Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
Connecting Policing to the Criminal Justice 
Network 

7 October 2020 
 

Security Classification 
NPCC Policy: Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification (Protective Marking may assist in assessing whether exemptions to FOIA may apply): 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you on receipt of a request 
prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
Author: 
 DCC Tony Blaker 
Force/Organisation: 
 National Police Chiefs’ Council - Criminal Justice Co-Ordination Committee (Kent Police) 
Date Created: 
 07/09/2020 
Coordination Committee: 
 Criminal Justice Co-ordination Committee 
Portfolio: 
 Courts Portfolio 
Attachments @ para 
 Appendix 1 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and storage and security of 
papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in compliance with other security controls and 
legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
 Appendix 1 
 
Video Remand Hearings Costs and Benefits Model ing 
 
Classification and Approval  
 
Classification  
 
Government Security classification: 
Official 
Disclosable under FOIA 2000 
No 
 
Approval  
Document Reference 
DPP/ DF/ VEJ/ 191 
Version 
0.3 
Last updated 
09/01/20 
Author 
Andy Godfrey 
Review  
Gary Lee (VEJ Lead for DF) Simon Alland (DF 
Lead) Steve Curry (VEJ Programme Director)  
 
1. 
CONTEXT SUMMARY 
1.1.  This paper describes the work undertaken to model police cashable benefits related to Video 
Remand Hearings (VRH) by Digital First (DF) and the VEJ Programme. 
 
1.2.  Assessment  of non-  cashable  benefits  will  occur  after  a meeting  with  the  Home  Office  on 
January 15th. 
 
1.3.  The key question to be resolved has been whether detainees spend less or more time in police 
custody under VRH and how great that difference is.  Extant data has painted an unclear and, 
at  times,  contradictory  picture.    By  fully  understanding  the  potential  impact  of  VRH  on 
detention times it is hoped that we will be able to arrive at an authoritative position on costs 
and benefits. 
 
1.4.  A further key question relates to safety and security and that is: what is the probability of 
those remanded to prison remaining in police custody overnight1? 
 
2. 
BENEFITS METHODOLOGY 
2.1.  VRH has no impact pre-charge. The key data point (timestamp) is therefore, for the majority 
of cases, the time at which a detained person is charged and bail denied (or latest time when 
there are multiple charges).  For the remaining cases where there are no new charges (such 
as  Failure  to  Appear  Warrants)  the  timestamp  changes  to  that  at  which  detention  is 
                                                           
1 As referenced in the HMICFRS report on custody suites in Norfolk and Suffolk 14-25 May 2018. The issues relate to: the potential for 
increased risk through holding a prisoner and; standard police custody is not designed or equipped to serve the rights and entitlements of 
prisoners (as opposed to detained persons). 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
authorised. Both of these timestamps represent the earliest point at which the VRH process 
could begin (see also the figure at the end of this document). 
 
2.2.  VRH has no impact on the timestamp.  For modelling purposes therefore there is no difference 
whether  data  comes  from  a  force  that  runs  VRH,  or  one  that  doesn’t.  For  comparison 
purposes however it is useful to have data from a force that does run VRH with a further data 
point then being the time at which detainees are disposed of from police custody in that force. 
 
2.3.  Data on charge and detention authorised times was gathered from custody systems in Kent, 
Sussex and Norfolk and Suffolk. 
 
2.4.  The two VRH areas (Kent/ Norfolk and Suffolk) required a resource intensive manual trawl of 
actual custody records. On assessing Norfolk and Suffolk data it was decided that there too 
many anomalies for it to be used.  Due to the resource requirement it has only been possible 
to gather one month of information from Kent: for September 20192. 
 
2.5.  For Sussex it has been possible to interrogate the custody system directly and we have been 
able to gather six months of data (June-November 2019)3. 
 
2.6.  We  have  used  the  VEJ  programme’s  predictive  ‘custody  hotspot’  model  to  carry  out  an 
analysis of both Kent and Sussex data. In addition, we have carried out manual modelling4 of 
the Kent data to allow us to have a control set for the predictive model. 
 
2.7.  The modelling assumptions5 are summarised here: 
  Six models: 
  Model 1 non VRH comparator (court hours Mon-Fri 10:00-17:00, Sat 10:00-15:00); 
  Model 2 baseline current court hours (Mon-Fri 10:00-17:00, Sat 10:00-15:00); 
  Model 3 VEJ Programme optimum scenario (aka 2B) (Mon to Sat 10:00 to 22:00); 
  Model 4 HMCTS scenario (Mon-Fri 09:00-18:00, Sat 10:00-15:00); 
  Model 5 HMCTS scenario (Mon-Fri 08:00-20:00, Sat 10:00-15:00); 
  Model 6 HMCTS scenario (Mon-Fri 08:00-20:00, Sat & Sun 10:00-15:00). 
  Different preparation times for the court paperwork - 1 hour for warrants and 2.5 hours 
for all other cases6. 
  30  minutes  (2  hearings  per  hour)  and  17  minutes  (3.5  cases  per  hour)  for  the  VRH 
separately modelled7. 
  90% (VEJ Programme target) and 60% (Crime Service Model target) detainee eligibility 
for video separately modelled. 
  Remand to prison rate 35%. 
  One  PECS  scenario  (scenario  2  from  those  discussed  below).  Based  on  PECS  Gen4 
flexibility but, for ease of modelling, with pickups timed at 08:00, 13:00 and 17:00 (08:00 
and 16:00 Saturday) and no Sunday service. 
                                                           
2 From broader interrogation of the Kent custody system, September 2019 was an average month in the year in terms of detainees put 
forward to the court. 
3 Thank you to Dave Cook at Sussex Police for expediting this. 
4 i.e. trawling through multiple spreadsheets of data and applying the assumptions by hand. Some assumptions had to vary, as shown at 
2.8. 
5 The assumptions are based either on those chosen by HMCTS when the CJS Working Group modelled VRH or VEJ Programme 
assumptions except; PECS scenarios were devised by DF. 
6 As agreed between Gary Lee (DF), Paula Bartlett (CPS) and Danny Cain (HMCTS) by email. 
7 Evidence from the VEJ Programme is that the current figure for Kent is 3.2 cases per hour. 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
 
2.8.  The manual model varies from the above as follows: 
  Court throughput measured at 2 hearings per hour only, but with no spread of cases 
throughout the day. 
  Three PECS scenarios8. The likelihood being that the actual service will vary across the 
country and nationally will fall somewhere between the extremes. 
 
2.9.  The non VRH comparator models taking all detainees away from custody at the next instance 
of a PECS pickup (08:00 Monday to Saturday).  This non VRH figure is then subtracted from 
the outcome of each of the other Models (2 to 6) to give the difference in hours spent in 
custody. 
 
2.10.  Note that we have modelled a single PECS pickup for non VRH.  If flexible pickups are available 
to non VRH forces, this model would be more efficient in  reducing detainee hours. Prison 
reception closing times represent a hard stop and are considered unlikely to change due to 
the prohibitively high costs discussed9 by HMPS and the impact on prisoner human rights. 
 
2.11.  For non VRH, the number of detainees remanded to prison who overnight in police custody 
is zero: as it would be in reality unless by exception e.g. prison lockouts where prisoners have 
been transported to police custody from court. 
 
3. 
OUTCOMES 
3.1.  For detainee hours there is a high level of correlation between the three modelling methods 
(Kent manual, Kent predictive and Sussex predictive). Because of the manual model’s inability 
to spread cases throughout a day in fact it behaves much closer to 17 minutes per hearing 
rather  than  30.    When  the  manual  method  is  considered  like  this,  Kent  manual  to  Kent 
predictive has a variation of -24 to +36 minutes and the maximum variation between any of 
the  outcomes  across  the  three  is  -36  to  +4210  minutes.  The  differences  are  considered 
predictable  and  the  Sussex  modelling  should  therefore  be  the  more  accurate,  given  the 
greater sample set. 
 
3.2.  Modelling the Sussex data returns the following reductions in detainee time spent in police 
custody (post timestamp) by comparison with non VRH: 
Eligibility> 
60/40 
90/10 
60/40 
90/10 
Efficiency> 
2 per hr 
2 per hr 
3.5 per hr 
3.5 per hr 
Model 2 Baseline/hrs 
1.00 
0.10 
1.20 
1.60 
Model 3 VEJ Prog./hrs 
3.10 
3.90 
3.20 
4.80 
Model 4 HMCTS/hrs 
1.40 
0.80 
1.60 
2.20 
Model 5 HMCTS/hrs 
2.00 
1.70 
2.10 
3.00 
Model 6 HMCTS + Sunday /hrs 
2.80 
3.30 
2.90 
4.30 
 
3.3.  Of immediate interest are the 90% eligibility figures (highlighted) for Models 2, 4 and 5 with 
2 cases per hour. It appears that higher eligibility with lower throughput starts to clog these 
                                                           
8 Scenario 1 - 08:00 and 13:00; Scenario 2 - 08:00, 13:00 and 17:00; Scenario 3 - 08:00 and 17:00 (Monday to Friday, Saturday 08:00 and 
16:00 for all). 
9 At Costs and Benefits Working Group. Human rights of the prisoner is the actual hard stop and the changes possible are for a small 
number of hours which represent a disproportionately large increase in costs. Overall the indication is that prison reception times will not 
move much, if at all. 
10 Note that the modelling returns one decimal figure results so 6 minutes is the granularity. 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
models,  with  cases  being  taken  over  to  the  following  day  and  detainee  hours  in  custody 
increasing (and the difference to non VRH decreasing) as a consequence. This is particularly 
of note in the baseline hours model where the difference from non VRH is close to zero. 
 
3.4.  Also note that the VEJ Programme’s six-day model reduces detainee time in police custody to 
a greater degree than the HMCTS seven-day model. 
 
3.5.  From the manual modelling we are able to extrapolate some further figures for different PECS 
pickup  scenarios  (1  and  3)  with  3.5  cases  per  hour.  Negative  figures  in  red  mean  that 
detainees would spend more time in police custody in the VRH model compared with non 
VRH: 
 
Eligibility 
PECS scenario 1/ hrs 
PECS scenario 2/ hrs 
PECS scenario 3/ hrs 
Model 
60/40 
-3.55 
1.20 
0.58 

60/40 
-0.65 
3.20 
2.71 

60/40 
-2.97 
1.60 
1.00 

60/40 
-2.14 
2.10 
1.55 

60/40 
-0.79 
2.90 
2.44 

90/10 
0.87 
1.60 
0.67 

90/10 
4.08 
4.80 
4.06 

90/10 
1.47 
2.20 
1.29 

90/10 
2.27 
3.00 
2.17 

90/10 
3.57 
4.30 
3.60 

 
3.6.  This shows that less favourable (to police) PECS pickups (08:00 and 13:00) when combined 
with low eligibility (60%) will result in detainees spending longer in police custody under any 
of the VRH models compared to non VRH. 
 
3.7.  Measurement of the number of detainees remanded to prison who remain in police custody 
shows  the following  results  (per  100  prisoners).  By  extrapolation  from  the manual  model, 
PECS scenario 1 will, as may be expected, perform significantly worse in taking prisoners away 
from police custody than scenario 2. Note that scenarios 2 and 3 give the same outcomes as 
both  have  ‘remanded  in  the  day’  prisoners being  taken  away  at 17:00.  Also note  that  the 
figure is zero for non VRH: 
 
Eligibility 
PECS 2 per 100 prisoners 
PECS 1 per 100 prisoners 
Model 
60/40 
0.0 
2.9 

60/40 
5.0 
8.0 

60/40 
0.0 
2.9 

60/40 
2.0 
4.9 

60/40 
4.0 
6.9 

90/10 
0.0 
4.8 

90/10 
7.0 
12.1 

90/10 
0.0 
4.9 

90/10 
3.0 
7.9 

90/10 
6.0 
10.9 

 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
3.8.  As may be expected, the later the hours the court works and the more defendants that pass 
through VRH, the more detainees who should be in prison remain in police custody overnight. 
The best performing model in terms of reducing detainee hours gives the greatest number of 
prisoners retained in police custody. 
 
4. 
DETAINEE COSTS 
4.1.  A HO led study into Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) custody costs in 2017 found that the 
actual cashable cost of keeping a detainee in police custody was £1.18 per detainee per hour.  
At 2019 inflation rates this equates to £1.28.  This figure is for incidentals only and does not 
cover staff and estate costs, which are fixed. 
 
4.2.  We have been provided with data from a similar study in Kent for Financial Year 2018/19.  The 
data in the study included many of the categories found in the MPS paper.  The time spent in 
custody was not available, so we were unable to produce an hourly rate however the data 
from each study was generally in alignment. The figure of £1.28 per detainee per hour has 
therefore been accepted11 as a representative measure. 
 
4.3.  In the DF Virtual Remand Hearings Demand Analysis Report, we estimated that the number 
of remands being requested across England and Wales would, based on a 2015 HMCTS figure 
of 216,500, be between 165,000 and 178,00012 by 2022.  It is thus possible to propose a high 
(216,500)  and  low (165,000) maximum  benefits  figure  to  illustrate  the  models  if  reflected 
nationally13.  Each figure is by comparison to the non VRH model. 
 
Model 
High 
Low 

£443,392 
£337,920 

£1,330,176 
£1,013,760 

£609,664 
£464,640 

£831,360 
£633,600 

£1,191,616 
£908,160 
 
4.4.  The maximum theoretical cashable saving for policing in England and Wales in these models 
would be £1.33m; where a decrease in detainee time spent in custody of 4.80 hours has been 
modelled  using  the  optimum  VEJ  Programme  court  hours  (their  operating  model  2B,  our 
Model 3). 
 
4.5.  Likewise, it is possible to calculate a high and low using the tables at paragraph 3.5 where the 
worst performing case is current court hours (with detainees spending 3.55 hours longer in 
police custody) which gives a low disbenefit of -£749,760 and a high disbenefit of -£983,776. 
 
5. 
POLICE COSTS 
5.1.  The steady state (revenue or running costs) for Home Office police forces is stated in the DF 
Test  Custody  Assumptions  Report  as  being  £28.1m  per  annum14  (VRH  taken  up  across  all 
                                                           
11 Accepted by the Costs and Benefits Working Group and specifically the VEJ Programme, both the original and inflated figures originate 
from HO. 
12 (Version 1.0 dated 6th December 2017) Conclusions paragraph 11.3. The expected decrease is mainly due to changes in the Bail Act. 
13 i.e. multiply hours saved by £1.28 then by each of 216,500 and 165,000. Using the 90% eligibility and 3.5 cases per hour to illustrate the 
maximum benefit. 
14 (Version 1.0 dated 29th March 2019) Executive Summary paragraph 1.7. 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
forces) made up mainly of staff and IT costs. Note that this is applicable only to the baseline 
model (Model 2) and to police costs (i.e. no other agencies are included): additional working 
hours may be expected to attract additional costs. 
 
6. 
CONCLUSION  
6.1.  In answer to the question posed at paragraph 1.3 (do detainees spend more or less time in 
police custody under VRH), we have shown that, in the majority of cases modelled, detainees 
could spend less time (up to 4.80 hours) in police custody through VRH. Under a specific PECS 
scenario, with 60% VRH eligibility, detainees could spend longer (up to 3.55 hours) in police 
custody through VRH, regardless of the court hours model. 
 
6.2.  Under certain circumstances (excluding the VEJ Programme model and the HMCTS Sunday 
court)  with  the  higher  level  of  eligibility  (90%)  the  court  hours models  start  to clog  police 
custody if the throughput of cases being dealt with by the court drops. 
 
6.3.  In answer to the question posed at paragraph 1.4 (what is the probability of those remanded 
to prison remaining in police custody overnight), and as illustrated in the tables at 3.7, the 
longer  the  hours  worked  by  the  court,  the  more  detainees  who  should  be  in  prison  are 
retained in police custody: up to a maximum of 12.1 per 100. Under a non VRH model no 
detainees who should be in prison are retained in police custody as ‘business as usual’. The 
dilemma  at  the heart of  this modelling  is  that  the  more  efficient  a  scenario  is  at  reducing 
detainee hours, the less efficient it is at removing prisoners, with a consequent increased risk 
impact on police. 
 
6.4.  All  of  the  variables  impact  the  results:  Court  hours,  PECS  pickups,  eligibility  rate  and 
throughput of the court. Any combination of these that is not optimal will alter the outcomes 
adversely. 
 
6.5.  Using  the  datasets,  assumptions  and  modelling  scenarios  considered  in  this  report,  the 
maximum theoretical cashable benefit for policing in England and Wales is £1.33m per annum 
(for the VEJ Programme Model).  At the other extreme of current court hours, lower levels of 
PECS transport and low VRH eligibility the highest theoretical cashable disbenefit is -£0.98m 
per annum15. Given the spread of variables and likely national variations it is anticipated that 
different forces will see a variety of results across the spectrum modelled. 
 
6.6.  Steady state it is expected that police costs will be £28.1m per annum (applicable to Model 2 
only: additional working hours may be expected to attract additional resource costs). 
 
6.7.  Further work is required to identify non cashable benefits. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
15 Note that this latter figure uses an extrapolation of the manual model and is therefore likely to be less accurate than the maximum 
saving. 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
Warrant
‘Detention 
Eligible 
Y
Disposal at 
CPS Papers 
VRH 0.5 
Y
Authorised’ 
Remand?
for VRH?
next PECS 
1 hour
hour
Timestamp (w)
pickup (y)
N
N
Disposal (y) 
Disposal 
(08:00)
(y)
Other: no charge
‘Detention 
Eligible 
Y
Disposal at 
CPS Papers 
VRH 0.5 
Y
Authorised’ 
Remand?
for VRH?
next PECS 
2.5 hours
hour
Timestamp (w)
pickup (y)
N
N
Disposal (y) 
Disposal 
(08:00)
(y)
New charge
‘Charged at’
Eligible 
Y
CPS Papers 
VRH 0.5 
Disposal at 
Y
Timestamp 
for VRH?
next PECS 
2.5 hours
hour
Remand?
(x)
pickup (y)
Key:
N
N
Could occur the 
Disposal (y) 
Disposal 
next day
(08:00)
(y)
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 5RS 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE