Anticipation at all levels inculcates a culture of initiative and provides the time and space to 
operate one step ahead of our adversaries. We wil  not always outwit our enemies but the speed at 
which UK and partner nation forces change their behaviour to mitigate threats wil  help maintain 
the pace of transition and progress towards the desired political end state. Types of stability 
operation such as counter-irregular activities, demand we constantly review and capture the 
lessons identified then refine our training and education both at the tactical level (adapting TTPs) 
through to force generation (individual and collective mission-specific training events). Anticipate, 
learn and adapt is command-led but all soldiers must be actively engaged.  
 
 
 
 
66 Other Government Departments may use the term ‘Monitoring and Evaluation’. 
5-6 

FOI2020/12929
 
5-33. Operate in Accordance with the Law. The armed forces and the other agencies involved in 
stability operations must abide by the law and be seen to do so. This is more than a matter of the 
standing requirement to act lawfully. As the armed forces of a country which adheres strictly to the 
rule of law, our moral authority to intervene and conduct stability operations depends on our lawful 
conduct: it is about our integrity. This also applies to any alliance or coalition we are part of, and 
the partner nation. It is a critical aspect of gaining and maintaining popular support, and of 
undermining any perceived legitimacy of adversaries. It is often the case that adversaries commit 
serious crimes and therefore our lawful conduct sets us apart. If members of the security forces are 
accused of breaking the law, legitimacy is maintained by visible and effective investigations and 
where necessary, prosecutions. In the end, cover-ups destroy legitimacy. 
 
5-34. It should be self-evident that professional, well-trained and wel -led armed forces must 
operate in accordance with the law. Operating outside international, national or partner nation law 
wil  lose us popular support, eroding the chances of stability. Operating in accordance with the law 
not only fosters the rule of law, which is an important end in itself, but it is a crucial part of 
maintaining legitimacy of the partner government and of the security forces. Land forces may find 
themselves operating with coalition partners and/or other allies, including partner nation security 
forces. Combining the military capabilities of different nations brings depth, breadth and legitimacy 
to a military force. It also generates complexity and frictions associated with interoperability. The 
difference in interpretation of national law is one example which must be overcome. For 
multinational operations or ad hoc coalitions, national caveats are usually declared reflecting the 
law and policy of each respective nation in areas such as the interpretation and application of ROE 
for offensive force, targeting and detention.  
 
5-35. The application of coalition or combined force fighting power wil  generate specific legal 
considerations for tactical commanders. Particular laws and practices may be at odds with our 
own. Where, for example, partner nation security actors are known to abuse or torture detainees 
then UK land forces may be unwil ing to transfer detainees in their custody until political agreement 
and assurances are made. There have been instances in the recent past where it was alleged and 
occasionally subsequently proven that British forces broke the law. Irrespective of whether the 
allegations are proven or not, the consequences of the allegations or crimes have major 
implications for the conduct of the campaign and the overall reputation and standing of the UK. No 
matter what tactical circumstances a soldier or commander may find themselves in, expediency is 
not an excuse to operate outside the law.  
 
 
5-7 




FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 6. Operations Themes and Stability  
Introduction 
6-01. Operations may be assigned or described in terms of 
Operations Themes and Stability 
particular contextual themes. These operations themes allow 

Introduction 
the general conditions of the operating environment to be 

Warfighting 
understood, informing the intellectual approach, resources 

Security 
available (including force levels, rules of engagement and 

Peace support 
force protection measures), likely activities required and levels 

Defence engagement 
of political appetite and risk. There are four themes, aligned to 
 
the functions of land power: warfighting, security, peace support and DE. Ultimately, the 
purpose of all these themes is to promote stability benefiting the UK (see Figure 3-1). 
 
6-02. The themes provide a framework for understanding the context and dynamics of a 
conflict. A theme may be set at the strategic level and form part of the narrative for operations, 
but this will not necessarily happen. As a conflict evolves, the thematic designa tion may 
change. It is important for the operational and strategic levels of command, informed by 
tactical commanders, to anticipate the need for any change. Within a single operations theme 
more than one type of operation will often occur simultaneously.67 
 
Warfighting 
 
6-03. In warfighting (also referred to as major combat operations), most of the activity is directed 
against a significant form of armed aggression perpetrated by large-scale military forces belonging 
to one or more states or to a well-organised and resourced non-state actor. These forces engage 
in combat operations in a series of battles and engagements at high intensity, varying in frequency 
and scale of forces involved. The immediate goal is to ensure freedom of action at the expense of 
their opponents. The rhythm of operations is often high with high logistics consumption. Enemy 
armed forces may also use irregular and CBRN capabilities to support conventional forces’ military 
objectives. Operating in a context where warfighting is the predominant theme may be further 
exacerbated, perpetuated or exploited by irregular actors seeking to benefit from instability, 
whether through insurgency, terrorism, criminality or disorder. These themes are collectively known 
as irregular activities. 
 
Security 
6-04. The transition from combat operations to multi-agency stability operations (to re-establish 
stability and prosperity, underpinned by the rule of law) is important to establish a perception of 
security.68 It is likely to be characterised not by the attainment of specific end states (such as 
absolute victory) but by incremental conditions-based outcomes (albeit they may reflect political 
direction to achieve particular goals according to a rough timetable). The mix of actors, and their 
respective motivations, wil  be highly dynamic. Conventional opponents, even once defeated, may 
re-appear as or be reinforced by irregular forces; the threat they pose may need to be countered at 
the same time as re-establishing legitimate indigenous governance and authority. Pursuing the 
gradual transition towards stability, land forces are likely to support the activities of other actors in 
protecting, strengthening and restoring civil society, governance, rule of law and the economy. 
Operating in a context where security is the predominant theme requires an increasing number of 
stability activities together with offensive and defensive activities. 
 
Peace Support 

6-05. The peace support theme describes an operating environment following an agreement or 
ceasefire that has established a permissive environment where the level of consent and 
 
67 ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 8, Annex C. 
68 Most notably, human rather than state-centric security will be crucial in gaining the trust and confidence of local 
populations. 
6-1 

FOI2020/12929
 
compliance is high, and the threat of disruption is low. Where peace support is the predominant 
theme, land forces may expect to conduct almost exclusively stability activities, even if ready for 
offensive and defensive activities. The purpose is to sustain a security situation that has already 
met the criteria established by international mandate; the use of force by peacekeepers is normally 
limited to self-defence. Peace support activities include peacemaking, peace enforcement, 
peacekeeping and peace building. Peace support activities are most often mandated and 
coordinated by the UN, but may be delegated to a military alliance such as NATO. 
 
Defence Engagement (DE)  

6-06. DE is the means by which we use our Defence assets and activities, short of combat 
operations, to achieve influence. It includes state-to-state military dialogue, bilateral or 
multinational training and exercises, and capacity building in which UK forces train, advice, assist 
and accompany partner nation security structures. DE spans the mosaic of conflict and types of 
operation; it is most effective when initiated in peacetime, continuing if necessary through conflict 
and into post-conflict stability operations. Its purpose is to sustain the UK’s position and influence, 
protect and promote prosperity and security, build capacity and establish comprehensive 
relationships and understanding.  
 
6-07. Early, effective and enduring DE within the Ful  Spectrum Approach can help to avert 
instability and, if not, reduce the likelihood of it being prolonged. It is a necessary theme of all 
operations. The land contribution to DE is covered in detail in Annex A to this chapter, being an 
emerging area of doctrine with limited coverage in other land publications. 
 
 
 
6-2 


FOI2020/12929
 
Annex A to Chapter 6: The Land Contribution to Defence Engagement 
6A-01. 
IntroductionJoint Doctrine Note 1/15 Defence Engagement provides a detailed 
description of DE at the joint level. The land contribution to DE should be focused on establishing 
relationships, increasing access and influence, developing and enhancing understanding, and 
building capability and capacity for specified partner nations. It is not about conducting activity, but 
the achievement of UK effects or objectives; it therefore needs to be coherent, coordinated and 
prioritised across Defence and Government. Those involved in DE activity need to have an 
understanding of the UK strategic plan for the partner nation in which they are deployed and what 
their part in the plan is.  
 
Context 
 
6A-02. 
Strategy. DE is cross-Government business. The NSS and SDSR 15 explicitly direct 
that the nation should use its capabilities to build prosperity by extending the UK’s influence in the 
world, and strengthen security. Key documents are Building Stability Overseas Strategy (BSOS) 
and the joint MOD/ FCO International Defence Engagement Strategy (IDES). International Policy 
and Planning (IPP) and the Euro-Atlantic Security Policy (EASP), European Bilateral Relations & 
EU Exit (EBRX) and Wider Europe Policy (WEP) teams own the MOD’s regional strategies, 
informed by the global network of Defence Attaches.  
 
6A-03. 
Al  Army DE (otherwise known as Army International Activity (AIA)) is subordinate to 
and guided by the regional and country strategies which are owned by the MOD international 
policy staffs. 
 
 
 
Figure 6A-1. The unbroken chain linking higher-level strategy to delivery 
 
6A-04. 
National Prosperity Agenda. The 2015 SDSR clearly states the role Defence has in 
our nation’s economic security and prosperity. The Prosperity Agenda is the golden thread which 
runs through all Army DE.  
 
6A-05. 
IDES. The IDES describes how DE supports HMG strategy through the Full Spectrum 
Approach. Developed by the MOD and FCO, it brings together all the levers available to achieve 
the NSS objectives. The 2017 IDES sets out five DE objectives, nested under the three NSOs of 
SDSR 2015: 
 
a. 
Develop understanding. 
 
b. 
Prevent conflict. 
6A-1 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
c. 
Capability and capacity building. 
 
d. 
Promote prosperity. 
 
e. 
Access and influence. 
 
6A-06. 
In devising DE strategy, the MOD follows a similar approach to other cross-
Government work that uses a logical framework to link inputs to aims through activities, outputs, 
and objectives and this is shown at Figure 6A-2.69 Each category in the logical framework is 
described in detail in JDN 1/15. 
 
 
 
Figure 6A-2. The DE logical framework (JDN 1/15) 
 
6A-07. 
While a large element of DE is conducted at the operational and strategic levels, 
tactical-level activity has the capacity to deliver strategic effect. The Army therefore has a key role 
to play. The Army DE Sub-Strategy provides high-level direction on the execution of Army 
International Activity (AIA). 
 
6A-08. 
DE Activities. DE activities include the following: 
 
a. 
High Level International Engagement (HLIE) Chief of the General Staff (CGS). 
 
b. 
Senior Level International Engagement (SLIE) (1* – 3*). 
 
c. 
Formal staff talks.70 
 
d. 
Liaison Officers (LO) and Exchange Officers (EO). 
 
 
69 Joint Doctrine Note 1/15: Defence Engagement, para 2.7. 
70 Army Staff Talks (AST) are undertaken annually, and complement Defence Staff Talks (DST). 
6A-2 

FOI2020/12929
 
e. 
Loan service. 
 
f. 
Training and Education (including Overseas Training Exercises (OTX) and International 
Defence Training (IDT).71 
 
g. 
Defence Sections. 
 
h. 
Regimental affiliations and alliances. 
 
6A-09. 
Army International Activity (AIA). AIA supports the achievement of UK effects and 
objectives by pursuing the following outcomes: 
 
a. 
Achieving high levels of cross-DLOD72 interoperability with our allies to sustain our 
position of influence and leadership with our strategic partners. 
b. 
An army persistently engaged overseas to understand and shape while becoming a 
reference army which other army’s view as their primary partner and a capability benchmark 
within the international military community. 
c. 
An army that maintains our status and leverage abroad and one that seeks to establish 
comprehensive relationships with emerging powers and other emerging states if significant to 
the UK. 
d. 
To support wider Defence efforts to prevent conflict, protect and encourage stability in 
priority regions through capacity building and enhanced persistent engagement. 
e. 
To support the UK Prosperity Agenda through support to industry and defence exports 
while training our forces for contingency in diverse and austere conditions around the world. 
6A-010. 
AIA sees the Army persistently and actively engaged overseas, international by design. 
Through AIA we enhance our ability to understand, shape and respond to emerging opportunities, 
threats and trends. Regional alignment to specified countries and regions drives much of this 
interaction. This allows the Army to develop understanding, establish relationships, increase 
access and gain influence to better coordinate Army activity and deliver DE effect. There are three 
areas of AIA: 
 
a.  Interoperability. 
 
b.  Security Cooperation. 
 
c.  Capacity Building. 
 
6A-011. 
None of these exclusively supports or replaces any one DE activity although there are 
varying degrees of overlap between elements. They are the Army’s ways to achieve the ends of 
the IDES. 
 
6A-012. 
Interoperability. Interoperability is the ability to act together coherently, effectively and 
efficiently to achieve Al ied tactical, operational and strategic objectives.73 This broad definition can 
be broken down into three dimensions: 
 
a. 
Breadth. NATO divides interoperability into Human, Procedural and Technical. Human 
interoperability is the mutual trust and shared understanding generated through shared 
experience. Procedural interoperability covers national policy as well as SOPs, TTPs, and 
 
71 Prioritisation of training will be driven by: commitments to allies; political/military prioritisation; the Prosperity Agenda; 
partner nation pull; and resources. 
72 Defence Lines of Development. 
73 AAP-06 – NATO Glossary of Terms
6A-3 

FOI2020/12929
 
doctrine. Technical interoperability is predominantly focussed on equipment capability 
solutions, but is underpinned by the need to communicate and share data. 
 
b. 
Depth. ‘Fight tonight’ interoperability mitigates gaps through warfare development to 
ensure that contingent forces can operate effectively at high readiness in multinational 
coalitions. ‘Fight tomorrow’ interoperability designs multinational solutions into the Funded 
and Future Force through capability development. ‘Fight in the Future’ aligns multinational 
ideas for the Conceptual Force. 
 
c. 
Level of Ambition. Interoperability requires nations to allocate resources and cede 
sovereignty. Strategy must align interoperability outcomes by agreeing an achievable level of 
ambition. Defence Strategic Guidance 2008 and Defence Strategic Direction 2016 defined 
three levels of interoperability ambition: ‘Integrated’ - forces able to merge seamlessly and 
are interchangeable; ‘Compatible’ - forces able to interact with each other in the same 
battlespace in pursuit of common goal; and ‘Deconflicted’ - forces can co-exist but not 
operate in the same battlespace. 
 
6A-013. 
This area of DE focuses on the development of capability in order to allow the UK to 
work alongside close allies, including alliances. It enhances the credibility of the military deterrent 
and at the operational and tactical levels it provides a more flexible and dynamic capability to the 
theatre commander. It encompasses near, mid and far-term activities, and can include training and 
education. Interoperability can reduce risks in multinational operations, but it requires nations to 
compromise in order to agree common standards, and to accept risk in sharing military information 
and pooling capability.  
 
6A-014. 
Integrated Action requires significant cooperation between all elements of the CJIIM 
force. The key enabler for military cooperation is interoperability. The purpose of professional study 
and working and training together with other forces and nations is to build interoperability. 
Interoperability strengthens and amplifies the unique contributions of all forces and agencies at 
every level. Multinational and inter-component interoperability is usual y more chal enging and 
needs more effort and resources than interoperability within UK land forces, but even this requires 
conscious effort. The exact requirement for interoperability is determined according to operational 
need and political ambition.74  
 
6A-015. Security Cooperation.75 This promotes close bilateral Army-to-Army relationships with 
specified partner nations: fostering exchanges; developing insight and understanding; and growing 
capability. Annual staff talks are the usual method of maintaining these relationships, and this is 
supplemented with a steady drum beat of activity conducted through the Liaison Officer (LO) and 
Exchange Officer (EO) networks. Security cooperation can also be achieved through training and 
education. This activity is focused on countries where the UK aims to have a positive long-term 
relationship, a short-term security interest or a political/military requirement to engage. Equally, the 
generation of insight and understanding with countries where there is a less developed relationship 
leads to increased combat effectiveness and better regional understanding.  
 
6A-016. 
Capacity Building. Capacity building concerns efforts to optimise indigenous security 
forces, build institutional capacity and provide support to institutional reform and/or gain greater 
local, national or regional influence. It leads to better regional understanding and is often 
conducted with countries on the fringe of areas of potential conflict. Closer cooperation leads to 
better ‘day one’ understanding should conflict arise, and provides land forces with better situational 
awareness, a network in place, and linguistic and cultural expertise. 
 
a. 
Specialised Infantry Group (SIG). The SIG oversees and commands the Specialised 
Infantry Battalions (SpIBs). SpIBs are geographically aligned to specific regions to provide 
 
74 See ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 7 and British Army Interoperability Policy and Country Plans (1* re-draft), 
dated 13 Feb 17 for further details. 
75 Note that Defence Engagement broadly equates to Security Cooperation in US doctrine whereas Security Cooperation 
is a sub-set of DE in UK doctrine. 
6A-4 

FOI2020/12929
 
long-term, enduring partnerships that are culturally and linguistically attuned to the detailed 
needs of that country or region. They offer a tailor made, credible, connected, persistent and 
agile ‘understand and train, advise, assist, mentor and accompany’ capability that wil  
complement the existing and continued work of regionally-aligned brigades. They wil  be the 
first echelon of UK DE capability; designed principal y to operate in the more demanding 
higher risk/higher threat areas. 
 
b. 
Measurement of Effectiveness (MOE). In the conduct of capacity-building tasks 
overseas, MOE indicators are necessary in order to provide both quantitative and qualitative 
assessments. MOE also provides evaluation of project progress, to determine value for 
money and to confirm projects are achieving outcomes (against objectives) supporting 
desired impacts or effects. Detail on MOE is provided in Part 5.76 
 
6A-017. 
Formation Alignment. The alignment of the 1 (UK) Div brigades, and selected Force 
Troops Command (FTC) brigades to priority regions of the world, allows the Army to deliver 
command-focused defence engagement that wil  contribute to national and defence policy. This is 
to be achieved by the commanders and staffs of each formation working on behalf of the MOD, 
using land delivery plans (LDPs), to build relationships and regional expertise that wil , in turn, lead 
to prioritised engagement tasks. For the Army, this wil  maximise the opportunities for regional 
engagement, and wil  contribute to the development of regional expertise within aligned formations. 
 
6A-018. 
Persistent Engagement. Persistent engagement is often delivered through capacity 
building. Commander Field Army (CFA), through GOC 1(UK) Div, wil  continue to develop capacity 
building activity, to develop regional understanding and establish relationships and influence, while 
supporting the Government’s Prosperity Agenda. CFA wil  ensure that the understanding generated 
by the regionally-aligned brigades and SpIBs is shared across land forces, both during routine 
peacetime engagement and in the event of contingent operations. 1 (UK) Div wil  be made 
available to inform operational design as appropriate and to assist in the operational gearing during 
transfer of responsibility from a regionally-aligned brigade to a deploying force. The regionally-
aligned brigades, in support of Defence Attaches, wil  shape demand from countries in their regions 
which land forces can support and which is beneficial to the UK’s interests in terms of regional 
security, influence and prosperity. Land delivery plans (LDPs) wil  be used to plan, cohere and 
coordinate all AIA within each region/ country. IDES regional strategies activity-output mapping, 
owned by IPP, wil  inform the shaping process. 1 (UK) Div wil  maintain the proponency for capacity 
building within the Field Army and wil  coordinate with the Army Directorate of Operations and 
Commitments (ADOC) to ensure a coherent, persistent effect in the delivery of capacity building 
through short-term training teams and, where appropriate, overseas training exercises. 
 
6A-019. 
DE in Relation to Crisis. DE wil  be conducted during the build up to a crisis, as a 
minimum by providing early warning via Defence's Global Network. At that stage it may be possible 
to help avert the crisis (and instability) through upstream engagement. During a crisis, DE can be 
used to guarantee access to a theatre and basing and overflight rights. Capacity building activities 
may also be possible. After a crisis DE can contribute to stability through capacity building activity 
as occurred in Sierra Leone following Operation PALLISER and during Operation TORAL in 
Afghanistan. 
 
6A-020. 
Figure 6A-3 il ustrates this for a hypothetical situation, it is not intended to be viewed as 
linear. We must accept that it is possible that our intervention may destabilise a state if conflict 
sensitivity is not applied. At all times, the overall military response wil  involve DE activities, not 
least because those activities make a major contribution to our understanding of the operating 
environment or theatre in question.77  
 

 
76 Ibid, Annex C. 
77 Joint Doctrine Note 1/15: Defence Engagement, dated Aug 2015, para 1.7. 
6A-5 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
Figure 6A-3. DE activities in relation to crisis. 
6A-6 




FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 7. Types of Stability Operations 
Introduction 
Types Stability of Operations 

7-01. This chapter provides an overview of the different types 
Introduction 

of stability operations with full detail being provided in Parts 1-
Types of Stability Operations 
5 of this AFM. Each type of stability operation must be 
understood in terms of how it supports the ends of stability. 
 
Types of Stability Operations78 
 
7-02. Counter-irregular activity (see Part 1). Counter-irregular activity comprises three 
overlapping and interrelated categories: counterinsurgency (COIN), counter-terrorism and counter-
criminality. 
 
a. 
COIN. COIN is defined as: comprehensive civilian and military efforts made to defeat 
an insurgency and to address any core grievances. It encompasses those military, 
paramilitary, political, economic, psychological and civil actions taken by a government or 
its partners to defeat insurgency. The approach involves neutralising insurgents by killing, 
capturing, marginalising or reconciling them. COIN is characterised by controlling the level 
of violence and securing the population through instances of combat, normally conducted at 
relatively low tactical levels. Consumption of resources and violence are low (relative to 
focused combat operations), but the nature of violence is likely to be more shocking 
because of its context, where normality is sought or actually appears to exist. See Part 1 
to this AFM for further detail.79 
 
b. 
Counter-terrorism. Counter-terrorism describes all preventive, defensive and 
offensive measures taken to reduce the vulnerability of forces, individuals and infrastructure 
against terrorist threats and/or acts. Counter-terrorism operations may be conducted against 
state-sponsored, internal or transnational, autonomous armed groups who are not easily 
identified, and who may not fall under the categories of combatants defined in international 
law. Measures taken include those activities justified for the defence of individuals as wel  as 
containment measures implemented by military forces or civilian organisations. Land forces 
have a greater contribution to creating and maintaining effective protective measures to 
reduce the probability and impact of terrorist attacks against infrastructure or people.  
 
c. 
Counter-criminality. Counter-criminality is the action focused on preventing organised 
criminal groups from escalating their activities to the point where they become a threat to 
allied forces. The character of conflict is such that insurgency, terrorism and criminality wil  
often feed off each other. Land forces’ contribution to counter-criminality wil  be very much in 
support of specialist agencies, requiring deep contextual understanding to inform and assist 
these agencies as necessary. 
 
7-03. Military contribution to peace support (see Part 2). Peace support activities concern the 
impartial use of diplomatic, civil and military means, normally in pursuit of UN Charter purposes 
and principles, to restore or maintain peace. Fol owing an intervention, land forces’ freedom to 
operate wil  be determined by the wil ingness of the opposing parties to seek resolution. Any 
reluctance may result in combat, either directly or in the protection of other agencies and the local 
population.  
 
7-04. The distinguishing factor of peace support operations is that land forces are impartial, 
supporting an international mandate rather than a partner nation government necessarily. Peace 
support efforts include conflict prevention, peacemaking, peace enforcement, peacekeeping and 
peacebuilding. DE is intrinsic to all. This categorisation does not represent a sequential process 
 
78 ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 8, Annex C. 
79 Army Field Manual Volume 1 Part 10 Countering Insurgency is extant, but will be revised in 2018, becoming Part 1, 
Counter-irregular Activity.  
7-1 


FOI2020/12929
 
where one necessarily leads to the next; for example, peacekeeping wil  not necessarily be 
preceded by peace enforcement. Land forces must understand how the different types of efforts 
relate to, complement or overlap each other so that their actions support, rather than undermine, 
an on-going political process. Figure 7-1 provides a basic conceptual framework to visualise how 
these activities may relate to each other. 
 
 
 
Figure 7-1. The military contribution to peace support. Note the position of the types of peace support 
activities in relation to conflict. The political process must have primacy throughout all peace support 
activities as illustrated by the arrow. All tactical activities may apply at any stage although non-lethal variants 
are more likely once a peace agreement is in place. 
 
a. 
Conflict prevention. A range of activities, including DE to keep inter and intra-state 
disputes from escalating into armed conflict. 
 
b. 
Peacemaking. Conducted after the initiation of a conflict to secure a ceasefire or 
peaceful settlement involving primarily diplomatic action supported, when necessary, by 
direct or indirect use of military assets. 
 
c. 
Peace enforcement. Designed to end hostilities through the application of a range of 
coercive measures, including the use of military force. It is likely to be conducted without the 
strategic consent of some, if not all, of the major conflicting parties. 
 
d. 
Peacekeeping. Designed to assist the implementation of a ceasefire or peace 
settlement and to help lay the foundations for sustainable peace. It is conducted with the 
strategic consent of all major conflicting parties. 
 
e. 
Peacebuilding. Designed to reduce the risk of relapsing into conflict by addressing the 
underlying causes of conflict and the longer-term needs of the people. It requires a 
commitment to a long-term process and may run concurrently with other types of peace 
support efforts. 
 
