This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
Connecting Policing to the Criminal Justice 
Network 

7 October 2020 
 

Security Classification 
NPCC Policy: Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification (Protective Marking may assist in assessing whether exemptions to FOIA may apply): 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you on receipt of a request 
prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
Author: 
 DCC Tony Blaker 
Force/Organisation: 
 National Police Chiefs’ Council - Criminal Justice Co-Ordination Committee (Kent Police) 
Date Created: 
 07/09/2020 
Coordination Committee: 
 Criminal Justice Co-ordination Committee 
Portfolio: 
 Courts Portfolio 
Attachments @ para 
 Appendices 1-3 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and storage and security of 
papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in compliance with other security controls and 
legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
 
Executive Summary 
 
In the past few decades police forces and other Criminal Justice (CJ) agencies have turned to technology in order 
to improve cross-organisational collaboration and efficiency in the Criminal Justice System (CJS).  
In 2016 HMCTS launched the Common Platform (CP) Programme which sought to deliver a shared process that 
would transform the way practitioners in the justice system work with new technologies. Subsequently in 2019 
the  Ministry  of  Justice  (MOJ)  commissioned  the  development  of  their  own  video  platform  as  part  of  the 
programme – now known as CVP (Cloud Video Platform). 
The forerunner to CVP for policing was the Video Enabled Justice (VEJ) programme. A collaborative test pilot 
which  complemented  the  work  of  Digital  First  (DF)  to  establish  an  evidence  base  of  ‘what  works’  for  Video 
Remand Hearings (VRH) and live link witness testimony with an aim of maximising the use of technology in the 
CJS. The pilot has shown there to be a trade-off between benefits and disbenefits for policing. On one hand the 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
use of VRH sees HMCTS realise the greatest benefits, with policing bearing substantial costs, whilst on the other 
the use of live link for police witnesses can realise considerable benefits for policing in maintaining operational 
effectiveness.  
Furthermore,  the  use  of  technology  enabled  live  link  for  civilian  witness  testimony  has  provided  substantial 
benefits in securing victim and witness participation in pursuing prosecutions. The potential to provide evidence 
in a safe and secure environment has been a driver to success and provided a legitimate methodology in the 
best interests of justice for victims.  
Following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic HMCTS requested that policing supported the accelerated 
rollout of CVP for all criminal jurisdictions. Most forces responded to the request to assist, and with no funding 
and limited opportunity for planning, preparation or analysis of CVP, introduced VRH to custody suites forthwith. 
The collective policing experience of the accelerated roll-out of CVP has been one of relative disorganisation and 
disruption. The consequential impact has been extensive: the costs, the changes in custody risk; along with the 
dependency  on  policing  to  make  changes  to  estates,  IT,  staffing  and  processes  has  challenged  professional 
relationships, culminating in the continued use of VRH being considered by many as unsustainable for policing.  
What is abundantly clear and evident is the financial implications for policing to implement video technology 
into its infrastructure, policy and procedures; this is by far the single greatest barrier to feasibility. A national 
review conducted by the portfolio during the COVID-19 response has estimated revenue costs of £27.8m per 
annum  for  policing.  Furthermore,  a  capital  injection  of  £10.5m  to  establish  the  infrastructure  necessary  to 
stabilise the technology and meet legislative/policy requirements would be required. 
Despite the recent challenges it would be misleading to suggest there is no business case for policing to continue 
with the use of video technology. For example, the use of technology enabled live links and similar initiatives 
across the country evidence the potential to realise substantial savings for policing. Furthermore, the inception 
of video technology into the systems and processes of strategic partners such as: CPS; HMPS; Defence; Probation 
and Interpreter services present opportunities to unlock additional benefits for policing to reduce demand and 
remove inefficiencies. 
There is clear evidence from the VEJ programme that video technology augmented by supporting technology 
and effective business processes tailored to policing, has scope beyond the parameters of the pilot which could 
transform and modernise the way the police service operates, internally and collaboratively.  
Policing  is  rapidly  reaching  a  crossroads  as  we  start  to  transition  from  recovery  to  improvement,  and  the 
necessity for VRH becomes an option for individual forces rather than a requirement. Regardless of the decision, 
forces will need a  strategy  for remotely engaging  with courts and the wider  CJS partners given the strategic 
direction  of  travel.  The  Ministry  of  Justice  (MoJ)  and  Home  Office  (HO)  officials  have  asked  for  policing  to 
consider adoption of VRH going forward and it is important for a national position to be established.  
The content  of this paper outlines in detail  the evidence base  which  I have utilised to  carefully  consider the 
policing  position,  set  against  the  challenges  we  face  and  our  future  aspirations.    Inextricably  linked  is  the 
Government’s key priority for policing which sets a strategy of maximising the operational effectiveness of the 
20,000 uplift and minimising the impact on policing of the post COVID-19 court backlog and existing inefficiencies 
in the CJS. Consequently, my recommendations are: 
1.  Support VRH where possible until December 2020 at which point forces should return to pre-COVID 
arrangements. This will provide a reasonable period for HMCTS to implement and gain traction with 
their national recovery plan. 

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
2.  Police witness testimony via technology enabled live link should be the long-term default position for 
policing.  
3.  Policing should support the use of live link for civilian witnesses, although it is for HMCTS to lead and 
implement, not policing. 
4.  For policing to reconsider the use of VRH on a long-term basis several conditions would first need to be 
met: 
  A capital injection of £10.5m for policing to provide police custody facilities; 
  An investment of £27.84m per annum to cover policing resources required for VRH, or deployment of 
enough PECS resources with relevant capabilities through legislative changes to mitigate this;  
  Development of the technology used to support video enabled processes which removes inefficiencies 
and reduces demand on policing e.g. a bespoke tool to effectively manage the surrounding planning, 
preparation  and  communication  activities  required  for  a  VRH,  like  that  developed  by  the  VEJ 
programme (GTL) which automates tasks, removes inefficiencies from the processes, gathers and tracks 
Management Information (MI);  
  Development  of  effective  business  processes  to  support  video  enabled  technology,  mitigate  risk, 
remove efficiencies and operationalise the lessons learnt from the VEJ programme; 
  It is critical HMCTS increase remand court capacity / throughput to minimise custody times and prevent 
lockouts; conduct hearings earlier and/or extending HMPS reception times. 
Notwithstanding these recommendations there is a compelling business case for the wider use of video within 
the policing network. As such I would advocate investment in video technology being considered for policing, 
with  individual  force  strategic  plans  exploiting  the  opportunities  to  reduce  inefficiencies  and  optimise 
performance. 
 
