Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
Title: Regulating, Standardising and 
Professionalising Language Services through 
the Police National Framework by Creating 
Police Approved Interpreters and Translators 
(PAITs) 

7 October 2020 
 

Security Classification 
NPCC Policy: Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification (Protective Marking may assist in assessing whether exemptions to 
FOIA may apply): 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you 
on receipt of a request prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx  
 
Author:  
CC Simon Cole 
Force/Organisation:  
Leicestershire Police 
Date Created:  
02/09/2020 
Coordination Committee:  
Criminal Justice 
Portfolio:  
Victims and Witnesses 
Attachments: 
N/A 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and 
storage and security of papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in 
compliance with other security controls and legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
 
1.  INTRODUCTION 
 
1.1.  Traditionally,  dating  back  to  the  National  Agreement  of  2007,  the  National  Register  of  Public  Service 
Interpreters  (NRPSI)  has  been  seen  by  police  services  across  the  UK  as  an  independent  body  that 
regulates the language professionals deployed to police assignments.  
 
1.2.  As  market  forces  have  influenced  procurement  practices  and  police  budgets  have  been  reduced,  the 
need for forces to ensure high standard interpreting and achieve value has led to the practice of awarding 
language  service  contracts  to  language  service  providers  (LSPs)  rather  than  the  protracted  practice  of 
individual  police  officers  making  multiple  phone  calls  to  interpreters  on  an  authorised  list  in  order  to 
secure their attendance. 
 
2.  RISKS TO POLICE FROM CURRENT PRACTICE  
 
2.1.  The NRPSI register is voluntary. Many interpreters now are registered with LSPs rather than with NRPSI. 
By only using NRPSI registered interpreters, the pool available for police use is reduced by well over 50%, 
which will impact on fulfilment. 
 

 
2.2.  Wording around police practice and guidance is unclear as to whether police ‘should’ or ‘must’ use NRPSI 
registered interpreters. This could lead to judicial arguments and the potential loss of cases at court if the 
defence seize on the fact that an interpreter or translator was not on the NRPSI register. 
 
2.3.  Whilst  NRPSI interpreters are subject  to a  code of conduct and may be disciplined resulting in  removal 
from the register,  the LSPs and police are not  made aware of this due to a  lack of current  information 
sharing and the resulting risk to current and future prosecutions is high. Interpreters are also subject to 
LSP codes of conduct. None of which meet the specific needs of police assignments. 
 
2.4.  The National Police Framework for Language services is modelled on the exclusive use of LSPs to deploy 
interpreters  to  police  assignments.  Continued  media  and  news  reports  are  being  distributed  by  NRPSI, 
stating  (inaccurately)  that  police  are  accepting  lower  qualified  and  experienced  interpreters  due  to  the 
involvement of LSPs. Over time, this could engender a lack of confidence in police prosecutions involving 
interpreters.  There  is  a  need  to  ensure  the  integrity  of  the  new  Police  Framework  and  secure  its 
reputation as fit for police use from the outset. 
 
2.5.  The NRPSI Registrant checks that interpreters have the correct qualifications, vetting and experience, but 
they do not authorise any of these. They are the final link in the journey of an interpreter to becoming 
approved for police use. It is unnecessary, as LSP’s check all of these requirements when on-boarding a 
new  linguist  irrespective  of  whether  they  are  NRPSI  registered  or  not.  It  is  an  extra  step  that  adds  no 
value for the language professionals as NRPSI do not act as a Language Service Provider or assign them to 
police deployments. 
 
2.6.  Some  forces  across  the  country  have  already  removed  the  NRPSI  requirement  from  their  policies, 
indicating a lack of confidence in the register as a suitable ‘independent’ regulatory body for police use. 
There is a need for a consistent approach across the country to prevent confusion, particularly as forces 
begin to procure regionally on the National Police Framework. 
 
3.  PROPOSAL 

 
3.1.  The  introduction  of  a  police  specific  procurement  framework  for  language  services,  provides  a  timely 
opportunity for the police service to take full control of language services.  
 
3.2.  A  new  category  of  Police  Approved  Interpreter  and  Translator  (PAIT)  is  proposed  with  the  following 
advantages: 
 
3.2.1. No  requirement  for  linguists  to  be  on  a  voluntary  register.  The  National  Police  Contract 
Manager will hold a full list of all approved interpreters and translators. 
 
3.2.2. All  language  professionals  will  be  bound  by  the  Police  Code  of  Ethics,  as  they  are  deemed 
‘contractors’. 
 
3.2.3. Conduct  matters  and  poor  practice  by  language  professionals  investigated  by  LSPs  will  be 
overseen by the National Police Contract Manager, thus ensuring an interpreter expunged from 
one LSP list will be expunged from all lists (and no longer be able to work for police). It will be 
conducted  in  consultation  with  Warwickshire  Police  Vetting  Unit  to  ensure  intelligence  and 
disciplinary  outcomes  are  shared  with  all  stakeholders.  Police  investigations  will  remain 
independent  but  conclusions  should  be  shared  with  the  National  Police  Contract  Manager  to 
ensure the integrity of future prosecutions. 
 
3.2.4. Training,  guidance  and  information  sharing  will  be  coordinated  on  a  national  basis  across  all 
LSPs and all linguists. 
 
3.2.5. One single ID card will be made available to all approved interpreters and translators who hold 
PAIT status. 
 
National Police Chiefs’ Council  

3.3. The  proposals  above  are  designed  to  meet  the  needs  of  modern  policing  requirements  and  will 
ensure  the  professionalisation  and  standardisation  of  police  interpreters  and  translators  across  all 
forces. 
 
3.4. There  will  be  resistance  from  a  minority  of  interpreter  pressure  groups,  who  will  see  the  PAIT  as  a 
move  away  from  independent  review  and  regulation,  but  the  fact  is  that  NRPSI  was  only  ever  a 
voluntary  register  with  a  slowly  reducing  membership.  The  PAIT  system  is  independent  of 
commercial and political influence. 
 
3.5. The  police  will  regulate  the  use  of  language  professionals.  The  police  are,  and  always  will  maintain 
independence in their dealings with the public, employees and contractual obligations.  
 
3.6. The PAIT system is designed to regulate language professionals for police use and ensure the integrity 
of  all  investigations,  prosecutions  and  other  interactions  with  non-English  speaking  or  deaf  people 
who come into contact with police. 
 
4.  ASSURANCE 
 
4.1. 
The  PAIT  system  will  ensure  the  integrity  of  all  language  professionals  used  for  police  assignments 
through: 
4.1.1. Highest  standards  of  interpreting  set  by  the  requirement  for  NPPV3  vetting,  DPSI  or  DPI 
qualification  and  a  minimum  number  of  hours  public  service  interpreting  experience  before 
gaining approval. 
4.1.2. Similar  standards  for  qualifications,  vetting  and  experience  will  be  set  for  translators  and 
transcribers, as well as for non-spoken (BSL) interpreters. 
4.1.3. Standardised  information  sharing  between  police  forces,  interpreters,  LSPs  and  vetting 
agencies. 
4.1.4. Suitable conduct and behaviour code based on independent review and oversight, linked with 
sharing to all stakeholders as described above. 
4.1.5. Enhancement of the status of police linguists through the title of ‘Approved’ Police Interpreter 
and Translator. 
4.1.6. More  effective  regulation  of  Language  Service  Providers  by  police  through  auditing  and 
information sharing to ensure the service they provide meets the needs of the police forces. 
 
5.  DECISIONS REQUIRED 
 

5.1. Council is asked to: 
i. 
Support the proposal to develop a Police Approved Interpreter/Translator (PAIT) 
ii. 
Mandate  that  language  professionals  deployed  to  police  assignments  no  longer 
require  to  be  on  the  National  Register  of  Public  Service  Interpreters  (NRPSI),  so 
long as they are on the PAIT register. 
iii. 
 Mandate  that  all  future  documentation  relating  to  police  use  of  language 
professionals  (National  Police  Framework,  Authorised  professional  Practice  etc.) 
omits any reference to NRPSI requirements and instead refers to the PAIT system. 
iv. 
Confirm  that  the  PAIT  system  replaces  the  2007  Agreement  on  police  use  of 
Linguists. 
 
 
Simon Cole QPM 
Chief Constable Leicestershire Police 
Procurement of Language Services 
 
National Police Chiefs’ Council