7-05. Military contribution to humanitarian assistance (see Part 3). Military support to 
humanitarian assistance is the use of available military resources to assist or complement the 
efforts of responsible civil actors in the operational area or specialised civil humanitarian 
organisations in fulfil ing their primary responsibility to alleviate human suffering. They may occur in 
response to both natural and man-made disasters, and result from conflict or flight from political, 
7-2 

FOI2020/12929
 
religious or ethnic persecution. Military support to humanitarian assistance is limited in scope and 
duration. In a NATO context, it includes disaster relief, dislocated civilian support, security, 
technical support and CBRN management. For UK humanitarian assistance and disaster relief 
operations, joint doctrine should be consulted.80 
 
7-06. Military contribution to stabilisation (see Part 4). Stabilization and Reconstruction is the 
NATO term used to cover what the UK defines as Stabilisation. It is applied in politically messy, 
violent, chal enging and often non-permissive environments in which the legitimacy of the state and 
political settlement is likely to be contested, and in which other types of stability operations are 
unfeasible. The central chal enge of stabilisation is to bring about some form of political settlement 
in a pressured and violent context, to create an environment where longer-term peacebuilding and 
state building processes (including reconstruction) may have a chance of success. It requires 
protecting and promoting legitimate political authority, using a combination of integrated civilian and 
military actions to reduce violence, re-establish security and prepare for longer-term recovery. 
 
7-07. Capacity Building (see Part 5). Capacity building, a component of Integrated Action, is 
used to maintain or change the capability, wil , cohesion and perceptions of friendly, neutral and 
even hostile actors. It includes land forces’ support to SSR, support to initial restoration of essential 
services and to interim governance tasks. Capacity building can be a discrete type of operation, 
occurring across the mosaic of conflict, as well as a tactical function. As an operation, it may be 
conducted discretely or alongside other operations; it may form part of DE (AIA) or in less benign 
circumstances, including in combat situations. Capacity building concerns those actions taken to 
improve security and, when necessary, civil and infrastructure capability. The military’s contribution 
is but one element of the Ful  Spectrum Approach, which requires cooperation among all agencies 
engaged.  
 
 
80 JDP 3-52, Disaster Relief Operations; the Military Contribution, 3rd Edition. 
7-3 




FOI2020/12929
 
PART C: DELIVERY 
 
C-01. Introduction. Part C provides an overview of land forces’ 
Part A – Context 
tactical contribution to stability operations. Detailed guidance in 
Delivering stability 
the context of the specific types of stability operations is provided 
The Government approach 
in Part 1-5 and the supporting TTPs in the handbook to this AFM. 
The UK military approach 
 
Combat and stability operations 
Part B – Fundamentals of 
C-02. Chapter 8 explains the nature of the operating environment 
Stability Operations 
into which land forces might deploy. Chapter 9 describes the 
Principles of stability operations 
stability activities in detail while Chapter 10 provides general 
Operations themes and stability 
guidance on the orchestration and execution of stability 
Types of operation 
operations across divisional, brigade and battlegroup levels of 
 
command. 
Part C –Delivery 
 
 
Operating environment 
 
Stability activities 
C-03. Success in applying Integrated Action across the 
 
Orchestrating and executing 
operations themes requires a military mind capable of 
stability operations 
understanding the nuances and subtleties of stability operations. 
This part draws out those elements. 
 
   
  Approaching Stability Operations 
   
  ‘At the root of the problem lies the fact the qualities required for fighting conventional war are 
  different from those required for dealing with subversion or insurgency; or for taking part in 
  peace-keeping operations for that matter. Traditional y a soldier is trained and conditioned to 
  be strong, courageous, direct and aggressive, but when men endowed with these qualities 
  become involved in fighting subversion they often find that their good points are exploited by 
  the enemy.’ 
   
 
General Sir Frank Kitson GBE, KCB, MC*. (1971), Low Intensity Operations. Faber and 
 
Faber, London, p 200. 
 
 
   
Part C-1 

FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 8: The Operating Environment 
 
Building Stability Overseas 
 

Operating Environment 
8-01. Land forces are directed to conduct stability operations 
•  Building stability overseas 
overseas in anticipation of, during, or following a crisis.81 
•  Understanding 
While a broad range of actors can contribute to stability, 
•  Transition and stability 
including Other Government Departments (OGDs), Non-
operations 
governmental Organisations (NGOs) and International 
•  The security-development nexus 
Organisations (IOs), land forces offer unique capabilities. 
•  Threats to Stability operations 
These capabilities allow them to promote stability using 
•  Legitimacy and force 
operational art.82 The primary chal enge is to understand how 
•  Human Terrain 
tactical activities might support long-term stability.  
•  Media 
 
•  International organisations 
8-02. The following sections, derived from NATO doctrine, 
 
develop understanding of the operating environment commonly encountered during stability 
operations.83 The operating environment can be described as a “composite of the conditions, 
circumstances and influence that affect the employment of military capabilities and bear on the 
decisions of a commander”.84 Understanding the complexity and interrelationships between 
elements of the operating environment is fundamental to the efficient conduct of stability activities.  
 
8-03. While this chapter isolates aspects of the operating environment, land forces should be 
cognisant that the operating environment is dynamic, interconnected and constantly evolving. The 
operating environment may also be shaped deliberately and unintentionally by external factors 
which may both support or frustrate the execution of stability activities. 
 
“Never walk into an environment and assume that you understand it better than the people 
who live there." 
Kofi Annan, UN Secretary General. 
 
 
 
Understanding 
 
8-04. Knowledge, Understanding and Respect for Local Culture. As the support of the 
population is a key factor in long-term success in stability activities, the way land forces behave in 
that context is crucial. While stability activities are demanding and time consuming, ignoring local 
norms wil  isolate the force from the population. Furthermore, lack of local support and 
understanding can stimulate popular support for the adversary’s ideas. Academic and partner 
nation expertise should be employed before and during deployment to enhance understanding. 
The following measures should be implemented with support from the Defence Cultural Specialist 
Unit (DCSU) and unit cultural advisors (CULADs): 
 
a. 
Pre-deployment Training. Basic notions about local language and culture (religion, 
traditions, ways and customs, antagonisms) should be taught. This includes explaining 
appropriate rules of behaviour once deployed. Focus should be on personnel who wil  
encounter the population on a regular basis. A single disrespectful or humiliating act 
perpetrated by any one of them could disrupt or eliminate progress towards encouraging the 
population to support the government and land forces’ wider efforts. Additionally, a 
disrespectful act could make a whole community rally to the insurgents. Guidance should be 
provided and explored on potential cultural dilemmas that may be faced. For example, when 
 
81 BSOS, Chapter 2. 
82 ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 8. 
83 ATP-3.2.1.1. 
84 AJP-3.4.4. 
8-2 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
is gender-based 'abuse' considered a cultural issue to be tolerated, and when is it considered 
a violation of rights? 
 
b. 
On Deployment. Once deployed, all personnel must behave in a manner which gains 
the confidence of the local population. This wil  reinforce legitimacy and help the force 
maintain situational awareness.  
 
c. 
Changing perceptions. Some simple ideas should always be remembered: be aware 
that today’s enemies and suspicious civilians could be tomorrow’s partners and vice versa. 
For example, the way prisoners or civilians in combat areas are treated, or even the way a 
patrol is conducted wil  impact on how the population perceives us. Al  opportunities should 
be seized to talk with locals to demonstrate genuine interest in their plight. Dismounted 
patrols should be preferred over mounted as they enhance interaction with the population 
and facilitate intelligence gathering.  
 
d. 
Unit rotations. Progress in civil relations may be put in jeopardy by frequent rotations. 
Land forces must make every effort to ensure the preservation of public confidence despite 
the disruption caused by rotations. A proactive Key Leader Engagement (KLE) plan wil  
assist in a successful handover transition, along with effective employment of continuity staff. 
 
8-05. Interpreters. A lack of language skills within the deployed force can hamper interaction with 
the local population. Having a basic understanding of the languages used in a theatre of operations 
is important to the understanding of the adversaries, bel igerents, neutrals and the locals’ agenda. 
Land forces should have at least a basic knowledge of local languages and how to use interpreters 
effectively. 
 
Transition and Stability Operations
 
 
8-06. Operations themes describe the general conditions of operating environments. These 
conditions may necessitate standalone stability operations, where no enemy is present, or at the 
other extreme, transition from major combat operations within a mosaic of conflict. This section 
emphasises stability activities in the context of transition from major combat operations while Parts 
1-5 to this AFM describe the specifics of the five types of stability operations.  
 
8-07. The need for transition from major combat operations to stability operations is not always 
apparent. Nonetheless, planning for stability operations is inherent to any campaign plan and 
should be conducted concurrently to warfighting, rather than once it is clear transition has begun. 
This is a key lesson from the invasion of Iraq in 2003 in which insufficient planning for transition 
enabled enemies and adversaries to seize the initiative. 
 
8-08. The boundaries between combat and stability operations wil  be blurred at the tactical level 
and may occur sporadically and unexpectedly across the area of operations. Indicators are likely to 
be: 
 
a.  A ceasefire or surrender of enemy forces. 
 
b.  An increase in population movements and requests for assistance. 
 
c.  A reduction in violence or the threat of violence directed at land forces by an enemy 
force. 
 
8-09. There wil  not necessarily be a reduction in other forms of violence, for example criminal or 
terrorist-initiated violence. 
 
8-10. Command Compression. The boundaries between the tactical and operational levels of 
command are likely to be compressed during transition in several ways. Joint capabilities such as 
8-3 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
ISTAR, Aviation and Offensive Support may even be placed under land forces’ command or control 
for specific operations. Interagency activities to initiate development, governance and rule of law 
programmes or deliver strategic or political objectives may also require support by land forces. 
Command responsibilities and demands wil  both compress and may also broaden concurrently. 
Land forces wil  increasingly become the supporting rather than the supported component. Note 
that command compression can work both ways. While this might mean joint capabilities 
supporting a battlegroup, it might also mean elements of a battlegroup being tasked directly by the 
Joint Commander (or higher). 
 
8-11. Legal Ambiguities. During transition, the legal framework of the state may not have re-
asserted itself sufficiently and there may be a judicial vacuum or a state of legal uncertainty which 
may be fil ed by a combination of national, international and local laws. Land forces can overcome 
this friction through a clear understanding of the legal basis of their own intervention. The legal 
basis can and does change over time, as occurred during operations in Iraq.  
 
8-12. Establishing a Secure Environment. Establishing a secure environment in which other 
stability and development activities can flourish is likely to be the primary role of land forces. This 
wil  require a change from an enemy to a population-centric approach. Restraint and a more 
centralised control of fires wil  characterise such operations. Given land forces’ capabilities, they 
wil  be more focused on security than other equally important components of the rule of law. The 
exact approach wil  differ per the circumstance but is likely to include tasks such as: 
 
a. 
Supporting the Rule of Law. Stability Policing may be required in the absence of a 
viable indigenous or international police force or other forms of implementing law and order 
which are accepted by the population, for example tribal law. This wil  require clarification of 
the legal framework under which land forces wil  operate and a continuous appreciation of 
the national legal balance of power. It wil  be crucial that support to one part of the criminal 
justice chain, such as stability policing, is equal y matched by development support to other 
parts of the criminal justice chain, such as pre-trial detention centres, access to legal aid, 
judicial independence, court infrastructure, and correction services among others. Without 
balance throughout the chain, efficiencies in one part can cause overload in other parts 
leading to a multiplication of human rights abuses, miscarriages of justice, and increase in 
impunity, all the while undermining legitimacy of national forces. Curfews and riot control 
measures should be considered where violence is in danger of escalation.  
 
b. 
Separation of Forces. Regular or irregular forces may seek to settle their differences 
through violence, threatening the security of local nationals and civilian agencies. Land 
forces may be required to separate such forces by a mix of interposition, deterrence, 
interdiction and negotiation. Communication and coordination wil  be required with all parties. 
Marking of boundaries and arrangements for dealing with intentional and unintentional 
infringements wil  be required. 
 
c. 
Protection of Critical National Infrastructure. A breakdown in the rule of law leading 
to increased criminality may require urgent local responses to protect critical national 
infrastructure until rule of law can be re-imposed. Defending or guarding communications, 
power and waste installations may be necessary in the short term. The generation and 
organisation of local security forces to relieve our own troops from static guarding tasks wil  
be necessary to avoid becoming fixed and unresponsive because of such tasks. 
Commanders should note that the overt presence of UK land forces may increase the threat 
to critical national infrastructure if our forces are targeted by enemies and adversaries. The 
same considerations should be applied to cultural property protection (see Annex D to 
Chapter 10). 
 
d. 
Intelligence Operations. Attacks against civilians are a favoured tactic by an enemy 
force seeking to undermine the legitimacy of state-sponsored forces. Early opportunities may 
be present during transition to gather significant amounts of intelligence on organisations and 
8-4 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
individuals who might present a threat to the mission. Opportunities to gather, process, and if 
necessary act on intelligence should be taken to disrupt the formation of opposition groups to 
deny them the opportunity to thrive. The intelligence that can be garnered from men or 
women should be actively sought (by appropriate means), and their capacity to influence 
both 'friendly' populations and adversary groups should be explored. 
 
e. 
Civil-Military Operations Centres (CMOCs). CMOCs serve as a meeting place for 
military and civilian entities involved in stabilisation, governance, humanitarian relief and 
construction activities in an area of operations. It is normally located outside a military area 
and establishes an interface between military and civilians, providing a conduit for 
coordination of activities and advice for the populace on the availability and mechanics of 
military assistance. 
 
8-13. Boundaries. Where possible, military areas of operation should be established with 
contiguous boundaries aligned to existing national, regional, government and police boundaries 
which wil  help the re-establishment of normality. If boundaries must be different then consider 
using tribal/ ethnic boundaries or ceasefire lines. Advice from local authorities and civil society, 
from Political Advisors (POLADs), Legal Advisors (LEGADs), Stabilisation Advisors (STABADs) 
and Cultural Advisors (CULADS), as well as well as IOs and NGOs wil  be required to ensure that 
all boundaries support the long-term stability of the region or campaign. 
 
The Security-Development Nexus 
 
8-14. The term security-development nexus introduces the idea that there cannot be security 
without development and vice versa, a theme reflected in the principles of stability operations. The 
same idea indicates that security and development are rarely achieved sequential y. So, if pursued 
concurrently, land forces wil  encounter and wil  have to engage with development actors. In this 
context, commanders must be mindful of the risks associated with the securitisation of the 
humanitarian and developmental space.85 Equally, the routine execution of non-lethal stability 
activities does not exclude the possibility that land forces might have to conduct offensive activities 
in response to threats.  
 
8-15. Quick Impact Projects (QIPs) and Consent Winning Activity (CWA). QIPs are short-term, 
small-scale initiatives designed to deliver an immediate and focused impact on target audiences, 
primarily civilian. They are commonly associated with support to the initial restoration of services. 
CWA is a tactical-level tool aimed at forming economic relationships, establishing communication 
channels and enhancing cooperation with a local community. CWA has the potential to overcome 
the ‘consent gap’. This is the period after the ‘honeymoon’ of initial defeat of an enemy during 
which QIPs might be employed that endures until longer-term, large scale development projects 
are delivered. QIPs and CWA should also be supported by a baseline study, project managed 
throughout, with clear and measurable objectives, and defined measurements of effectiveness. 
This subject is covered in detail in Part 5 to this AFM. 
 
Threats to Stability Operations 
 
8-16. There are five major categories of threat which might be encountered on stability operations. 
These may appear in isolation or as a combination: 
 
a.  Traditional threats emerge from states employing recognised military capabilities and 
forces in conventional forms of military competition and conflict. 
 
 
85 Described in detail in Part 3 to this AFM, due to published in 2017. 
8-5 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
b.  Irregular threats are those posed by an adversary employing unconventional, 
asymmetric, and often il egal, methods and (not exclusively irregular) means to counter 
traditional military advantages.86 
 
c.  Catastrophic threats may involve for example, the acquisition, possession, and use of 
chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons (potentially by irregular 
activists), also called weapons of mass destruction and effects. 
 
d.  Disruptive threats involve an adversary using new technologies that reduce land 
forces’ advantages in key operational domains. For example, information activities using 
social media or cyber-attacks. Cyberspace in particular presents significant opportunities 
and threats in the context of stability operations. Integrated Action is enhanced by 
cyberspace’s ubiquitous, interconnected and dynamic nature. These same factors, 
however, also enable threats such as espionage, sabotage and subversion. CJIIM 
interoperability is particularly challenging. However, since the effects of actions taken in 
cyberspace and the electromagnetic environment are not necessarily geographically 
bounded, de-confliction and mutual understanding are imperative.87 
 
e.  Environmental and natural threats are described in detail on page 81 to JDP 3-52 
Disaster Relief Operations and in Part 3 to this AFM. These threats often trigger the 
international community to provide humanitarian assistance which may involve a military 
contribution. Al  types of stability activities might be used in a humanitarian operation.  
 
8-17. Enemies and adversaries wil  seek to gain an advantage over land forces by exploiting 
threats. For example, adversaries may seek to interdict land forces attempting to enter a crisis 
area. If land forces successfully gain entry, the adversary (in the case of an insurgency) may seek 
engagement in complex terrain and urban environments as a way of offsetting land forces’ 
advantages. Methods used by adversaries include dispersing their forces into small mobile combat 
teams – combining only when required to strike a common objective – and becoming invisible by 
blending with the local population. 
 
8-18. Threats that occur from an internal conflict in a region may necessitate the deployment of 
land forces to perform stability activities in the framework of peace support (peacekeeping, peace 
enforcing, peacemaking and peacebuilding). These types of threat wil  possibly be a combination 
of traditional and irregular threats. 88  
 
8-19. Conflicts are much more likely to be fought ‘amongst the people’ instead of ‘around the 
people.’ This fundamentally alters the ways in which military units can apply force to achieve 
success in a conflict, since collateral damage should be avoided wherever possible.  
 
Legitimacy and Force 
 
8-20. Campaign Authority. Campaign authority is the authority established by international forces, 
agencies and organisations within both combat and stability operations. Campaign authority 
comprises four interdependent factors: 
 
a. 
The perceived legitimacy of the mandate. 
 
b. 
The perceived legitimacy of the way those exercising that mandate conduct themselves 
both individually and collectively. 
 
 
86 See Warfare Branch. (2016) Irregular Adversaries: Land Component Handbook
87 See ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 7. 
88 See Part 2 to this AFM, due to be published in 2017. 
8-6 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
c. 
The extent to which factions, local populations and others consent to, comply with, or 
resist the authority of those executing the mandate. 
 
d. 
The extent to which the expectations of factions, local populations and others are 
managed, or met, by those executing the mandate. 
 
8-21. Land forces’ contributions to stability should be both legal and purposeful. They should also 
be, and be perceived to be, legitimate, acceptable and appropriate in a broader sense. Campaign 
authority derives from confidence that the appropriate and legitimate measures are employed by 
land forces. This helps to maintain support from those that shape opinion, share power and grant 
consent. 
 
8-22. Legitimacy. Legitimacy encompasses the legal, moral, political, diplomatic and ethical 
propriety of the conduct of military forces. As the justification for using force, and the way it is 
applied, legitimacy has both collective and individual aspects, both of which directly affect the utility 
of force. Legitimacy is based upon both subjective considerations, such as the values, beliefs and 
opinions of a variety of audiences (at home and overseas), and demonstrable, objective legality. 
 
8-23. Law and the Use of Force. Law governs the use of force in several different ways; it 
regulates when States can resort to using force, for example by sending their troops onto the 
sovereign territory of another State. It also establishes how force can be lawfully used once those 
troops have been deployed, whether in an armed conflict, or on a peacekeeping mission or other 
operation. It is important to distinguish between laws that regulate how a State may act, and those 
that govern the conduct of the individual/unit. These distinctions must be made in order that rules 
of engagement (ROE) can be viewed in a proper context.  
 
8-24. While it is the responsibility of those who authorise ROE to ensure that the permissions 
contained in them are lawful, commanders at all levels remain responsible for ensuring that forces 
under their command operate within the law. Furthermore, everyone remains ultimately responsible 
in law for his/her actions. Typically, the amplification to the Political Policy Indicator within the ROE 
profile wil  explain the legal basis for action.89 Nevertheless, both this amplification and the ROE 
profile exist only to give guidance; they cannot by themselves guarantee the lawfulness of any 
action. An appreciation of the relevant legal principles is essential.  
 
8-25. A complex mixture of international and domestic (national) laws regulate when and how force 
may be used. The principal sources of these laws include:  
 
a. 
The UN Charter. 
 
b. 
The Hague Regulations, the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols; Customary 
International Law. 
 
c. 
International Human Rights Law including, in some circumstances, the European 
Convention on Human Rights (ECHR).  
 
d. 
The Criminal Law Act 1967 and section 76 Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 
and the common law defence of self-defence.  
 
8-26. The specific circumstances of each operation, including the location of the actions 
undertaken, and the nature of any conflict wil  influence which of these laws wil  apply. Most 
stability operations wil  spring from a UN resolution, an invitation from the partner nation, or some 
kind of international agreement like a treaty. That authority determines all freedoms and 
 
89 This gives overall direction to commanders for how the ROE are to be applied, including if new circumstances evolve 
and swift direction from higher authorities is unavailable. In addition, it provides an indicator to commanders of those 
ROE changes that are likely to be acceptable. 
8-7 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
constraints: control of and/or responsibility for territory and people, lethal effects, the ability to 
capture and detain, intelligence collection and interaction with civil defence institutions. 
 
 
Mandates, Rules of Engagement and Use of Force 
 
Mandates can be seen either as ceilings or floors [constraints or freedoms]. Conservative, 
risk-averse UN officials or commanders constrained by their home governments will interpret 
the mandate as a ceiling. By contrast, creative and decisive commanders will take a 
leadership role by interpreting the mandate as a floor, defining it operationally and using all 
their capabilities to implement the spirit, not just the word, of the mandate. 
 
Major General (Retd) Patrick Cammaert UN Department for Peacekeeping Operations 
 
 
8-27. Ethics and Morality. Ethical and moral considerations underpin the law and the 
administration of justice, and are also reflected in operational decision-making and military 
conduct. Commanders are accountable for their actions and the actions of those under their 
command. Commanders are duty-bound to ensure that the highest moral and ethical standards are 
maintained by their subordinates and can achieve this through a robust ethos, personal example, 
training and education. 
 
8-28. Land forces wil  be exposed to chal enge and complexity during stability operations. They wil  
face opponents and partners with different moral, ethical and legal boundaries and perspectives, 
while themselves operating under intense scrutiny. The trend towards transparency and greater 
regulation of Defence activities reflects the expectations of the society we serve and whose values 
we reflect. If we are to maintain campaign authority, then we must respect the morals and ethics of 
our own culture. Moreover, while never compromising our own moral standards, we must respect 
local traditions, customs and practices and pay appropriate attention to the needs of minority or 
otherwise vulnerable groups, such as women, children and ethnic minorities. Our chal enge is to 
ensure that society’s expectations of greater legal and ethical regulation are balanced against the 
imperatives of operational effectiveness. 
 
8-29. General Conduct. Land forces can threaten stability and campaign authority through 
inappropriate conduct, on and off duty, including when their spending power attracts criminal or 
unethical activity. By, for example, using sex workers, or exchanging favours for sex, soldiers and 
foreign aid workers support the sex trade and undermine local values. Foreigners may also distort 
the local economy and undermine justice and other local values by paying bribes or over-paying for 
contracts. Commanders, their staff and all personnel must be clear about the importance of 
exemplary behaviour on and off duty, and must state explicitly what is and is not acceptable.90  
 
Audiences, Actors, Adversaries and Enemies (A3E) 
 
8-30. Introduction. Integrated Action requires us to gain a sophisticated understanding of the 
operating environment and situation. We need to defeat or neutralise those who oppose us while 
winning over and possibly empowering those who are neutral and friendly. To do this we must 
identify audiences, actors, adversaries and enemies.91 
 
 

 
90 MATT 6, including the Army Standards, is a useful reference. 
91 See ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 4. 
8-8 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
 
Figure 8-1. Audiences, Actors, Adversaries and Enemies 
Audiences 
 
8-31. The population may be divided by ethnic, religious or political affinities or origins. These are 
often deeply rooted in history and may be the very origin of the conflict. These complex divisions 
may cause problems during stabilisation and reconstruction operations. This subject is covered in 
more detail in Part 4 to this AFM. Frequently, military intervention is required because a decaying 
local state apparatus is unable to rule and provide reasonable public services to the population. 
Accordingly, the population becomes the centre of gravity for both the alliance and the insurgents. 
 
