This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
Connecting Policing to the Criminal Justice 
Network 

7 October 2020 
 

Security Classification 
NPCC Policy: Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification (Protective Marking may assist in assessing whether exemptions to FOIA may apply): 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you on receipt of a request 
prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
Author: 
 DCC Tony Blaker 
Force/Organisation: 
 National Police Chiefs’ Council - Criminal Justice Co-Ordination Committee (Kent Police) 
Date Created: 
 07/09/2020 
Coordination Committee: 
 Criminal Justice Co-ordination Committee 
Portfolio: 
 Courts Portfolio 
Attachments @ para 
 Appendix 2 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and storage and security of 
papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in compliance with other security controls and 
legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 
5RS 



OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
OFFICIAL 
 
 
 
 
Appendix 2 
 
Digital Policing Portfolio, Floor 17, Portland House, Bressenden Place, Westminster, London, SW1E 5RS 

link to page 4 link to page 7 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 17 link to page 24 OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
Appendix 1 
 
 
Video Enabled Justice - Costs and Benefits Summary 
 
 
 
 
 
Author 
Andy Godfrey / Gary Lee 
Version/document number 
Version 1.0 DPP/DF/VEJ/190 
Classification 
OFFICIAL 
Reviewers 
Gary Lee (Digital First)/ Moira Quick (CPS)/ Kirsty Sommerville 
(Home Office)/ Simon Alland (Digital First Lead)/ Siobhan 
Nolan (DPP Director) 
Approver 
DCC Tony Blaker 
Date 
31st March 2020 
 
 
 
 
Contents 
1   

Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................. 4 

Context .................................................................................................................................................... 7 

Opportunities ........................................................................................................................................ 11 

Video Remand Hearings ........................................................................................................................ 12 

Police Witness ....................................................................................................................................... 14 

Other Opportunities .............................................................................................................................. 17 

Conclusions and Considerations ............................................................................................................ 24 

Appendix A – VRH Costs and Benefits ......................................................... Error! Bookmark not defined. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

link to page 7 OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
1 
Executive Summary 
1.1 
Digital First is participating in the Crime Service Model design process on behalf of policing.  As 
part of that work, Digital First have prepared this document to summarise, in one place, all police 
costs and benefits work on video to date.  This will include discussion of opportunities that have 
not been subject to financial analysis. 
1.2 
This document is the product of Digital First Video Enabled Justice Work Package 23. The stated 
objective of the Work Package is to: 
“…examine all preceding work… to pull together a final cohesive case on costs and benefits.” 
1.3 
This document was provided for review to all relevant Digital First stakeholders1. 
1.4 
This document is intended to inform those who: 
  may invest or are investing in video facilities and require background for business cases or; 
  are considering the wider implications of video investment for forces and the overall impact 
nationally. 
1.5 
This document provides: 
  The context for video usage; 
  A summary of the opportunities for policing; 
  A summary of costs and benefits work undertaken by Digital First and the VEJ Programme 
relating to Video Remand Hearings; 
  A summary of costs and benefits work undertaken by the VEJ Programme and others relating 
to police witness appearance by video; 
  A summary of the other video opportunities for policing; 
  Conclusions and considerations. 
1.6 
For wider context, other reports previously provided by Digital First (listed in Section 2) should 
be consulted. 
1.7 
The  conclusions  of  this  document  are  related  in  the  following  paragraphs.  A  summary  table 
showing opportunities, costs, benefits and qualitative impacts is shown at the end of this section. 
1.8 
The drivers for  police use of video  in  relation  to justice outcomes are manifold and, as court 
estate is rationalised, becoming more compelling. 
1.9 
The costs, the changes in custody risk, lack of a definitive conclusion on judicial outcomes and 
the dependency on policing to make estates, IT, staff and process changes makes Video Remand 
Hearings unpalatable for the majority of forces. At this time, it is highly unlikely that many Chief 
Constables  and  Police  and  Crime  Commissioners  would  agree  to  invest  in  resource  or 
infrastructure to deliver Video Remand Hearings, without the identification of central funding. 
                                                           
1 In this instance HMCTS VHC project, HMCTS business as usual, HMCTS Finance, CPS, Home Office and VEJ Programme. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
1.10  Video working can generally be beneficial for policing. The introduction of a low barrier to entry 
network  connection  into  courts  and  a  common  booking  solution,  especially  if  they  could  be 
combined  as  the  VEJ  Programme  have  demonstrated,  would  considerably  enhance  these 
benefits. Digital First are aware of some forces who are waiting, and in some cases have been for 
a number of years, for the network solution to enable their courts and video strategies. There 
are increasing opportunities as other partners become video equipped. 
1.11  Many  factors  are  involved  in  costs  and  benefits  including  existing  working  practices  and 
geography. In particular the geographical relationship of Criminal Justice System partners to the 
police  (e.g.  prisons,  courts)  is  a primary  component. This  makes  a ‘one  size  fits all’  costs  and 
benefits  case  impossible  to  calculate.  Other  agencies  have  not  yet  issued  any  definitive 
statements on costs and benefits of video working: HMCTS costs and benefits in particular are 
tied into a much larger package of change. 
1.12  Regardless of Video Remand Hearings, forces should have a strategy for remotely engaging with 
courts  and  other  Criminal  Justice  System  partners  (such  as  prisons).    This  strategy  should 
embrace  all  court  and  video  working  including,  for  example,  PACE  reviews  and  statutory 
applications.  A whole system approach, understanding and exploiting all video opportunities in 
a  single  business  case,  should  be  more  compelling  than  attempting  to  exploit  ad  hoc  single 
opportunities. 
Opportunity 
Location  Cost 
Benefit 
Qualitative Impact 
Notes 
VRH 
Custody  £28.1m per annum and  A spread 
Beneficial to 
 
£10.4m capital cost. 
between +£1.47  defendants for some 
and -£3.27m. 
warrants.  Beneficial to 
defendants and others 
(e.g. defence) where 
travel is extended or 
difficult. 
Extradition 
Custody  Expensive on its’ own 
Marginal, 
Reduces the possibility 
May not be 
but no cost if using VRH  dependent on 
of cases being 
allowed. 
facilities. 
force as some 
dismissed. 
will use more 
 
than others.  
Beneficial to 
defendants not 
required to travel. 
Inspector 
Custody  Minimal. Can be done 
Saves the cost of  Potentially increases 
 
Review 
cost effectively, and is 
the officer 
the number of officers 
by some forces, 
travelling. 
who can do this (and 
without the 
therefore diversity and 
requirement for VRH 
resilience), if they are 
facilities. Where VRH 
not tied to locations.  
facilities are available 
May be preferable to 
they can be used at no 
phone interviews in 
additional cost. 
terms of outcomes. 
Superintendent  Custody  Minimal. Can be done 
Saves the cost of  Potentially increases 
PACE 
Review 
cost effectively, and is 
the officer 
the number of officers 
requires 
by some forces, 
travelling. 
who can do this (and 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
without the 
therefore diversity and 
detainee 
requirement for VRH 
resilience), if they are 
consent. 
facilities. Where VRH 
not tied to locations.  
facilities are available 
May be preferable to 
they can be used at no 
phone interviews in 
additional cost. 
terms of outcomes. 
Warrant of 
Custody  Once the court is 
Saves the cost of  Reduces possibility of 
PACE 
Further 
involved, more ‘VRH–
police 
missing timelines. Time 
requires 
Detention 
like’ facilities may be 
transporting the  is not lost on the PACE 
detainee 
required implying 
prisoner. 
clock. If allowed out of 
consent. 
increased costs. If VRH 
hours HMCTS 
facilities can be used 
potentially do not need 
there is no additional 
to open courts and 
cost. 
their staff and judiciary 
do not need to travel. 
Interpreters 
Custody  Reduced hourly costs. 
Dependent 
Reduction of lost time 
Each 
upon the 
in investigations.  
application 
application. 
Potentially earlier 
is different. 
disposal of defendants. 
Video link liable to be 
better than phone (e.g. 
through facial cues). 
Suspect 
Custody  Could use VRH facilities,  Saving of officer 
 
