Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



 
 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
Op. Elter Update – Report for the 
Undercover Policing Inquiry 

 7 October 2020  
 

Security Classification 
NPCC Policy: Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification (Protective Marking may assist in assessing whether exemptions to 
FOIA may apply): 
 
OFFICAL-SENSITIVE-OPERATIONAL 
 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you 
on receipt of a request prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx  
 
Author: 
CC Andy Cooke 
Force/Organisation: 
Merseyside Police & NCCoC Chair 
Date Created: 
2 September 2020 
 
Coordination Committee: 
National Crime Co-ordination Committee 
Portfolio: 
Serious & Organised Crime 
Attachments @ para 
N/A 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and 
storage and security of papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in 
compliance with other security controls and legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
 
1.  PURPOSE 
 
1.1.  This purpose of this report  is to  provide  Chief Constables  Council  with a  summary  the ongoing work  of 
Operation Elter in relation to the National Public Order Intelligence Unit (NPOIU) and the completion of a 
report entitled ‘The National Public Order Intelligence Unit: Formation, Function and Closure’, which it is 
intended to be provided to the Undercover Policing Inquiry (UCPI). 
 
2.  BACKGROUND 
 
2.1.  The  NPOIU  was  a  national  unit  that  existed  between  1999  and  2011.  Its  purpose  was  to  gather  and 
develop intelligence to assist police in responding to the  harm posed by criminal conduct or significant 
public disorder caused by political extremism or protest activity. The NPOIU was managed under the then 
ACPO  TAM  structures  and  also  hosted  and  managed  for  several  years  in  the  MPS.  The  Home  Office 
funded the NPOIU and they had representation on the Steering Group that was established to oversee 
the  unit.    Prior  to  its  closure  in  2011,  it  was  returned  to  the  MPS  following  the  revelations  about  the 
conduct of some undercover officers which ultimately led to the demise of the unit.  
 
2.2.  At the NPCC Council meeting in January 2016, Chiefs were briefed on the UCPI, the emerging knowledge 
of the NPOIU and the risks to the service. Council supported the need for a review of the intelligence held 
by  the  NPOIU  and  agreed  to resourcing  the  ongoing  investigation  into  the  NPOIU  being  undertaken  by 
Operation Elter, based upon the substantial amount of information and intelligence held centrally about 
 

the unit and its operatives and operations that has been recovered by Operation Elter and is described 
below. 
 
2.3.  In September 2016, Operation Elter was formally established in order to conduct the review of the NPOIU 
to  ensure  a  consistent  approach  in  gathering  and  assessing  information  in  relation  to  the  criminal 
allegations  and  associated  misconduct  and,  to  support  disclosure  to  the  UCPI  through  the  NPCC  co-
ordination  team.  The  investigation  was  initially  led  by  CC  Mick  Creedon  and  now  CC  Andy  Cooke  on 
behalf of the NPCC. 
 
2.4.  Chiefs’ Council has already been briefed about the workings of the NPOIU between 1999 and 2011 and 
the  fact  that  the  unit  to  a  greater  or  lesser  extent  was  active  in  every  force  in  England  and  Wales 
including the Ministry of defence Police and the Civil Nuclear constabulary. 
 
2.5.  The NPOIU adopted some tactics and methodologies from the SDS and this included the use of deceased 
children’s  identities  and  long  term  intelligence  deployments  against  identified  high  risk  groups  in  areas 
such as animal rights, domestic extremism, political protest and climate change. The review of the NPOIU 
material  was  prompted  by  numerous  allegations  against  officers  from  different  Forces  who  were 
seconded  to  the  NPOIU.  These  allegations  mirrored  those  made  against  MPS  SDS  officers  and  include 
allegations  of;  inappropriate  sexual  relationships,  serious  criminality  and  miscarriages  of  justice.  A 
number of parallel civil actions have also been lodged against a number of police forces and are yet to be 
resolved. 
 
3.  INVESTIGATION UPDATE 
 
3.1.  Operation Elter’s work is unique in a number of ways, in particular because of the scale of the task – the 
examination  of  complex  long-term  covert  operations  and  the  governance  of  the  entire  unit  has  no 
comparable precedent in modern policing.  Consequently every care has been taken to ensure Operation 
Elter  discharges  its  responsibilities  professionally  through  a  proportionate  and  ethical  investigation. 
Operation Elter has applied the standard major investigation principles and use of the HOLMES recording 
and management system. It must be noted that the investigation, in principle, is being conducted to an 
objective review standard and not a pure evidential standard. This is because of the voluminous amount 
of material subject to examination. However, where the material examined has generated concern, some 
specific cases have been subject of criminal or misconduct investigation.   
 
3.2.   The NPOIU material held within Operation Elter has now grown to encompass approximately  20,000GB 
of data which is approximately 15 times larger than the material Operation Herne held in relation to the 
SDS.  This  data  includes  583  exhibits,  of  which  437  are  technical  devices.  These  include  laptops,  mobile 
phones, DVDs, CDs, hard-drives, back up tapes and USB sticks. There are also 117 boxes of paper records 
containing  3,088  documents.  This  material  is  held  across  a  number  of  different  auditable  systems 
including CT HOLMES (11,395 documents) and the AD Lab Digital Media Forensic Toolkit (50 million files). 
 
3.3.   In  order  to  build  a  comprehensive  assessment  of  the  NPOIU  in  the  most  expedient,  thorough  and 
efficient  manner,  the  SIO’s  strategy  was  to  prioritise  research  into the  UCOs.  An  individual  investigator 
was  allocated  to  each  UCO  in  order  to  research  and  profile  their  NPOIU  career  through  the  use  of 
targeted search parameters against the immense quantity of material recovered. Investigators developed 
a  continuity  of  knowledge  and  learned  about  all  aspects  of  UCOs’  deployments  including  their  targets, 
operations,  cover  officers  and  management  decisions.  As  investigators  became  familiar  with  the  UCOs 
they were able to spot patterns of behaviour or matters that required further examination. 
 
3.4.   Investigators highlighted to the SIO any material they thought warranted further review or inquiry. This 
identified a  number of  emerging  issues as the review progressed, these issues were then briefed to all 
Operation Elter personnel in order to ensure that everyone appreciated the need to identify all relevant 
material. Operation Elter has commenced 18 separate misconduct and criminal investigations as a result 
of this practice and reported on a further 10 separate enquiries. 
 
National Police Chiefs’ Council  

3.5.  Operation  Elter  has  now  completed  the  vast  majority  of  nominal  profiles.  These  include  UCO  profiles, 
cover  officer  profiles  and  senior  management  profiles.  They  have  also  identified  and  reported  on  the 
involvement of other UCOs deployed alongside or in support of the NPOIU. 
 
3.6.  In  view  of  the  complexities  involved,  the  increasing  costs  and  extended  length  of  the  investigation,  CC 
Andy Cooke commissioned an external force progress review of Operation Elter which was completed in 
January 2020 by Police Scotland. As previously reported to Council the review found that Operation Elter 
had  met  and  continued  to  meet  its  defined  terms  of  reference  and  was  providing  ‘value  for  money’  in 
respect of mitigating potential operational and reputational risk. 
 
3.7.  The Police Scotland review also made 31 recommendations which have been accepted and have formed 
the  basis  of  a  template  for  the  next  steps  of  the  operation.  Following  assessment  of  the  projected 
workload moving forward coupled with the continuing demands of the UCPI, the IPT and Civil litigation 
the opinion of the Review Team was that the investigative capability/capacity of Operation Elter should 
remain  in  place  but  on  a  much  reduced  scale  retaining  current  HOLMES  and  Adlab  IT  capability.  The 
Review  Team  have  recommended  that  once  Operational  Elter  has  been  scaled  down  to  a  leaner 
investigation entity it should be merged with the NPCC UCPI Co-ordination Team and it is not anticipated 
that any further requests for funding for Operation Elter in its current format will be made to council.  
 
3.8.   In August 2020 Operation Elter completed a detailed 141 page report entitled ‘The National Public Order 
Intelligence Unit: Formation, Function and Closure’. The report, which is classified as ‘Secret’, details the 
understanding gained from the analysis of the substantial amount of centrally held material and seeks to 
answer  the  161  questions  identified  by  the  UCPI  in  its  Module  One  NPOIU  Issues  List  it  published  in 
February  2019.  Whilst  the  document  is  focussed  on  how  and  why  the  NPOIU  was  formed,  how  it 
operated and how and why it  was finally disbanded, it  also highlights the investigations that Operation 
Elter has/is undertaking as part of its examination into the NPOIU and the outcomes to date. 
 
4.  CONCLUSION 
 
4.1.  Following the Police Scotland Review at the beginning of 2020 Operation Elter has significantly reduced in 
its  establishment  by  approximately  sixty  percent  to  a  size  commensurate  with  its  ongoing  tasks  and 
investigations. These include the completion of the five ongoing criminal and misconduct investigations, 
supporting  the  MPS  response  to  matters  currently  before  the  Investigatory  Powers  Tribunal  and 
providing  ongoing  support  to  the  NPCC  in  response  to  the  continuing  requirements  of  the  UCPI. 
Operation Elter is now in the process of being merged with the NPCC UCPI Co-ordination Team.  
 
4.2.  The NPOIU  continue to be a  main  focus of the UCPI and there are numerous ‘Core Participants’  with a 
declared interest in the unit.  The UCPI continues to scope the vast quantities of centrally held material 
recovered  Operation  Elter,  alongside  NPOIU  related  material  held  within  Forces,  to  gain  a  better 
understanding of the NPOIU and determine what documents are relevant to the Inquiry. The UCPI have 
now  requested  disclosure  of  both  the  Operation  Elter  NPOIU  report  and  Police  Scotland  Review  report 
which will provide a greater understanding of the issues involved. Both reports will be made available to 
the relevant NPCC business leads and are available to Chief Constables on request. 
 
5.  DECISIONS REQUIRED 
 
5.1.    Council to note the content of the report. 
 
5.2.    Council to note the on-going work of Operation Elter and its merger with the NPCC Co-ordination Team. 
 
5.3.  Council  to  note  the  forthcoming  disclosure  to  the  UCPI  of  the  Operation  Elter  report  entitled  ‘The 
National Public Order Intelligence Unit: Formation, Function and Closure’ and the Police Scotland Review 
report. 
 
Andy Cooke 
Chief Constable 
National Crime Co-ordination Committee 

National Police Chiefs’ Council