8-32. A population may be rich in history, traditions and culture which must be understood by land 
forces. Local society is often structured in traditional communities and organised in solidarity 
(tribal) networks. Leaders of traditional, cultural or religious organisations are key interlocutors and 
must be considered as part of the KLE programme. 
 
8-33. Groups. Social groups are generally based on nationality; family, clan and tribe; with 
language, religion, culture, ethnicity, beliefs and values held in common. Different groupings wil  
hold different views on such fundamental issues as birth, life and death, honour and dishonour and 
the role and position of men, women and children in society. Care must be exercised when 
interpreting the behaviour of a group against our own values and standards. Strict observance of a 
religious dogma or set of beliefs or significant hatred of a group may provide an insurgent with an 
unshakable wil  to die for their cause. Non-combatants may be hostile, ambivalent, tolerant or 
friendly in nature and may change their attitude because of actions by any actor. Their consent 
could be given freely or may be conditional, but cannot be assumed. 
 
8-34. Leadership and Authority. The leading personalities within the human environment wil  
differ from state to state or region to region depending on the culture, education, religion and 
political beliefs. This results in a complex linkage by which authority and power may be exercised. 
This is of relevance, as the allegiance of a group may not be to a Head of State but to someone 
else inside or outside the state borders. Respect for chiefs or an elder is traditionally maintained in 
many societies. These key leaders may have been influenced or marginalised by other actors such 
as insurgents, warlords or criminals. Nevertheless, linked to the stability operations principle of 
understanding the context, a commander should endeavour to discover who the social leaders are 
as they are likely to have knowledge of and exert influence in the community. 
8-9 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
8-35. It should be noted that in many societies women are excluded from formal leadership 
positions, but nonetheless are likely to play an important role in influencing societal attitudes and 
perspectives. The informal nature of these leadership and influencing roles, combined with the 
potential difficulty of accessing women in conservative societies, can make it easy to overlook 
women in outreach or engagement programmes. This needs to be guarded against, and creative 
ways found to achieve this engagement. 
 
Local, Regional and National Authorities 
 
8-36. When intervening in a crisis overseas, land forces must recognise that as well as being part 
of a UK Ful  Spectrum Approach they wil  also have to work closely with local, regional and national 
authorities. These actors may well have the capacity to take some if not ful  responsibility for the 
planning and execution of the crisis response. A military force simply acts as an instrument of 
power employed by a government. Land forces must be aware that their supporting role is only 
temporary and that the aim is to return to a situation in which their contribution is no longer 
required. 
 
8-37. Good cooperation with partner nation representatives is essential from the outset. 
Consultation and joint planning must start at an early stage. The use of Liaison Officers (LOs) is 
important. Fol owing the partner nation’s plan where possible, land forces can then promote 
stability through tactical activities. 
 
8-38. When deployed overseas, in some cases, land forces have been inclined to help local 
societies by introducing their own forms of administration and their own norms. Often, this ignores 
how societies have evolved in their own context. Although these initiatives are well meant, this 
approach is not always successful. For example, agricultural societies have a different level of 
organisation from industrialised societies.  
 
Military Forces 
 
8-39. General. The range of military actors in an area of operations can be almost as diverse as 
the number of civilian actors. Not all military actors, or perceived military actors, conduct 
themselves with the appropriate level of professionalism. Nor do they always act in accordance 
with international law and the Geneva Conventions. The prior actions of armed, uniformed 
elements may make initial engagement with the local community quite difficult. For many civilians, 
it is virtual y impossible to distinguish between one camouflage uniform and another. Considerable 
time and patience may be required for UK land forces to build a workable rapport with the local 
community.  
 
8-40. Foreign Military Forces. Foreign military forces are military elements – friendly or 
adversarial – from other nations influencing or operating within the borders of the partner nation. 
These forces may be present due to a request for intervention or assistance, or by aggressive 
military action. Investment in understanding the motives of these foreign forces wil  allow land 
forces to select the necessary actions to be taken to influence them. 
 
8-41. Coalition Forces. Operations conducted as part of a coalition wil  be subject to additional 
frictions. Each contributing nation is likely to have strategic objectives that are not necessarily 
aligned with the UK’s, and their forces may be under different remits. ROE and chains of command 
may be complex. National agendas and their implications for the employment of their troops must 
be understood and considered when planning. Decision making is likely to be slower, more 
complicated and perhaps more frustrating than when a single nation is involved. This wil  in part be 
due to the problems with language and not having a common understanding of terminology. 
National reporting chains should not be allowed to side-line the coalition chain of command. The 
coalition view of events should always be considered. 
 
8-10 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
8-42. Partner Nation Forces. Partner nation military forces are those forces raised, trained and 
sustained by the partner nation as part of the national defence. These forces may include the 
military services such as; army, navy, marines and air force. Some nations may also have 
paramilitary forces that are not part of the defence force. These paramilitary forces typically have 
responsibility for internal security and might include police or specialist security forces. 
 
8-43. Former Partner Nation Military Forces and Non-State Security Forces. In a post-conflict 
or fragile state situation, a partner nation may have forces that are not under its control. Former 
military forces that are in the process of demobilising may have retained their uniforms and 
weapons. Non-state security forces may have been raised for special or particular interests. Both 
may have significant grievances with the partner nation government and chal enge its authority. 
 
Commercial Actors
 
 
8-44. Local Contractors. Local companies or local civilian workers may be offered contracts by 
land forces for construction and logistical work. Part 1 to this AFM provides guidance on how to 
avoid distorting the local economy and reduce the risk of corruption through conflict sensitivity. 
 
8-45. Commercial Organisations. Multinational corporations are often engaged in reconstruction, 
security, economic development and governance activities under contract from supporting 
governments. These companies are, or could become, part of the redevelopment of the state and 
should be part of the partner nation’s overall plan for development. As a minimum, military 
commanders should know which companies are present in their area of operations and where 
those companies are conducting business. 
 
8-46. Private Security Services/Companies. See Chapter 9, para 9-34. 
 
The Media 
 
8-47. National and international media are routinely interested in stability operations. Due to rapid 
information transfer, images and articles in the national or regional media may influence the 
opinion of the population and politicians, including military departments. In addition, the media may 
exert direct and indirect influence on the operational planning process and C2, therefore potential 
media effects should be considered.  
8-11 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
Social Media and the Arab Spring 
 
As a result of the many technological advancements and innovations that have 
revolutionized how individuals communicate, an abundance of information has become 
available to everyone. Depending on where the information is found, however, it’s reliability 
can be questioned. With the growing number of international, self-described (both non-for-
profit and for-profit) organizations such as Facebook, Wikipedia, Wikileaks and more, much 
of the information provided is now often opinionated and biased, nonetheless, truthful. 
Ultimately, public information supplied by social networking websites has played an 
important role during modern-day activism, specifically as it pertains to the Arab Spring. In 
Arab countries, many activists who played crucial roles in the Arab Spring used social 
networking as a key tool in expressing their thoughts concerning unjust acts committed by 
the government. 
 
Being capable of sharing an immense amount of uncensored and accurate information 
throughout social networking sites has contributed to the cause of many Arab Spring 
activists. Through social networking sites, Arab Spring activists have not only gained the 
power to overthrow powerful dictatorship, but also helped Arab civilians become aware of the 
underground communities that exist and are made up of their brothers, and others willing to 
listen to their stories. 
 
In countries like Egypt, Tunisia, and Yemen, rising action plans such as protests made up of 
thousands, have been organized through social media such Facebook and Twitter. “We use 
Facebook to schedule the protests” an Arab Spring activist from Egypt announced “and [we 
use] Twitter to coordinate, and YouTube to tell the world.” The role that technology has taken 
in allowing the distribution of public information such as the kinds stated by the 
aforementioned activist, had been essential in establishing the democratic movement that 
has helped guide abused civilians to overthrow their oppressor.  
 
Kassim, S. (2012). Twitter Revolution: How the Arab Spring Was Helped By Social Media. 
Mic.Com. Accessed 30 Jan 17. Available at https://mic.com/articles/10642/twitter-revolution-
how-the-arab-spring-was-helped-by-social-media  
 
 
 
International Organisations (IOs), NGOs and Human Security 
 
8-48. Role of Land Forces. Given the population-centric nature of stability operations, land forces 
must understand the threats to human security within their area of operations. The threat to human 
security as a direct or indirect consequence of conflict is not a new phenomenon; the issue is as 
old as warfare itself. Within the context of Integrated Action, guided by the Conflict Sensitive 
approach, the promotion of human security may bring considerable benefits in positively shaping 
actor behaviour. 
 
8-49. In most operations, the military is likely to play a role in helping address elements of the 
human security needs of the population. Responsibilities may include protecting the population 
from adversaries and fulfil ing human rights obligations. In most circumstances, the military wil  
almost certainly be in a supporting, rather than leading, role, working with other agencies as part of 
a Full Spectrum Approach. There are many aspects of human security that armed forces do not 
always have the capabilities to address. For example, land forces wil  rarely be able to provide 
long-term humanitarian assistance, unlike dedicated civilian agencies. Details on the execution of 
tasks supporting human security can be found in the annexes to Chapter 10. Other CJIIM actors 
involved in the provision of human security likely to be encountered on operations are: 
 
8-12 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
a. 
Other Government Department (OGDs). These are departments of state with specific 
remits and are sometime known as ‘Partners Across Government’ (PAG). They include: 
 
(1) 
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). The FCO safeguards the UK’s 
national security by working to reduce conflict and builds our prosperity by promoting 
sustainable global growth. In human security, the FCO is engaged in such areas as 
human rights protection, preventing sexual violence, and the protection of child 
soldiers. 
 
(2)  The Department for International Development (DFID). DFID’s goal is to 
promote sustainable development and to eliminate global poverty. Within this mandate 
DFID supports al  dimensions of human security.92 
 
b. 
International Organisations (IO). These are organisations supported by states from 
within the international community which attempt to set the agenda on development issues. 
Examples of UN affiliated IOs can be found in Figure 8.1 below. These organisations are 
covered in more detail in Parts 2 and 3 to this AFM. 
 
 
Figure 8-1. UN organisations likely to be encountered on stability operations 
 
c. 
International Non-governmental Organisations (INGOs). These include 
international non-profit organisations and worldwide companies, for example, Save the 
Children and Médecins Sans Frontières. 
 
d. 
The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). The ICRC is a humanitarian 
institution which does not fall neatly into the categories above.93 Signatories to the 
four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and their Additional Protocols have given the ICRC a 
mandate to protect victims of international and internal armed conflicts. Such victims include 
war wounded, prisoners, refugees, civilians, and other non-combatants. ICRC is the only 
institution explicitly named under International Humanitarian Law (IHL) as a controlling 
authority.94 
 
 
92 See Chapter 2 for further detail on FCO/DFID roles. 
93 See https://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/misc/5w9fjy.htm. 
94 The terms ‘law of armed conflict’ and ‘international humanitarian law’ are terms of art and mean the same thing as both 
are concerned with the way armed force is used in conflict. See para 1.2 to JSP 383: Manual of the Law of Armed 
Conflict

8-13 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
e. 
Impartiality. INGOs, NGOs and the ICRC often prefer to operate alone and without 
direct military support to maintain impartiality. Humanitarian organisations use their 
impartiality to gain access to all those in need, which often incudes dialogue with all parties, 
including adversaries. 
 
8-14 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 9: Stability Activities 
 
Introduction. Part B provided an overview of the link 
Stability Activities 
between operations themes, types of operation and 
•  Introduction 
tactical activities (Figure 3-1). This chapter describes in 
•  Security and Control 
detail the category of tactical activities known as stability 
•  Support to SSR 
activities. While stability activities are central to stability 
o  Support to DDR 
operations, other tactical activities may need to be 
•  Support to Initial Restoration of 
executed within the same area of operations. In 
Essential Services 
operational design and tactics, the groups of tactical 
•  Support to Interim Governance 
activities are closely related.  
Tasks 
 
9-01. Within all types of operation, land forces conduct 
all or some of a range of tactical activities, often concurrently. The balance between the 
different activities varies from one operation to another over time, as il ustrated in Figure 9-1 
below. Tactical activities are either offensive, defensive, stability or enabling. In the mosaic of 
conflict a force may be required to conduct all activities simultaneously. Also, these activities 
are not mutually exclusive. A single force element may link them by a simple transition from one 
activity to another without breaking contact with an enemy; for instance from a defensive activity 
to an offensive one. Enabling activities are never conducted for their own sake; their purpose is 
to enable or link other activities.  
 
 
Figure 9-1. Within the mosaic of conflict, the balance of tactical activities vary over time and between 
operations. 
9-02. Stability Activities. Stability activities are bespoke tactical methods used for delivering the 
stabilising aspect of any land operation. They require the application of the Ful  Spectrum 
Approach in cooperation with partner nations and allied agencies. This collaboration requires 
individuals with the right skil s and personalities.95 There are four types of stability activities: 
 
a. 
Security and Control. 
 
b. 
Support to Security Sector Reform (SSR). 
 
c. 
Support to Initial Restoration of Essential Services. 
 
d. 
Support to Interim Governance Tasks. 
 
9-03. Note that this chapter explains the characteristics of the stability activities only. Chapter 10 
provides guidance on how they might be executed at the Divisional, Brigade and Battlegroup levels 
of command. 
 
95 These are broadly the same as the five aspects of human interoperability (language, rapport, respect, knowledge and 
patience). 
9-15 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
9-04. Tactical Functions. The tactical functions represent the full breadth of a land force’s 
activities when conducting operations. They are a device that helps to organise activities into 
intelligible groups; they have no effects, whereas the activities do. Few, if any, stand alone. Al  
activity needs to be commanded and sustained for example. The bigger and more combined arms 
the force is, the more likely it is to have the ability for significant activity under every heading.  
 
9-05. As a rule of thumb, corps and divisions are designed to conduct all the tactical functions 
simultaneously. Subordinate force elements may be able to apply all the functions to lesser 
degrees or specific ones to great effect. For example, an engineer unit has less access to fires 
than a combined arms battlegroup, which in turn may have fewer opportunities for capacity building 
than one scaled for security force assistance tasks. The tactical functions also provide a useful 
checklist for commanders when assessing a plan, and a common vocabulary for describing a 
force’s overall capabilities. See Chapter 8, ADP Land Operations for further detail. 
 
Security and Control 
 
9-06. Introduction. Security and control is likely to be the activity which requires most military 
effort. Security is a fundamental human need and motivates and regulates behaviour. Security 
(human, personal, regional, national and physical) creates the conditions in which other activity 
crucial to well-being can take place. People wil  generally give their loyalty to the group that best 
meets this need. Winning the contest for security is therefore essential to establishing the security 
of a state. The early establishment of a secure environment and a degree of law and order, 
following military intervention helps to: 
 
a. 
Provide a permissive environment for external, civil actors to operate. 
 
b. 
Promote campaign authority. 
 
c. 
Provide the opportunity for the development or resumption of normal security, social, 
political and economic activity. 
 
d. 
Provide the opportunity for dialogue between opposing factions leading to political 
activity. 
 
9-07. Security and control activities are intended to avoid actions by adversaries and reduce civil 
disorder and violence from uncontrolled groups; other goals are to enforce ceasefires, and forge 
peace agreements to ensure long-term security. A secure situation is required prior to starting the 
reconstruction of a country or region after a crisis (conflict or natural disaster). Independent of the 
origin of the crisis, should the local security forces be unable to act, land forces should gain control 
of the situation at the earliest opportunity possible. 
 
9-08. Achieving Security. Security is achieved and maintained through: 
 
a. 
Deterrence. Through deterrence, land forces can discourage the adversary from acting 
against the interests of the partner nation government and its military forces. This is done by 
showing them that the cost of their action wil  be higher than the potential benefit.  
 
b. 
Control. Through control, land forces can gain awareness of the situation and 
anticipate the evolution of events, so they can plan an action or a reaction to what might be a 
threat to security. Control involves securing borders, lines of communication, key points, 
population and towns, as well as occupying key areas and facilities. It requires dynamic 
planning and implementation; passivity must be avoided. In addition, control wil  be more 
efficient if deterrence and an appropriate response capability are combined.  
 
c. 
Response. If deterrence is ineffective and control does not prevent or counter hostile 
aggression, land forces, along with the partner nation’s security forces, can provide an 
9-16 

FOI2020/12929
 
effective response to restore the conditions to its former state. The response should consist 
of a rapid and balanced reaction to the aggression which wil  counter, neutralise or destroy 
the adversary, if needed. Similarly, the response should include the capacity for monitoring 
and crowd control activities. 
 
9-09. Planning considerations. Success in establishing a secure environment depends upon 
many variables, some of which are outside the control of an external military force. Al  these factors 
should have been considered by the strategic comprehensive estimate and are linked to the 
principles of stability operations. 96 Variables to consider when planning are: 
 
a. 
Social, Ethnic and Political Factors. The social and ethnic mix of a society and its 
propensity to violence because of its history, political divisions or criminality wil  impact on the 
security environment. 
 
b. 
The Nature of the Political Settlement. A comprehensive peace settlement reduces 
the scope for further violence. 
 
c. 
The Nature and Extent of the Demobilisation of Combatants. Failure to conduct a 
comprehensive and timely demobilisation, disarmament and reintegration (DDR) programme 
can perpetuate violence and lawlessness. Equally, an overly ambitious programme can also 
lead to a security vacuum that can be exploited by protagonists. 
 
d. 
Regional Stability. The influence of neighbouring states can exacerbate or improve a 
situation. 
 
e. 
The Size, Posture, Command and Skills of the Military Force. The military force 
providing security and control must be configured, trained and resourced to conduct the 
mission. For example, large numbers of combat-ready soldiers who remain in barracks wil  
be of little use in promoting stability. A continuous presence on the ground can have a 
stabilising effect. 
 
f. 
The Extent of Organised Crime. In a transitional phase, organised crime can emerge 
as an ally of spoilers and rejectionists. Criminals wil  benefit from a lack of law and order and 
wil  exploit any security vacuum. It is therefore essential that credible and impartial criminal 
justice systems and the civil police service are developed early. Part 1 to this AFM provides 
further details on counter-criminality. 
 
   
  The Allies and the Mafia: Sicily, Second World War 
   
  “The Al ied occupation undeniably gave new oxygen to the mafia. Anxious to exclude both 
  Communists and Fascists from power, the occupying Anglo-American Army – whether 
  knowingly or unknowingly – installed several prominent mafiosi as mayors of their towns. (An 
  Italian-American mafioso, Vito Genovese, managed to become interpreter for the American 
  governor of Sicily, Colonel Charles Poletti, during the six months of military occupation.) 
  Criminal elements succeeded in infiltrating the Al ied administration, often with the help of 
  Italian-American soldiers. They managed to smuggle supplies from military warehouses and 
  ran a flourishing black market in such scarce commodities as food, tobacco, shoes and 
clothi  ng…the aftermath of World War II was a time of chaotic freedom and economic 
exp  
ansion which the mafia exploited ably.” 
 
 
 
Stil e, Alexander. (2011). Excellent Cadavers: The Mafia and the Death of the First Italian 
 
Republic. Random House, New York City, pp 17-18. 
 
 
 
 
 
96 For example, through Political, Military, Economic, Social, Infrastructure (PMESI) and Area, Structures, Capabilities, 
 
Organisations, People and Events (ASCOPE) analyses.  
 
9-17 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
g. 
Condition of Security Sector. The capacity and capability of the partner nation’s 
security sector wil  influence the security situation. 
 
h. 
History. Analysis of the history of conflict (including key events such as uprisings, 
assassinations and peace agreements) and associated changes in governance, security and 
socio-economic development wil  provide an insight into local attitudes towards violence and 
proposed solutions. 
 
9-10. Intelligence. Intelligence will prove essential in the conduct of security and control tasks to 
permit both the precise targeting of individuals and organisations and informing wider situational 
awareness. Integral assets (Field human intelligence (HUMINT) Teams, signals intelligence 
(SIGINT) teams etc.) may be augmented by partner nation assets, where appropriate, and other 
international intelligence organisations (e.g. INTERPOL).97 The sharing of intelligence will help to 
develop a climate of cooperation between land forces, partner nation forces and other 
organisations. Commanders will require guidance from PJHQ as to what can be shared and this 
guidance should be kept under review. Equally, advice from LEGADs on intelligence and 
information gathering is essential given the considerable array of legal frameworks that may be 
constraining the intervention. 
 
9-11. Establishing the Rule of Law. Successful implementation of the rule of law requires an 
effective criminal justice system consisting of police, judiciary and penal elements. Early 
establishment of rule of law wil  increase the chances of mission success. Delivering personal 
security (part of human security) for the population should be a high priority and wil  set the 
conditions for the resumption of normal economic and social activity. See para 1-11 and note that 
Part 1 to this AFM covers detention operations. 
 
9-12. Stability Policing. Experience has shown that it can take a considerable amount of time to 
build and deploy a civilian police force. During the initial stages of a conflict, military forces may be 
required to maintain internal security and fil  the security vacuum in the absence of a viable 
indigenous or international police force. Where this is necessary, combat force elements should be 
complemented by military and civil law enforcement capabilities, such as the Military Police, and 
replaced entirely by an appropriate civilian organisation as soon as practicable. Stability Policing 
needs to be linked to judicial and penal processes and wil  set the foundations for wider SSR as 
the operation progresses. Specialist pre-deployment training may be required for force elements 
due to the complex legal issues surrounding Stability Policing. Legal guidance and clarification 
must be sought concerning powers of stop, search, arrest and detention. 
 
9-13. Military Police. Military Police (MP) are a significant force multiplier during Stability Policing 
operations due to their specialist knowledge of police-specific considerations and operating within 
a non-permissive environment. Their employment as part of the Stability Policing force is essential 
to safeguard the reputation of land forces when operating under the complex legal conditions that 
accompany this type of activity. Due to MP being a finite and limited resource, the scale and remit 
of their employment wil  be determined by the Force Provost Marshal (FPM). AJP-3.22 Al ied Joint 
Doctrine on Stability Policing
 provides detailed guidance on the employment of MP during stability 
operations. 
 
9-14. Civilian Police. Typically, following Stability Policing activity or where the security situation 
permits, UK land forces may deploy civilian police. These personnel are likely to be deployable 
experts working for the Stabilisation Unit. They are particularly useful in the training and mentoring 
of partner nation police forces and may reduce the requirement for Military Police support in that 
role. 
 
9-15. Information Activities. Information activities are actions designed to affect information or 
information systems. They can be performed by any actor and include protection measures. 
 
97 AFM Vol 1 Part 3A ISTAR and Doctrine Note 16-06 ISR contain more detail on intelligence activities. 
9-18 

FOI2020/12929
 
Activities include: psychological operations (PSYOPS); engagement; operations security (OPSEC); 
deception; electronic warfare (EW); cyber; presence, posture, profile (PPP); special capabilities 
(SPECAP); and physical destruction.98 More detail is in Doctrine Note 17/05: Information Activities 
 
Support to Security Sector Reform 
 
9-16. Introduction. SSR is a comprehensive set of programmes and activities undertaken to 
improve the way a partner nation provides safety, security and justice. SSR is a long-term effort 
conducted by the partner nation’s government requiring extensive resources and participation of 
many security sector actors. Land forces’ principal contribution to a partner nation’s SSR is through 
capacity building. This subject is covered in more detail in Part 5 to this AFM and AJP 3.4.5 
Stabilization and Reconstruction
 
9-17. The Security Sector. The composition of the security sector differs from country to country 
so there is no universally applicable definition of it. There are four generally accepted categories 
comprising the security sector: 
 
a. 
Security Actors. Armed forces; police and gendarmeries; paramilitary forces; 
presidential guards; intelligence and security services (military and civilian); coast guards; 
border guards; customs authorities; reserve or local security units (civil defence forces, 
national guards, government backed militias) and veterans’ groups. 
 
b. 
Security Management Oversight Bodies. The executive; national security advisory 
bodies; legislature and legislative select committees; ministries of defence, internal affairs, 
foreign affairs; customary and traditional authorities; financial management bodies (finance 
ministries, budget offices, financial planning and audit units); civil society organisations 
(civilian review boards and public complaints commissions). 
 
c. 
Justice and Law Enforcement Institutions. Judiciary; justice ministries; correctional 
facilities; criminal investigation and prosecution services; human rights commissions and 
ombudsmen; customary and traditional justice systems.99 
 
d. 
Non-Statutory Security Forces. Liberation armies, private security companies (PSC), 
guerril a armies, private bodyguard units and political party militias. 
 
9-18. Objectives. There are four primary objectives when conducting SSR: 
 
a. 
Increase the capacity for effective governance, oversight, and accountability in the 
security sector. 
 
b. 
Improve delivery of security and justice. 
 
c. 
Assist local leadership to develop an ownership of the reform process. 
 
d. 
Support the development of sustainable security and justice delivery. 
 