Recording 
Interview 
and 
if available, or other, 
travel and 
required. 
Police 
less costly. 
accommodation. 
Station2 
Police Witness 
Police 
Costs relate to building 
Saving of officer 
 
Will vary 
Station 
facilities, booking and 
travelling and 
between 
management of 
waiting time in 
forces. 
facilities.  IT costs could  court. Early 
Benefits 
be much reduced if JVS 
return to duties. 
are 
fixed endpoints are not 
£2.8m per 
intrinsically 
required (which also 
annum in the 
linked with 
increases flexibility). 
five- force 
efficient 
region. 
court 
processes. 
Prison visits 
Police 
Minimal if JVS fixed 
Saving of officer 
Reduction in risk to 
 
Station 
endpoints are not 
travelling. 
police when in prison 
required. 
and to prisons when 
admitting and escorting 
officers. 
Voluntary 
Police 
Minimal, dependent 
Saving of officer 
Removal of 
 
Interviews 
Station 
upon existing IT 
travelling. 
requirement of 
services. 
members of the public 
to travel. 
Statutory 
Police 
Dependent upon the 
Saving of 
 
Some 
Applications 
Station/  application.  If there is 
travelling and 
warrants 
mobile 
access to low barrier to 
waiting time. 
could be by 
entry technology and 
video 
                                                           
2 For all examples: ‘Custody’ denotes within the secure custody envelope, ‘Police Station’ denotes outside of that envelope.  In this specific 
example the interviewing officer would not need to be in custody as long as the interview is appropriately recorded somewhere. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
court booking 
mobile.  
processes, then the 
Some may 
costs would be 
need extra 
minimal. 
security. 
Some 
made by 
phone. 
Tribunals 
Police 
Minimal if JVS fixed 
Saving of 
 
 
Station 
endpoints are not 
travelling and 
required. 
waiting time. 
Immediate 
return to duties. 
Inter-agency 
Police 
Minimal cost if systems 
Saving of 
Saving of travelling for 
 
Station/  interconnect. 
travelling. 
others. Environmental 
mobile 
impact reduced3. 
Victim or 
Other4 
Funding and cost 
 
Beneficial for victims 
 
Witness 
models vary. 
and witnesses whether 
they be vulnerable, 
intimidated or just less 
willing or able to travel. 
Better judicial 
outcomes. 
 
2 
Context 
2.1 
Digital First has been participating in the Crime Service Model (CSM) design process on behalf of 
policing. This representation will come to an end in March 2020, in line with the end of funding 
for  the  wider  Digital  First  Programme.    As  part  of  that  work,  Digital  First  have  prepared  this 
document to summarise, in one place, all police costs and benefits work on video to date.  This 
will include discussion of opportunities that have not been subject to financial analysis. 
2.2 
Video Enabled Justice (VEJ) presents a complex set of not necessarily interrelated opportunities 
for police forces. To ease understanding we have previously set out five video elements forming 
the basis of VEJ as it relates to policing.  These are mainly sub divided by the different facilities 
that are required for each: 
1.  Video Remand Hearings (VRH).  First hearing of a detained person undertaken from police 
custody  with  a  requirement  to  facilitate  safe  and  secure  confidential  consultations.  VRH 
facilities  could  be  used  for  other  custody  related  opportunities5  such  as  PACE  reviews  or 
extradition hearings. 
2.  Police Witness testimony to  court.  Also known as Police  Live link. From any suitable (i.e. 
court  approved)  location  which  is  environmentally  treated  to  be  appropriate  (e.g.  look, 
                                                           
3 Note that this also applies wherever travelling is not required. 
4 Not a court room or police station. 
5 The advice from custody subject matter experts is that only those who have a reason to be in custody should be in custody, thus 
opportunities such as police witness would not normally be appropriate from the same facilities. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
lighting and acoustics). Usually in  a police station  and  can be used  in other  opportunities 
when appropriate6 and available7. 
3.  Statutory Applications to court. Potentially from any location8, includes opportunities with 
mobiles  and  out  of  court hours  working.  The  video element  is  not  always  required. Also, 
certain  applications  may  need  to  be  made  in  closed  court  and  this  may  require  a  higher 
security rating for network connectivity. 
4.  Vulnerable or Intimidated Victims and Witnesses and by extension  any witness unable or 
unwilling  to  travel  to  court.  Also  known  as  Remote  Link  Sites.  This  is  not  necessarily  a 
requirement on the police but forces, and particularly Witness Care Units, are often involved 
in facilitating such appearances through a police facility or system. These facilities should not 
be in a police station or court. 
5.  Any video capability that does not require connectivity to the court (we have excluded intra- 
and inter- force video conferencing from the opportunities, though clearly this does exist). 
2.3 
Work on costs and benefits has to date concentrated mostly on VRH and police witness. 
2.4 
The following notes are set out on usage of terms: 
  Live link.  Defined as any video link approved for connection to a court but also commonly 
used  by policing to describe a location  from  which police witnesses can  give evidence by 
video to court and/ or the process of doing so. 
  Remote Link Site.  Defined as a place where witnesses may give evidence via a video link from 
a  location  away  from  a  court  building.  This  includes  spaces  that  are  purposed  by  police 
specifically for  the  use  of police  witnesses  to  give  evidence  by  video (often  called  by  the 
police: Live link Rooms – see above). 
2.5 
Digital First have previously published a number of documents that set out the wider landscape 
of Video Enabled Justice and this document should be read in context with those: 
  ‘Virtual Remand Hearings – Demand Analysis Report’ (Reference DPP/DF/VEJ/149 version 
1.0 6th December 2017). Herein known as the Demand Report. 
  ‘Virtual Remand Hearings: People and Process Impacts’ (Reference DPP/DF/VEJ/162 version 
1.1 6th March 2018). Herein known as the People and Process Report. 
  ‘Force Video Enabled Justice Landscape Review Report’ (Reference DPP/DF/VEJ/180 version 
1.1 dated 30th January 2019). Herein known as the Landscape Review. 
  ‘Test Custody Assumptions Report’ (Reference DPP/DF/VEJ/182 version 1.0 dated 29th March 
2019). Herein known as the Custody Assumptions Report. 
2.6 
The  opportunities  laid  out  in  this  report  are  discussed  in  greater  detail,  with  the  underlying 
legislation referenced where appropriate, in the Landscape Review. VRH is described in much 
greater detail in the People and Process Report and the Custody Assumptions Report. 
                                                           