 

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 

Background 
1.1 
In the past few years, police forces and Criminal Justice (CJ) agencies have turned to technology in order 
to improve cross-organisational collaboration and efficiency in the Criminal Justice System (CJS). From 
what  has  long  since  been  a  paper-based  industry,  the  CJS  has  been  gradually  migrating  towards 
digitisation  which  combines  the  respected  traditions  with  the  enabling  power  of  technology  (Lord 
Chancellor, 2016).  
1.2 
Since  2016  HM  Government  have  made  it  clear  their  desire  to  see  swifter  and  more  efficient  justice 
delivered  for  victims  of  crime  within  a  more  effective  and  cohesive  CJS  that  best  serves  victims  and 
witnesses and reduces inefficiencies for all stakeholders. At the centre of this vision is the CJS Common 
Platform (CP) programme. Launched in 2016 it sought to deliver a shared process which would transform 
the way practitioners in the justice system work with new technologies.  
1.3 
One strand has been the use of video technology, with the first ‘digital courtroom’ pilot created in March 
2013 in Birmingham, which included digital screens to present evidence, police to court video-links and 
video technology to allow witnesses and experts to give evidence remotely. This was widely regarded as 
a success with the former Justice Minister Damien Green announcing a national roll-out of the system in 
April 2013. 

Video Enabled Justice (VEJ) Programme  
2.1 
When HMCTS undertook the development of their new digital management system, Common Platform, 
in 2016 they intended to introduce their own bespoke video platform in the latter part of the programme 
(now  known  as  CVP  (Cloud  Video  Platform))  which  could  interface  with  technologies  used  by  other 
agencies. In order to test this concept and gain an understanding of what would and would not work the 
Home Office Police Reform Transformation Fund provided £11.3m to the VEJ Programme to develop and 
pilot  a  video  solution  that  would  meet  the  requirements  of  policing  and  CJ  partner  agencies.  Sussex, 
Surrey and Kent (with Norfolk and Suffolk joining the programme in March 2019) became the testbed for 
the new technology and the forerunner to any subsequent video solution (CVP being the HMCTS system).  
 

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
2.2 
The  VEJ  programme  brought  together  key  stakeholders  e.g.  Police,  HMCTS,  CPS,  and  the  Defence 
Community in an effort to: identify the benefits and disbenefits for policing and partners; establish what 
works;  stress-test  the  technology;  develop  the  supporting  systems  and  processes;  and  establish  the 
resources and costs to operationalise the technology. 
2.3 
There were three main elements to the VEJ programme which has been developed over the 3-years it 
has been operating in court rooms: 
2.3.1 
First Appearance Video Remand Hearings – The VEJ video manager tool referred to as GTL is an 
innovative solution used to facilitate the video appearance of a detainee held in police custody 
into  a  Magistrates’  Court,  which  enables  hearings  to  be  conducted  in  a  more  efficient  and 
effective way, consequently reducing custody duration. Furthermore, it facilitates the remote 
participation in the hearing by CPS, Defence, Probation, Interpreters and YOT. 
2.3.2 
Police Witness ‘live links’ - The programme introduced technology enabled police witness live 
links in the Magistrates’ and Crown Courts which drives efficiencies through better co-ordination 
of police witnesses and maintains operational effectiveness of resources.  
2.3.3 
Vulnerable  Witnesses  Remote  Links  –  This  allows  vulnerable  victims  and  witnesses  to  give 
evidence  in  a  safe  and  secure  environment  other  than  the  court  room  e.g.  a  Civilian 
Victim/Witness Suite. 
2.4 
Whilst the concept of using a video platform for users to communicate sounds simple and is a basic one 
most  people  are  familiar  and  comfortable  with,  it  is  the  surrounding  planning,  preparation  and 
communication  activities  which  adds  the  layers  of  complexity.  It  is  these  challenges  that  the  VEJ 
programme has sought to overcome by developing a bespoke tool for policing, known as GTL. The tool 
automates tasks, removes inefficient processes, gathers and tracks Management Information (MI) and 
assists in optimising the use of police resources.  

What has been learnt so far  
3.1 
In 2020 a review of the costs and benefits modelling for  VRH was undertaken by the Digital First  (DF) 
programme (Appendix 1) and found that any potential cashable benefits for policing are minimal when 
compared  to  the  costs.    They  are  also  dependent  upon  the  efficiency  of  several  other  variables, 
particularly the court capacity, court operating hours, detainee eligibility and PECS pickups. 
3.2 
Using  the  datasets,  assumptions  and  modelling  scenarios  considered  in  that  report,  the  maximum 
theoretical cashable benefit for policing in England and Wales is £1.33m per annum and the maximum 
theoretical non- cashable benefit is £3.10m per annum giving a combined benefit of £4.43m per annum 
(for  an  extended  hours  model).  Based  on  pre-COVID  court  operating  hours  with  lower  levels  of  PECS 
transport and low eligibility (60%), the highest theoretical cashable disbenefit was  -£0.98m per annum 
and the maximum theoretical non- cashable disbenefit -£2.29m per annum giving a combined disbenefit 
of -£3.27m per annum. 
3.3 
Spread across all Home Office forces, based on pre-COVID court hours, the cashable benefits spread from 
+£0.44m to -£0.98m and non-cashable from +£1.03 to -£2.29m.  Given the spread of variables and likely 
local variations it is anticipated that different forces will see a variety of results.   
3.4 
The  impact,  or  otherwise,  of  VRH  on  judicial  outcomes  has  still  not  been  evidenced  at  this  point.  An 
independent evaluation has been conducted by the University of Surrey examining the use of VRH and 
its unintended consequences associated with courtroom technology. The findings predominantly relate 
to the booking tool and how the technologies interact and is beyond the scope of this paper.  