9-19. The Full Spectrum Approach. To be successful, SSR requires all elements of national 
power to be applied in a coherent fashion and in coordination with other donors and the recipient or 
partner nation. See Part A.  
 
9-20. Security concepts. International consensus supports the idea that the foundation of state 
security action should be the protection of the people. This idea is based on two principles: 
 
 
98 NATO includes civil-military cooperation (CIMIC) as an information activity whilst the UK views it as an element of 
capacity building. More detail on CIMIC is in Part 5 to this AFM. 
99 Guidance on the reform of these sub elements of the security sector can be found in ATP-3.2.1.1, page 2-12. 
9-19 

FOI2020/12929
 
a. 
The security interests of the state should not conflict with the security interests of its 
citizens. 
 
b. 
The state is ultimately responsible for providing the security conditions for the wellbeing 
of its population. 
 
9-21.  In developing countries that security is not provided exclusively by western-style statutory 
bodies but also comes from traditional and non-statutory systems. The conditions are not limited to 
law and order issues but include all political, economic and social issues that ensure life is as free 
from risk as possible. Ideally the security sector wil  be controlled and guided by a national security 
strategy. If one does not exist its development could be an early element of the SSR programme. 
 
9-22. Supporting the Development of a Partner Strategic Plan for SSR. The military 
contribution to a SSR programme should be incorporated within an overall partner nation strategic 
reform plan, developed by the partner nation with support from all the stakeholders, including the 
intervention force where applicable, IOs, and NGOs. 
 
9-23. Security is the essential element to effective rule of law, political participation, legitimate 
governance and ultimately state sovereignty. For states that are fragile due to armed conflict, 
natural disaster, or other events that threaten the national government, an effective security sector 
builds legitimacy, secures the people from harm, fosters economic and social development, and 
encourages foreign investment. 
 
9-24. Partner Nation Defence. Military forces are developed primarily to counter external threats. 
The design of these forces develops from the analysis of those threats and the specific capabilities 
required to counter them. Providing humanitarian assistance and countering certain types of 
internal military threats can also be a necessary capability. Defence reform should be structured by 
the constraints of relevant partner nation executive and legislative branch directives, legislation and 
policy documents. Partner nation national security strategies, policies, acts and budgets are 
examples of documents which should inform the design and implementation of defence reform and 
SSR programmes. Assisting the partner nation to craft them if they are absent or out-dated 
becomes an essential feature of the reform process. 
 
9-25. The activities of land forces are generally focused on reforming the partner nation’s military 
forces, but those actions are only part of a broader, comprehensive effort to reform the entire 
security sector, which is composed of individuals and institutions that provide safety, security and 
justice for the people of a state. 
 
9-26. Execution of comprehensive SSR unites all elements of the security sector through the Ful  
Spectrum Approach. See Figure 9-1 below for other elements within the security sector and their 
relationships. 
 
9-20 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
 
Figure 9-1. Elements of SSR (from ATP-3.2.1.1) 
 
9-27. Leadership Capacity Building. Chal enges associated with developing legitimate, and 
accountable security forces require capable leadership in the partner nation security sector at all 
levels. To establish the conditions for long-term success, SSR may help the partner nation identify 
and begin training and advising security force leaders as early as possible. Such efforts must avoid 
undermining partner nation legitimacy while recognising that assistance, advice, and education 
may be needed. Programmes focused on developing senior leaders may prove helpful. 
 
9-28. Advisor, trainers, mentors, monitoring and liaison staff should be carefully selected to deal 
with the frustration of working with developing security forces. Advisors’ tour lengths should be long 
enough for relationships to be forged and for a deep understanding of how best to develop the 
indigenous force to emerge. See Part 5 to this AFM for further details on this subject. 
 
9-29. Public Trust and Confidence. In rebuilding the institutions of a fragile state, commanders 
must engender trust and confidence between the local population and the security forces. As SSR 
proceeds, these security forces carry a progressively greater burden in ensuring public safety. 
Frequently, they do so in an environment characterised by crime and violence. This proves true in 
areas recovering from violent, predatory forces. Recovery requires a community-based response 
that uses the unique capabilities of the security forces and police. Operating in accordance with the 
laws of the partner nation, the success of these forces wil  help to gain the trust and confidence of 
the local population. Furthermore, increased public confidence engenders greater desire among 
the people to support the efforts of the security forces. Note, though, gaining trust can be a huge 
chal enge, especially where the security forces themselves have historically been viewed by the 
public as corrupt and predatory. 
 
9-30. Partner Nation Dependency. During reform, the risk of building a culture of dependency is 
mitigated by adopting a training process. This process sequentially provides training and 
equipment to security forces, a dedicated advising capability, and an advisory presence. After initial 
training efforts, this reform helps partner nation security forces progress toward the transition of 
security responsibility. A robust transition plan supports the gradual and coherent easing of partner 
nation dependency, typically in the form of increased responsibility and accountability.  
 
9-21 

FOI2020/12929
 
9-31. Depending on the security environment, external actors in SSR may need to protect new 
partner nation security forces from many direct and immediate threats during their development. 
While this requirement usual y applies only during initial training, security forces remain at risk 
throughout their development during SSR; these threats may contribute to problems with discipline, 
dependability, and desertion. In extreme circumstances, protecting partner nation security forces 
may necessitate training outside the physical boundaries of the state. Prior to this, detailed 
analysis must be conducted of cultural and security implications. 
 
9-32. Non-State Security Forces. Local militias, neighbourhood watches, and tribal forces are a 
frequent response when the state is unable to provide effective security to local communities and 
may be significant employers within local communities. SSR programmes must acknowledge the 
presence of these non-state actors and determine how best to deal with them. Indeed, intervening 
forces may quickly achieve a measure of local legitimacy by partnering with local non-state security 
actors in such situations.  
 
9-33. Local militias and other non-state security forces are less legitimate and functional at the 
district and provincial levels, though their activities may undermine state authority at those levels 
due to the disconnects between local actors and the district and provincial government bodies that 
are charged with formal responsibility for public safety. Given many non-state security actors tend 
to lack inclusive and formal accountability and oversight mechanisms, over time they tend to 
become major abusers of human rights and predators in their own and other communities.  
 
9-34. Uncontrolled violence, once accepted by state authorities or intervening forces, is very 
difficult to restrain. The DDR of non-state security forces is essential to reforming a partner nation’s 
security sector. Where bearing weapons is a socially accepted feature of adulthood, disarmament 
wil  be problematic at best. Disarmament processes may require a nuanced approach that 
differentiates between personal weapons and heavy or crew-served weapons. The perception that 
former combatants are receiving benefits that are not broadly available to civilians may generate 
resentment, if not open hostility. To add to the complexity, combatants may be adamant they have 
earned such benefits. Without adequate economic opportunities for reintegration, disarmament and 
demobilisation activities alone wil  gain little traction. A summary of DDR can be found at Annex A. 
 
9-35. Private Security Companies and Security Forces. The private security industry comprises 
those individuals and institutions that provide security for people and property under contract and 
for profit. The activities of an uncontrolled or poorly regulated private security industry can present 
unique governance problems and act as an obstacle to SSR programmes directed at both military 
and law enforcement forces. Increased security provision by non-state actors is prevalent in all 
regions of the world. SSR planners therefore must consider the potentially serious implications of 
the private security industry in the partner nation, as wel  as the effects of limited regulation and 
accountability of a market, which continues to grow in both size and importance. 
 
9-36. Intelligence and security service reform is a key element of SSR that is often overlooked. 
Intelligence and security services are normally located within central government, typically 
reporting directly to senior decision makers. They should provide warnings and insights about 
threats and trends which impact on the security and economic well-being of a state and allow 
decision makers to shape policy. Intelligence services can make a significant contribution to the 
process of building a nationally-owned and led vision of security through the provision of tactical or 
strategic intelligence assessments on the range of threats faced by the state. 
 
9-37. In addition to assisting the overall SSR process, intelligence services themselves frequently 
require reform. Intelligence services of the state may have been involved in human rights abuses 
or colluded in the rule of a corrupt or tyrannical regime. Thus, there may be a requirement to 
reform the intelligence services and structures of a state as a part of the comprehensive SSR 
programme. This is not a specifically military problem, but given our potential reliance on local 
intelligence agencies to develop our own understanding reform is very often in land forces’ interest. 
 
9-38. Border forces. The control of border areas by state-sanctioned border forces wil  be 
necessary to prevent any movement of hostile actors into a fragile state. This helps to restore the 
9-22 

FOI2020/12929
 
idea that the state is sovereign. Border forces are often involved in detecting and preventing crime 
in border areas, including illegal trafficking and entry. These forces can include border guards, 
coast guard, and immigration and customs personnel. In many states, ineffective border 
management systems frustrate efforts to detect and prevent organised crime and other irregular 
activity. Border forces can also be associated with corruption, which reduces state revenues, 
erodes confidence and discourages trade and economic activity. Issues to be considered in the 
initial development of a border control force are: 
 
a. 
Facilitating the efficient and regulated movement of people and goods, thereby 
achieving an appropriate balance between security, commerce, and social normalisation. 
 
b. 
Building capacity to detect and combat il icit trafficking, organised crime, terrorism and 
other factors leading to insecurity in border areas. 
 
c. 
Strengthening revenue-generating capacity, promoting integrity and tackling corruption. 
 
d. 
Establishing a border guard under central government control. 
 
e. 
Harmonising border control and customs regulations regionally and enhancing cross-
border cooperation. 
 
f. 
Establishing cross-border protocols with adjoining states. 
 
9-39. Perseverance. SSR is a complex activity, and participants must demonstrate persistence 
and resilience in managing the dynamic interactions among the various factors affecting the reform 
programme. Within the SSR processes, some failures are likely. Early identification of potential 
points of failure allows for mitigating action. 
 
Support to Initial Restoration of Essential Services 
 
9-40. Introduction. Sustainable human security depends on providing essential services, for 
example medical services, electricity, water, sewerage and food. The more demanding the physical 
environment and the more destructive the preceding fighting, the greater the lack of services wil  
be felt. Most of the solutions are in the hands of the civilian components supporting the Ful  
Spectrum Approach and the main military contribution should be the provision of sufficient area 
based security to enable this. If the security situation is not permissive to civilian specialists, 
military forces may need to directly support local authorities (state or non-state) to deliver these 
services, or, in extremis, directly deliver themselves.  
 
9-41. Definition and scope. Restoration of services comprises life-saving activities and essential 
services for a limited period. Life-saving activities are those actions that, within a short time span, 
remedy, mitigate or avert direct loss of life, physical harm or threats to a population or major part 
thereof. Essential services are those that satisfy basic human needs and provide the necessary 
infrastructure for economic recovery as efficiently as possible. They cover Sewage, Water, 
Electricity, Academics (i.e. education), Rubbish, Medical and Security (SWEAR-MS).100 Land 
forces may have to intervene to support the initial restoration of essential services for the following 
reasons: 
 
a. 
Civil agencies are incapable of delivering the required effect due to the security 
situation. Note that military restoration must complement longer-term partner nation 
development plans and avoid creating dependence on military support. 
 
b. 
To improve security: 
 
 
100 Adapted from ATP-3.2.1.1. The NATO version uses ‘trash’ rather than rubbish. 
9-23 

FOI2020/12929
 
(1)  Directly, by fixing populations (for example, by the provision of clean water in a 
given area), improving routes (permitting, armoured vehicles/ quick reaction force 
access), improving street lighting etc.  
 
(2)  Indirectly, by removing cause for discontent amongst the civil population and 
denying a shadow government and/or adversaries the opportunity to occupy a vacuum. 
 
c. 
To promote campaign authority. 
 
d. 
To support the logistic and infrastructure requirements of a military force. 
 
e. 
To act as a catalyst for governance, economic and social activity (for example by 
repairing strategic infrastructure and improving transport links). 
 
f. 
Legal obligations placed upon occupying powers by international law to provide and 
care for civilian populations.  
 
9-42. The restoration of essential services for a civilian population, linked to information activities 
and other lines of operations, is an early measure that can be taken to increase the chances of 
mission success. Restoration work must be linked to information activities to capitalise on the good 
wil  from the local population and deny criminal groupings from taking unwarranted credit. 
Restoration activity is likely to be conducted primarily by military engineers or contractors with 
STABADs playing a coordinating role. The military medical services may also be involved where 
there is a requirement to restore medical facilities for the civilian population and to provide advice 
on environmental health issues. 
 
9-43. The nature and size of the military contribution wil  vary. In some circumstances, it may be 
appropriate to focus military engineer effort on the restoration of services for the population at the 
expense of the provision of facilities to the force. 
 
9-44. Restoration Planning. Restoration planning should be undertaken early, as part of the 
integrated planning process in the absence of appropriate civilian agencies. An overall assessment 
of the partner nation’s infrastructure should be made and used to focus military and civilian 
resources to best effect in support of the campaign plan. Short-term, quick-win solutions should be 
aligned with long-term objectives and resources identified and allocated to conduct both. Provision 
should also be made for the military to hand over responsibility for restoration tasks to appropriate 
civil actors or partner nation institutions as soon as is practicable while having contingency plans to 
retake the lead in periods or in areas where the security situation deteriorates and prevents other 
actors from carrying out their role. The partner nation should be involved as early as possible in the 
planning of work and the allocation of priorities with partner nation personnel employed wherever 
possible. 
 
9-45. Risks. Military forces wil  often face a dilemma. In the short term there wil  likely be pressure 
for immediate results to be shown in the re-establishment of essential services, and short-term 
stability may partly depend on this. In the absence of civilian agencies, under pressure from local 
populations and authorities to assist, and with military capabilities available, it may be that in some 
circumstances providing this direct support wil  be necessary. Military commanders must not forget 
that their greatest contribution wil  always be the provision of sufficient security to allow partner 
nation authorities and supporting civilian agencies to conduct this service provision. 
 
9-46.  Military delivery is unlikely to be sustainable and solutions provided may detract from the 
local development of more permanent solutions. They may also indirectly undermine the legitimacy 
of local authorities, underlying their inability to provide basic services to the population. They also 
run a very real risk of exacerbating conflict dynamics if they inadvertently favour different groups 
over others. Where UK civilian departments and the military agree that direct military involvement 
is appropriate, these risks can be minimised by, for example, ensuring military restoration planning 
is conducted in cooperation with local communities and authorities. Wherever possible, plans 
9-24 

FOI2020/12929
 
should be made to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions and their impact on 
overall conflict dynamics. As a minimum, the conflict-sensitive approach should be applied.  
 
9-47. Military support within Integrated Action. The restoration of essential services can 
contribute directly to improvements in the security situation. Restoration actions, most likely in the 
form of information activity and capacity building should aim to deliver non-lethal effect within a 
broader Integrated Action sequence. Within both combat and stability operations, expert advice 
from military engineers and cultural property protection specialists should be used to: 
 
a. 
Avoid, where possible, damaging or destroying infrastructure that wil  be required to 
achieve long-term stability. 
 
b. 
Minimise the long-term damage to any infrastructure that must be targeted to achieve a 
required effect during combat operations. 
 
c. 
Protect infrastructure crucial to stability that might be vulnerable to other threats during 
combat operations. 
 
d. 
Identify infrastructure whose protection or repair wil  positively affect actor behaviour. 
 
9-48. Intelligence Preparation of the Environment (IPE). Basic services and infrastructure 
should be examined as part of the IPE process during all phases of a campaign. Correctly focused 
restoration effort can achieve significant results. 
 
9-49. Short-term gains wil  need to be balanced against long-term objectives and the impact on 
perceptions of local populations should be considered. Restoration activity should be conducted in 
support of and exploited by information activities (failure to do so may leave a vacuum that is 
exploited by opposition groups). Information activities may also be required to produce a remedial 
effect where critical infrastructure has been damaged because of military action or to manage 
expectations when quick repairs are not achievable. 
 
9-50. Coordination of Activity. Military restoration activity must be coordinated with the efforts of 
civil actors and in line with long-term strategic objectives. The process of integrated planning and 
coordination should continue at the operational and tactical level. Stabilisation Advisors and CIMIC 
staff wil  play a role in this process, conducting liaison with civil actors and, where the situation 
permits, establishing a Civil Military Operations Centre (CMOC) as a mechanism for 
coordination.101  
 
9-51. Funding. Ideally, funds for restoration activity should be made available from a single source 
at the national level and channelled to partner nation institutions as they develop their capability 
and capacity. Restoration activity must be adequately resourced with funds being made available 
at the tactical level to deliver targeted effect. The mechanism for obtaining funds for restoration 
activity is theatre specific and must be understood. Financial authority must be delegated to the 
appropriate level102 to ensure that sufficient funds can be used in a timely manner to achieve 
desired effects. Restoration work with a direct impact on the military mission, such as repair of 
street lighting in an urban area to reduce the requirement for patrolling, should be funded through 
the military. 
 
9-52. Military units. Military units with specific capabilities may be directed to support the initial 
restoration of essential services, particularly: 
 
a. 
Engineer units. Military engineering resources will be limited, reinforcing the need for 
the appropriate targeting of assets and effective liaison and coordination of effort with other 
actors, including contractors.  
 
101 See AJP 3.4.9: CIMIC for more detail. 
102 Some funding could be made available to ground holding unit commanders, but funded projects must contribute to the 
overall effect that is trying to be achieved. 
9-25 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
b. 
Logistic Units. Varied support tasks can be developed by these units: provisional 
water/fuel supply, humanitarian relief tasks; airport/port management support, etc. Logistic 
units need to be flexible in their delivery of CSS to OGDs and NGOs and must be able to 
support the rebalancing of land forces during the transition to stability operations. 
 
c. 
Medical Units. They may, in extremis, provide limited medical support until the local 
medical facilities are rehabilitated. Medical support may range from local medical care to 
health inspection through prevention campaigns (vaccination). Veterinary services may also 
be required.  
 
d. 
CIMIC Units. Working with STABADs, they wil  enable cooperation between the military 
forces and civil actors in support of the mission.  
 
9-53. In some circumstances, it may be necessary to surge additional engineer resources to a 
theatre to cope with the infrastructure demands of the civilian population and the military 
concurrently. 
 
9-54. Non-local civil organisations. A few IOs and NGOs may start their activities within the area 
of operations from the very beginning of the conflict. They wil  play an increasingly important role to 
support the restoration of basic services, when security conditions are appropriate. Under such 
conditions, specialised civil agencies or corporations (contractors) – either local or foreign – may 
effectively participate in restoration activities, complementing land forces’ efforts or replacing them 
for the performance of this type of task. 
 
9-55. Use of Local Expertise and Labour. A chal enging but essential task is to make the best 
use of available local expertise as soon as possible.103 To set the conditions for long-term success 
and the eventual transfer of responsibility to the partner nation’s institutions, indigenous personnel 
should be involved in problem solving and decision making from the outset. Institutional capacity 
should be developed alongside technical ability and planning processes (prioritisation of tasks, 
securing of funds etc.) linked to governance activities. 
 
9-56. Wherever possible, local labour should be used on reconstruction projects to boost local 
economies and provide legitimate means of income to the local population. DDR programmes may 
be linked to reconstruction projects to provide employment opportunities for ex-combatants.  
 
9-57. Quick impact projects. Ultimately, support to restoration of services wil  contribute to the 
longer-term campaign objectives of allowing the nation to recover and become self-sustaining in 
terms of stability. In the short term, the development of quick impact projects is very useful to 
demonstrate that things are evolving in the area for the benefit of the population. These quick 
solutions should be aligned with the long-term objectives and resources, and they should 
contribute to increasing partner nation ownership. They should only be started if there is a certainty 
that they can be finished and must be conducted with conflict sensitivity in mind. 
 
9-58. Quick impact projects should provide the community with an immediate benefit, which should 
win the good wil  of the community. This wil  set the conditions for the local community and the 
alliance to cooperatively identify, plan and implement longer term projects. Highly visible 
improvements for the population are a decisive starting point on the way to success. 
 
9-59. Transition Management. Where the military has been obliged to undertake activity normally 
carried out by civil actors there will be a requirement to hand over responsibility, either by province 
or nationwide, to partner nation institutions or other appropriate civil actors. Depending upon the 
situation (capability and capacity of partner nation institutions, security etc.) the time required for 
the transition process wil  vary. It should be a conditions-based activity and decisions to conduct a 
 
103 A risk is that intervention alters the dynamics of the local economy potentially creating dependency cultures and 
fostering corruption. This subject is covered in Part 1 of this AFM, Counter-Irregular Activity
9-26 

FOI2020/12929
 
transfer of responsibility should be linked to other relevant lines of operation (for example 
Governance). Information activities should exploit opportunities to highlight progress and the 
effectiveness of legitimate partner nation institutions. 
 
Support to Interim Governance Tasks 
 
9-60. Introduction. It is accepted that the provision of governance is not generally a military 
responsibility and if land forces do get involved it is most likely to be in a supporting role. In some 
circumstances, however, the military may be the only organisation able to take responsibility for 
governing an area.  
 
9-61. Land forces may be required to undertake a range of civil administration tasks in support of a 
weak partner nation government or in the absence of a working indigenous or international 
administration. Such tasks may range from CIMIC liaison to the establishment of an interim military 
government and are likely to include some degree of responsibility for the provision of essential 
services. The military should seek to hand responsibility for governance tasks to an appropriate 
indigenous or international civil organisation at the earliest appropriate opportunity. Its primary role 
wil  be in establishing the environment in which civil actors can operate. 
 
9-62. Planning considerations. Comprehensive and detailed planning wil  be required with input 
(and ideal y the lead) from OGDs, the partner nation government and other IOs and NGOs as 
appropriate. Considerations include: 
 
a. 
Mandate. The mandate under which the force is operating will articulate responsibilities 
and structures for government. 
 
b. 
Understanding. Existing structures and legislation need to be clearly understood and 
their existence and ability to function effectively assessed. The subtleties of the local 
environment should be understood. To understand fully the local situation, an analysis of 
existing power bases and the interrelationships between them should be conducted. 
 
9-63. A Possible Approach. Although there is no template for best practice in governance, the 
following functions are likely to be required: 
 
a. 
Rule of Law. Some form of rule of law should be established. Land forces may be 
required to perform the role of a police force through Stability Policing, or assist local police; 
protect and assist existing, or establish, some form of judiciary; and support or establish 
some form of penal system. This wil  usually involve working with both formal (state) and 
informal (customary or community-led) security, justice and conflict resolution providers. 
 
b. 
Civil Authority. A mechanism for meeting the immediate needs of the civil population 
(shelter, food, water, medical provision, sanitation, fuel, power etc.) must be established. 
Committees comprising prominent local citizens may provide a suitable means for 
determining needs and establishing priorities. How these members are selected so that they 
are seen to broadly represent the local population (including women) can be crucial to their 
legitimacy and stabilising influence. An understanding of the local politics wil  be essential in 
negotiation and communications in general. 
 
c. 
Communications. Communication is critical to the establishment of civil authority and 
the rule of law. Information activities wil  be required to support governance activity, and 
information collection to provide data on the civil authority being established, the role of the 
military etc. An information vacuum risks exploitation by elements hostile to the military force 
or the supported civil authority. 
 
9-64. In all cases, best use should be made of local expertise, structures and capabilities. 
Adequate resources should, ideally, be provided to allow local officials to resolve their own issues. 
Strict standards of accountability should be enforced to lessen the effects of corruption. 
 
9-27 

FOI2020/12929
 
9-65. Protection of Existing Facilities. Early effort must be made to protect existing government 
infrastructure. Failure to do so is likely to increase the amount of resources and time required to 
establish even basic partner nation governance facilities and capability/capacity. 
 
9-66. Use of Existing Institutions. Experience has shown that using existing government 
institutions produces quicker results than building new ones from scratch. The prominence 
afforded to non-state institutions also requires careful consideration. Frequently these wil  continue 
to operate in the absence of state institutions. Even when state institutions are available, non-state 
institutions are often the preferred service provider for most of the population (for example, 
alternative dispute resolution mechanisms as opposed to the formal court system). To provide an 
initial degree of governance there may be a requirement to permit former, undesirable regime 
elements to remain in post (under close supervision) until they can be replaced by a suitable 
alternative. 
 
9-67. Elections. The military may also support an Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) in 
organising elections. The temptation to hold early elections to meet deadlines and exit strategies 
should be avoided to prevent the legitimisation of spoilers and disruption of the long-term 
democratic process. Studies suggest that it is desirable to hold local elections in the first instance 
to provide the opportunity for local leaders to emerge and gain experience and for political parties 
to build a support base. Extended preparation periods also facilitate the establishment of other 
aspects of civil society, such as a free press. 
 
9-68. Coordination and Consistency. The activities of all agencies involved in the provision and 
development of governance and capacity must be coordinated. A consistent approach should, 
ideally, be adopted by all actors. 
 
9-69. Control of Partner Nation Security Forces. SSR activity must include the development of 
how partner nation Security Forces are controlled by a legitimate government. Attempts should be 
made to include this principle from the outset of any governance activity. 
 