6 e.g. It would not be appropriate to move defendants in and out of the custody secure envelope to share these facilities. 
7 Witnesses should always take precedence. 
8 Including Live link Rooms but not usually custody. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
2.7 
The main drivers for video usage relate to efficiency and modernisation of the courts. Use of 
video  can  also  generally  (i.e.  not  just  related  to  the  courts)  provide  efficiencies  for  policing, 
particularly in relation to the saving of travelling time.  For forces that do not have court facing 
video capability or a video strategy, it needs to be considered that, in the future: 
  HMCTS aspire to carry out more of their Courts and Tribunals work by video; 
  Under some circumstances it may no longer be considered business as usual to physically 
appear in a court room or in front of a judge or magistrate9; 
  Specialisation of courts may mean that physical court rooms may be in different locations, 
which may be further  from  police facilities than  is currently the case (existing examples of 
specialisation are Family, Drug and Alcohol (FDAC) and Specialist Domestic Violence (SDVC) 
courts); 
  Out of Hours applications may best be dealt with in the future outside of a physical court room; 
  CJS partners may appear by video and mechanisms for consulting with those partners may be 
video based; 
  The most efficient locations for police estate may not necessarily geographically concur with 
that of the courts, leading to increased travelling; 
  There is evidence10 that the accommodation of less able-bodied defendants is a concern in 
the court estate. Use of video may resolve some of the issues; 
  Connectivity  into  courts  may  become  easier  and  cheaper.  In  support  of  their  proposed 
increased use of video in courts, HMCTS and the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) have acknowledged 
that there needs to be a flexible and cost- effective method for partners and other service 
users to connect into courts (often described as the ‘low barrier to entry’).  There have been 
MoJ led pilot initiatives for this (Internet Based Video Solution (IBVS) and Cloud Video Platform 
(CVP)). When a suitable solution comes to fruition, this would allow forces to move away from 
costly, fixed  (and hence less flexible) physical Justice Video System (JVS) endpoints. Such  a 
system would not only enable police to connect more cost effectively into courts but also, if 
other agencies network in the same manner, increases the opportunities to connect to other 
stakeholders and partners. 
2.8 
There are benefits to those members of the public required to appear at court, especially those 
less willing or able to travel11 which the police may be able to help facilitate12. 
                                                           
9 DF have been involved on a number of discussions with HMCTS on the use of video where officers would or do appear remote from the 
court – this of course includes existing initiatives such as search warrant applications by phone. 
10 From our Landscape Review: “Devon and Cornwall Police are in discussions with HMCTS to consider implementation of a policy to use 
virtual court for disabled detainees in police custody (to prevent their unnecessary transfer to DDA compliant HMCTS courts which are a 
significant distance outside of our force area)”. Court DDA compliance is an issue in other court areas e.g. Cumbria. 
11 As discussed extensively in the Landscape Review: includes the vulnerable, intimidated, mobility impaired, infirm and transport 
deprived. 
12 e.g. vulnerable and intimidated witness suites supported by police across England and Wales. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
2.9 
DF observation of CJS strategy towards video working is that it is piecemeal and is often driven, 
or  held  back,  by  the  local  agendas  of  the  stakeholders  (mainly  police,  Police  and  Crime 
Commissioner, defence, CPS, HMCTS, the judiciary) and that opposition or recalcitrance by any 
individual party is difficult to overcome. Nonetheless it should be appropriate for all forces to 
have a strategy for deciding how they may interact remotely with courts and partners both now 
and in the future, as court and police estates evolve. 
2.10  When  considering  a  video  strategy,  forces  need  to  understand  the  efficiency  and 
appropriateness of any individual VEJ capability measured against current and future processes. 
This measurement needs to consider the broad direction of travel and will change over time. 
Each  police  process  needs  to  be  considered  separately  with  the  best  solution  overall  being 
selected for each.  A whole system approach, identifying the appropriate outcomes, synergies 
and  efficiencies  across  the  whole  court  landscape,  will  provide  a  more  compelling  case  for 
investment than ad hoc requests for funding related to individual elements. 
2.11  It  needs  to  be  stated  that,  apart  from  VRH  and  police  witness, measurement of benefits  e.g. 
reduced  travelling  and  waiting  times,  has  so  far  been  extremely  problematical  with  no  real 
success, by anyone, in providing appropriate datasets.  In terms of anecdote and what little hard 
evidence exists, those forces which use VEJ (excepting VRH) see it as having positive outcomes 
in  terms  of  benefits.  HMCTS  intend  to  commence  a  number  of  video  pilots  in  financial  year 
2020/21 which should provide more definitive data. 
2.12  Nationally, forces operate their processes in different ways, making any upscaling of a single VEJ 
model  problematical.  The  meaningful  underlying  numbers  required  to  build  such  a  model, 
despite the number of datasets that appear to be recorded, have been impossible to come by 
from any of the stakeholders13. Also, while a national model would be useful in broad terms, at 
force level the processes, numbers, IT capability, geography, and also where past investment has 
been made14 vary hugely.  Thus, a national model (‘one size fits all’) is unlikely to reflect local 
issues. 
2.13  DF  have  observed  that  the  key  to  making  any  element  of  VEJ  work  is  early  and  continued 
communication  across  all  stakeholder  parties.  The  greater  the  understanding  between  CJS 
partners and buy in to a common process, the greater the probability of a successful outcome. 
Consequently,  many  of  the  benefits  are  reliant  upon  other  parties  (particularly  the  main 
stakeholders named above: police, Police and Crime Commissioner, defence, CPS, HMCTS, the 
judiciary). 
2.14  Some or all of the following will be required and should be considered as a starting point for 
considerations when forming a video strategy: 
  Processes agreed with the relevant partners; 
                                                           
13 Particularly here meaning CPS, Police and HMCTS.  Meaning that loads of data is being recorded but isn’t of any use for this exercise. 
14 e.g. as is often quoted: Kent have invested heavily in their underlying IT infrastructure which makes use of video efficient for them – 
other forces have invested in different ways appropriate to their own issues at the time.  
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
  Video links technically approved by the force and, for court purposes, quality approved by the 
judiciary; 
  A physical space that is appropriate for the type of business to be carried out.  This may include 
appropriate  acoustic  and  visual  measures  (e.g. soundproofing,  suitable  lighting, decoration 
and building services); 
  A booking system for all of the requisite elements (people, rooms and video links); 
  When working into the court, a method of communication to allow the court to adjust and 
change listings and, by extension, to be able to influence room and video link bookings; 
  Where relevant, a secure method of transferring case papers digitally; 
  Where relevant, a common set of forms; 
  A reliable and secure technical solution backed up by contingency processes; 
  Where  relevant,  a  method  of  carrying  out  confidential  consultations  between  the  various 
parties both pre and post hearing (e.g. in VRH between the defence solicitor and defendant 
or the solicitor and CPS); 
  Where  relevant,  video  access  to  the  appropriate  justice  partners  including  case  workers, 
reoffending prevention and rehabilitation workers; 
  Judicial approval is required for any form of court video working and such approval is also 
required locally. 
 
