This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
Title: Digital Ethics Proposal 
7 October 2020 
 

Security Classification 
NPCC Policy: Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification (Protective Marking may assist in assessing whether exemptions to 
FOIA may apply): 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you 
on receipt of a request prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx  
 
Author:  
DCC David Lewis 
Force/Organisation:  
Dorset Police 
Date Created:  
02/09/2020 
Coordination Committee:  
Workforce 
Portfolio:  
Ethics 
Attachments: 
App A 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and 
storage and security of papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in 
compliance with other security controls and legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
 
1. 
INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE 
 
1.1. 
This paper briefly outlines some of the challenges for policing in using technology, particularly artificial 
intelligence and algorithms, and the importance of being seen to do so in an ethical way. 
 
1.2. 
The  paper  proposes  next  steps  in  ensuring  ethical  accountability  for  our  use  of  technology  and  seeks 
the support of Chief Constables’ Council in exploring the options outlined. 
 
2. 
BACKGROUND 
 
2.1. 
The evolving complexity of crime today is significant and the entrepreneurial nature of criminals means 
that they are able to adapt swiftly to changes in society and technology. 
 
2.2. 
There are huge potential benefits to policing in the use of technology, from the use of algorithms in our 
processes,  through  digital  investigations,  to  facial  recognition.    These  clearly  have  the  potential  to 
accelerate investigations, make our processes more efficient and allow us to  invest freed-up resources 
in crime fighting.  However, if we stand still technology and criminality will advance and we will be left 
behind. 
 
2.3. 
Whilst  it  is  clear  that  the  use  of  technology  by  the  police  can  reduce  the  likelihood  of  victims  being 
harmed  by  crime,  there  is  an  absence  of  clarity  from  policing  about  what  well-governed  and 
proportionate use of technology looks like. 
 
2.4. 
Consequently the most  heard voices in the  digital  debate are  often  those of civil rights organisations.  
The most controversial and eye-catching initiatives – e.g. Facial Recognition – are the most debated, yet 
least  understood,  by  the  public  and  media.    A  number  of  other  important  issues  are  not  widely 
discussed and we could do more to establish a sense of  policing being a trusted force for good in the 
 

use  of  technology  whilst  being  open  to  public  scrutiny.    This  goes  to  the  heart  of  our  legitimacy  and 
establishing public confidence in police use of new technologies. 
 
2.5. 
Notwithstanding these caveats there have been a  number of  helpful  contributions  from authoritative 
sources (or  it may be that the volume and complexity of material  exacerbates the problem).  Broadly 
summarised  they  suggest  that  policing  requires  a  clearly  codified,  coordinated  and  transparently 
governed approach.  Appendix A contains a number of sources for those who wish to read more deeply 
into the issue. 
 
2.6. 
The focus of this paper relates to digital ethics, and it may be useful to distinguish between (at least) 
four sub-categories: 1) Biometrics; 2) Digital Forensics; 3) Surveillance and Investigatory Powers; and 4) 
AI (Artificial Intelligence) and Algorithms. All of these have different  ownership, governance and legal 
frameworks, although from a policing perspective it is often difficult to clearly separate them. That said, 
the  main  focus  of  our  work  going  forward  seems  likely  to  be  around  AI  and  Algorithms,  where  the 
biggest gap exists, but there will inevitably be overlap with the other three categories.  
 
2.7. 
In  terms  of  stakeholders  the  landscape  is  cluttered.    A  variety  of  NPCC  Coordinating  Committees  and 
portfolios  are  involved,  notably  Crime  Operations,  IMORCC,  and  Professional  Standards  and  Ethics.  
Many regulators have a stake in the debate, including the Information Commissioner,  the soon-to-be-
established Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner, the Investigatory Powers Commissioner 
and  the  Forensic  Science  Regulator.    Other  oversight  includes  HMICFRS  and  the  IOPC.    OPCCs  have 
played important roles, including MOPAC’s London Policing Ethics Panel and the West Midlands OPCC’s 
Ethics Committee, but have not yet developed a coordinated response.   The Home Office are exploring 
digital ethics and already have a Biometrics and Forensics Ethics Group, whilst the College of Policing is 
developing  its  position.    An  Independent  Digital  Ethics  Panel  for  Policing  exists,  but  is  struggling  for 
support  and  resources,  and  the  West  Midlands  OPCC  are  proposing  options  to  develop  their  well-
regarded  Ethics Committee into the national sphere.  The Portfolio has also engaged with industry  to 
explore good practice already developed elsewhere and is running an engagement event with TechUK. 
 
3. 
PROPOSAL 
 
3.1. 