9-28 

FOI2020/12929
 
Annex A to Chapter 9: Demobilisation, Disarmament, and Reintegration 
 
9A-01. 
Introduction. A further intervention role for land forces is in the DDR of armed 
elements of a conflict. DDR usually forms part of a peace agreement and is conducted within the 
wider post-conflict recovery process.  
 
9A-02. 
Purpose of DDR. DDR seeks to increase the stability of the post-conflict security 
environment by ensuring that combatants, and their weapons, are taken out of the conflict and 
provided with at least a minimal transition package so that they can return to their civilian life and 
forego returning to arms again. The complex DDR process has dimensions that include culture, 
politics, security, humanity, and socio-economics. In a UN context, the ‘UN Integrated DDR 
Standards’ wil  apply. 
 
9A-03. 
Ex-combatants in Society. While the process is focused on the ex-combatants, the 
wider community wil  also feel the benefits of a successful DDR programme that enhances security 
and is a clear sign of progress to peace. Communities wil  require assistance to successfully 
absorb such ex-combatants. If combatants are disarmed too quickly then this may create a security 
vacuum, if they are detained for too long in encampments this may create unrest. Without a fully 
funded reintegration programme, militia leaders may simply re-form their groups for criminal 
purposes, creating a new security problem.  
 
9A-04. 
Gender, ethnic and minority issues must also be considered in the design of DDR 
programmes. For example, while women are sometimes used as armed combatants, frequently 
their role in armed groups may be as cooks, spies or porters, or as sexual y enslaved 'wives' of 
male combatants. As such, the criteria for entry into DDR schemes needs to look beyond simple 
ownership of weapons, and special arrangements made in relation to subsequent demobilisation 
and reintegration support provided to groups such as women and children.  
 
9A-05. 
Effective DDR planning relies on analysis of possible beneficiaries, power dynamics, 
and local society as wel  as the nature of the conflict and on-going peace processes. External and 
partner nation military forces and police working together in a peace support role may facilitate the 
process. Former combatants must develop confidence in DDR and the organisations charged with 
implementing it. To build this confidence, the programme must be focused on promoting a stable 
society, government, and economy at all levels. This leads to the partner nation taking 
responsibility for DDR processes. Some former combatants wil  be incorporated into the armed 
forces, while others may not. 
 
9A-06. 
Role of Land Forces. Generally, UK land forces do not lead the planning and 
execution of DDR programmes. When involved, land forces should be integrated in the planning 
from its inception and may assist more directly in the disarmament and demobilisation stages. 
Military forces and police, whether from external sources or the partner nation, are fundamental to 
the broad success of the programme, providing security for DDR processes. Successful 
programmes use many approaches designed for specific security environments.  
 
9A-07. 
Each programme reflects the unique aspects of the situation, culture, and character of 
the state. International DDR approaches must comply with “The Principles and Guidelines on 
Children Associated with Armed Forces or Armed Groups”, also known as The Paris Principles.104 
The legal advisor is responsible for providing command guidance on any situations pertaining to 
child combatants. See Annex B to Chapter 10.  
 
9A-08. 
Disarmament is the collection, documentation, control, and disposal of small arms, 
ammunition, explosives, and light and heavy weapons of former combatants, bel igerents, and the 
local population. Disarmament also includes the development of responsible arms management 
programmes. Ideally, disarmament is a voluntary process carried out as part of a broader peace 
 
104 The Paris Principles (2007) are designed to guide interventions to prevent unlawful recruitment of children, to facilitate 
the release and reintegration of children associated with armed forces or armed groups, and to ensure the most 
protective environment. 
9A-1 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
process. Disarmament functions best with high levels of trust between those being disarmed and 
the forces overseeing disarmament. Some groups may hesitate to offer trust and cooperation or 
even refuse to participate in disarmament efforts. In these circumstances, disarmament may occur 
in two stages: a voluntary disarmament process followed by more coercive measures. The latter 
wil  address individuals or small groups refusing to participate voluntarily. In this second stage, 
disarmament of combatant factions can become a contentious and potentially very destabilising 
step of DDR. Military forces should manage disarmament carefully to avoid renewed violence. 
 
9A-09. 
Demobilisation is the process of transitioning a conflict or wartime military 
establishment and defence-based civilian economy to a peacetime configuration while maintaining 
national security and economic vitality. Within the context of DDR, demobilisation involves the 
formal and controlled discharge of active combatants from armed forces or other armed groups. 
Demobilisation includes identifying and gathering former combatants for processing and discharge 
orientation. This extends from the processing of individual combatants in temporary centres to the 
massing of troops in camps designated for this purpose (cantonment sites, encampments, 
assembly areas, or barracks). In many societies, women and children are active participants in 
violent conflict. During demobilisation, separate facilities are necessary for adults and children. 
Additionally, child soldiers require specific services including health, education, food, assistance 
with livelihood development, and reintegration into communities. This subject is covered in more 
detail in Chapter 10. SSR programmes must adequately address demobilisation to avoid renewed 
violence from combatant groups or organised criminals. 
 
9A-10. 
Reinsertion is also part of the demobilisation phase. It is the immediate assistance 
(usually cash) provided to demobilised combatants to allow them to return home and support 
themselves and any dependents until such time as their reintegration programmes commence. 
 
9A-11. 
Reintegration is the process through which demobilised combatants receive amnesty, 
re-enter civil society, gain sustainable employment, and become contributing members of the local 
population. It usually teaches marketable skills to participants and provides them with psycho-
social support. To minimise tensions with host communities, ideally ex-combatant reintegration 
should be complemented with parallel community-based programmes that provide economic and 
livelihood support to the wider population. 
 
 
9A-2 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
Chapter 10: Orchestrating and Executing Stability Operations 
 
10-01. 
Introduction. Land forces have four inherent 
Orchestrating and Executing 
attributes: people, presence, persistence and versatility. The 
Stability Operations 
key quality which alters these properties so they are relevant in 
 
new and changing situations is adaptability.105 Stability 
•  Transition 
operations routinely present new and changing situations 
•  The Division 
requiring adaptability, not least in how the force is organised.  
•  The Brigade 
 
•  The Battlegroup 
10-02. 
Transition. Parts 1-5 to this AFM concern the 
•  Annexes: Human Security Themes 
discrete types of stability operations. The emphasis in this 
o  Women, peace and 
chapter is on the execution of stability activities in the context of 
security 
o  Children and armed 
transition from major combat operations.  
conflict 
 
o  Human trafficking 
10-03. 
In stability operations, at the operational or higher 
o  Cultural property protection 
tactical level, corps and divisions orchestrate Integrated Action 
and align their activity with joint, inter-agency and multinational 
operations. The orchestration of operations concerns the direction and arrangement of actions, 
sequential y and simultaneously, to create desired effects. Brigades, units and other force 
elements, operating at the tactical level, plan and execute their contributions to the divisional 
operation. Throughout, formations and units will apply the Operations Process as described in 
Chapter 4 to AFM Command. The likely weight of effort against the stability activities can be seen 
in Figure 10-1 below. 
 
 
 
Figure 10-1. Likely weight of effort in stability operations by formation. Lighter areas indicate more limited 
involvement. A Corps responsibility would be similar to the Division/2* node. 
 
10-04. 
This chapter provides guidance on how stability activities might be executed at the 
corps, divisional, brigade and battlegroup levels of command. The annexes to this chapter provide 
guidance on the land contribution to human security by theme, linking to the population-centric 
nature of stability operations.
 
105 ADP Land Operations 2017, Chapter 1. 
10-1 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
The Corps and the Division 
 
10-05. 
Introduction. The role of the corps, 2* node or divisional HQ in stability operations is to 
coordinate, synchronise, prioritise and resource the activities of force elements under command.106 
It must engage with the partner nation to understand its vision and how existing institutions work. It 
wil  also need to understand the divide between its tasks and those of subordinate formations. The 
corps or division can also support civilian-led elements of the campaign plan through active 
participation in the Full Spectrum Approach. Generic tasks are: 
 
a. 
Planning, resourcing and coordinating the restructuring of partner nation’s security 
forces. This includes assessment of Security Sector Reform (SSR) activity. 
 
b. 
ISTAR and targeting. 
 
c. 
Joint and combined operations, lethal or non-lethal. 
 
d. 
Coordinating and resourcing divisional/brigade actions with capabilities retained at the 
divisional level, such as command support, aviation, artil ery, ISTAR and sustainment assets, 
including the identification and committal of reserves. 
 
e. 
Coordination with higher political and military authorities. 
 
f. 
Future and contingency plans. 
 
g. 
Information activities, including the provision of metrics and the resources to monitor 
and analyse influence outcomes. 
 
h. 
Focus for media operations. 
 
i. 
Synchronisation of military operations and information with the development of 
essential services and the economy. 
 
10-06. 
Organisation. The requirement to conduct stability operations concurrently with 
warfighting wil  see corps and divisional HQs relying on subject matter experts such as those listed 
below: 
 
a. 
Information activities and capacity building specialists. 
 
b. 
Legal Advisor(s) (LEGAD). 
 
c. 
Policy Advisor(s) (POLAD). 
 
d. 
Operational Analyst(s) (OA). 
 
e. 
Stabilisation Advisor(s) (STABAD). 
 
f. 
Gender Advisor(s) (GENAD). See Annex A to Chapter 10. 
 
g. 
Cultural Advisor(s) (CULAD). 
 
h. 
Religious Advisor(s) (RELAD). 
 
i. 
Environmental Protection Advisor(s). 
 
j. 
OGD liaison officers. 
 
106 In a NATO coalition context, refer to AJP-3.4(A), Allied Joint Doctrine for Non-Article 5 Crisis Response Operations. 
10-2 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
10-07. 
Staff may need to take on additional roles to enable the HQ to plan and execute certain 
tactical activities. In particular, support to SSR, interim governance tasks and the restoration of 
essential services. Pre-deployment preparation should include role-specific individual training for 
staff and HQ collective training should include attached civilian and multinational staff. Limited 
resources mean commanders and staff must understand that a balance needs to be struck 
between force elements conducting security tasks and those conducting civil-military cooperation 
(CIMIC). The point where the balance lies wil  depend on the security situation and the level of 
effort required to conduct the core military tasks. As the security situation improves over time, or 
when partner nation security forces become more capable as part of SSR, more divisional force 
elements can be flexed to support civil effects or to meet changing requirements. In most 
circumstances the headquarters is likely to be augmented by specialist personnel from Force 
Troops Command, in particular 77 Brigade. 
 
10-08. 
Executing the Stability Activities. 
 
a. 
Security and Control. Establishing and maintaining the rule of law is essential, 
particularly in transition, where partner nation law and order institutions may not be 
functioning effectively and where international police may not immediately be available. 
Initial responsibility for enforcing law and order wil  likely fall to the military through the 
conduct of Stability Policing. The HQ wil  therefore be required to plan and resource 
accordingly. Consideration should be given to rerol ing troops that are no longer 
employed in major combat. See the brigade and battlegroup sections below for a 
description of the tasks associated with security and control. Corps/divisional level 
considerations are captured in the Table 10-1 below.  
 
Step 
Execution/ Activity 
Resources 
1. Understand legal 
• Understand the means 
• Legal Advisor. 
authority
available to the military to 
• Stabilisation Advisor and other HQ 
enforce the rule of law. This 
based civilian advisors. 
includes the use of force, 
• DFID in-country advisor. 
powers to stop, search, detain 
• FCO Security and Justice Advisor. 
and intern civilians. 
 
• Ensure that actions taken to 
establish the rule of law are 
legal. 
• Understand partner nation 
criminal laws and powers. 
2. Communicate
• Engage prominent local figures  • Tac Psyops Teams. 
Expected behaviour, 
within the civil community. 
• Legal Advisor. 
restrictions and 
• Use local media. 
• Interpreters. 
consequences must be 
• Use information activities to 
• Military personnel 
clearly articulated to the 
inform and influence behaviour. 
• Civpol advisors. 
civil population. 
• Information activities & media. 
3. Stability Policing and 
• Consider use of curfews. 
• Interpreters. 
support to Rule of Law. 
• Conduct patrolling activity (if 
• Civpol advisors. 
possible with local police service 
• Legal Advisor/Army Legal Service. 
and or indigenous armed 
• Royal Military Police. 
forces). 
• Med. 
• Stop/search/detain persons as 
• Royal Engineers. 
necessary. 
• Military Provost Staff. 
• Establish and run temporary 
• Prison Service advisors. 
detention facility. 
• Log & Med sp. 
- Include inspections by IOs and 
• Clerical support. 
prominent local 
• Interpreters. 
figures. 
• Information activities. 
- Provide opportunity for 
• Stabilisation Advisor and other HQ 
enquiries & visits by family 
based civilian advisors. 
members (through International 
• DFID in-country advisor. 
Committee of the Red Cross). 
 
10-3 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
- Publish lists of detainees and 
their location. 
• Establish interim assessment 
system to determine the need 
for internment. 
- A panel of military and 
prominent civilian figures may 
provide an appropriate means of 
doing this. 
- Efforts should be made to 
reduce numbers held in 
detention facilities for minor 
offences. 
- An independent oversight 
mechanism should be 
established (e.g. a committee of 
prominent local figures, 
appropriate IOs). 
- Processes and findings should 
be publicised. 
Imposition of martial law? 
4. Transfer responsibility 
• Agree conditions for transfer of  • Stabilisation Advisor and other HQ 
to appropriate 
authority early. Note that this 
based civilian advisors. 
organisation. These could 
must be to a legitimate, 
• DFID in-country advisor. 
include international or 
accountable entity in order that 
• Interpreters. 
partner nation Police and 
campaign authority is 
• Civpol advisors. 
Prison Services and 
maintained. 
• Legal Advisor/ Army Legal Service. 
judicial systems. 
• Assist with the development of 
• Royal Military Police. 
police, judicial and penal 
• Med 
systems. 
• Royal Engineers. 
• Address as part of broader 
• Military Provost Staff. 
SSR (see Chapter 9). 
• Prison Service advisors. 
• Log & Med sp. 
• Clerical support. 
• Interpreters. 
• Information activities. 
• Army Legal Service. 
• Clerical support. 
 
Table 10-1. Establishing temporary rule of law 
 
b. 
Support to Security Sector Reform (SSR). The scope of corps/divisional support to 
SSR wil  vary according to the level of reform required and the security environment. In an 
unstable environment, it is likely that the military wil  be required to initiate capacity building, 
which wil  be conducted in line with reform criteria developed during the SSR pre-
assessment. The priority wil  be to ultimately establish a secure environment, preferably 
using indigenous forces. Planning by the HQ should address the need for support to SSR. 
This wil  include an assessment of the threat to security, existing security sector capabilities, 
likely responsibilities and tasks of the security sector and an articulation of the characteristics 
of the reformed security sector (role, function, primacy, size, structure, gender distribution, 
equipment). It needs to be recognised that a meaningful reform plan wil  not be possible 
without partner nation leadership and ownership. Nonetheless, initial planning, with as much 
partner nation participation as is practicable, wil  at least start to identify the broader 
parameters of the Security Sector chal enge, and put initial military tasks into a broader 
context. See Part 5 to this AFM for detail on the execution of SSR. 
 
c. 
Support to Initial Restoration of Essential Services. The HQ may be required to 
assist in the restoration of essential services during transition. Planning should be conducted 
early as part of the comprehensive planning process, including an assessment of partner 
nation infrastructure. Functional and integrating cel s should assess how their approach to 
targeting must change as the emphasis shifts from an enemy to population-centric approach 
10-4 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
in transition. Quick-win solutions must be aligned with long-term objectives, with resources 
identified and allocated to conduct both. Responsibility for restoration tasks should be 
handed over to appropriate civil agencies or partner nation institutions as soon as is 
practicable, while having contingency plans to retake the lead in periods, or in areas where 
the security situation deteriorates. Empowered partner nation personnel should be involved 
in prioritisation and planning, and best use made of the HQ's STABAD. It may be necessary 
to surge additional resources to a theatre to cope with the concurrent infrastructure demands 
of the civilian population and the military. Tasks potentially requiring land forces’ support 
include: 
 
(1) 
Conducting existing infrastructure technical assessments.  
 
(2) 
Preparation of an emergency infrastructure plan. 
 
(3) 
Advising on targeting and effects. 
 
(4) 
Securing key infrastructure assets. 
 
(5) 
Managing contracts processes. 
 
(6) 
Programme and project management.  
 
(7) 
Repair, maintenance and operation of infrastructure. 
 
(8) 
Re-establishment, training and mentoring partner nation service institutions. 
 
d. 
Support to Interim Governance. The military wil  likely be in a supporting role, given 
that its primary role wil  be security related. An HQ may be the only organisation able to take 
responsibility for governing an area. AJP-3.4.1. Peace Support Operations identifies that the 
military may be required to undertake civil administration tasks in support of a weak partner 
nation government, or in the absence of other administrative structures. The HQ should seek 
to hand responsibility for governance tasks to an appropriate civil indigenous, or International 
Organisation at the earliest opportunity. Guidance on the division’s contribution to 
governance can be found in Table 10-2 below. A preceding step to all this activity is to 
conduct a conflict sensitivity assessment to ensure all activity wil  at a minimum not 
exacerbate existing conflict dynamics and at best contribute positively to reducing 
instability.107  
 

Activity 
Execution 
Resources 
1. Communication. Establish a 
•  Hold meetings with civil 
•  Safe, neutral venue for 
dialogue with key community 
society representatives (use 
meetings. 
figures (including women) to 
J2 assessments etc. to 
•  Interpreters. 
increase awareness and 
ensure appropriate 
•  CIMIC staff. 
manage local expectation. 
personalities are involved). 
•  Tac Psyops teams. 
•  Use media/information 
•  Media teams. 
activities to inform local 
•  Clerical support to record 
opinions, perceptions and 
proceedings. 
expectations. 
•  STABAD and other HQ 
•  Publicise activities. 
based civilian advisor. 
•  Protect civil representatives 
•  RELAD. 
as necessary. 
•  DFID in-country advisor. 
•  FCO representatives. 
2. Identify and prioritise local 
•  Consult widely on what 
•  Safe, neutral venue for 
requirements. Establish 
selection criteria should be 
meetings. 
committees of local 
to ensure broad community 
•  Interpreters. 
representatives to represent and 
representation and 
•  CIMIC staff. 
 
107 See Conflict Sensitivity - Tools and Guidance, Stabilisation Unit, 2015). 
10-5 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
prioritise the needs of the civil 
legitimacy of all committees. 
•  Clerical support to record 
population. 
•  Hold regular meetings to 
proceedings. 
establish priorities and 
•  STABAD and other HQ 
update on progress. 
based civilian advisors. 
•  Identify and include local 
•  DFID in-country advisor. 
expertise (e.g. facilities 
managers). 
•  Encourage local ownership 
of issues. 
3. Provide administration and 
•  Establish sector working 
•  Meeting venues. 
essential services. Meet the 
groups (e.g. water, power, 
•  Interpreters. 
needs of the civilian population 
law and order) comprising 
•  Subject matter experts (e.g. 
and encourage local ownership. 
local and military experts. 
Army Legal Service, Royal 
•  Develop working group 
Engineers, Army Medical 
capability with military elms 
Services) and technical 
increasingly performing a 
support. 
mentoring role. 
•  Clerical support. 
•  Establish a mechanism to 
•  Source(s) of funding. 
allocate funds/resources 
•  Financial support. 
and monitor effectiveness 
•  Information activities. 
(the committee(s) 
•  CIMIC staff. 
established in step 2 may 
form the basis of this). 
•  Publicise activities and 
responsibilities to enhance 
legitimacy of organisations. 
•  Manage expectations. 
•  Audit accounts and 
expenditure. 
•  Link to national structures 
as soon as practicable. 
4. Set conditions for and 
•  Identify and agree 
•  CIMIC staff. 
handover of responsibility. 
conditions to be met for 
•  Information activities. 
Responsibility for governance 
transfer to occur early. 
•  Interpreters. 
should be handed over to the 
•  Identify suitable 
•  STABAD and other HQ 
partner nation authorities or an 
organisations to accept 
based civilian advisors.  
appropriate international civil 
responsibility (partner nation  •  DFID in-country advisor. 
organisation at the earliest 
institutions, IOs, NGOs, 
practicable opportunity. 
OGDs etc.). 
•  Develop capacity of local 
organisations. 
•  Publicise achievements. 
•  Manage expectations (local 
population, local 
administrators, NGOs, own 
forces etc.). 
 
Table 10-2. Establishing civil authority 
 
 
10-6 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
The Brigade 
 
10-09. 
Introduction. Brigade stabilising actions wil  usually be conducted within a divisional 
framework. The 2* HQ wil  provide the command experience and staff capacity to deal with the 
significant complexity and inter-agency nature of stabilising actions, allowing the brigade to 
concentrate on tactical delivery. The challenges of stabilisation may see additional functionality 
devolved to the brigade; influence, civil effect, additional intelligence, stabilisation and cultural 
advisors may all be task organised. The brigade HQ wil  need to reconfigure to integrate and 
optimise these assets. The sub-division of function and task between brigade and division wil  vary 
depending on context. Generic brigade HQ on stability operations tasks are: 
 
a. 
Intelligence gathering and identifying sources of instability. 
 
b. 
The over watch, training, supervision and mentoring of partner nation security forces. 
 
c. 
Security operations. 
 
d. 
Surge operations as required to restore law and order. 
 
e. 
Coordination with NGOs, civil ministries, donors, reconstruction agencies and 
contractors. 
 
f. 
Border security (where appropriate until relieved by partner nation security forces). 
 
g. 
Infrastructure security until relieved by partner nation security forces. 
 
h. 
Supporting information activities. 
 
10-10. 
Transition. Once the brigade has achieved an acceptable level of security and public 
order, the commander should consider moving to a partner nation security lead. This wil  be a 
political as wel  as security judgement. There are at least two options: transition from the brigade to 
an indigenous military security lead; or transition direct to a civil (police) lead, i.e. police primacy. 
Police primacy should be the goal as it can bolster the perception of progress and reinforce the 
impression of hostile groups as criminals rather than freedom fighters. It demonstrates the partner 
nation’s commitment to governing through the rule of law. Police primacy wil  often be 
unachievable until relatively late in the campaign and may even be an alien concept in some 
societies. Security transitions are often periods of high risk and uncertainty for the brigade, which if 
enacted prematurely can be counter-productive. 
 
10-11. 
Organisation. To carry out stability activities, the brigade may need to adapt individual 
and unit roles, composition, equipment, operating procedures and training. If the initial deployment 
of the force is based on a contingent intervention operation which then transitions to a stability 
operation (e.g. Iraq 2003 – 2004), then the force may have to adapt in contact. Commonality of CIS 
and a shared information environment must be sought despite chal enges such as security 
clearances. As the operational context evolves, the force must remain responsive to the ever-
changing demands of the operating environment. 
 
10-12. 
The initial composition of the brigade and its options for adaptation should be one of 
the major tasks to fall out of the commander’s analysis. A typical brigade composition to conduct 
stabilising actions is likely to contain the following generic elements: 
 
a. 
Integrated Headquarters (HQ). The brigade HQ structure is likely to require 
adjustment and, as a minimum, wil  need to integrate liaison officers, multi-agency partners 
and staff such as stabilisation, policy or cultural advisors. There is likely to be an increased 
emphasis on future plans/operations. In areas of limited permissiveness, the brigade HQ 
may need to host OGDs and agencies. The aim must be to promote coherence across civil 
10-7 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
and military activity. Ful  integration may only be necessary in the most complex of tasks and 
even then, may be difficult to achieve. Exchanging empowered planning staff or simply 
collocating HQ are viable alternatives in less demanding scenarios.  
 
b. 
Framework Forces. Framework forces enable and conduct the bulk of the routine 
security operations. They wil  largely be focused on securing key installations, locations and 
population centres.  
 
c. 
Strike Forces. Strike forces are used to disrupt and defeat the insurgent, often in 
depth. These forces can take both lethal and non-lethal actions to achieve these effects. 
 
d. 
Surge Forces. Surge forces are deployed to reinforce framework forces to achieve 
specific effects, for example the provision of security and control during elections. They can 
be based over the horizon or in-country.  
 
e. 
Capacity Building Forces. Capacity building forces are made up of brigade 
specialists who should have a deep cultural understanding of the local population and wil  
need to build robust working relationships with them. They may also deliver combat enabling 
capabilities, such as air and medical support that indigenous security forces lack.108 
 
f. 
Joint/Multi National Enablers. Joint enablers are those elements that move, sustain, 
maintain and support the brigade. These often prove to be a very large proportion of a 
stabilisation force and the requirement for joint enablers should not be underestimated. 
 