2.15  Key enablers that are expected to be provided by others are15: 
  A common listing system, which may be provided by Common Platform; 
  Low barrier to entry16 connectivity into the court’s JVS video network, which may be provided 
by MoJ. 
3 
Opportunities 
3.1 
DF have been working in the area of Video Enabled Justice since 2016.  What is identified in this 
section is a definitive list of all of the opportunities we have encountered during that period. 
3.2 
Please note that the opportunities are laid out differently here than how they are in Section 2. 
Here we deal with individual opportunities and at paragraph 2.2 with broad grouping by location. 
There is a cross reference in Section 7. 
3.3 
The following opportunities for video use into court have been identified:  
  Video Remand Hearings; 
  Extradition Hearings; 
  Applications for warrants of further detention; 
  Police Witness testimony to court; 
  Statutory Applications to court. 
                                                           
15 Note that VRH has a large and complex set of dependencies and prerequisites – please refer to the Custody Assumptions Report for 
details. 
16 That is cost effective and technically straightforward for the majority of users. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
3.4 
Communicating with detainees in prison is a further opportunity and this would use the same 
network infrastructure as a link to court (where prisons are JVS equipped). 
3.5 
In addition to court applications there are instances where there may be related police-to-police 
or police to ‘others’ video links: 
  Suspect interviews; 
  Voluntary interviews; 
  Review of detention (Inspector Review); 
  Extension to detention (Superintendent Review); 
  Staff appearing at tribunals or similar17; 
  Communicating  with  other  agencies  e.g.  NHS,  Probation,  Social  Services,  crime  related 
charities. 
3.6 
Providing  remote  facilities  for  Vulnerable  and  Intimidated  Victims  and  Witnesses  and  by 
extension  any  witness  unable  or  unwilling  to  travel  is  a  complex  benefits  case  often  having 
multiple sponsors. As responsibility for funding and servicing the capability can be spread across 
a number of agencies, this opportunity is not discussed further here. 
3.7 
Although  not  covered  in  any  depth  in  this  report  there  appears  to  be  an  overwhelmingly 
supportive  case  for  providing  remote  facilities  for  Victims  and  Witnesses.  There  is  broad 
consensus  that  video  enabling  those  who  would  not  otherwise  give  testimony  in  court  is 
beneficial to justice. This has been reinforced whenever we have discussed such facilities, across 
all agencies.  When putting together a funding case for video, impact on this capability should be 
considered e.g. will investment in a new video system reduce network costs for a victim suite? 
4 
Video Remand Hearings 
4.1 
Video  Remand  Hearings  have  been  the  subject  of  much  work  by  DF,  Home  Office,  VEJ 
Programme  and  the  various  agencies  on  the  CJS  Costs  and  Benefits  Working  Group.  
Consequently, this is the most informed financial case of all video-based opportunities. 
4.2 
Our most recent work on VRH costs and benefits18 has found that any potential cashable benefits 
for  policing  are  minimal  when  compared  to  the  costs.    They  are  also  dependent  upon  the 
efficiency of a number of other variables, particularly the court hours worked, detainee eligibility 
and PECS pickups. 
                                                           
17 e.g. Hampshire Constabulary set up a link for an officer to appear at a Criminal Injuries Compensation Hearing in 2019. 
18 Digital First Briefing Note DPP/DF/VEJ/192 version 1.0 (shown verbatim at Appendix A). 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
4.3 
Using  the  datasets,  assumptions  and  modelling  scenarios  considered  in  that  report,  the 
maximum theoretical cashable benefit for policing in England and Wales is £1.33m per annum 
and the maximum  theoretical non-  cashable benefit is £3.10m  per  annum  giving a combined 
benefit of £4.43m per annum (for an extended hours model).  At the other extreme of current 
court hours with lower levels of PECS transport and low eligibility (60%), the highest theoretical 
cashable  disbenefit  was  -£0.98m  per  annum  and  the  maximum  theoretical  non-  cashable 
disbenefit -£2.29m per annum giving a combined disbenefit of -£3.27m per annum.  
4.4 
The Custody Assumptions Report states that indicative steady state policing costs of £28.1m per 
annum are expected nationally if all Home Office forces run VRH, mainly due to staff and IT costs 
(note these costs are on the basis of current court hours). 
4.5 
Spread across all Home Office forces, on the basis of current court hours, the cashable benefits 
spread from +£0.44m to -£0.98m and non-cashable from +£1.03 to -£2.29m.  Given the spread 
of variables and likely local variations it is anticipated that different forces will see a variety of 
results which will spread across the spectrum.  Our conclusion is that running VRH nationally will 
place a financial burden on policing of between £26.6m and £31.4m per annum. 
4.6 
It is worth noting that there are potential savings elsewhere in the Criminal Justice System e.g. 
in reduced PECS journeys and custodial requirements at courts.  The defendant experience may 
also be improved in some cases, especially where a long journey to court would otherwise be 
required. 
4.7 
The  Custody  Assumptions  Report  and  the  People  and  Process  Report  both  found  that  VRH 
introduces a change in risk profile in custody that needs to be investigated, understood and, in 
the context of this report, analysed in economic terms.  Of particular concern is that detainees 
remanded to prison by the court will, in some circumstances, remain in police custody overnight.  
This risk should reduce, but will not be entirely eliminated, when the new PECS Gen4 contracts 
go live in August 2020 as that allows for flexible pickups through the day.   
4.8 
Indicative capital costs for setting up VRH for all Home Office forces is estimated at £10.4m (this 
excludes sites that, at that time, already had full VRH capability) across a rollout period of just 
over  6  years  (assuming  a  national  programme  and  starting  from  the  commencement  of 
procurement  for  works).  This  does  not  include  refurbishment  or  upgrade  costs  for  existing 
facilities  but  there  are  indicators, such  as  the  piloting  of booths  in  Kent  to  facilitate  safe  and 
secure consultations, that there may also be costs for forces that already run VRH, in order to 
meet a national standard. This cost includes estates, IT and Wi-Fi works19.  It should be noted 
that the use of booths, as currently being pioneered by Kent Police, would significantly reduce 
the rollout period as disruption within custody is minimised20. 
4.9 
Some transition costs may also be expected but have never been modelled. 
                                                           
19 Wi-Fi is required to facilitate solicitor access to papers in custody. 
20 Also note though that the capital costs are similar to those originally estimated. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
4.10  Not all police custody sites may be able to accommodate VRH facilities (through limitations of 
the site itself). 
4.11  The impact, or otherwise, of VRH on judicial outcomes has still not been affirmed. 
4.12  VRH appears to work for some forces21. Some forces see benefits in operating VRH for certain 
cases only  e.g. for  detainees charged during the day, whereas those charged  overnight go to 
court in person22. Cases where police discretion to bail is limited, but with a low probability of 
remand by the court, are of particular benefit to the police and the detainee if they appear by 
video as the detainees can be released quicker. 
4.13  Benefits are also seen for policing and PECS where there are out of area warrants (if the court 
will hear them) appearing by video. Work is currently proceeding on a Cross Local Justice Area 
Protocol23 which may reduce travelling issues. 
4.14  Where  there  are  issues  with  defendant  mobility  and  the  DDA  compliance  of  courts  there  is 
benefit to the CJS if cases are dealt with by video (particularly for the defendant: who does not 
need to be moved what can be long distances and then travel home again24). Where extended 
travelling time is required of the defendant25, this is an additional driver regardless of mobility. 
4.15  The  facilities  provided  in  custody for  video  appearance  at  court  could  also be used  for  other 
purposes discussed elsewhere. However, it may be the case that a more cost-effective facility 
(such as a safe and secure video booth) could be used instead of a, potentially more expensive, 
virtual hearing room: 
  Applications for Warrants of Further Detention; 
  Review of Detention (Inspector review); 
  Extension to Detention (Superintendent review); 
  Suspect interviews (force to force); 
  Extradition hearings (though see also below). 
5 
Police Witness 
5.1 
Where allowed by the court, police witnesses may appear by video. This will be from any suitable 
(i.e.  court  approved)  location  which  is  environmentally  treated  to  be  appropriate  (e.g.  look, 
lighting and acoustics). 
5.2 
As a rule, only those people who need to be in custody should be in custody. It is not appropriate 
therefore  to  share  facilities  with  VRH  (quite  apart  from  the  issues  this  would  cause  in  room 
booking). 
                                                           
21 e.g. Hertfordshire. 
22 e.g. Wiltshire; though note that more flexible PECS pickups may erode the advantages as detainees can be taken to court during the day 
as well as in the morning under Gen4 contracts. 
23 Seen at a draft version dated January 2020. 
24 e.g. in Cumbria where the nearest DDA compliant court is Preston in Lancashire. 
25 e.g. in Shropshire. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
5.3 
Police witness by Live link has been the subject of extensive work by the VEJ Programme and 
others.  This section relies mainly on the former, as the method of working and outcomes have 
been accepted by the Cost and Benefits Working Group, but also relates other information where 
it is available. 
5.4 
The benefit in having police witnesses appear by video is twofold: the saving of travelling and; 
the time waiting in court (the latter in particular is significant). By allowing officers to be in a 
police facility while waiting to appear they can continue to work in some capacity and return to 
duties more quickly. 
5.5 
The impact of altering duty rosters to cover court appearances is also disruptive in itself. 
5.6 
Our work with the VEJ Programme, East Midlands LCJB and others has identified that time lost 
waiting in court is exacerbated in two ways: 
  A large percentage of officers are called and never appear. Discussion26 has identified that 
there may be two reasons for this: 
  The officer would have given testimony, but something has occurred27 which means they 
were not required; 
  The officer would never have given testimony and should never have been called; 
  Officers are not stood down in a timely manner. 
5.7 
It is deduced that better case management and a more effective means of standing officers down 
would reduce wasted officer time. Some officers will still be called and not give testimony, for 
perfectly legitimate reasons, but that percentage could be much reduced.  One impact of better 
processes would be to reduce the benefits of video appearance. 
5.8 
A police presence in court may always be required, for example: to transport exhibits. 
5.9 
Our  discussions  with  forces  have  revealed  that  some  have  invested  in  different  measures  to 
prevent wasted time which means that Live link facilities would not produce the same benefits28. 
5.10  At the time of writing, the numbers of officers giving testimony is not recorded29 and the detailed 
breakdown of those numbers is not known30. 
5.11  All of the foregoing means that the benefits of video appearance nationally cannot be predicted: 
we do not have meaningful data and that data would need to be applied differently across forces.  
What is without doubt, however, is that in those areas where officer testimony is allowed by 
video, forces can demonstrate actual benefits. Some of these will now be discussed. 
                                                           
26 e.g. in the VEJ Programme weekly meetings with CJ partners. 
27 There are a number of possible reasons, but an example would be a late guilty plea. 
28 e.g. Lancashire have a complete mobile solution that allows their officers to work anywhere. Avon and Somerset are similar and have a 
volunteer driver service which means that the cost of transport to court is also not incurred. 
29 By anyone, though some police witness care units have some data. 
30 At the VEJ Programme weekly meeting on 3rd March 2020 it was reported by HMCTS that CPS were to provide a more detailed 
breakdown of numbers (as CPS are the only ones with access to all of the required information) but that this will require a new data 
gathering exercise to complete. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
5.12  Capital costs associated with police witness relate primarily to the setting up of rooms31, network 
and video equipment which will vary between forces and also locations. There may also be costs 
associated with setting up room diaries. A typical JVS link32 would cost £12,500 to install, other 
solutions may be substantially cheaper. 
5.13  Revenue costs will mainly relate to network use and that cost will depend upon the system used. 
JVS fixed endpoints will cost £2,777 per annum.  If the solution is Internet based33 the costs may 
reduce substantially. There will be some management overhead and this is likely to be similar to 
that already undertaken for in person appearances: the only additional tasks being management 
of the rooms and diary. 
5.14  The process needs to be monitored and managed to ensure that all partners remain diligent in 
their use of video and also in releasing witnesses when not required. Monitoring usually falls to 
the police (as they are the recipients of the benefits). 
5.15  The VEJ Programme have stated34 that in a Magistrates Court there is a potential time saving of 
5 hours (5 .5 hours in person, 0.5 hours by video) increasing to 10.5 hours in Crown Court (11 
hours in person, 0.5 hours by video). This gives their five- force region an estimated cashable and 
non-cashable benefit of £2.8m per annum. 
5.16  In addition, there is a travelling saving which will be dependent upon the various site and home 
locations. 
5.17  The East Midlands Criminal Justice Board reported in their Live links evaluation report35 that the 
indicative  cost  of  42  officers  attending  court  between  November  2015  and  March  2016  was 
£4,408 whereas if heard over video the cost fell to £367 (based on 4 hours in person and 20 
minutes by video). 
5.18  February to December in 2019 Thames Valley Police estimated that they were able to make a 
saving of £115,042 by using Live links for 334 officer witnesses in Magistrates Court (note that 
they base their savings on 4 hours saved per witness at a cost of £86.11 per case). 
5.19  We  have  attempted  to  obtain  national  figures  for  police  witnesses  through  CPS  and  HMCTS 
however, as discussed above, this is not explicitly recorded. Although impossible to calculate a 
blanket national benefit, forces can calculate their own savings as follows: 
Magistrates Court benefit = (Number of police witnesses x Average Time Saved (5 hours) x Average 
hourly cost of a police officer (£4736)) + (Miles travelled x 0.45p per mile) 
 
                                                           
31 See Police Witness Video Room Guideline DPP/DF/VEJ/185 for further information. 
32 JVS costs in this section are sourced from the Custody Assumptions Report. 
33 e.g. the low barrier to entry solution. 
34 Costs and Benefits Working Group Agenda papers for 19th November 2019. The methodology was endorsed by that meeting. 
35 “East Midlands Video Links Project (EMVL)” V.1 dated 14/12/16. 
36 NPCC Guidelines 2018 Police Constable banding, including salary, NI, pension, overtime premium and direct overheads. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
Crown Court benefit = (Number of police witnesses x Average Time Saved (10.5 hours) x Average hourly 
cost of a police officer (£47)) + (Miles travelled x 0.45p per mile). 
6 
Other Opportunities 
6.1 
Extradition Hearings 
6.2 
The Metropolitan Police Extradition Unit has recently confirmed to DF that all first appearance 
extradition hearings are held at Westminster Magistrates Court in person.  Use of video from 
police custody is not permitted. 
6.3 
In light of this there are no apparent opportunities for policing to utilise this option, at this time. 
The remainder of this section on extradition hearings is therefore provided for information only. 
6.4 
Video  links  from  prisons  for  subsequent  hearings  are  permitted.    Those  who  are  on  bail  are 
required to appear in person. 
6.5 
These hearings are time critical with a strong possibility of a dismissal if the process is delayed. 
6.6 
If allowed it would make a much more efficient use of resources if these could be undertaken 
from police custody video facilities used for VRH. 
6.7 
DF  attended  a  meeting  in  October  2016  regarding  Extradition  Hearings  with  Westminster 
Magistrates  court  staff,  the  Chief  Magistrate  for  England  and  Wales  and  Metropolitan  Police 
Service. Although transport in extradition cases would normally fall to the PECS contractor, under 
certain circumstances (especially where PECS transport could not be arranged in time) this would 
fall to the police to organise. A figure of £1,000 to £1,500 per trip was quoted37 for ‘high profile’ 
detainee transport by the National Crime Agency or Home Office. 
6.8 
At the time of that meeting the total volume of cases was 7-8 per day. 
6.9 
There is a potential double benefit: saving of resources and; reduction in the potential of cases 
being dismissed due to time limits being missed. 
6.10  If allowed, as this is a court hearing, the standard for facilities would need to be the same as that 
for  VRH.  Where  VRH  facilities  exist,  the  capital  and  revenue  costs  would  be  minimal:  being 
subsumed in the VRH activity.  They would use the same resource, management, booking tool 
and processes.  We would suggest that building custody facilities just for extradition hearings 
would not be cost effective due to the low throughput. 
6.11  Review of detention (Inspector Review) 
6.12  A detainee’s pre-charge detention in police custody must be reviewed regularly to ensure that: 
  The detainee understands their rights and that they are being complied with; 
  The investigation is being progressed expeditiously; 
  There is insufficient evidence to charge at that time; 
                                                           
37 Anecdotal - original source unknown. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
  Further detention is justified. 
6.13  Pre-charge reviews must be conducted by an officer of at least the rank of Inspector who has not 
been  directly involved  in the investigation. The Police and Criminal Evidence (PACE) Act 1984 
Code C allows for this type of review to be conducted by telephone or video. 
6.14  The legislation specifies that if Live link facilities are available, and it is practical to use them, then 
they should be used in preference to the telephone. 
6.15  The  use  of  video  or  telephone  to  conduct  this  type  of  review  could  potentially  enable  the 
reviewing officer to cover multiple custody suites, without the need for travel.  This would result 
in savings in both time and transport.  It would also remove the risk that is involved in personnel 
entering  and  leaving  a  secure  custody  environment. Conversely,  if  officers  are not  limited  by 
location, a wider pool of officers could undertake these duties, increasing diversity and resilience. 
6.16  Anecdotally  we  understand  that  HMICFRS  may  be  about  to  be  critical38  of  PACE  reviews  by 
phone.  This could be related to any number of factors but needs to be monitored to confirm if 
the criticism is of use of the phone (in which case video could be a mitigating factor) or of the 
process in place itself (i.e. that a solution other than video needs to solve). 
6.17  For some forces it may be the case that remote reviews do not fit their force model39. 
6.18  This opportunity could share facilities used for VRH where they exist and use the same resource, 
management,  booking  tool  and  processes.    Some  forces  have  provided  other  cost-  effective 
solutions. If the solution is one to one (as opposed to a conference) on the force network, then 
a booking tool is not essential. 
6.19  Extension to detention (Superintendent Review) 
6.20  For serious offences, an officer of at least the rank of Superintendent, who has not been directly 
involved in the investigation, can authorise up to a further 12 hours detention for a detainee who 
has been in custody for 24 hours. 
6.21  PACE Code C allows for this type of review to be conducted by video, subject to the following 
conditions: 
  The custody officer considers that the use of video is appropriate; 
  The detainee in question has requested and received legal advice on the use of video; 
  The detainee has given their consent to video being used. 
6.22  This type of review is time critical as they must be completed before the 24- hour cut off.  Many 
forces will identify one officer to conduct these reviews, over a given time period.  This can mean 
that an officer is required to travel significant distances to reach custody suites.  The distances 
involved can and do lead to significant time pressures on those involved in the process. 
                                                           