PROPOSED AREAS FOR ACTION 
 
3.1.1  Given all the above it is evident that the landscape needs some clarity and coordination.  At present the 
portfolio  has  identified  four  areas,  plus  1,  that  would  benefit  from  focused  and  coordinated  activity. 
They are to: 
 
3.1.2  Catalogue and maintain an up to date record of  police use of technology.  It is suggested that this is 
limited  to  a  manageable  scope  and  that  high  profile  measures,  such  as  the  use  of  facial  recognition 
technology  and  the  use  of  algorithms  to  inform  decision-making,  could  form  the  initial  basis  of  this 
activity. 
 
3.1.3  Develop  new  national  guidelines  for  police  use  of  data  analytics.    The  College  of  Policing  are  key 
partners in this respect and are keen to work alongside the Portfolio.  This would be a positive outcome 
and  we  are  already  working  with  the  College  to  explore  opportunities.    Likewise,  possibilities  exist  in 
other spheres, such as industry and other public sector bodies, to adapt good practice. 
 
3.1.4  Re-establish  an  independent  digital  ethics  committee.    This  will  provide  independent  ethical 
monitoring,  scrutiny  and  oversight  as  well  as  a  place  to  debate  dilemmas.    There  are  options,  as 
mentioned above, but whatever happens this body will need to be given an authoritative independent 
status,  will  need  to  recruit  high  quality  participants  with  the  requisite  expertise  and  will  also  require 
resourcing.  Consideration should be given to the volume of work that might be placed on such a body 
and whether local arrangements, with an escalation process, should be put in place. 
 
3.1.5  Coordinate a communications response to the challenges of the use of technology, data and AI. It is 
important to have prominent positive voices making the case for a trusted police service which is using 
technology transparently  to deliver safer communities and fight crime.  It is proposed that a series of 
National Police Chiefs’ Council  

interventions are coordinated and a clear response is put in place in the public debate about police use 
of technology.  Led by the NPCC this would involve the College of Policing, Home Office and APCC, as 
well as other stakeholders. 
 
3.1.6  Plus  1.  Educate  and  equip  police  leaders  in  their  understanding  of  the  use  of  digital  technology.  
External observers tend to agree that we do not as a collective have a thorough or deep appreciation of 
the opportunities that the use of tech provides.  Whilst not the preserve of the Ethics Portfolio per se, it 
is  obvious  that  a  lot  of  the  success  of  these  proposals  hinges  on  the  professional  knowledge  and 
capabilities of leaders in this area.  The Portfolio is happy to work alongside NPCC leads and the College 
in developing this as an opportunity. 
 
3.2. 
COORDINATION COMMITTEE APPROVAL 
 
3.2.1.  We have been consulting widely for some time, speaking to the various organisations referenced earlier 
in  the  report,  and  have  built  a  body  of  support  for  the  proposed  approach.    The  Ethics  Portfolio  sits 
within  the  Professional  Standards  and  Ethics  Portfolio,  working  to  the  Workforce  Coordination 
Committee.  Having been  supported there, we have also  engaged the  Crime Operations and IMORCC 
Committees, who have also both backed progression of the work outlined in this paper. 
 
3.3. 
STATEMENT/DETAILS OF COST OR RESOURCE IMPLICATIONS 
 
3.3.1.  There is clearly a potential cost implication in developing this work.  However, as yet it is not yet clear 
what financial support may be sought from forces, if any.   Negotiations are continuing with the Home 
Office, College of Policing, APCC and potential academic partners.  Options outside of the use of forces’ 
budgets  are  being  sought.    No  shared  NPCC  resources  will  be  committed  to  the  work  without  the 
approval of Chiefs’ Council.   
 
3.3.2.  It is clear however that partners are  keen to know that there is a  mandate from the NPCC about  the 
direction of travel, and it would be an important step to secure the support of Chiefs’ Council in order 
to move forward.   
 
4. 

CONCLUSION 
 
4.1. 
The  police  service  has  embarked  on  a  journey  to  gain  public  trust  and  confidence  in  its  use  of  new 
technologies, but has not yet arrived.  Transparent, well-structured governance and a strong, positive 
policing voice is required.  This paper outlines a proposal for the next steps to take us there.   
 
5. 
DECISIONS REQUIRED 
 
5.1. 
Chief Constables’ Council is asked to support the work described at 3.1, so that the Portfolio can bring 
back stakeholder-supported progress and a concrete proposal to a future meeting.  
 
 
David Lewis  
 
Deputy Chief Constable 
NPCC Lead for Ethics 
 
National Police Chiefs’ Council