10-13. 
Augmentation. During transition, the brigade may be augmented with additional 
personnel (including liaison officers) and capabilities. Examples are as follows: 
 
a. 
POLADs. POLADs are responsible for advising on aspects of UK defence policy and 
practice that affect decision making. 
 
b. 
LEGADs. LEGADs are usual y military lawyers, held at brigade or divisional level but 
may be task organised with a battlegroup for specific missions or activities. They are 
responsible for offering legal advice to the deployed force. They have a wide range of duties, 
covered in detail in JDP 3-46. 
 
c. 
STABADs. STABADs are deployed civilian experts from the Stabilisation Unit. They 
work with the brigade commander, integrating cross government stabilisation strategies and 
programmes into brigade planning.  
 
d. 
Operational Analysts(OAs). OAs can provide a range of specialist analytical and 
assessment products and advice to support land forces’ mission planning and execution, 
such as assessment of local variation from standard planning data or in support of Course of 
Action (COA) evaluation. OAs wil  also be able to advise on setting, collecting, and analysing 
Measures of Effectiveness (MOE) in support of the Effects Matrix or Campaign Plan.109 
 
10-02. 
Executing the Stability Activities.  
 
a. 
Security and Control. Success in achieving security is a precursor to enabling all the 
other lines of operation to flourish. The early establishment of a secure environment and a 
degree of law and order following military intervention provides a permissive environment for 
external and civil actors to operate. The brigade wil  contribute to the provision of security 
usually on behalf of the partner nation government. This may range from advice, military 
assistance, offensive actions to contain or deter, or a full-scale intervention to combat a 
 
108 Note that the Specialized Infantry Battalion concept is under development. 
109 OAs were employed at the brigade level on Operation HERRICK but are generally a divisional level asset. 
10-8 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
violent insurgency. In the latter case, the brigade wil  need to engage in offensive actions to 
suppress the insurgent, to wrest the initiative from him to dictate terms, and to demonstrate 
the partner nation government’s authority. Offensive action carries the risk of military and 
civilian casualties and the insurgent may deliberately target the population and through 
violence and intimidation try to dissuade the population and international community from 
supporting the government’s efforts. The following tasks may be executed as part of security 
and control: 
 
(1) 
Establishment of Tactical Bases. Static, tactical bases are used to support a 
continuous and effective security presence. Tactical bases wil  be established when the 
command decision is made that they offer sufficient tactical advantage over relying 
solely on vehicle and dismounted operations. They are the hubs around which forward 
operations are conducted on an enduring operation. Main bases are sited for strategic 
purposes such as theatre entry, whereas the locations of tactical bases are determined 
primarily by tactical considerations. Some bases are established to provide indirect 
support to operations such as communications nodes or to control border-crossing 
points. Others are required to establish the essential framework for security operations. 
In counter-insurgency and stability operations, this latter category is used to secure the 
population, establish a stabilising presence and create local influence. 
 
(2) 
Protection of political processes. The central chal enge of stabilisation is to 
bring about some form of political settlement in a pressured and violent context, and 
supporting the evolution of political processes is key to this. Brigade level contributions 
to this chal enge include:  
 
(a) 
Provision of a secure environment for negotiations, including protecting 
key sites where political processes take place.  
 
(b) 
Ensuring freedom of movement and protection of those engaging in 
political processes 
 
(c) 
Monitoring of ceasefires. 
 
(3) 
Promotion of Human Security. Winning the contest for human security is 
fundamental to the development of partner nation government authority and, ultimately 
security of the state. 110 The commander can employ a range of techniques including: 
 
(a) 
Protecting the Population and Key Assets. Winning the contest for 
human security is fundamental to the development of partner nation government 
authority and, ultimately security of the state. 
 
(b) 
Establishing Secured Areas. By providing secured areas the brigade wil  
isolate the adversary from the population. Securing key areas helps to support 
economic activity, enables major infrastructure projects and encourages effective 
governance and the rule of law. Once the situation allows, such areas should be 
consolidated and expanded. Support to local governance and development, 
together with initiatives that generate local employment and economic growth, wil  
be critical to maintaining security and stability
 
(c) 
Border Forces. Effective border control is essential to combat regional 
criminality and the movement of foreign fighters, weapons and supplies. The 
brigade may be tasked to patrol borders and mentor customs, immigration and 
border control agencies. 
 
110 This subject is covered in detail in the annexes to this chapter. 
10-9 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
(d) 
Provide Humanitarian Assistance. The greatest contribution to the 
delivery of humanitarian assistance that the brigade can generally make is to 
ensure area security and freedom of movement and access for civilian agencies 
delivering that humanitarian assistance. In extremis, the brigade may be asked to 
facilitate this provision more directly by providing direct convoy protection, or 
even to deliver it directly themselves. The brigade should only engage in these 
more direct forms of support after close consultation with DFID or other IOs 
leading aid distribution, such as the UN. This subject is covered in detail in Part 3 
to this AFM. 
 
(4) 
Countering Adversaries. Direct military action against adversaries is likely to be 
a central component of the brigade contribution to the wider campaign to build stability. 
In this case, setting the conditions for a negotiated political settlement may entail 
breaking the ideological, financial or intimidation links within and between different 
adversarial and bel igerent groups, as well as between them and the local population. 
 
 
‘In wars among the people, if you are using a lot of firepower, you are almost certainly losing.’  
 
General Sir David Richards, Chief of the Defence Staff (2010-2013) 
 
 
(5) 
Key Leader Engagement (KLE). KLE is recognised as an important element of 
the influence process and needs to be synchronised at brigade level with fires, 
manoeuvre and other information activities to achieve the required effects (Integrated 
Action). Engagement is predominantly conducted to gain information or influence 
behaviour and is a key enabler of human terrain analysis. The Commander wil  usually 
engage directly with the perceived key leader of the intended target audience. At 
brigade level, KLE mission analysis and planning should be conducted by the 
information activities staff or a designated engagement staff officer. While frequently 
excluded from holding formal positions of leadership, women generally play an 
important role in influencing societal attitudes and perspectives. The informal nature of 
these leadership and influencing roles, combined with the potential difficulty of 
accessing women in conservative societies, can make it easy to overlook women in 
KLE programmes. This needs to be guarded against, and creative ways found to 
achieve this engagement. 
 
(6) 
KLE must be focused. Al  engagement should take place under a single 
competent authority – which then determines the effects required and the means best 
suited to delivering those effects. KLE must not be passed to a separate part of the 
HQ. The conduct of KLE might be planned by information activities staff – the execution 
of KLE must be more coherent and part of a whole HQ. 
 
b. 
Support to SSR. The precise scope and nature of military support provided by the 
brigade wil  vary per the level of reform required and the security environment. The brigade 
wil  require a SSR cell to carry out the level of planning and liaison required with the partner 
nation and OGDs. The brigade contribution to SSR is likely to focus on capacity building, 
covered in Part 5 to this AFM. Other tasks may include: 
 
(1) 
Support to DDR. Further details can be found in Chapter 9.  
 
(2) 
Initial Generation and Management of Indigenous Forces. The condition and 
suitability of existing indigenous security forces should be assessed before a decision 
is made to generate new forces. The commander should ensure training teams 
establish basic support structures parallel to operational training, as the operational 
10-10 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
capability of local forces is likely to reflect the quality of basic administration: pay, 
feeding and equipment husbandry. 
 
(3) 
Support to the Judicial Sector. During the initial stages of a campaign, the 
brigade may be required to identify and provide protection to any functioning judicial 
mechanisms, both formal (state) and informal (customary, community-led), to ensure 
ongoing citizen access to justice and dispute resolution. Identification of what systems 
are functional wil  also provide important information to reform planning processes, 
once these commence. The brigade may also be required to begin the refurbishment or 
reconstruction of facilities, possibly including court houses and correctional facilities, or 
at least to provide security.  
 
(4) 
Developing Indigenous Police Services. The brigade may need to lead on 
basic police training. The responsibility for on-going internal security should ideally be 
provided by a demilitarised police force with a mandate for law enforcement and strong 
links to the judiciary. Ideal y, this sees the creation of a community-based police service 
in the brigade area of operations, with a clear separation between the roles of the 
partner nation’s police and the military. Police primacy for internal security should 
remain an aspiration, however, community policing models assume consent which is 
unlikely to be achievable during violent conflict. Therefore, the policing model must be 
realistic. 
 
c. 
Support to Initial Restoration of Essential Services. The brigade may be required to 
contribute in the early stages of an operation, or subsequent periods where the security 
situation deteriorates and civil agencies are unable to deliver. The nature and size of the 
military contribution wil  vary; in some circumstances, it may be appropriate to focus brigade 
engineer effort on restoration of services for the population at the expense of provision of 
facilities for brigade personnel. The ability to provide essential services demonstrates visible 
signs of progress and effective local governance and the two should be linked where 
possible. The brigade contribution may be optimised in supporting local and international 
humanitarian and development organisations to expand their access to the population. 
Where these agencies cannot operate, the brigade may be asked to provide direct 
assistance. In deciding whether and how to respond, the risks of exacerbating conflict 
dynamics must be considered, and a conflict-sensitive approach adopted. In extremis, 
support to the restoration of services may provide land forces with leverage over certain 
actors.  
 
d. 
Support to Interim Governance Tasks. Where possible, governance activities should 
be implemented by civilian actors and enabled, only where necessary, by the brigade. The 
military contribution to governance wil  depend on the level of security and in non-permissive 
environments where civilian access is limited the brigade may be drawn into those areas of 
governance essential for early progress. Civilian expertise must be integrated into planning 
through reach back/outreach or by in-theatre governance advisors and responsibility handed 
over as soon as practicable. Governance tasks should seek to build on the foundations of 
existing capacity, however informal or unsubstantial. By building on existing structure the 
expansion of governance is more likely to succeed than a system imposed by outsiders. This 
may mean the brigade carrying out much of the planning and delivery while ultimate 
responsibility lies with the local authorities. There may be a requirement for the commander 
to focus heavily on supporting key governing actors and this may take up a large proportion 
of his time. Al  brigade activities must strengthen the partner nation government and reinforce 
its legitimacy with the people. Typical tasks may include: 
 
(1) 
Support Development of Local Governance. It should be recognised that local 
governance is usually an intricate, highly politicised space, and direct military 
involvement should be a last resort. Even where civilian agencies are not present for 
security reasons, consultation with DFID and involvement of the Stabilisation Advisor 
10-11 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
should be sought. They wil  also help local people devise local solutions to problems 
and help the population and community leaders to build skills in community decision 
making. In best-case scenarios, this can provide greater transparency in resource 
allocation and other decision making processes. At the local level, support should be 
provided for the organs of the state (such as the Police) to help them build consent with 
the local population. Effective cooperation between state and non-state systems should 
be supported. 
 
(2) 
Dispute and Conflict Resolution. The brigade may be involved in supporting 
mechanisms that facilitate non-violent political contestation and the peaceful resolution 
of disputes and conflicts, and that assist communities to connect with local authorities. 
These may include: 
 
(a) 
Providing a secure environment for negotiations and dispute resolution 
processes.  
 
(b) 
Direct and regular engagement with key elites and government authorities.  
 
(c) 
In extremis, settling disputes, for example over land or property seizure.  
 
(d) 
Public outreach and information programmes.  
 
(e) 
Enforcing ceasefires and support to transitional justice arrangements. 
 
(3) 
Supporting Elections. The ability of the partner nation government to run fair 
and secure elections is an important indicator of stability and should be implemented 
by the partner nation government where possible. The brigade may be required to 
provide security for the civilian agencies that administer the election process and the 
wider community to enable maximum participation. Where possible security for 
elections should be provided by partner nation security forces, preferably police, 
supported and reinforced where necessary by the brigade. If elections are held too 
early they may provoke an increase in violence. The commander should assess their 
likely impact on security and advise the partner nation government and international 
agencies accordingly. 
 
(4) 
Countering Corruption. Corruption undermines confidence in the state, 
impedes the flow of aid, concentrates wealth in the hands of a minority and can be 
used by elites to protect their positions and interests. See Part 1 to this AFM for more 
details. 
 
The Battlegroup 
 
10-03. 
Transition. During transition the battlegroup is unlikely to be optimally task organised 
or equipped to execute al  the stability activities required to fulfil medium and long-term stability 
objectives. The focus should thus be directed at setting the conditions and enabling stability 
activities to begin, mostly through the provision of security and control. 
 
10-04. 
Information Activities. During transition, information activities wil  refocus to place 
more emphasis on engaging with local nationals and both international and UK audiences. Local 
national consent and support is likely to be fragile and may benefit from early interaction. Detailed 
guidance can be found in DN 17/05: Information Activities. 
 
10-05. 
Organisation. Battlegroups may need to re-task sub-units out of their primary role to 
generate additional mass and reinforce some specialist capabilities. Re-rolling non-infantry sub-
units to conduct a ground-holding infantry role may be required to achieve sufficient presence 
across a battlegroup area of operations. Drivers, medics, combat engineers, logisticians and 
10-12 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
intelligence analysts may need to be centralised. A1 Echelon is likely to be a supported, rather than 
supporting element and may be regularly employed on the battlegroup main effort. 
 
10-06. 
Augmentation. During transition, the battlegroup may be augmented with additional 
personnel (including liaison officers) and capabilities. Examples are as follows:  
 
a. 
CULADs. CULADs advise the battlegroup commander and his staff on cultural norms 
and practices of the partner nation to further KLE activities and assist the battlegroup in 
understanding the environment in which they are operating. They are key members of the 
battlegroup planning team and can be used as a Red Team player offering contrary views 
from the partner nation aspect. 
 
b. 
STABADs. STABADs are deployed civilian experts from the Stabilisation Unit. They 
work with the battlegroup commander, integrating cross government stabilisation strategies 
and programmes into battlegroup planning.  
 
c. 
Defence Advanced Search Advisor (DASA). DASAs advise battlegroup commanders 
on the employment of specialist search capabilities, such as the Defence Advanced Search 
Team (DAST) or the Al  Arms Search Teams and are part of the Battlegroup Engineer party. 
 
d. 
Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Operator. Operators advise battlegroup 
commanders on the destruction or exploitation of explosive ordnance and Improvised 
Explosive Devices. They deploy with a team and equipment to conduct explosive ordnance 
disposal operations within battlegroup areas of operation. 
 
e. 
Combat Camera Team (CCT). Army CCTs are deployed by PJHQ. They deploy with 
battlegroups to record video and voice data in support of media operations. They are often 
tasked by media staff within either the brigade or division. 
 
f. 
Psychological Operations (PSYOPS). Experts from 77 Brigade wil  normally deploy 
to conduct discrete PSYOPS within the battlegroup area of operations. This may include 
messaging, information campaigns and target audience analysis. These elements wil  
normally be tasked by brigade or divisional staff. 
 
g. 
Military Working Dogs (MWDs). MWD teams can reinforce the search capability of 
the force. During stability operations, units are also likely to be based in static locations 
creating a greater guarding responsibility. MWDs can become a significant force multiplier 
both as a sensor but also by deterring intruders. 
 
h. 
The battlegroup HQ could also expect to receive an increase in CIS capability with 
which to manage stability operations. They are also likely to find themselves in static 
locations operating from buildings of opportunity where available, until more permanent 
accommodation is provided.  
 
10-07. 
Executing the Stability Activities. 
 
a. 
Security and Control. The military tasks associated with security and control at the 
battlegroup level are described in detail in the Handbook to this AFM. These tasks are:  
 
(1) 
Patrolling. Patrolling is conducted to dominate ground, gather information, 
protect key infrastructure, reassure and gain the trust of the population, and support 
other operations or deployed troops.  
 
(2) 
Strike Operations. The purpose of strike operations should be to provide greater 
overall security for the population by removing undesirable elements from it. This can 
10-13 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
be: to search a building or site to remove il egal weapons, sensitive material or 
munitions; to search a building to gain evidence with which to enable an internment or 
successful prosecution through the appropriate justice system; to detain an individual 
for subsequent questioning, internment and prosecution; the exploitation of action 
taken or information gained for information activities purposes. 
 
(3) 
Convoy Protection. Convoys either manoeuvre employing organic recce 
elements and can control organic and joint fires, or they conduct moves controlled and 
co-ordinated by the in place force or battlespace owner. Convoys consist of five 
elements: Command, Vanguard, Close Protection Group, Logistic Elements and the In 
Place Force. 
 
(4) 
Public Order Operations. The battlegroup may need to conduct public order 
operations to maintain law and order where the civilian police are unable to deal with 
the situation. 
 
(5) 
Cordon and Search. Cordon operations are usual y mounted to obtain evidence 
or deny weapons and equipment to an enemy. They can be deliberate or hasty 
operations in response to an enemy attack, where preservation of the scene and 
control of the incident is required. 
 
(6) 
Route Protection. The protection of routes may be required as an own-force 
protection measure, to enable local populations to go about their business or to deny 
freedom of movement to an enemy. Route protection operations include vehicle check 
points and route checks. 
 
(7) 
Separation of Hostile Forces. Interposition or the separation of hostile forces 
may be required. Detail on interposition tactics, negotiation and mediation, delineation 
procedures and observation and monitoring is given in AJP-3.4.1. Peace Support 
Operations
. 
 
(8) 
Enforcement of Out of Bounds Areas. Key infrastructure, vulnerable 
communities, food storage depots, weapons cantonments etc. may need to be kept out 
of bounds or protected. The intelligence preparation of the environment should 
highlight such areas.  
 
(9) 
Curfews. Curfews provide a means by which the movement of personnel can be 
controlled during specific periods of time. 
 
(10)  Prisoner and Detainee Handling. The mandate under which the force is 
operating wil  articulate the specific powers of arrest and detention available to 
members of the force. JDP 1-10 Captured Persons must be followed throughout in 
conjunction with theatre-specific Standard Operating Instructions. In general, the 
procedures adopted should ensure that human rights are not infringed and that any 
evidence relevant to a potential prosecution is gathered, preserved and recorded 
correctly. 
 
(11)  Management of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDP). Every 
effort should be made to prevent the local population becoming displaced through 
measures such as ensuring their security and provision of essential services. Support 
to IDPs and refugees is usually conducted by specialist agencies such as IOs and 
NGOs. Depending on the scale and location of the problem land forces may be 
required to help with the movement and management of IDPs and refugees. 
 
10-14 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
(12)  Stability Policing. Elements of the Battlegroup may need to conduct Stability 
Policing activity in order to maintain initial law and order in the absence of a viable 
indigenous police force. 
 
b. 
Support to SSR. The battlegroup contribution is described under capacity building 
within Part 5 to this AFM. Note that support to SSR includes the provision of short-term 
training teams within Army International Activity, part of the UK’s DE plan.  
 
c. 
Support to Initial Restoration of Essential Services. The battlegroup contribution to 
the initial restoration of essential services should address immediate requirements where 
local or international civilian agencies are unable to do so. Such activities should be handed 
to a civilian agency lead as soon they can take over. The repair of complex infrastructure will 
be the remit of specialists, and beyond the scope of battlegroup engineers. This may wel  be 
identified by the battlegroup, but work wil  probably be tasked and controlled centrally by the 
division as troops able to carry out work wil  be limited in number. Possible tasks include: 
 
(1) 
Clearing Debris and Improving Key Routes. Battlegroups may need to employ 
engineer plant, EOD and search teams to clear and repair arterial routes and 
infrastructure damaged by our own or enemy force activity.  
 
(2) 
Fixing Power Supplies. Maintaining a supply of power to local populations wil  
assist in maintaining local consent. The repair of electricity sub stations, power cables 
or enabling the delivery of fuel are examples of activities to consider. 
 
(3) 
Supplying Clean Water. The provision of emergency supplies of potable water 
to the local population may be necessary where supplies have been damaged or 
contaminated by combat operations. Quick impact projects to establish a sustainable 
supply by, for example, digging bore holes should also be considered. 
 
(4) 
Erecting Temporary Shelters. Depending on the severity of major combat 
operations or crisis, many displaced persons may be expected to reside within the 
battlegroup area of operations, or to gravitate towards battlegroup locations. Although 
the battlegroup must avoid becoming fixed by the presence of displaced persons, due 
consideration should be given to the provision of suitable shelter. Where possible, local 
buildings should be used rather than committing limited battlegroup resources.  
 
(5) 
Delivering Humanitarian Aid. Land forces should consider all requests to 
support the delivery of humanitarian aid where required. Consideration should be given 
to whether military vehicles and manpower deliver the aid or if they act in support of the 
international or NGOs providing the aid. Advice should be sought through the policy 
advisor before agreeing requests from outside the military chain of command. 
 
d. 
Support to Interim Governance Tasks. While a major part of stability operations, 
Support to Interim Governance is likely to be a relatively minor battlegroup activity within 
transition. Plans for elections, the reconstitution of a judicial system and the long-term 
economic development and reconstruction plan are unlikely to have been formulated or 
enacted at this stage of the campaign. The battlegroup should be prepared to assist where 
directed by its chain of command.  
 
 
Annexes: 
 
A. 
Women Peace and Security and Gender Mainstreaming. 
B. 
Children and Armed Conflict. 
C. 
Human Trafficking. 
D. 
Cultural Property Protection. 
10-15 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
Annex A to Chapter 10: Women, Peace and Security and Gender Mainstreaming 
 
 
10A-01. 
This annex deals with three related issues: 
 
a. 
Conflict-Related Sexual Violence (CRSV) and responses to it. 
 
b. 
Promoting a gender perspective to improve operational effectiveness.  
 
c. 
The prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) on operations in general and 
UN missions in particular. 
 
 
 

 
…Sexual violence was our big weapon…we did it as a way of provoking the Congolese 
G  
overnment. Sexual violence has led to the Government wanting to negotiate with us.” 
 
 
C  
ommander Taylor, National Congress for the Defence of the People, in 2009 documentary 
‘W  
eapon of War: Confessions of Rape in Congo’. 
 
 
 
aylor was subsequently prosecuted and convicted for his involvement in these crimes. 
 
 
Context 
 
10A-02. 
The UK, NATO, and the UN recognise the different vulnerabilities to conflict 
experienced by men, women, boys and girls. This includes the impact on a society's prospects for 
post-conflict recovery and long-term stability caused by all forms of sexual and gender based 
violence, and the positive role women can play in building sustainable peace. This was articulated 
in 2000 through the UN's Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women Peace and Security, and 
has subsequently been strengthened through many additional resolutions. The UK's National 
Action Plan 
for implementing our commitments related to this agenda includes many commitments 
specific to the military. But in addition, there is a growing recognition across NATO, the UN, and the 
British military that mainstreaming gender across all aspects of how we conduct stability operations 
can directly improve our operational effectiveness. It can improve our understanding of the context, 
our intelligence and our force protection, and impacts directly on how we interpret our mandate and 
translate this into action at the strategic, operational and tactical levels. 
 
Definitions and Descriptions 
 
10A-03. 
The following definitions apply to the role of gender in conflict and the development of a 
gender perspective: 
 
a. 
Gender and Sex. Sex refers to biological and physiological characteristics. Gender 
refers to learned behaviours, roles, expectations, and activities in society. These societal 
norms can vary from society to society and can change in the lifetime of a mission. Sex 
refers to male or female, while gender refers to masculine or feminine. The differences in the 
sexes do not vary throughout the world, but differences in gender do.  
 
b. 
Sexual and Gender-Based Violence. The term “gender-based violence” refers to 
violence that targets individuals or groups based on their gender. Sexual violence includes 
sexual exploitation and sexual abuse. It refers to any act, attempt, or threat of a sexual 
nature that result, or is likely to result in, physical, psychological and emotional harm. 
 
c. 
Sexual Exploitation. Any actual or attempted abuse of a position of vulnerability, 
differential power, or trust, for sexual purposes, including, but not limited to, profiting 
monetarily, socially or politically from the sexual exploitation of another (UN). 
 
10A-1 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
d. 
Gender Analysis. A method used to understand the relationships between men and 
women in the context of a society.111  
 
e. 
Gender Advisor (GENAD). A dedicated gender expert who operates at strategic and 
operational levels providing internal advice and subject matter expertise. Gender advisors 
are needed to ensure that gender is an integrated part of planning operations (derived from 
NATO Bi-Strategic Command Directive 40-1). 
 
f. 
Gender Focal Point (GFP). The Gender Focal Point can be an officer or senior non-
commissioned officer who supports the commander in ensuring a gender perspective. The 
Gender Focal Point remains within the chain of command and ensures that a gender 
perspective is fully integrated into the daily tasks of the operation. He/she is likely to hold the 
GFP role as a secondary responsibility (derived from NATO Bi-Strategic Command Directive 
40-1
). 
 
g. 
Gender Perspective. Gender perspective considers the impact of gender on people's 
opportunities, social roles and interactions (Doctrine Note 16/02: Human Security – The 
Military Contribution
). 
 
h. 
Gender Mainstreaming. The systematic implementation of a gender perspective 
within an organisation or unit (derived from NATO Bi-Strategic Command Directive 40-1). 
 
Conflict-Related Sexual Violence (CRSV) 
 
10A-04. 
Impact on Society. Sexual violence is prevalent in conflict and may be used as a 
method of warfare to humiliate enemies and undermine their morale, terrorise and control civilians, 
force communities out of their homes and affect ethnic balance. The longer-term impact of 
widespread CRSV on societies is also increasingly understood; it perpetuates grievances and 
drives further conflict; undermines the transition to peace and stabilisation, increases hostility to the 
state (which is seen as unable to protect its citizens or provide justice), and has long-term 
economic and development consequences. Practices of CRSV are forbidden under the Law of 
Armed Conflict and the national criminal law of the UK as wel  as most other nations. 
 
10A-05. 
Sexual violence affects men, women, boys and girls differently. Women and girls are at 
particular risk of violence in conflict, whether in the home, during flight or in camps to which they 
have fled for safety. Children affected by sexual violence also include those who have witnessed 
the rape of a family member, male and female, and those who are ostracised because of an 
assault on their mother. Nonetheless, it is not always the case that women are the victims and men 
the perpetrators. Both men and women can be victims and perpetrators of violence, and 
combatants and agents of peace. 
 
10A-06. 
Systematic rape is often practised with the intent of ethnic cleansing through deliberate 
impregnation. This was the case in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Rwanda and Democratic 
Republic of Congo. Wartime rape often has a tragic ripple effect that extends far beyond the pain 
and degradation of the rape itself. Rape victims who become pregnant are often ostracised by their 
families and communities and abandon their babies. The text box above illustrates that men and 
boys can also become victims. 
 
The International Response 
 
10A-07. 
UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and Other Relevant Resolutions. In 2000, 
the UN Security Council recognised the unique and disproportionate threats to women in conflict 
and the positive role women can play in building peace through Resolution 1325. The resolution, 
 
111 Derived from NATO Bi-Strategic Command Directive 40-1
 
10A-2 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
under the banner of Women, Peace and Security (WPS), also set out a blueprint for understanding 
and tackling gender-specific issues. Subsequent resolutions (see Table 10A-1) follow similar 
themes and reflect the impact of conflict on men, women, boys and girls. 
 

UNSCR  Date 
Overview 
1820 
2008 
Focuses on the protection of women, girls, men and boys from sexual and gender-
based violence in armed conflict. Links sexual violence as a tactic of war with women, 
peace and security issues. Demands parties to armed conflict to take appropriate 
measures to protect civilians from sexual violence, including training troops and 
enforcing discipline. 
1888 
2009 
Mandates peacekeeping missions to protect women and children from sexual violence 
during armed conflict, and requests that the Secretary-General establish the Office of 
the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict. 
1889 
2009 
Calls for further strengthening of women’s participation in peace processes and the 
development of indicators to measure progress on Resolution 1325. National Action 
Plans (NAPs) introduced as a tool to demonstrate how member nations were 
implementing Resolution 1325. 
1960 
2010 
Focuses on the mechanisms to monitor the enforcement of protection from sexual and 
gender-based violence in armed conflict. Introduced a “name and shame” policy within 
the Security Council. 
2106 
2013 
Promotes participation of local women in post-conflict negotiation.  
2122 
2013 
Strengthens broader Women, Peace and Security agenda on participation (leadership) 
and gender mainstreaming at the highest-levels. 
2242 
2015 
Commits member states to integrate gender analysis into the understanding of drivers 
of conflict. Promotes increased consultation with women’s groups. Set new targets for 
participation of women in peacekeeping operations. 
2272 
2016 
Recommends specific measures to address allegations of Sexual Exploitation and 
Abuse (SEA) by UN peacekeepers, including robust pre-deployment training for police 
and troop contributing nations and quick, thorough investigations of allegations and 
prosecution of offenders. 
 
Table 10A-1. UN Security Council Resolutions relating to gender and sexual and gender-based violence 
 
10A-08. 
Four-Pillar Approach. The UN’s plan to tackle sexual and gender-based violence and 
to promote awareness of the role of gender in conflict is set out in a four-pil ar approach under 
Resolution 1325: 
 

a. 
Participation. The participation and inclusion of women (including servicewomen and 
civil society actors) in decision-making related to peacemaking, post-conflict reconstruction 
and the prevention of conflict. 
 
b. 
Protection. The protection of women and girls in armed conflict. 
 
c. 
Prevention. Prevention of conflict-related sexual violence, and effective reporting and 
protection of victims. 
 
d. 
Gender Mainstreaming. The systematic implementation of a gender perspective in 
peacekeeping and peace building, as per Resolution 1325, by all member states, especially 
in the context of peace missions led by the UN.112 
 
10A-09. 
UN Action against CRSV (UN Action). UN Action unites the work of 13 UN entities 
with the goal of ending sexual violence in conflict. It is a concerted effort by the UN system to 
improve coordination and accountability, amplify programming and advocacy, and support national 
efforts to prevent sexual violence and respond effectively to the needs of survivors. UK 
commanders serving with or alongside the UN should identify local representatives of the scheme 
to establish actions on and reporting requirements relating to sexual and gender-based violence. 
 
112 Note that subsequent resolutions emphasise the impact of conflict on men and boys more than Resolution 1325. 
 
10A-3 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
 
10A-10. 
UK National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security 2014-2017. The UK 
National Action Plan (NAP), established in 2006, emphasises that women’s participation is needed 
to make and build peace and prevent conflict breaking out. The NAP is jointly owned by the MOD, 
DFID and the FCO and follows the framework of Resolution 1325. The UK therefore recognises 
that sometimes women and girls suffer specific forms of violence in conflict which need to be 
addressed as part of any stabilisation effort, not just Peace Support. Building on the NAP, the UK 
agreed to review the doctrine and training provided to military personnel on Women, Peace and 
Security and sexual and gender-based violence at the 2013 G8 Summit. This includes training 
provided by the UK to other nations through capacity building. 
 
 
 
The UK’s National Action Plan for Women Peace and Security. 
 
10A-11. 
Linked to the above, HMG has placed emphasis on its Preventing Sexual Violence 
Initiative (PSVI) which seeks to eradicate sexual and gender-based violence within conflicts. The 
aim of the PSVI is the eradication of rape as a weapon of war, through a global campaign to end 
impunity for perpetrators, to deter and prevent sexual violence, to support and recognise survivors, 
and to change global attitudes that fuel these crimes. Further to the NAP, the UK (and the MOD 
specifically) also made commitments on Women, Peace and Security at the High Level Review of 
UNSCR 1325 and at the 2016 UN Peacekeeping Defence Ministerial. 
 
Improving Operational Effectiveness by Mainstreaming a Gender Perspective 
 
10A-12. 
Gender perspective is a tool used to better understand societies. Adopting a gender 
perspective and mainstreaming it into all dimensions of our operations can have a positive impact 
on our operational effectiveness. It can improve our understanding of the operating context, our 
intelligence and force protection, our influence amongst the host population and over our 
adversaries, our choices of what tactical actions we undertake and how we undertake them. To 
achieve mission success, land forces must fully understand the operating environment. Without a 
gender perspective, 50 per cent of the population might be missing from the estimate/analysis 
process. This is of particular importance in relation to establishing stability and security. The MOD’s 
intention is to deliver this capability through a cadre of land gender advisors using the NATO model 
as a guide.  
 
 
10A-4 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
10A-13. 
The MOD’s intention is to deliver this capability through a cadre of land gender 
advisors using the NATO model as a guide. The Field Army’s Training Needs Analysis, presented 
in August 2016, includes recommendations for the training of 50 Gender Advisors, who wil  sit at 
command level within the tri-Services, and Gender Focal Points, who wil  sit within each unit and 
advise on incorporating gender into the unit’s ordinary task. These recommendations wil  be 
implemented during 2017. 
 
10A-14. 
Interacting and communicating with women and girls results in improvements to our 
understanding of the local society, improved situational awareness, additional intelligence and 
increased mission influence. But in many of the societies we operate in, accessing women and 
girls through our KLE programmes and daily force interaction can be chal enging. Women are 
frequently excluded from formal positions of leadership, and conservative social norms can make it 
culturally unacceptable for our predominantly male land forces to interact directly with women and 
girls. Extra effort and creative approaches therefore need to be found to overcome these 
chal enges and maximise the benefits of these gender perspectives into our planning and 
operations. 
 
Gender Balance on Operations 
 
10A-15. 
The experiences and skil s of both men and women are essential to the success of 
land operations. Specifically, a gender-mixed force aids communication with a broad cross-section 
of society within the operating environment. Notably, Integrated Action requires the identification 
and understanding of the key actors, male and female, in a conflict situation prior to designing 
operations to change or maintain actors’ behaviour as required. Appropriately trained and 
experienced female soldiers are essential for engagement with women and children. This should 
not be a narrow specialist activity; gender engagement activities include, but are not limited to: 
CIMIC, HUMINT, Information Activities, investigations, medical services, public affairs and support 
to SSR. 
 
10A-16. 
NATO Approach: Bi-Strategic Command Directive 40-1. In Aug 2012, NATO 
members, including the UK, subscribed to a command directive integrating Resolution 1325 and its 
strands into the NATO command structure and operational practices.113 This focuses on enhancing 
operational performance by adopting gender mainstreaming across all functions. It also 
emphasises the effect servicewomen can have through their ability to engage with both women 
and men in conservative societies.  
 
10A-17. 
The NATO’s direction to its members: 
 
a. 
Incorporate Resolutions relating to gender into military planning and the conduct of 
operations. 
 
b. 
Establish Gender Advisors into military HQ to provide specific advice and operational 
support on gender dimensions to the Commander and NATO personnel.114 
 
c. 
Educate and train soldiers on gender mainstreaming and the theory of Resolution 1325 
and Women, Peace and Security. 
 
Operational Planning and Preparation 
 
10A-18. 
Thorough planning and preparation are crucial to the success of the mission. 
Integrating a gender perspective at all levels of planning is imperative when developing strategies 
to address the full spectrum of crisis management scenarios in which land forces are involved. 
Gender analysis is not a standalone function but must be integrated into every line of 
 
113 See NATO Bi-Strategic Command Directive 40-1 dated 8 Aug 2012. 
114 See Annex A and definitions section. 
 
10A-5 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
operation/staff function to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the whole operating 
environment.  
 
10A-19. 
Gender perspective should be considered while conducting the intelligence preparation 
of the environment (IPE), for example during PMESI, ASCOPE and stakeholder analysis. Appendix 
2 provides a list of gender-specific considerations for inclusion within the intelligence preparation of 
the environment. Their significance wil  vary per the mission although all wil  support a better 
understanding of the operating environment. The nature of the information requirements wil  also 
vary between formation and unit levels. Where the protection of civilians forms a central element 
within the mission, Neutral/ Environmental Information Requirements may replace enemy-focused 
Priority Intelligence Requirements. 
 
10A-20. 
The Full Spectrum Approach must be applied to ensure that expertise is fully exploited. 
Commanders must also understand, via the G2 Branch and cultural advisor, the cultural context 
within which they are operating and not simply apply their own norms, law and behaviour. The 
distinction between international and local law, human rights and culture must be analysed and 
addressed. Note that, wherever possible, cultural expertise should also be made available to junior 
commanders to support tactical level cultural understanding. 
 
10A-21. 
Measures to Achieve or Enhance a Gender Perspective
 
a. 
Specify the requirement for gender advisors during the force generation processes. 
Consider the participation of women in the force to engage with the entire population at all 
times. 
 
b. 
Seek early advice from the cadre of gender advisors throughout the planning process 
to ensure the full integration of gender perspective. Their knowledge should be based on a 
gender analysis specific to areas of operation, integrated with broader intel igence 
preparation of the environment. 
 
c. 
Gender advisors should provide subject matter expertise on procedures to protect 
civilians, with specific consideration given to men, women, girls and boys, from violence, 
rape and other forms of sexual abuse, including human trafficking. This fol ows Resolutions 
1325, 1820 and related resolutions. If the gender advisor does not hold expertise on sexual 
and gender-based violence an appropriate representative within the CJIIM environment 
should be consulted. Note that it is preferable for a gender advisor to hold these skil s. 
Deployable Stabilisation Unit experts can also provide guidance. 
 
d. 
Ensure a gender perspective in all capacity building efforts supporting, training and 
mentoring local security forces. 
 
e. 
Consider how a gender perspective can be integrated into operational staff work. Note 
that NATO has directed that its operational plans must contain an annex on gender. 
 
More detail on Tactical and Operational measures that can be taken to incorporate gender 
perspectives into operations is provided in 'How can gender make a difference to security in 
operations - Indicators
', NATO, 2011, p37-38. 
 
Disrupting and Reporting Conflict-Related Sexual Violence  
 
10A-22. 
Reporting. Strong and effective monitoring and reporting mechanisms should always 
be in place, making sure that criminal acts including human rights violations, sexual and gender-
based violence and indications of domestic or international trafficking of human beings are 
reported, addressed and correctly processed. This includes the requirement to understand who the 
interlocutors are within police forces, OGDs, NGOs and IOs. This wil  vary from theatre to theatre 
 
10A-6 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
and wil  be briefed within Mission Specific Training. Taking early advice from the legal advisor or 
the military police is essential. 
 
10A-23. 
Tactical considerations. In many societies, women and girls often bear responsibility 
for collecting water, purchasing food and firewood. In conflict areas, these gendered activities may 
expose them to significant security risks, such as rape, assault, and kidnapping. Therefore, 
consultation with women and women's organisations is essential in the planning of patrol routes 
and schedules when trying to improve security. Such consultation is crucial, as measures taken to 
protect women and girls without consultation often result in ineffective or counterproductive 
effects.115  
 
10A-24. 
Protecting and engaging with women and girls can also have significant security and 
intelligence benefits for the force. While they conduct their outdoor activities, women and girls may 
be the first to observe actions that might affect the security environment. Their perspectives can 
enhance the mission's understanding of the security environment daily. They may be aware of the 
activity of male fighters from or around their household, black market economic activity, and 
informal power structures that are having a destabilising effect at the local level. Specific 
consideration should be paid to protecting female sources and their households from identification. 
 
10A-25. 
Handling of Female Captured Persons (CPERS). The captivity of female captured 
persons may be very culturally sensitive and personnel should follow the guidance in JDP 1-10 
Captured Persons throughout. Due regard must be given to females’ physical strength, the need to 
protect them against rape, forced prostitution and other forms of sexual violence or abuse, and the 
special demands of biological factors such as menstruation, pregnancy and childbirth as well as 
meeting culturally specific requirements. Pregnant women and mothers of dependants must have 
their cases considered with the utmost priority. Female captured persons shal  in all cases benefit 
from treatment as favourable as that granted to male captured persons. Advice and guidance on 
the handling of female detainees should always be sought from attached Military Police assets. 
 
10A-26. 
Female captured persons must be kept in separate accommodation from male 
captured persons. Female captured persons should be under the immediate supervision of female 
Service personnel where possible. In cases where families are detained or interned, if possible, 
and unless there is an urgent operational requirement to segregate specific family members, they 
should be kept together as family groups and away from other captured persons. 
 
Sexual Exploitation and Abuse 
 
10A-27. 
Legitimacy. Some members of the force may be tempted to engage in sexual 
exploitation and abuse. This includes using prostitutes and trading assistance for sex. Sexual 
exploitation and abuse is forbidden on all multinational operations on the basis that it undermines 
campaign authority and is most likely il egal. The additional risk that sexual exploitation links 
military personnel to human trafficking is explored in Annex C. 
 
10A-28. 
UN Missions. In recent years, there have been a number of high-profile cases of 
alleged abuse by peacekeepers within communities they were responsible for protecting. This has 
led to considerable reputational damage to the UN and the troop-contributing nations. 
Consequently, the UN has adopted a zero tolerance approach to sexual exploitation, expressed in 
its Sexual Exploitation and Abuse policy.116 The policy forbids all UN personnel from engaging 
in sexual relations with sex workers and with any persons under 18, and strongly 
discourages relations with beneficiaries of assistance (those that are receiving assistance 

 
115 UN Women’s Addressing Conflict-Related Sexual Violence (2010) provides examples of successful tactics, 
techniques and procedures implemented within UN peacekeeping missions. These will be subsumed into the Tactics, 
Techniques and Procedures handbook accompanying this publication. 
116 UNSCR 2272, passed in Mar 16, provides further direction on standards expected of peacekeepers and allows the 
Secretary General to repatriate units involved in Sexual Exploitation and Abuse. 
 
10A-7 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
food, housing, aid, etc... as a result of a conflict, natural disaster or other humanitarian 
crisis, or in a development setting).  
 
10A-29. 
Note that efforts to prevent the perpetration of sexual exploitation and abuse by our 
own troops wil  differ from those targeting sexual violence amongst the population of the partner 
nation, not least because the jurisdictions wil  differ. In the context of sexual exploitation and abuse, 
commanders must seek legal advice early so as not to contaminate evidence which may endanger 
future prosecutions. 
 
10A-30. 
Reporting. UK personnel should be aware of the following procedures for reporting 
sexual exploitation and abuse when serving within a UN mission: 
 
a. 
In the first instance, report to the chain of command. Alternatively, reports can be made 
to the mission Conduct and Discipline Team (CDT). 
 
b. 
All complaints and information on misconduct (for all categories of personnel) are to be 
channelled to the CDT. The Team reviews and assesses information to determine if 
allegations of misconduct are credible. The Team then recommends notification and 
investigation in accordance with applicable procedures. 
 
c. 
In some cases, it may be necessary to report directly to the Office of Internal Oversight. 
Most missions have a structure with sexual exploitation and abuse focal points. Reports are 
confidential and personnel are protected from retaliation. 
 
d. 
The CDT informs the Head of Mission through Chief of Staff (heads of component 
informed as appropriate). 
 
e. 
The CDT is responsible for tracking and follow up of allegations. 
 
10A-31. 
Standards of Partner Nations’ Armed Forces. Where UK forces are deployed 
alongside other troop-contributing nations suspected of abuse in a UN context, commanders 
should follow the guidance above. When operating outside of the UN but in a multinational context, 
UK personnel identifying sexual exploitation and abuse should inform their own chain of command 
so that appropriate national representatives can be notified. Concerns regarding conduct may not 
be limited to sexual exploitation and abuse. Partner nations may not be as capable or as 
disciplined as UK forces in other areas, such as in the provision security and control. While land 
forces cannot cover the failings of others throughout a mission, UK standards must not drop to 
those they must work with, even if this creates reputational issues for other contingents.  
 
Appendices 
 
1. 
Reporting with a gender perspective. 
 
 
10A-8 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
Appendix 1 to Annex A to Chapter 10 
 
Reporting with a Gender Perspective 
 
10A1-01.  The following is a list (not exhaustive) of questions that should be considered when 
reporting or contributing to Intelligence Preparation of the Environment: 
 
a. 
How does the security situation affect women, men, girls and boys? 
 
b. 
What risks, similar and/or different do men, women, girls and boys face? 
 
c. 
What are the differences in vulnerabilities between these groups (women, men, girls 
and boys)? 
 
d. 
Are women's and men's security issues known, and are their concerns being met? 
 
e. 
What role do women play in the military, armed groups, police or any other security 
institutions such as intelligence services, border, customs, immigration, or other law 
enforcement services (per cent of forces/groups, by grade and category)? 
 
f. 
What role do women play in the different parts of and social groups in the society? 
 
g. 
Does the selection and interaction between local power holders and the operation 
affect women's ability to participate in society - such as legal, political or economic spheres? 
 
h. 
Gender disaggregated data on for example: political participation, education, refugees, 
prisoners, health-related issues, refugees, sexual and gender-based violence etc. 
 
i. 
Assessment of the current situation and planned actions. 
 
j. 
Report on who in the operational theatre is responsible for gender issues/WPS and UN 
Security Council 1325 agendas. Who are the UN Humanitarian officers and Women’s 
Protection Advisors (WPAs)? 
 
 
10A1-1 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
Annex B to Chapter 10: Children and Armed Conflict 
 
10B-01. 
Conflict has a disproportionate effect on children and land forces can play an important 
role in safeguarding them from violence and exploitation during operations. The nature of that role 
is dependent on the mission and whether humanitarian and law enforcement agencies are present 
within the area of operations. 
 
10B-02. 
The Law of Armed Conflict and International Human Rights Law (IHRL) provide 
overarching direction on the protection of children from unnecessary suffering and the 
safeguarding of their fundamental human rights in conflict. Other laws may apply too, such as 
local, military or UK law.  
 
10B-03. 
The UN identifies six grave violations of children’s rights: 
 
a. 
Kil ing or maiming. 
 
b. 
Recruitment or use as soldiers. 
 
c. 
Sexual violence. 
 
d. 
Attacks against schools or hospitals. 
 
e. 
Denial of humanitarian access. 
 
f. 
Abduction of children. 
 
10B-04. 
This annex focuses on child soldiers and attacks against schools. 
 
Definitions 
 
10B-05. 
Child. A person below the age of 18, unless the laws of a particular country set the 
legal age for adulthood younger (UN Convention on the Rights of a Child). Note that UK doctrine 
(JDP 1-10, Edition 3), in a CPERS context, classes people aged 15,16 or 17 as juveniles. This 
distinction is explained in detail in paragraphs 10B-22 to 10B-23. 
 
10B-06. 
Child Soldiers. Children who have been conscripted or enlisted into armed forces or 
groups or who have been used to participate actively in hostilities (Law of Armed Conflict). 
 
Note that the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) applies a broader interpretation: 
 
“…a child associated with an armed force or armed group refers to any person below 18 
years of age who is or who has been recruited or used by an armed force in any capacity, 
including but not limited to children, boys and girls, used as fighters, cooks, porters, 
messengers, spies or for sexual purposes. It does not only refer to a child who is taking part 
or has taken a direct part in hostilities
.” 
 
Child Soldiers 
 
10B-07. 
Recruitment and Vulnerabilities. There are many complex factors (push and pull) 
which result in a child’s vulnerability to being recruited or used by armed groups. Possible factors 
include: 
 
a. 
Potential for income, food, or security through service with armed groups or through the 
“spoils of war”. 
 
b. 
Ideology of the child or their family as a motivation for fighting. 
10B-2 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
c. 
Abduction. 
 
d. 
Being offered by their community in exchange for staying safe from attack. 
 
e. 
Being offered by their family due to extreme poverty and hunger. 
 
f. 
Emotional and physical immaturity. 
 
10B-08. 
The UK is a party to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which 
defines a child as "every human being below the age of 18 years unless under the law applicable 
to the child, majority is attained earlier”. The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the 
Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict - to which the UK is a party - requires States Parties to 
"take all feasible measures to ensure that members of their armed forces who have not attained 
the age of 18 years do not take a direct part in hostilities". 
 
10B-09. 
Impact. Children employed or used by armed groups wil  have an array of experiences. 
Some become desensitised to violence – often at a very formative time in their development which 
can psychologically damage them for life. This experience may make them more likely to commit 
violent acts themselves and can contribute to their break with society. The association of children 
with armed forces and groups can lead to: 
 
a. 
Deterioration in their physical and mental health. 
 
b. 
Reduced opportunities for education and social development. 
 
c. 
Poor relationships with families and communities. 
 
d. 
A reduction in their physical safety and the risk of reprisals and re-recruitment. 
 
10B-10. 
Even when child soldiers are set free or escape, many cannot go back home to their 
families and communities because they have been ostracised by them. They may have been 
forced to kil  a family member or neighbour to prevent them from returning to their homes. Many 
girls have babies from their time spent with non-state armed groups and their communities do not 
accept them home. Most have missed out on school – sometimes for many years. Without an 
education, they have few prospects and sometimes return to their armed groups as they have 
simply no other way of feeding themselves. The chal enge for civil society is to channel the energy, 
ideas and experience of demobilised child soldiers into contributing in positive ways to the creation 
of their new, post-conflict society. This task is nothing new with the Second World War providing 
many examples of the use of child soldiers. 
 
10B-11. 
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration. Effective child-sensitive and 
specific DDR is vital to long-term stability and is usual y part of a national programme that is led by 
the host government, with support from international donors, the UN and NGOs. UNICEF and the 
relevant host nation ministry usually takes charge of the aspect of DDR programmes that relates to 
child combatants, with support from child protection NGOs such as Save the Children and the 
International Rescue Committee. Land forces may be directed to assist in the disarmament and 
demobilisation stages of the programme.  
 
10B-12. 
UN Security Council Resolutions. There have been 10 resolutions relating to 
children and armed conflict: 
 
UNSCR 
Date 
Overview 
 
1261 
1999 
Condemned the targeting of children in armed conflict and the recruitment of child 
soldiers in violation of international law. This included the “Worst Forms of Child Labour 
10B-3 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
Convention” and the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court which prohibits 
forced conscription of children under the age of fifteen in armed forces or the 
participation in war crimes.  
1314 
2000 
Expressed concern at the impact of conflict upon children and the use of child soldiers. 
Expressed willingness to consider more targeted measures to protect children during 
and after conflict. Called for provisions to protect children including during the 
demobilisation, disarmament, reintegration of child soldiers and inclusion of child 
protection advisors in operations. 
1998 
2001 
Declared schools and hospitals off limits for both armed groups and military activities. 
1379 
2001 
Considered provisions to protect children during peacekeeping operations and 
requested the Secretary General to identify parties to conflict that used or recruited 
child soldiers. 
1460 
2003 
Called for the immediate end to the use of child soldiers and endorsed an “era of 
application” of international norms and standards for the protection of war-affected 
children. 
1539 
2004 
Condemned the use and recruitment of child soldiers, the killing and maiming of 
children, rape, sexual violence, abduction, forced displacement, denial of humanitarian 
access, attacks against schools and hospitals, child trafficking, forced labour and 
slavery. Implemented monitoring schemes. 
1612 
2005 
Established a mechanism to monitor and report on the most serious violations that are 
committed against children in conflict. This mechanism, referred to as the 1612 
Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism, reports on six grave violations which ultimately 
can result in sanctions. 
1882 
2009 
Directed that parties to armed conflict engaging in patterns of killing and maiming of 
children and/or rape and other sexual violence against children should be ‘named and 
shamed’. 
2068 
2012 
Declared the readiness of the UN to impose sanctions on armed groups persistently 
violating the human rights of children. 
2143 
2014 
Called for children’s continued access to health care, condemns attacks on health 
facilities and health workers and affirms children’s right to access services. 
2225 
2015 
Called for increased monitoring of the abduction of children in conflict. 
2250 
2015 
Resolution on youth, peace and security recognising the contribution of youth in the 
prevention and resolution of conflicts. Warned against the rise of radicalisation to 
violence and violent extremism amongst youth. 
 
Table 10B-1. Resolutions relating to children in conflict 
 
Schools in Conflict 
 
10B-13. 
Opening. Schools and other educational establishments must be permitted to continue 
their ordinary activities. Any occupying power must, with the cooperation of the national and local 
education authorities, facilitate the proper working of schools and other institutions devoted to the 
care and education of children. In certain circumstances an occupying power may be within its 
rights in temporarily closing educational institutions, but only when there are very strong reasons 
for doing so, these reasons are made public, and there is a serious prospect that the closure wil  
achieve important and worthwhile results. 
 
10B-14. 
Targeting. There is no definition of civilian objects within the Law of Armed Conflict nor 
is the term used in the treaties dealing with internal armed conflicts, but the principles of military 
necessity and humanity require attacks to be limited to military objectives. Thus, attacks on schools 
are prohibited unless they are being used by the enemy for military purposes. If an attack is 
deemed necessary, all feasible means must be taken to minimise injury to civilians and damage of 
civilian property. 
 
Tactical Responses 
 
10B-15. 
The role of land forces in safeguarding children wil  be dependent on the nature of the 
mission and the type of operation being conducted. Beyond the demands of the Law of Armed 
10B-4 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
Conflict, commanders may be required to support the work of child protection agents operating 
within their area of operations by means of the stability activities. 
 
10B-16. 
UN Country Task Force (CTF). Where the UN is present, mechanisms to monitor and 
report on grave violations wil  be established via the CTF on Monitoring and Reporting. This body 
is generally co-chaired by UNICEF and the senior UN representative in-country but wil  receive 
input from others including IOs and NGOs. The CTF also has established protocols for verification 
of information, ensuring confidentiality and security of victims/witnesses and information.  
 
 
 
Figure 10B-1. UN monitoring and reporting mechanism for child protection (UN Child Protection 
Manual). 
 
10B-17. 
Child Protection Advisors (CPAs). Child Protection Advisors are specialist staff sent 
to UN missions to help fulfil the child protection mandate. Their work includes: 
 
a. 
Ensuring that child protection is integrated into the mission. 
 
b. 
Training newly-deployed peacekeepers on child protection. 
 
c. 
Monitoring and reporting the most serious violations against children to UN HQ. 
 
10B-18. 
Land forces can be crucial in identifying grave violations against children to child 
protection staff, helping to identify and release children from armed groups. For land forces to 
respond correctly, education and training must include: 
 
a. 
Briefing on the details of child protection actors within the mission. 
 
b. 
Briefing on SOPs for monitoring and reporting of grave violations against children.117 
 
c. 
How to identify vulnerable children and gather information on the recruitment of child 
soldiers and abuse of children. 
 
d. 
How to report sightings of child soldiers. 
 
 
117 Note that UNICEF has created templates for this based on the direction given in UN Security Council Resolution 
1612. 
10B-5 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
e. 
How to treat detained child soldiers (see JDP 1-10 Captured Persons). 
 
f. 
ROE relating to child soldiers.  
 
10B-19. 
Occasionally, child protection advisors will be told that partner nation military units are 
holding child soldiers from rival factions. Land forces may be asked to work with them to secure the 
freedom of these children from the partner nation who may be using the children as servants or 
worse. Using the Force Commander to speak with a partner nation military commander sends a 
strong message to that military and may deter them from holding children in future.  
 
10B-20. 
Responding to Child Soldiers. The use of child soldiers puts professional forces at a 
disadvantage. Not only is it demoralising to fight and kill children, the shock of having to do so can 
increase reaction times. Commanders should consider the following when issuing direction to their 
subordinates: 
 
a. 
External Perceptions. The killing and wounding of child soldiers is likely to be 
perceived differently to the killing and wounding of adults and could be used in propaganda 
against land forces. This is a key consideration for commanders at all levels. Actions could 
be perceived as excessive, and could bring into question consent from home, irrespective of 
the freedoms to tackle threats as expressed within the Law of Armed Conflict. There could 
also be scrutiny by government, parliament and the media after the event. The possibility of 
combat with child soldiers must be anticipated and guidance given to the force. 
 
b. 
Child Behaviour. The immaturity of child soldiers may result in a reduced 
understanding of the consequences of their actions. Human Rights Watch, an NGO, 
identifies the following characteristics of child soldiers which may make them behave 
differently to adult soldiers: 
 
“Because children are often physically vulnerable, easily intimidated, and susceptible to 
psychological manipulation, they typically make obedient soldiers. As part of their training for 
violence, child recruits are often subject to gruelling physical tasks as well as ideological 
indoctrination. Children accused of the slightest infractions may be subject to extreme 
physical punishments including beating, whipping, caning, and being chained or tied up with 
rope for days at a time. In some conflicts, commanders supply child soldiers with marijuana 
and opiates to make them "brave" and lessen their fear of combat. Furthermore, 
commanders may initiate child recruits by forcing them to witness or commit abuses and 
killings in order to desensitize them to violence.”118 

 
10B-21. 
Reaction to Child Soldiers. The following actions should be considered where child 
soldiers are encountered: 
 
a. 
Response to Threat. Commanders should ensure that theatre-specific ROE are 
understood by their subordinates allowing rapid and decisive action to be taken. 
 
b. 
Post Incident Report. The killing or wounding of child soldiers is likely to draw the 
attention of many audiences, including the media. All personnel involved in incidents must 
record the details of the incident at the earliest opportunity using the Post Incident Report 
format. Regardless of the legality of the act, the killing of child soldiers can be used to 
undermine campaign authority. Personnel involved in incidents must report them quickly so 
that land forces can be “first with the accurate facts and message”. This wil  avoid the local 
population being subject to misleading propaganda by armed groups operating in the area. 
 
 
118 See https://www.hrw.org/news/2008/04/16/coercion-and-intimidation-child-soldiers-participate-violence.  
10B-6 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
c. 
Trauma Risk Management (TRIM). Commanders should ensure that all personnel 
involved in incidents concerning child soldiers receive adequate support through TRIM.119 
 
10B-22. 
Captured Persons. For each operation, the MOD will establish a policy for handling 
juveniles, which will conform with human rights law and the humanitarian principles of the Geneva 
Conventions. In the first instance, commanders should seek advice from the Force Provost 
Marshal and force legal advisors on managing juveniles and children and should refer to JDP 1-10: 
Captured Persons. The Force Provost Marshal should seek assistance from and engage with the 
International Committee of the Red Cross. Medical staff, padres and potentially some appropriate 
NGOs could also provide advice and assistance if appropriate in the circumstances. Medical 
support can be especially helpful in efforts to ascertain the age of captured persons. 
 
10B-23. 
Captured Juveniles. For this publication, captured juveniles are defined as captured 
persons aged 15, 16 or 17. The following guidance reflects the basic legal position regarding the 
treatment of juveniles: 
 
a. 
Captured persons who are, or are judged to be, juveniles shall be processed through 
the same administrative and induction arrangements as adult captured persons. Where 
possible, juveniles will be separated from other captured persons during these processes. 
 
b. 
Juveniles should be accommodated separately from all adult and child captured 
persons except where they are part of a family group. Male and female juveniles shall be 
accommodated separately. Juveniles could suffer from isolation and therefore careful 
consideration should be given for them to associate with adult captured persons at certain 
times, for example, communal prayer time, exercise and feeding. Such association must 
always be planned and supervised closely. 
 
c. 
The International Committee of the Red Cross will assist with repatriating juvenile 
prisoners of war and early liaison is essential. All other juvenile captured persons can be held 
by land forces. They can also be transferred to the partner nation authorities or to another 
nation’s authorities, but such transfers wil  be governed by MOD policy and human rights 
considerations. 
 
d. 
Initial questioning of juveniles can be carried out to establish the identity and age of the 
individual. Subsequent tactical questioning and interrogation of juveniles is not prohibited in 
law; however, MOD will issue operation-specific guidance on whether this is permitted as a 
matter of policy. Such policy wil  have due regard to the juvenile’s age, any special condition 
and vulnerability, as well as the military benefit to be derived. 
 
10B-24. 
Captured Children. For this publication, captured children are defined as all captured 
persons under the age of 15. The following guidance reflects the legal position for the treatment of 
children: 
 
a. 
Children should not be held in captivity unless captured to prevent imminent danger to 
our Armed Forces. If they are detained, this should be for the shortest possible period. 
Children must be housed in separate quarters from adults and juveniles, unless they are part 
of a family group. In certain circumstances those under the age of 15 may be removed from 
a location to be protected from danger. 
 
b. 
Children must be guarded by a minimum of two UK personnel specially selected for 
this task. One of them (at least), where possible, should be of the same sex as the captured 
children. 
 
 
119 For further guidance see Dallaire Child Soldiers Initiative (2014), Child Soldiers: A Handbook for Security Sector 
Actors. Halifax, Canada: Dalhousie University.  
10B-7 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
c. 
Children are not to be tactically questioned or interrogated. The International 
Committee of the Red Cross can assist in gaining neutral information. 
 
d. 
For each operation, the MOD will issue specific guidance regarding transferring or 
releasing children who have been captured. 
 
10B-25. 
There may be instances where captured persons do not know, are unwilling to reveal, 
or mislead land forces about their date of birth to avoid tactical questioning or interrogation. It may 
be extremely difficult to ascertain the age of young captured persons. Such a captured person will 
be considered to be a child until more detailed checks can be made. Assessment of age will be 
made by, or on behalf of, the detention authority, considering all relevant evidence, particularly 
medical and dental officers’ assessments. If an individual reasonably claims or is assessed to be 
less than 15 years of age, they should be treated as a child. 
 
10B-26. 
All officers responsible for captured persons facilities must pay particular care and 
attention when holding juveniles, children or vulnerable people. They have an obligation to care for 
them in a manner that takes account of their age and particular needs. Juveniles and children are 
more vulnerable than adults and need to be protected from violence or abuse, including to, and 
amongst, themselves. They are to be treated with special respect and shall be protected from any 
form of assault. In addition, they will be provided with the care and assistance they need whether 
due to their age or for any other reason. 
 
10B-27. 
In many countries, a significant proportion of juveniles may have lost contact with their 
families before, or because of, their period in captivity. Commandants at captured persons holding 
facilities will need to give attention to identifying those young people who may want and need 
additional support in re-establishing links with their families or for whom family links have 
irrevocably broken down. Land forces may request assistance from the International Committee of 
the Red Cross in establishing family links. In addition, where operational circumstances allow, 
depending on the nature of the operation and the duration of the period in captivity, the 
commandant should consider some sort of purposeful activity or training for juveniles. The main 
purpose should be to avoid returning the young persons to the social circumstances that 
contributed to their original capture. It will be important to enlist the help of the relevant government 
and non-government agencies, including those of the partner nation, in designing and delivering 
appropriate resettlement programmes. 
 
10B-8 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
Annex C to Chapter 10: Human Trafficking 
 
10C-01. 
Introduction. Human trafficking occurs within and between countries. Trafficking may 
take place for a range of exploitative purposes and victimises women, men, boys and girls. While 
land forces are unlikely to lead in disrupting trafficking networks and supporting victims, they may 
be required to support other agencies facing such tasks within their area of operations. 
 
10C-02. 
Elements of Human Trafficking. Figure 10-C-1 below il ustrates the elements 
involved in human trafficking. The purpose of trafficking can be varied including prostitution, slavery 
and organ removal. Trafficking can occur through a variety of means ranging from deception to 
coercion and is enabled by recruiters, drivers and agents who harbour people. 
 
ACT
MEANS
PURPOSE
PUR
•Rec
R
ruit
r
men
m
t
en
•Thre
T
a
hre t
a  or
   
or us
u e 
e of
   
•Prost
Pros it
i ut
u ion
of 
io
•Tran
T
s
ran por
s
t
por
forc
o e
•Sexual 
Sex
exploit
ex
at
a ion
rce
i
•Tran
T
s
ran f
s er
e
•Coer
C
c
oer ion
•For
F c
or ed 
e labo
l
ur
abo
+
ion
+
= TRAFFICKING
+
+
= TRAFFICKIN
•Harbo
H
uri
arbo
ng
uri
•Abduc
Abdu t
c ion
•Slaver
Slav y
ion
•Rec
R
eipt
ei  
pt of
o  
f per
p s
er ons
o
•Frau
F
d
•Rem
R
ov
em
al 
ov
of 
of org
 
an
org
s
raud
an
•Dec
D
ept
e ion
•Other
Ot
 
her t
  ypes
y
 
pes of
o  
ion
f
•Abuse
Abus  
e of
o  pow
 
er 
pow
or
er   
exploit
ex
at
a ion
or 
vulnerabili
v
t
ulnerabili y
•Giving 
Giv
paym
pay en
m
t
en s 
s or
o  
r
benef
ben it
i s
t
 
 
Figure 10C-1. Elements in human trafficking 
 
10C-03. 
UN Response to Human Trafficking. The adoption in 2000 by the UN General 
Assembly of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially 
Women and Children
 marked a milestone in international efforts to stop the trade in people. As the 
guardian of the Protocol, the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) addresses human trafficking 
issues through its Global Programme against Trafficking in Persons. Most states have ratified the 
Protocol but translating it into reality remains problematic. Few criminals are convicted and most 
victims are probably never identified or assisted. 
 
10C-04. 
UN Departments Seeking to Prevent and Combat Trafficking. UNODC has issued 
various strategies to address trafficking including the Thematic Programme Against Transnational 
Organized Crime and Il icit Trafficking (2011-2013). 
Interagency-Coordination Group Against 
Trafficking, aims to improve coordination and cooperation between UN agencies and other IOs to 
facilitate a holistic approach to prevent and combat trafficking in persons, including protection of 
and support for victims of trafficking. The International Organization for Migration, an 
intergovernmental organisation, is also a major contributor to international efforts to reduce human 
trafficking. 
 
Definitions 
 
10C-05. 
Trafficking in Persons. UNODC defines Trafficking in Persons as “…recruitment, 
transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or 
other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position 
10C-1 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a 
person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation.” 
 
10C-06. 
Exploitation. There is no universally agreed definition regarding the exploitation of 
people. UNODC considers exploitation in the context of the prostitution of others or other forms of 
sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices like slavery, servitude or the 
removal of organs.  
 
Tactical Response 
 
10C-07. 
Stability Activities. The role of land forces in disrupting trafficking networks and 
supporting victims wil  vary per the mission and military activity. In most cases, land forces wil  
serve in a supporting role, enabling police primacy, assisting IOs and NGOs by means of the 
stabilising actions. For example, when providing security and control, land forces wil  gain an 
understanding of the movement of people throughout the area of operations. At the same time, 
when engaging in SSR and capacity building it may be possible to provide training to partner 
nation forces on the impact of trafficking and exploitation. In this context, commanders should 
ensure that effective liaison and reporting networks are established with partner nation law 
enforcement agencies as well as NGOs and IOs. 
 
10C-08. 
Legitimacy. As stated in Chapter 8, commanders must ensure that they, and their 
soldiers, are beyond reproach in their personal conduct to maintain mission legitimacy. This means 
considering out of bounds areas and the level of personal relationships permitted within the area of 
operations. For example, strip clubs are out of bounds to all British personnel serving with the UN 
Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP). Part of the aim of these measures is to reduce the 
likelihood that British troops directly or indirectly support or sustain trafficking and sexual 
exploitation and abuse. 
 
 

 
10C-2 
 


FOI2020/12929
 
Annex D to Chapter 10: Cultural Property Protection 
 
10D-01. 
Definition. Cultural property is defined in Article 27 of the 1907 Hague Regulations as 
including buildings dedicated to religion, art, science or charitable purposes and historic 
monuments. 
 
10D-02. 
Introduction. Sites of cultural and historic importance are areas where inappropriate 
behaviour by land forces can undermine campaign legitimacy and wider influence efforts. Enemy 
forces may use such sites as firing points, bases or depots in the belief that they will not be 
targeted. They may also use them to prompt inappropriate action by land forces to provide 
opportunities for their own information activities. The dilemma posed in such circumstances is the 
need to avoid alienation of the population, and any perceived desecration of these sites, while 
confronting the enemy. 
 
10D-03. 
Damage to cultural property may be detrimental to the cultural heritage of a nation or 
even mankind and is often irreversible. Harm to cultural property will most likely attract negative 
publicity to the operation, and may therefore give rise to tactical problems or even result in conflict 
escalation. Damage to cultural property can thus complicate the attainment of the ends of stability 
and thereby undermine mission success. Conversely, if land forces demonstrate care for cultural 
property, they have the potential to gain and maintain popular support. See Figure 10D-1 below. 
 
 
 
Figure 10D-1. Cultural property in conflict in legal and emotional contexts (NATO). 
 
10D-04. 
At the time of writing the UK is on the verge of signing up to the 1954 Hague 
Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. While provision 
has been made for cultural property protection through The Law of Armed Conflict historically, 
ratification will make commanders liable under law. Land forces are also supported by a 
designated unit of cultural property protection experts. 
 
Objectives 
 
10D-05. 
For the purpose of CPP, HQs at all levels should develop: 
 
a. 
Measures for identifying and protecting cultural property in the Operations Process 
from its early planning stage and throughout the operation. 
10D-3 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
 
b. 
Systems for identifying and protecting cultural property throughout operations. 
 
c. 
Procedures for mitigating the risks and consequences of damage to cultural property 
caused by accidents or lawful collateral damage, through public diplomacy and information 
campaigns. 
 
d. 
Contingency plans for urgent restitution if necessary. 
 
Responsibilities 
 
10D-06. 
As part of pre-deployment training land forces should receive appropriate training, 
education and instructions to fulfil their CPP responsibilities under international law.  
 
10D-07. 
In support of the commander, and in coordination with CIMIC staff and LEGADs, the 
CPP officer should: 
 
a. 
Provide or seek advice on CPP, including the applicability of and responsibility under 
the 1954 Hague Convention and its two Protocols (upon ratification of the convention in 
2017). 
 
b. 
ensure that CPP aspects are considered during the completion of the environmental 
baseline study (EBS). 
 
c. 
obtain lists of cultural sites and repositories to be used in locating of camps, 
installations, infrastructure, and preparation of areas for on-the-ground military activity; post 
off-limit areas; avoid/minimise damage due to mission requirements. 
 
d. 
account for the mission capability to address local concerns about cultural property and 
the impact the construction of bases and other installations and infrastructure will have on 
the area. 
 
10D-08. 
Understanding. It is essential that the location and reasons for significance of cultural 
sites within an area of operations are understood. Sacred sites should be routinely considered in 
the intelligence preparation of the environment process. As a guideline, the following should be 
considered: 
 
a. 
Location. In addition to the location of the site the importance of the area as a whole 
should be understood. 
 
b. 
Reason for Significance. There is a need to understand the unique aspects of sites. 
For example, whether a site is significant at a local, national, or global level. 
 
c. 
Behaviour. Rules and practices regulating entry and behaviour (for example carrying 
weapons, using force and shedding blood are strictly prohibited within a mosque). 
 
d. 
The impact of desecration. Acts of desecration may be seen as a violation of the 
sanctity of a site. This may prompt the use of force to defend it or to avenge the desecration. 
 
e. 
Calendar. There may be religious festivals, times of the month etc, which would impact 
on military activity near the site (e.g. large numbers of pilgrims present or auspicious dates). 
 
10D-09. 
Consultation with Custodians of Cultural Property and Religious Leaders. 
Custodians and religious leaders may not be willing collaborators with security forces but they are 
likely to help with providing information that will avoid damage to sacred sites. They should be 
consulted to gain a detailed understanding of the significance of property and the implications of 
10D-4 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
military operations in or around it. They will understand rules of behaviour and may be able to 
determine acceptable compromises. They will have an influence on public opinion and, if not 
consulted or involved, may hamper the efforts of military forces. 
 
10D-10. 
Conduct of Operations. The following guidelines may assist with planning and 
conducting operations in and around cultural and historic sites: 
 
a. 
Where possible, avoid significant religious festivals and time operations to avoid 
unnecessary offence to religious sensitivities (prayer times, holy periods etc.). 
 
b. 
Balance the anticipated gains of lethal operations against the wider effect on public 
opinion. 
 
c. 
Consider the use of partner nation security forces to enter sacred sites with foreign 
troops providing external security. 
 
d. 
Involve cultural custodians and local religious leaders as far as practicable. This should 
include the application of the gender perspective to achieve a broad understanding of cultural 
interests. 
 
e. 
Consider cordon operations and negotiation to facilitate a peaceful solution when the 
enemy is known to be in a culturally significant site. 
 
f. 
Support all activity concerning cultural sites with a campaign to shape perceptions prior 
to, during and after operations. 
 
g. 
Conduct remedial action post-operation. Restoration work or some means of 
compensation for damage may be required. In extremis, repair may become a military 
responsibility. Information activities may also be required. 
 
Military Infrastructure and Cultural Property120 
 
10D-11. 
Military activities including the construction and management of military camps and 
installations and other infrastructure have a propensity for damaging cultural and historic resources 
in a number of ways, including: 
 
a. 
Damage resulting from acts of hostility or use for military purposes, including combat 
related collateral damage. 
 
b. 
Damage caused by camp construction, expansion, and other construction activities, 
including roads and infrastructure improvement. 
 
c. 
Deliberate destruction, plundering and looting by civilians and combatants of sacred 
structures, museums, archaeological sites, and other forms of cultural property. 
 
d. 
Inadvertent damage resulting from military-supported projects like engagement 
exercises, training activities, and/or CIMIC sponsored construction or infrastructure 
improvements. 
 
10D-12. 
Paying attention to and, when necessary, protecting cultural property provides an 
opportunity for land forces to demonstrate respect for local customs and traditions. 
 
 
120 Adapted from NATO doctrine: Allied Joint Environmental Protection Publication - 2 (AJEPP-2). 
10D-5 
 

FOI2020/12929
 
10D-13. 
In sum, cultural property protection (CPP) is a mission requirement and involves 
strategic to tactical level considerations.  
 
10D-14. 
CPP is a cross-cutting activity during stability operations, involving functions with 
expertise in environmental protection (EP), intelligence gathering and analysis, CIMIC, Geospatial 
Imaging, LEGAD, combat support (targeting and fire support, engineers) and combat service 
support. 
 
Best Practice 
 
10D-15. 
Environmental Baseline Study (EBS). For the purpose of identifying cultural property 
during operations, the definition of cultural property in the 1954 Hague Convention is applicable. As 
part of the operational planning, the best possible geo-spatial data information should be sought 
regarding the presence of cultural property within the proposed operational area. 
 
10D-16. 
Specialist support is required for detailed baseline characterisation of cultural property. 
To ensure best practice, including compliance with international law, EP officers are to coordinate 
on CPP-related activities with J9 CIMIC staff for verification and reporting. To the greatest extent 
possible, information about cultural property should be collected from partner nation experts and/or 
locals. 
 
10D-17. 
The baseline characterisation of cultural property should include, but not necessarily be 
limited to, the following considerations: 
 
a. 
Is the camp/installation/infrastructure located in an area which is known for cultural 
property? Do operational maps identify cultural property in the designated area? 
 
b. 
In addition to clearly visible cultural property – included but not limited to places of 
worship, like churches, mosques, cemeteries, and burial grounds; collections of cultural 
property, such as museums; ancient buildings and structures; memorials and sites of trauma 
– the baseline characterisation needs to consider also indications of less visible cultural 
property, such as archaeological sites, ancient infrastructure, and underground features. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10D-6