38 Understood to relate to unannounced custody inspections in Sussex, which report has not yet been published. 
39 e.g. if officers have other due diligence tasks in custody that are undertaken at the same time as reviews. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
6.23  As with Inspector Reviews, the use of video could allow one reviewing officer to service multiple 
custody suites without the need to travel or enter a secure custody environment unnecessarily. 
The potential for resulting efficiencies in both time and travel, along with a reduction in risk, by 
using video, should therefore be clear. The converse case of facilitating a wider pool of officers 
is also true. 
6.24  As  for  Inspector  reviews  remote  working  may  not  be  appropriate  for  some  current  force 
processes. 
6.25  In terms of use of facilities and costs this opportunity is the same as Inspector reviews. 
6.26  Applications for Warrants of Further Detention 
6.27  Following an arrest for a serious offence, the police have the power to keep a detainee in pre-
charge  custody  for  a  maximum  of  36  hours  (this  does  not  apply  in  terrorism  offences).  Any 
extension to this can only be authorised by a court, who have the power to extend pre-charge 
detention up to a maximum of 96 hours, by issuing a ‘Warrant of Further Detention’. 
6.28  Ordinarily  the  detainee  is  required  to  appear  at  court  in  person,  along  with  their  legal 
representative (if appointed).  PACE Code C Section 44 enables magistrates to allow applications 
to be conducted by video from police custody, subject to the following conditions: 
  The  custody  officer  considers  that  the  use  of  video  for  the  purpose  of  the  hearing  is 
appropriate; 
  The detainee in question has requested and received legal advice on the use of video; 
  The detainee has given their consent to video being used; 
  It is not contrary to the interests of justice to give the direction. 
6.29  The detainees’ production at court is time critical.  They must appear in court before the police 
authorised 36-hour period expires.  The PACE detention clock does not stop whilst detainees are 
transferred to and from court. There have been examples of police missing the cut off time by a 
matter of minutes and the court have refused to hear the application.  This has led to suspects 
being immediately released from custody. 
6.30  No allowance is made for cases where the time falls outside of normal court hours.  In these 
circumstances,  preparations  for  a  hearing  have  to  begin  at  an  early  stage  in  the  detainees’ 
detention and the courts are sometimes required to convene for a single hearing. 
6.31  There are a number of potential benefits that could be accrued from using a video link: 
  No cost for transporting detainees to and from court – this requires at least 2 officers for each 
detainee, who  would be removed  from  their  normal duties, along with a suitable mode of 
transport; 
  Removes the risk of moving potentially high-risk prisoners into and out of the secure custody 
environment; 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
  Reduced loss of PACE detention time.  It would not be unusual for 2-4 hours of the ‘PACE 
Clock’ to be lost whilst the detainee(s) is away from the custody suite.  During this time there 
is no opportunity to progress the investigation through further interviews; 
  Out of hours there may be no need for a court to be opened with a potential to reduce risk to 
court staff. 
6.32  This opportunity could share facilities used for VRH where they exist.  Additional processes would 
be required if warrants are applied for out of hours but generally costs would be subsumed in 
VRH.  Where VRH facilities do not exist, additional costs are implied. As this is a connection to 
the court, access to the court video booking processes would be ideal. 
6.33  Use of Interpreters 
6.34  There is anecdotal evidence from a number of CJS partners, including defence solicitors, that the 
use of remote interpreters could be of great benefit, particularly where it reduces the amount 
of time spent waiting for the appropriate interpreter to travel to a police station.  Interpreters 
are paid an hourly rate for their time, including any travel to and from their destination.  As a 
result, the ability to appear by video could also significantly reduce expenditure. 
6.35  There  are  number  of  potential  use  cases,  including  PACE  interviews  and  VRH.    To  enable  an 
interpreter  to appear by video  for a PACE interview at a police  station, forces would need  to 
provide a suitable video platform into which third parties can connect.  The process would rely 
on the security and resilience of this system, along with the co-operation of the interpreter, who 
will need to have suitable equipment at their end.  Many interpreters prefer to see the face of 
the person who is speaking to assist understanding of what is being said.  This may be another 
factor that forces will need to consider.   
6.36  During  VRH  the  current  best  practice,  based  on  recent  judicial  guidance,  would  see  the 
interpreter physically present with the defendant in police custody.  The benefit of this is that 
proceedings  can  be  translated  for  the  defendant,  without  necessarily  disrupting  the  hearing 
itself.    Therefore,  the  option  of  an  interpreter  appearing  remotely  will  be  for  each  force,  in 
consultation with their CJS partners, to assess.  As with PACE interviews, this will be dependent 
on the provision of a secure video platform into which third parties can connect. Ultimately the 
court will have the final say over this type of use case. 
6.37  Suspect Interviews 
6.38  PACE Code C, Section 39, allows for a person in police detention to be interviewed using a ‘Live 
link’ by a police officer who is not at the police station where the detainee is held.  This would be 
a police-to-police video link, rather than to courts. 
6.39  The use of this facility could be applied where a suspect has been arrested in another force area 
and requires interviewing prior to a charging decision being made.  For minor offences this would 
appear to be an appropriate option, but for more serious offences it may not.  Each case would 
need to be assessed on its own merits. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
6.40  The responsibility for the transport of prisoners wanted by police, as opposed to those who are 
subject  to  a  warrant  issued  by  the  courts,  falls  to  the  force  who  have  ownership  of  the 
investigation.    It  is  still  common  practice  for  officers  to  be  deployed  to  collect  prisoners  and 
return them to the correct force area.  This is in order to complete an investigation, which will 
normally include a PACE interview, before a charging decision can be made. 
6.41  The cost of transport and the length of time officers are away from their normal duties can be 
significant  and,  in  some  cases,  include  an  overnight  stay.    There  is  also  the  risk  involved  in 
transporting detainees, some of whom may be wanted for serious offences, from one secure 
custody environment to another. 
6.42  The use of video could, potentially, enable any charging decision to be made without the need 
for unnecessary travel by officers from the investigating force, thereby avoiding the costs and 
risks highlighted above. 
6.43  Suspect interviews would require the suspect to be in custody, but the interviewing officer does 
not need to be.  The interview will need to be properly recorded and it should be noted that 
recording  equipment  would  not  be  allowed  in  a  VRH  so,  if  those  facilities  are  to  be  used, 
measures  may  be  required  to  demonstrate  that  such  equipment  is  not  operating  during  a 
hearing. As long as force networks interconnect, the IT costs should be minimal and the impact 
on  existing  resource  is  minimal.  As  these  are  expected  to  be  low  throughput,  a  booking  tool 
would be useful but not essential (unless using VRH facilities in which case there should be no 
additional cost anyway). 
6.44  Communicating with detainees in prison 
6.45  In certain circumstances police may find it appropriate to communicate with detainees in prison 
by video.  This could involve the use of the same video facilities, if available, that officers use to 
give evidence at court. With this in mind, officers need to ensure that the rooms are not already 
booked for a court hearing, which would take precedence. 
6.46  Officers and staff required to speak to a prison detainee may be required to travel considerable 
distances and, in some cases, this may include an overnight stay.  The benefits in saved travel 
costs and time are clear as officers would not have to travel potentially long distances, for what 
may prove to be an unfruitful discussion. 
6.47  In  addition  to the savings in  time and money, any risk from  entering a prison environment is 
removed (both for the officers and the prison).  Many prisons now have video facilities and are 
able to assist with this type of request. 
6.48  Prisons use the JVS system so any facility would connect to that, ideally through the low barrier 
to entry solution which would minimise cost and maximise flexibility. These would be ad hoc, so 
a booking tool is useful but not essential and the impact on resource and process is minimal. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
6.49  Voluntary Interviews 
6.50  The  provision  under  PACE  allows  for  the  Voluntary  Interview  of  a  suspect  who  has  not  been 
arrested, but who needs to be interviewed under caution.  The benefits of conducting this type 
of interview by video with a suspect who is in another force are, are clear, in so much as it would 
negate  the  need  for  officers  or  the  suspect  to  travel.    In  some  cases,  this  could  include 
considerable distances. 
6.51  Any use of this provision would require the assistance of the force where the suspect is located 
and, as with any PACE interview, an audio recording solution would be a minimum requirement. 
As long as force networks interconnect and there is a suitable confidential space the costs should 
be minimal. Again, these would be ad hoc, so a booking tool is not essential and the impact on 
resource and process is minimal. 
6.52  Statutory Applications 
6.53  Part 47 of the Criminal Procedures Rules outlines when video or indeed telephone can be used 
when making certain applications to a court. The list of these applications is lengthy and complex, 
but would include amongst others: search warrants, Domestic Violence Protection Orders and 
certain Proceeds of Crime Act (POCA) applications. 
6.54  Applications can be made from any location, both during and outside of normal court hours and 
the video element is not always required. Certain applications may need to be made in closed 
court which may require a higher security rating for network connectivity. 
6.55  East Midlands Criminal Justice Board carried out an evaluation40 of their video search warrants 
process in Leicestershire.  Whilst it was conceded that financial savings were difficult to calculate, 
an estimate was made for Leicester.  An indicative cost was proposed for 391 applications by 
video of £1,706; in person this would have been £10,886 (based on a 10- minute video hearing 
with a non video hearing average officer time of 1 hour at the hearing and travelling time for an 
average  of  8  miles).    The  saving  calculated  is  approximately  £23  per  application.  The  East 
Midlands report concluded that “it  is common sense that being able to carry out non urgent 
applications from a police station allows officers to be more productive and reduces the need to 
travel.” 
6.56  Search warrant applications are made by a number of forces using the telephone. 
6.57  The same benefits  in both time and money that are highlighted  above can be applied  to any 
application  where  the  efficient  and  successful  outcome  of  the  process  does  not  rely  upon 
physical presence. 
6.58  If the low barrier to entry solution is in place IT costs would be minimal and flexibility high as long 
as a confidential space is available. As this is a connection to the court, access to the court video 
booking processes would be ideal. 
                                                           
40 “East Midlands Video Links Project (EMVL)” V.1 dated 14/12/16. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
6.59  Appearance at tribunals or similar 
6.60  Police officers and staff can be required to appear  at hearings outside of the normal criminal 
justice environment, such as misconduct hearings, employment tribunals or similar work-related 
activities e.g. Criminal Injuries Compensation Hearing. 
6.61  As with court hearings, the majority of time that officers and staff spend at these events is on 
travelling and waiting to give evidence.  The ability to remain at their normal place of work whilst 
they wait to be called, enables them to complete other administrative duties and then return to 
their normal role much sooner.   
6.62  Where  appearance  is  at  an  HMCTS  hosted  tribunal,  Live  link  facilities  will  be  suitable  for 
connection.  The low barrier to entry technical solution, as previously discussed, could greatly 
enhance flexibility and cost in the instances where connection to JVS is required. We would not 
expect that additional JVS facilities could be justified for this opportunity. We would expect the 
same video booking tool to be in place for tribunals as courts so access to the booking process 
would be useful. 
6.63  Where  appearance  is  not  to  an  HMCTS  tribunal,  interconnectivity  to  third  party  systems  is 
required and this would need to be assessed on a case by case basis. 
6.64  Co-operation with other agencies 
6.65  Police, in the course of their work, can communicate with a number of other CJS partners.  These 
can  include but are not limited  to: CPS; NHS; Probation; Social Services; crime prevention  or; 
rehabilitation related charities. 
6.66  Video conferencing with partners would negate the need and expense of travel and reduce the 
time spent away from normal duties.  The potential use cases are numerous and may vary hugely 
between forces, but each will need a reliable video platform to work successfully. As long as the 
force system can interconnect to the third parties, costs should be minimal. 
 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
7 
Conclusions and Considerations 
7.1 
The following table summarises the opportunities. The costs and benefits are for policing, the 
qualitative impact refers more widely: 
Opportunity 
Location  Cost 
Benefit 
Qualitative Impact 
Notes 
VRH 
Custody  £28.1m per annum and  A spread 
Beneficial to 
 
£10.4m capital cost. 
between +£1.47  defendants for some 
and -£3.27m. 
warrants.  Beneficial to 
defendants and others 
(e.g. defence) where 
travel is extended or 
difficult. 
Extradition 
Custody  Expensive on its’ own 
Marginal, 
Reduces the possibility 
May not be 
but no cost if using VRH  dependent on 
of cases being 
allowed. 
facilities. 
force as some 
dismissed. 
will use more 
 
than others.  
Beneficial to 
defendants not 
required to travel. 
Inspector 
Custody  Minimal. Can be done 
Saves the cost of  Potentially increases 
 
Review 
cost effectively, and is 
the officer 
the number of officers 
by some forces, 
travelling. 
who can do this (and 
without the 
therefore diversity and 
requirement for VRH 
resilience), if they are 
facilities. Where VRH 
not tied to locations.  
facilities are available 
May be preferable to 
they can be used at no 
phone interviews in 
additional cost. 
terms of outcomes. 
Superintendent  Custody  Minimal. Can be done 
Saves the cost of  Potentially increases 
PACE 
Review 
cost effectively, and is 
the officer 
the number of officers 
requires 
by some forces, 
travelling. 
who can do this (and 
detainee 
without the 
therefore diversity and 
consent. 
requirement for VRH 
resilience), if they are 
facilities. Where VRH 
not tied to locations.  
facilities are available 
May be preferable to 
they can be used at no 
phone interviews in 
additional cost. 
terms of outcomes. 
Warrant of 
Custody  Once the court is 
Saves the cost of  Reduces possibility of 
PACE 
Further 
involved, more ‘VRH–
police 
missing timelines. Time 
requires 
Detention 
like’ facilities may be 
transporting the  is not lost on the PACE 
detainee 
required implying 
prisoner. 
clock. If allowed out of 
consent. 
increased costs. If VRH 
hours HMCTS 
facilities can be used 
potentially do not need 
there is no additional 
to open courts and 
cost. 
their staff and judiciary 
do not need to travel. 
Interpreters 
Custody  Reduced hourly costs. 
Dependent 
Reduction of lost time 
Each 
upon the 
in investigations.  
application 
application. 
Potentially earlier 
is different. 
disposal of defendants. 
Video link liable to be 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
better than phone (e.g. 
through facial cues). 
Suspect 
Custody  Could use VRH 
Saving of officer 
 
Recording 
Interview 
and 
facilities, if available, or  travel and 
required. 
Police 
other, less costly. 
accommodation. 
Station41 
Police Witness 
Police 
Costs relate to building 
Saving of officer 
 
Will vary 
Station 
facilities, booking and 
travelling and 
between 
management of 
waiting time in 
forces. 
facilities.  IT costs could  court. Early 
Benefits 
be much reduced if JVS 
return to duties. 
are 
fixed endpoints are not 
£2.8m per 
intrinsically 
required (which also 
annum in the 
linked with 
increases flexibility). 
five- force 
efficient 
region. 
court 
processes. 
Prison visits 
Police 
Minimal if JVS fixed 
Saving of officer 
Reduction in risk to 
 
Station 
endpoints are not 
travelling. 
police when in prison 
required. 
and to prisons when 
admitting and escorting 
officers. 
Voluntary 
Police 
Minimal, dependent 
Saving of officer 
Removal of 
 
Interviews 
Station 
upon existing IT 
travelling. 
requirement of 
services. 
members of the public 
to travel. 
Statutory 
Police 
Dependent upon the 
Saving of 
 
Some 
Applications 
Station/ 
application.  If there is 
travelling and 
warrants 
mobile 
access to low barrier to  waiting time. 
could be by 
entry technology and 
video 
court booking 
mobile.  
processes, then the 
Some may 
costs would be 
need extra 
minimal. 
security. 
Some 
made by 
phone. 
Tribunals 
Police 
Minimal if JVS fixed 
Saving of 
 
 
Station 
endpoints are not 
travelling and 
required. 
waiting time. 
Immediate 
return to duties. 
Inter-agency 
Police 
Minimal cost if systems  Saving of 
Saving of travelling for 
 
Station/ 
interconnect. 
travelling. 
others. Environmental 
mobile 
impact reduced42. 
Victim or 
Other43 
Funding and cost 
 
Beneficial for victims 
 
Witness 
models vary. 
and witnesses whether 
they be vulnerable, 
                                                           
41 For all examples: ‘Custody’ denotes within the secure custody envelope, ‘Police Station’ denotes outside of that envelope.  In this 
specific example the interviewing officer would not need to be in custody as long as the interview is appropriately recorded somewhere. 
42 Note that this also applies wherever travelling is not required. 
43 Not a court room or police station. 
 

OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
 
intimidated or just less 
willing or able to travel. 
Better judicial 
outcomes. 
 
7.2 
The drivers for  police use of video in  relation  to justice outcomes are manifold and, as court 
estate is rationalised, becoming more compelling. 
7.3 
The costs, the changes in custody risk, lack of a definitive conclusion on judicial outcomes and 
the  dependency  on  policing  to  make  estates,  IT,  staff  and  process  changes  makes  VRH 
unpalatable for the majority of forces. At this time, it is highly unlikely that many Chief Constables 
and  Police  and  Crime  Commissioners  would  agree  to  invest  in  resource  or  infrastructure  to 
deliver VRH, without the identification of central funding. 
7.4 
Video working can generally be beneficial for policing. The introduction of a low barrier to entry 
network  connection  into  courts  and  a  common  booking  solution,  especially  if  they  could  be 
combined  as  the  VEJ  Programme  have  demonstrated,  would  considerably  enhance  these 
benefits.  DF  are  aware  of  some  forces  who  are  waiting,  and  in  some  cases  have  been  for  a 
number of years, for the network solution to enable their courts and video strategies. There are 
increasing opportunities as other partners become video equipped. 
7.5 
Many  factors  are  involved  in  costs  and  benefits  including  existing  working  practices  and 
geography. In particular the geographical relationship of CJS partners to the police (e.g. prisons, 
courts) is a primary component. This makes a ‘one size fits all’ costs and benefits case impossible 
to calculate. Other agencies have not yet issued any definitive statements on costs and benefits 
of video working: HMCTS costs and benefits in particular are tied into a much larger package of 
change. 
7.6 
Regardless of VRH, forces should have a strategy for remotely engaging with courts and other 
CJS  partners  (such  as  prisons).    This  strategy  should  embrace  all  court  and  video  working 
including,  for  example,  PACE  reviews  and  statutory  applications.    A  whole  system  approach, 
understanding and exploiting all video opportunities in a single business case, should be more 
compelling than attempting to exploit ad hoc single opportunities.