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
3.5 
Of note the Custody Assumptions Report and the People and Process Report (Appendix 2) both found 
that VRH introduces a change in risk profile in custody that needs to be investigated, understood and 
analysed in economic terms. Of particular concern is  ‘lockouts’ (detainees remanded to prison by the 
court remaining in police custody overnight). A common issue that features in the CVP impacts section 
of this paper. (Note: This risk should reduce, but will not be eliminated, when the new PECS Gen4 contracts 
go live in August 2020 as that allows for flexible pickups through the day.
)   
3.6 
Operationally VRH appears to work for several forces with some realising benefits in operating VRH for 
certain cases only e.g. for detainees charged during the day or with cases of low probability of remand 
which  can  be  processed  quicker  and  increase  cell  availability.  The  Metropolitan  Police  report  their 
average  detention  times  for  those  bailed  or  released  under  investigation  are  half  those  that  are 
remanded in custody.  The average detention time is approximately 15 hours but raises to 31 hours for 
remands in custody and even more for those remanded to prison. 

Live link 
4.1 
The use of live link is not unique to policing, however the VEJ  pilot has demonstrated that where it is 
augmented  by  the  GTL  technology  it  can  derive  significant  benefits.  Essentially,  there  are  two  major 
benefits for policing: firstly, the time saved travelling to and from court and the cashable savings which 
accompany that travel; and secondly in reducing the time police officers spend waiting at court when 
cases are cracked or ineffective and have been concluded. An issue which is further exacerbated by a 
large percentage of officers being called to court and never appearing. Both scenarios allow officers to 
remain within a police facility whilst waiting to appear, creating an opportunity to continue with other 
duties and be re-deployed without delay once released.  
4.2 
Initial scoping of cost and benefits for live links was carried out by the DF review and have recently been 
refreshed with current data to support a national discovery business case and implementation for CSR 
submission.  The  VEJ  programme  has  demonstrated  that  significant  cashable  savings  can  be  achieved. 
(‘Video Enabled Justice - Costs and Benefits Summary’ (Appendix 2)).  
4.3 
One  of  the  challenges  in  establishing  a  robust  evidence  base  has  been  the  absence  of  a  consistent 
methodology  to  record  data  in  each  force,  which  means  the  benefits  of  video  nationally  cannot  be 
accurately predicted. However, what was clear is that those forces utilising live link, and have recorded 
testimony data, were able to evidence tangible benefits.  
4.4 
The VEJ Programme found that in a Magistrates’ Court there is a potential time saving of 5 hours (5 .5 
hours in person vs 0.5 hours by video) increasing to 10.5 hours in Crown Court (11 hours in person vs 0.5 
hours by video), dependent on effective management of police witnesses, providing the five-force region 
an estimated cashable and non-cashable benefit of £2.8m per annum. 
4.5 
The East Midlands Criminal Justice Board reported in their live link evaluation that the indicative cost of 
42 officers attending court between November 2015 and March 2016 was £4,408, whereas if heard over 
video the cost fell to £367 (based on 4 hours in person vs 20 minutes by video). 
4.6 
Thames Valley Police estimate for the period of February to December 2019 they were able to make a 
saving of £115,042 by using live link for 334 officers in Magistrates Court (hours saved per witness at a 
cost of £86.11 per case). 
4.7 
It is important to note these are predominately non-cashable savings / benefits, however, they are critical 
in  achieving  the  government’s  national  policing  priority  to  maximise  the  efficiency  and  operational 
effectiveness of the uplift to 20,000 officers. There are also variable savings in the absence of travel which 
can be modest through to substantial, dependent on force geography and site locations. 

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
4.8 
The DF programme attempted to obtain national figures for police witnesses through CPS and HMCTS, 
however, as discussed above this is not  explicitly recorded.  Despite not  being calculable at a  national 
level, individual forces can forecast their own savings as follows: 
4.8.1 
Magistrates’  Court  benefit  =  (Number  of  police  witnesses  x  Average  time  saved  (5  hours)  x 
Average hourly cost of a police officer (£47)) + (Miles travelled x 0.45p per mile) 
4.8.2 
Crown Court benefit = (Number of police witnesses x Average time saved (10.5 hours) x Average 
hourly cost of a police officer (£47)) + (Miles travelled x 0.45p per mile) 
4.9 
The capital costs associated with live link primarily relate to the initial set up of rooms, network and video 
equipment. A typical Justice Video Service (JVS) link costs approx. £12,500 to install. 
4.10  The revenue costs principally relate to network use and will vary dependent on the specific system used. 
For example, JVS fixed endpoints will cost £2,777 per annum, although if the solution is online the costs 
would  reduce  substantially.  There  are  administration  overheads  (booking  officers  on  a  booking  tool), 
although  they  are  akin  to  that  already  undertaken  for  ‘in  person’  appearances  (duty  changes  / 
notifications). It is broadly agreed that appearance of police witnesses by video into court can produce 
substantial savings for policing. Legislation means that it can already be done, most courts are equipped 
for it, and several forces have already invested and are attaining benefits. 
4.11  Several forces have stated that live link does not return value for them due to their current methods of 
working and / or geography. The real  savings are only apparent  if processes are put  in place to track 
management data, test it and apply the findings to those elements of the witness process that are causing 
inefficiencies,  regardless  of  agency.    For  example,  by  accurately  tracking  activity  the  VEJ  programme 
revealed  only  30  %  of  all  police  witnesses  called  ended  up  providing  testimony,  demonstrating  an 
evidence-based opportunity to seek better case management and reduce wasted police time.  
4.12  A significant constraint in maximising the potential of technology enabled live link is that an application 
by the CPS or defence to the judge for each witness is required and is granted or not at their discretion. 
Whilst this was prudent at the initial stages of introducing and testing the concept, it is time to evolve 
the process which sees police witness testimony being delivered by video as a default position and an 
application not to do so by exception. The evidence strongly supports the rationale to do so and offers 
the best opportunity to augment the operational effectiveness of police officers.   
4.13  The use of technology enabled live link for civilian witness testimony has provided substantial benefits in 
securing victim and witness participation in pursuing prosecutions. The potential to provide evidence in 
a safe and secure environment has been a driver to success and provided a legitimate methodology which 
is in the best interests of justice for victims.   
4.14  Other legacy practices such as OIC's attending crown court to simply be available to CPS counsel, which 
could still be serviced by video at police stations, present further opportunities to remove inefficiencies. 
A national  assessment  undertaken by the VEJ programme indicates potential non cashable savings of 
£10.8m per annum for policing.  
4.15  Whilst the responsibility to coordinate witness testimony is a judicial function, witness care units play a 
key  role  in  administering  video  enabled  live  link  for  police  and  civilian  witnesses.    Whilst  policing  is 
committed to providing the best possible service to victims and maximising the operational effectiveness 
of police officers using video, the consequential increase of demand on WCUs must be recognised. 

Introduction of CVP  
5.1 
Following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic which resulted in court closures across the country, 
combined with the  subsequent  direction from the  Lord Chief Justice  to increase the use of video and 
audio  technology, HMCTS  provided a  response and, in March 2020, the judiciary  introduced CVP and 
accelerated its rollout to all jurisdictions.  

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
5.2 
Consequently, a temporary, untested, VRH process was implemented nationally to minimise the risks of 
people  physically  attending  Magistrates’  Courts.  Remand  hearings  are  carried  out  by  video  with 
defendants  appearing,  wherever  possible,  from  police  custody  with  other  participants  (CPS,  Defence 
Representative, Probation, Interpreter, etc) appearing remotely; with only the Bench and HMCTS staff 
present in court. 
5.3 
HMCTS requested assistance  from  police  to keep the CJS  moving and urgently implement  CVP across 
force  areas,  which  policing  endeavoured  to  achieve.  However,  due  to  the  speed  at  which  CVP  was 
introduced the appropriate planning, preparation and support which would  ordinarily be expected for 
such  a  large  change  programme,  was  absent.  Consequently,  there  was  a  diverse  approach  to 
implementation, including estate,  connectivity, technology, resources, health and  safety, systems and 
processes, local relationships etc. For some forces it was simply not possible to introduce, for others it 
was introduced partially (COVID-19 cases only), or as a hybrid with audio technology. 
5.4 
At the time of inception, the full impact of introducing CVP for VRH to policing was unknown. Although 
the VEJ pilot had provided a preliminary insight it is important to distinguish the fundamental differences 
between the two systems. GTL is a bespoke product designed and developed for policing, incorporating 
the  micro  activities  conducted  in  custody  pre  and  post  hearing.  Additionally,  appropriate  business 
processes  to  augment  the  technology  have  been  refined  over  time  to  minimise  inefficiencies  and 
optimise  the  operability  of  custody  resources.  Conversely  CVP  in  its  current  iteration  is  a  basic  video 
communications platform.  

Impact of CVP on policing 
6.1 
A  disbenefit  of  the  rapid  introduction  of  CVP  has  meant  no  robust  mechanism  to  track  and  test  the 
impacts, benefits and disbenefits to policing has been in place.  Nonetheless, the NPCC Custody portfolio 
and the Op Talla Working Group have secured a preliminary evidence base as to the day-to-day impact 
on forces. A summary of these findings is: 
6.1.1 
Resourcing  –  The  consensus  reached  amongst  the  Op  Talla  Regional  Working  Group  as  a 
yardstick is 3 FTE members of staff at each custody suite working 5 days a week 8-5 with cover 
on a Saturday (this varies by force depending on the number and capacity of each custody). 
Some areas report remand courts operating late in the evening due to volume, thus increasing 
resource requirements. Forces have used a  mixture of DDOs, PCs and Sgts to complete the 
scheduling and co-ordinating functions to service CVP (Note: for GTL forces these activities are 
automated).  
6.1.2 
PECS  contractors  –  The  effectiveness  of  PECS  staff  in  custody  suites  to  absorb  additional 
demand is limited. Current legislation in respect of their powers, contractual requirements and 
access to IT systems have all been limiting factors. 
6.1.3 
Strategic relationships – A common theme from forces has been the strain on the relationship 
with HMCTS and other strategic partners such as CPS, Defence and Probation. It is important 
to recognise this as an unintended consequence which will need attention moving forward. 
6.1.4 
Implementation  -  No  assisted  implementation  has  led  to  a  disparate  approach  with  little 
consistency, inefficient systems and processes and less than optimum use of resources e.g. use 
of Police vs DDO vs Sgts vs PECS. Telephone calls to arrange hearings, the use of spreadsheets 
and  the  absence  of  MI  is  a  regression  to  what  has  been  trialled  in  the  VEJ  pilot  that  had 
successfully removed the inefficiencies in respect of remands. 

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
6.1.5 
Safer  Detention  and  Handling  of  Prisoners  (SDHP)  –  During  these  temporary  arrangements 
many forces  have been unable to implement  guidance in order to facilitate  VRH, operating 
with dynamic risk based decisions e.g. using rooms which are not built to meet basic health 
and safety responsibilities, poor infrastructure, detainees left on their own, hard end points 
not  being  used  and  lack  of  private  consultation.  Insufficient  use  has  been  made  of  safe 
consultation  booths  which  were  developed  by  the  VEJ  programme  and  are  in  use  in  Kent, 
Sussex and Surrey. 
6.1.6 
Connectivity  –  The  majority  of  custody  estate  across  the  country  is  ageing  and  was  never 
designed  with  the  use  of  modern  technology  in  consideration.  Preceding  custody  building 
design appears to go hand in hand with poor connectivity and infrastructure. Forces whose 
only option are soft endpoints have reported great difficulty in establishing and maintaining 
connectivity, having to default to audio technology for hearings.  
6.1.7 
Capacity  –  Demand  and  resourcing  models  across  the  country  have  not  been  designed  to 
accommodate  elongated  stays  of  detainees.  Traditionally  the  transportation  of  remand 
detainees at the start of the working day was a ‘recalibration’ for custody, creating capacity 
for the next cycle of detentions. Universally, forces have reported a significant impact on their 
ability to absorb new demand by retaining detainees often deep into the subsequent working 
day. Detainees being redirected to alternate custody suites and / or to other force areas has 
been commonplace. For the majority, the location of the detainee has a consequential impact 
on their investigative resources and medical provisions adding further demand. This issue has 
been further exacerbated by ‘lockouts’. Forces report  this regularly occurring in two ways - 
firstly, the capacity of the remand courts to hear the volume of cases in time for transferring 
the  detainee  to  prison  (examples  of  remand  courts  operating  until  2300  hours  have  been 
reported) and secondly the cut off time (lockout) brought forward in some policing areas. The 
Metropolitan Police for example report an average of 3 lockouts per day. 
6.1.8 
Hidden demand – This concept is more challenging to quantify as incidents are circumstantial. 
An example is a detainee being remanded by the court awaiting pickup from GEOAmey and in-
between this period fell ill and was taken to hospital. This continued for a further 72 hours 
requiring  2  PCs  to  conduct  constant  supervision  at  the  hospital.  Pre  VRH  this  responsibility 
would have sat with GEOAmey.  
6.1.9 
Hidden costs -  Travel  warrants  issued to those detainees released by the  court  would  have 
been paid for by suppliers. One force, for example, report the cost has reached in excess of 
£500 for the week. 
6.1.10 
Transfer  of  risk  –  The  undefined  period  of  extended  detention  for  the  purpose  of  the  VRH 
results in police absorbing and managing all the risks and responsibilities associated with each 
detainee.  Each  detainee  presents  a  unique  risk,  some  are  minor,  however,  most  detainees 
attract  some  level  of  care  from  needing  to  see  a  nurse  through  to  the  need  for  constant 
supervision  and  restraint  for  their  own  safety.  Policing  understands  the  existing  risk  profile 
based on years of data and have designed their systems, processes and resource modelling to 
absorb this for a 24-hour period (in rare circumstances up to 96 hours) and not the extended 
stay experienced as a result of VRH.  
6.2 
The full cost to policing in operating CVP during the pandemic continues to be  tracked by each police 
agency.  To  provide  some  context,  Kent  which  are  considered  a  medium  sized  force  and  had  existing 
practices  and  supporting  technology  for  VRH,  have  incurred  additional  costs  of  £30k  per  month. 
Lancashire  Constabulary,  which  is  comparable  to  Kent,  introduced  CVP  technology  with  no  prior 
experience and have incurred additional costs of £40k per month. The Metropolitan Police have recorded 
their costs in excess of £160k per month and rising.   

 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
6.3 
Due to the extraordinary level of demand generated by VRH which is far beyond any custody resilience 
modelling,  most  of  the  resourcing  required  to  meet  demands  has  had  to  come  from  the  frontline, 
removing police officers from operational policing.  
 

Benefits of CVP to policing 
7.1 
Numerous factors are involved in establishing the costs and benefits, including existing working practices 
and geography. It appears the geographical relationship of CJS partners to the police (e.g. prisons, courts) 
is a primary component. This makes a ‘one size fits all’ costs and benefits case impractical to calculate. 
Similarly, other agencies have not yet issued any definitive statements on costs and benefits of video 
working: for example, HMCTSs costs and benefits are tied into the broader CP programme of works which 
remains ‘in progress’. Therefore, currently, there are no published cost / benefit data analysis on VRH.  
7.2 
Some forces have shown that VRH has value in those cases that would have been a ‘Late Notification’ or 
for afternoon court and transportation is limited. They can then arrange with the court a VRH without 
moving the prisoner and keeping them overnight. 

Summary of CVP roll out 
8.1 
The recent experience of those forces involved in the accelerated roll-out of CVP has been one of relative 
disorganisation and disruption. The costs, the changes in custody risk and the dependency on policing to 
make changes to estates, IT, staffing and processes leaves VRH unsustainable for most forces.  
8.2 
A few forces simply could not absorb the additional demands and were unable to introduce VRH. Several 
forces have had to limit its use to COVID cases only, and for several others, withdrawn altogether or in 
the process of doing so (Appendix 3). As it stands, it is highly unlikely that many Chief Constables and 
Police  and  Crime  Commissioners  would  agree  to  invest  in  resources  or  infrastructure  to  deliver  VRH 
without the identification of central funding.  
8.3 
In considering policing’s position it is important to distinguish between the recent CVP experience and 
the wider use of video technology in the CJS. The former being an isolated use of the technology during 
a response of unprecedented scale, with limited opportunity for planning and preparation, for the main 
purpose of remand hearings; set against the latter, being a well-designed bespoke product with a suite 
of options for the purpose of removing inefficiencies and optimising police resources,  akin to the VEJ 
pilot. 
8.4 
What is clear from the VEJ pilot is there is a trade-off between benefits and disbenefits for policing. On 
one hand the use of VRH sees HMCTS realise the greatest benefits, with policing bearing substantial costs 
of additional resources, decreased cell capacity and an increase in associated risks. Whilst on the other 
the  use  of  technology  enabled  live  link  for  police  witnesses  and  vulnerable  victims  is  a  considerable 
benefit, saving police officer time, expenses and optimising officer deployments. Additionally, there are 
discernible areas of potential within policing such as: 
  Suspect interviewing – internally and between force areas; 
  PACE reviews and extensions; 
  Health screening. 
10 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
8.5 
Examining  the  wider  CJS  landscape,  video  technology  has  the  potential  to  unlock  further  benefits  for 
policing. The introduction of an entry network connection into courts and a common booking solution, 
especially if they could be combined as the VEJ Programme would considerably enhance these benefits. 
Furthermore, the inception of video technology into the systems and processes of strategic partners such 
as:  CPS;  HMPS;  Defence  Community;  Probation  and  Interpreter  services  present  opportunities  for 
policing to reduce demand and inefficiencies. Examples could be:  
 
Extended court hours; 
 
Cross-border remand hearings; 
 
Extradition hearings; 
 
Warrant of further detention hearings; 
 
Out of hours applications; 
 
Prison visits; 
 
Police led prosecutions; 
 
DVPN/ protection order hearings; 
 
Access to civil courts – civil orders, licencing etc.; 
 
Interpreter services; 
 
CPS consultation – RASSO – advice clinics; 
 
Defence consultation; 
 
Cross jurisdiction hearings;  
 
S.28 hearings. 
8.6 
For  policing  it  may  also  be  strategically  prudent  to  consider  the  aspirations  of  the  CJS  with  video 
technology and the consequential impacts on policing. The judiciary have stated that CVP provides the 
functionality needed for video hearings in all courts and has set their strategic aim to move as quickly as 
possible to a  single technology for  consistency and  operational  effectiveness; which  includes, but  not 
exclusively, the following: 
  HMCTS aspire to carry out more of their Courts and Tribunals work by video; 
  Under some circumstances it may no longer be considered ‘business as usual’ to physically 
appear in a court room or in front of a judge or magistrate; 
  Specialisation of courts may mean that physical court rooms will be in different locations, 
which may be further from police facilities than is currently the case (existing examples of 
specialisation are Family, Drug and Alcohol (FDAC) and Specialist Domestic Violence (SDVC) 
courts); 
  Out of Hours applications dealt with outside of a physical court room; 
  CJS partners may appear by video and mechanisms for consulting with those partners may 
be video based; 
  The most efficient locations for police estate may not necessarily geographically concur with 
that of the courts, leading to increased travelling; this has been particularly evident in rural 
areas during the CVP roll out.  
  The potential use of video for disabled defendants; 
11 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
  Connectivity  into  courts  may  become  easier  and  cheaper.  In  support  of  their  proposed 
increased use of video in courts, HMCTS and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) have acknowledged 
that there needs to be a flexible and cost-effective method for partners and other service 
users to connect into courts (often described as the ‘low barrier to entry’).  There have been 
MoJ  led  pilot  initiatives  for  this  (Internet  Based  Video  Solution  (IBVS)  and  Cloud  Video 
Platform (CVP)). When a suitable solution comes to fruition, this would allow forces to move 
away  from  costly,  fixed  (and  hence  less  flexible)  physical  Justice  Video  System  (JVS) 
endpoints. Such a system would not only enable police to connect more cost effectively into 
courts but also, if other agencies network in the same manner, increases the opportunities 
to connect to other stakeholders and partners. 
8.7 
Regardless of the different methodologies currently used across the country, forces will need a strategy 
for remotely engaging with courts and other CJS partners.   A whole systems approach, understanding 
and  exploiting  all  video  opportunities  in  a  single  business  case,  should  be  more  compelling  than  the 
current ad hoc use seen during the COVID response.  

What policing would require continuing with VRH 
9.1 
For policing to continue to support the CJS with the use of video technology on a long-term basis, several 
key issues would need to be resolved to create a workable and sustainable option for Chief Constables 
to consider.  
9.2 
Costs  
9.2.1 
The capital and revenue costs for long term VRH adoption by all HO forces (i.e. excluding British 
Transport  Police)  were  calculated  in  the  DF  paper  ‘Test  Custody  Assumptions  Report’.  These 
costs were adapted by the HO for the requirements of the CJS Costs and Benefits Working Group 
in relation to their specific scenario models. In addition, as part of the Costs and Benefits Working 
Group exercise, DF calculated a schedule of work required (Appendix 2). 
9.2.2 
Our understanding of custody estate has advanced since then and two changes in the cost basis 
have occurred (the potential use of confidential video booths and the likely move away from JVS 
as the video solution). It is considered timely therefore to revisit these costs. Note that we do 
not  repeat  here  the  extensive  assumptions  made  in  previous  reports,  only  new  or  changed 
assumptions. 
9.2.3 
Note  that  the  work  discussed  here  only  gets  us  to  a  broad  brush  high-level  budgetary  cost 
estimate,  to  get  to  a  more  accurate  figure  requires  survey  of  all  sites.  In  summary  we  have 
included for all expected contractor and capital works costs but excluded costs associated with 
each agency both standing up and facilitating their own elements of the roadmap. 
9.2.4 
We expect that all sites will require a survey and some element of remedial work in order to 
meet the standard of the VRH guideline and the Custody Design Guide. We have used the same 
basis of calculation as previously with updated information. 
9.2.5 
We estimate indicative costs for each force as follows: 
 
Force 
Capital 
Revenue 
Notes 
Cost/ £k 
Cost  /  £k 
per annum 

Avon & Somerset 
133 
475 
Booths, though these may not be required; small element of 
remedial works; PFI costs. 
Bedfordshire 
105 
342 
Booths; medium element of remedial works. 
12 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
BTP 
116 
342 
Booths; full remedial works at one site; medium at the other. 
Cambridgeshire 
105 
342 
Booths; medium element of remedial works. 
Cheshire 
157 
475 
Booths; medium element of remedial works. 
City of London 
63 
210 
Booths; full remedial works. 
Cleveland 
180 
486 
Booths; full remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works; some 
PFI costs; network costs. 
Cumbria 
242 
541 
Booths; full remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works; some 
PFI costs; network costs. 
Derbyshire 
272 
685 
Booths; full remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works; some 
PFI costs. 
Devon & Cornwall 
279 
807 
Booths; medium element of remedial works. 
Dorset 
174 
475 
Booths;  medium  element  of  remedial  works;  50%  chance  of 
Wi-Fi works; some PFI costs. 
Durham 
231 
541 
Booths; full remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works. 
Dyfed-Powys 
213 
475 
Booths  (one  site  only);  full  remedial  works;  Wi-Fi  works; 
network costs. 
Essex 
331 
940 
Booths; small element of remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
Gloucestershire 
89 
276 
Booths;  small  element  of  remedial  works;  Wi-Fi  works;  PFI 
costs. 
Greater Manchester 
795 
1,603 
Booths; full remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works; some 
PFI costs. 
Gwent 
144 
342 
Booths; full remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works; some 
PFI costs; network costs. 
Hampshire 
173 
541 
Booths; though these may not be required; small element of 
remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works. 
Hertfordshire 
92 
342 
Booths; small to medium element of remedial works. 
Humberside 
133 
409 
Booths; small element of remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
Kent 
283 
1,006 
Booths; small element of remedial works; 20% chance of Wi-Fi 
works; some PFI costs. 
Lancashire 
333 
741 
Booths; remedial works (except one site); Wi-Fi works. 
Leicestershire 
143 
475 
Booths; small element of remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi 
works. 
Lincolnshire 
281 
608 
Booths; remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
Merseyside 
211 
475 
Booths; remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
Metropolitan Police 
1,506 
3,207 
Booths; remedial works at  most sites; Wi-Fi works; some PFI 
costs. 
Norfolk 
34 
541 
Small element of remedial works; PFI costs. 
North Wales 
257 
541 
Booths; remedial works; Wi-Fi works; some PFI costs; network 
costs. 
North Yorkshire 
190 
475 
Booths; remedial works. 
Northamptonshire 
141 
342 
Booths; remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
Northumbria 
303 
751 
Booths; remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works. 
13 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
Nottinghamshire 
174 
486 
Booths; remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works; network 
costs. 
South Wales 
322 
674 
Booths; remedial works; Wi-Fi works; network costs. 
South Yorkshire 
236 
618 
Booths; remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works. 
Staffordshire 
155 
409 
Booths; medium element of remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
Suffolk 
17 
342 
Small element of remedial works; PFI costs. 
Surrey 
35 
475 
Small element of remedial works; 50% chance of Wi-Fi works. 
Sussex 
81 
741 
Small element of remedial works; Wi-Fi works; some PFI costs. 
Thames Valley 
497 
1,006 
Booths;  remedial  works;  Wi-Fi  works;  small  element  of  PFI 
costs. 
Warwickshire 
126 
342 
Booths; remedial works. 
West Mercia 
280 
674 
Booths; remedial works. 
West Midlands 
458 
1,094 
Booths; remedial works; Wi-Fi works. 
West Yorkshire 
330 
818 
Booths; remedial works; some PFI costs; network costs. 
Wiltshire 
88 
342 
Booths; small element of remedial works; some PFI costs. 
14 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
9.2.6 
The total capital cost of the works discussed above is £10.5m. This is inclusive of: 
 
Refurbishment costs for rooms (to enable them to meet the design guides)  
 
Booth costs for confidential consultation (based on a contractor quote including a base 
cost for installation and delivery) 
 
PFI multiplier (1.2) as used previously 
 
Wi-Fi survey and Wi-Fi installation 
 
Network  cost  allowance  (for  those  forces  that  have  not  connected  to  CVP  during  the 
temporary measures. Note: that these are allowances for network changes not renewing 
the system) 
 
Contractor preliminaries for survey and design (these are applied to all sites equally) 
9.2.7 
The works cost is exclusive of: 
 
VAT 
 
Optimism Bias 
 
CJS agency services (e.g. project management; procurement; technical resource; training) 
9.2.8 
The revenue costs shown above total £27.84m per annum.  This is inclusive of: 
 
£26.48m resource (including training, pension and other costs); 
 
£1.36m annual sundry costs such as IT, equipment replacement and refurbishment (on a 
5-year cycle, split as a percentage per year). 
9.2.9 
These are substantial costs which are beyond the scope of any police budget, ergo, realignment 
of funding and / or additional funding would be required for policing to consider this feasible.  
9.3 
Infrastructure 
9.3.1 
A blueprint for the introduction of video technology, particularly for VRH, is required to provide 
forces assisted implementation which could avoid 43 procurements for technology, leading to a 
patchwork network across the country. Furthermore, the appropriate servicing and support of 
the technology will need to be established to prevent additional burden to forces’ existing IT 
structures.  
9.3.2 
Development of the technology used to support video which removes inefficiencies and reduces 
demand  on  policing  e.g.  a  bespoke  tool  to  effectively  manage  the  surrounding  planning, 
preparation and communication activities required for a  VRH, like that developed by the VEJ 
programme (GTL)  which  automates tasks, removes inefficiencies from the processes, gathers 
and tracks Management Information (MI). 
 
15 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
9.4 
Resourcing  
9.4.1 
The resource model is summarised as follows: 
9.4.2 
1 coordinator (called a Video Sergeant (VS) by DF) per force, based on a Sergeant’s pay grade, 
with an additional coordinator for the top 10 largest custody suites. This is based on those forces 
where  VRH  is  business  as  usual:  there  is  a  permanent  role  for  coordinating  activity  between 
custody and the courts, and providing management data to the force (note that this role is often 
filled by a higher rank but usually as one of a number of tasks). 
9.4.3 
1  Video  Dock  Officer  (VDO)  per  room  (e.g.  to  allow  a  simultaneous  hearing  and  confidential 
consultation would require 2 rooms and 2 VDOs). This is based on those forces where VRH is 
business as usual: best practise indicates that one per simultaneous hearing is enough but that 
an additional overhead should be allowed to cover for sickness, training et al – that overhead is 
calculated based on 0.6 x FTE. Note that in many of the temporary arrangements currently in 
place it is considered that 2 dock officers are required to maintain safety. 
9.4.4 
A role requirement with clear lines of responsibility for the VDO role which may be conducted 
by PECS and / or any other functions which are required but not covered by the PECS role (e.g. 
taking detainees to and from the cell or coordinating activity).  
9.5 
Legislative changes 
9.5.1 
Amendments to allow PECS staff to complete the full function of the role in police custody suites. 
The removal  of barriers  to  efficiency  e.g. applications  for  video evidence by exception rather 
than the current default position. Clarification or amendment to legislation for  defendants to 
choose  whether  to  appear  remotely  for  VRH  (one  force  remains  unsatisfied  with  the  legal 
position of PECS staff and VRH). This would provide the capability for PECS staff to replace the 
additional  staffing  required  within  police  custody  and  reduce  the  £27.84m  estimated  cost  to 
policing.  
9.6 
Organisational change  
9.6.1 
Development of effective business processes to support video enabled technology, mitigate risk, 
remove efficiencies and operationalise the lessons learnt from the VEJ programme. 
9.6.2 
The  national  police  officer  uplift  programme  would  need  to  be  factored  into  any  resource 
modelling based on forecasts of increased demand. 
9.6.3 
The implementation of extended court hours would have a significant impact on the projected 
costs and would need to be recalibrated.  
9.6.4 
A review of the reception times by HMPS would be necessary to move forward. Similarly, if this 
remains, the projected costs to policing would need to be recalibrated. 
9.6.5 
A  mutually  agreeable  resolution  to  the  redistribution  of  risk  management,  which  is  lawful, 
legitimate, in the best interests of justice and protects the reputation of each agency.  
9.6.6 
A  formal  ‘programme  management’  approach  to  implementation  with  the  appropriate 
governance  structures;  collaboration;  escalation  policies;  training;  and  a  tracking  and  testing 
mechanism with valid and reliable units of measurements to create an evidence-base of what 
does and does not work; quantifying costs and benefits to the CJS and judicial outcomes. 
10  Future potential 
10.1  There are many uses and benefits for video within the CJS, of which the current applications in use today 
have been detailed within this paper.  However, the use of video can go much further in creating a more 
efficient and effective justice process by expanding access for victims, witnesses and defendants, which 
can be achieved with the necessary investment in infrastructure and commitment to transform. 
16 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
10.2  Policing is the start of the CJ process and any transformation of the system will be at a rate that policing 
can positively support. The foundation of progression towards a more efficient and effective future is the 
use of technology and particularly video. An example of how this could be achieved through the criminal 
justice recovery and transformation agenda is:  
I. 
A domestic abuse suspect is arrested, and investigation commences; 
II. 
Police refer the case to CPS for a charging decision whilst the suspect is in custody; 
III. 
The suspect is charged and the 1st hearing takes place via video to a centralised court prior to 
the suspect leaving police custody. 
10.3  This  would  enable  early  Guilty  Pleas  (GPs)  to  be  accepted  and  reports  ordered.  Matters  that  require 
Crown  Court  attention  can  be  ‘sent’  straight  away.  For  those  contested  cases  remaining  in  the 
Magistrates’ arena trial dates can be set and issues identified avoiding unnecessary adjournments. Data 
taken form CPS during Jan-19 to Dec-19, show 29,843 GPs for domestic abuse cases were entered at the 
1st hearing (CPS, 2020). This represents 64% of all GPs and presents a substantial opportunity to shift the 
entire productivity of the CJS to a swifter pace.  
10.4  This  would  create  efficiencies  in  the  system  by  reducing  remand  times,  demonstrating  to  victims  the 
commitment to their case and potentially reduce attrition. Furthermore, it would prevent the need for 
28/56-day  delays  for  a  1st  hearing  in  cases  of  high  harm,  providing  better  protection  for  victims  and 
reducing safeguarding demands on police resources.  
10.5  This type of innovation to operational policing offers an insight into the ‘art of the possible’ in creating a 
modern justice system reflective of societal evolution.  
11  Conclusion 
11.1  Video technology has been steadily progressing since its introduction to the CJS in 2013. The VEJ pilot 
was the first major step forward in linking strategic partners through video technology realising a balance 
of benefits for each agency and a better-quality service to victims and witnesses.  
11.2  The considerable programme of works within CP expected to deliver a smooth transition from current 
state to digitisation of an end to end system which would provide clear benefits to policing. The global 
pandemic fundamentally altered the trajectory of CP inducing immediate and substantial changes with 
the roll-out of CVP. The consequential impact has been extensive, costly and challenging.  
11.3  Policing is rapidly reaching a crossroads as we start to transition from recovery to improvement and the 
necessity for VRH becomes an option for individual forces rather than a requirement. Despite the recent 
challenges it would be misleading to suggest there is no business case for policing to continue with the 
use of the technology. It is important to differentiate between the unplanned implementation of CVP in 
reacting to the pandemic, and a well thought out structured programme which is focused on the wider 
use of technology and not limited to VRH. The VEJ pilot has evidenced a trade-off can be found between 
VRH and live link with potential to be scaled up.  
11.4  Where the case may be more compelling is the future direction of the CJS to embrace and optimise video 
technology across all courts.  Both the judiciary and MoJ have set an aggressive timeline of transformation 
with technology at the centre of their strategic reform. 
11.5  What  is  abundantly  clear  and  evident,  is  the  financial  implications  for  policing  to  implement  video 
technology into its infrastructure, policy and procedures is by far the single greatest barrier as a feasible 
option to progress.  
11.6  There exists an expectation from the HO, HMCTS and the judiciary for policing as a strategic partner to 
continue  to  contribute  to  the  benefit  of  the  whole  CJS.  Should  the  funding  and  ancillary  challenges 
described  in  this  paper  be  resolved  there  would  be  a  stronger  case  for  Chief  Constables  to  consider 
continuing with VRH.  
17 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
11.7  Regardless of the decision, forces will need a strategy for remotely engaging with courts and the wider 
CJS  partners  given  the  strategic  direction  of  travel.  Without  such  a  strategy  forces  risk  being  isolated 
within  the  CJS  and  needing  to  find  alternative  methodologies  for  integration  which  are  less  efficient, 
costly and outdated.  
11.8  The government’s key priority for policing sets the strategy of maximising the operational effectiveness 
of the 20,000 uplift and minimising the impact on policing of the post COVID-19 court backlog and existing 
inefficiencies in the CJS.  
11.9     The NPCC Criminal Justice Coordination Committee agreed this paper on the 7 September 2020. 
12.  Recommendations and Decisions Required 
Examining the extensive evidence available to me at the time and set against our future aspirations, chiefs are 
asked to agree the following recommendations: 
1.  Support VRH where possible until December 2020 at which point forces should return to pre-COVID 
arrangements. This will provide a  reasonable period for HMCTS  to implement  and gain traction 
with their national recovery plan. 
2.  Police witness testimony via technology enabled live link should be the long-term default position 
for policing.  
3.  Policing should support the use of live link for civilian witnesses, although it is for HMCTS to lead 
and implement, not policing. 
4.  For policing to reconsider the use of VRH on a long-term basis several conditions would first need 
to be met: 
  A capital injection of £10.5m for policing to provide police custody facilities; 
  An  investment  of  £27.84m  per  annum  to  cover  policing  resources  required  for  VRH,  or 
deployment of enough PECS resources with relevant capabilities through legislative changes 
to mitigate this;  
  Development  of  the  technology  used  to  support  video  enabled  processes  which  removes 
inefficiencies and reduces demand on policing e.g. a bespoke tool to effectively manage the 
surrounding planning, preparation and communication activities required for a VRH; 
  Development of effective business processes to support video enabled technology, mitigate 
risk, remove efficiencies and operationalise the lessons learnt from the VEJ programme; 
  It is critical HMCTS increase remand court capacity / throughput to minimise custody times 
and prevent lockouts; conduct hearings earlier and / or extending HMPS reception times. 
Notwithstanding these recommendations there is a compelling business case for the wider use of video within 
the policing network. As such I would advocate investment in video technology being considered for policing, 
with  individual  force  strategic  plans  exploiting  the  opportunities  to  reduce  inefficiencies  and  optimise 
performance. 
 
DCC Tony Blaker 
NPCC Lead for Courts 

NPCC Criminal Justice Coordination Committee 
 
 
 
18 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 


OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
References 
Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice & Senior President of Tribunals 2016, Ministry of Justice, 
viewed 2 August 2020, 
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/
553261/joint-vision-statement.pdf 
 
CPS, Case Management System (CMS) and associated Management Information System (MIS), viewed 
2 September 2020. 
 
 
19 
 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE