This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council 
 
National Citizens in Policing Capability 
15 July 2020 
 
Security Classification 
Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification in compliance with the Government Security Classification (GSC) Policy 
(Protective Marking has no relevance to FOI): 
 
OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE 
Freedom of information (FOI) 
 
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you 
on receipt of a request prior to any disclosure. For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
Author: 
Lisa Winward 
Force/Organisation: 
North Yorkshire Police 
Date Created: 
04.06.20 
Coordination Committee: 
Local Policing 
Portfolio: 
Citizens in Policing 
Attachments @ para 
 
Information Governance & Security 
 
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and 
storage and security of papers are in compliance with the SPF. Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in 
compliance with other security controls and legislative obligations. If you require any advice, please contact xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management 
 
1.  Introduction 
 
1.1 
Since the introduction and implementation of the 2016 National Citizens in Policing (CiP) strategy, 
significant progress has been made to help embed a strong and positive volunteering culture within 
the policing family. This has included; establishing national and regional infrastructure, including 
national working groups across the CiP strands; the trialling of innovative practice to establish a 
robust evidence base, and developing and implementing national strategies across all areas of the CiP 
portfolio. 
 
1.2 
The structure of the current Citizens in Policing portfolio has been highly effective in providing a cross 
function capability to coordinate the involvement, management and leadership of volunteers within 
policing. It provides an ongoing support capability to individual forces on a daily basis as well as a 
holistic national overview required to identify issues which require the attention of senior leaders. 
 
1.3 
Funding for this capability is due to cease, therefore, this paper outlines the options to maintain this 
capability for two years in order to complete the work required to embed into business as usual and 
transition to the proposed new national NPCC Hub. It will enable integration of Citizens in Policing 
into future national capabilities to provide the ongoing support to the delivery of the NPCC National 
CiP Strategy and associate work stream strategies. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2.  Background 
 
2.1 
With over 38,000 volunteers directly in police services (including Special Constable, Police Support 
Volunteers and Volunteer Police Cadets), and another 40K plus directly allied to policing (e.g. 
neighbourhood watch), the development within the portfolio has been informed by a robust evidence 
based via national benchmark work and the surveying of CiP volunteers across England and Wales. 
The 17 Police Transformation National Pilots have also provided invaluable information in terms of 
evaluation and learning1. 
 
Headlines from the reports 
  Over 10 million hours were served collectively over the past three years by Special Constables 
nationally.
  There are over 1,000 roles performed by PSVs with a growing number of specialist roles.
  There are 1,089 Specials in specialist roles and significant expansion in specialisms, plus growth in 
collaborations, for example between Specials and ambulance service
  VPC Cadets have expanded rapidly with a doubling of the number of units since 2015, and almost 
18,000 including mini police and rapid growth in diversity standing at 30.9% BME.
  1,350 Specials on Employer Supported Policing
  Feedback from volunteers demonstrates 94% of PSVs feel their morale is good, and 85% feel 
appreciated for what they contribute.
  83% of Special Constables describe their morale as good, and 73% feel recognised for what they do
 
3.  National Coordination - Capability Approach 
 
3.1 
There is a need to maintain a strategic capability to coordinate the ongoing development of the 
volunteering agenda across all of the CiP work streams, specifically forging relationships through 
active engagement with the public, including young people via the VPC. This capability will provide 
policing with expertise, coordination, knowledge management with the ability to work with key 
partners to ensure that the agenda reflects best practice and learning across all sectors. 
 
3.2 
The infrastructure reduces duplication of effort and maximises investment through its ability to 
capture, evaluate and disseminate best practice, guidance and strategy to support the development 
of local approaches, resulting in a quality experience for those volunteering within the service. 
 
 
4.  Benefits of the capability: 
 
4.1 
Raising the standard: The national and region roles across the CiP work streams provide oversight  and 
national  coordination  and  work  closely  with  forces  to  support  continuous  improvement,  utilising 
national developed frameworks including the Valuing Volunteer Framework, National VPC Safeguarding 
Policing and other associated tools. This also includes working closely with the Home Office, College of 
Policing  and  experts  within  the  field  to  ensure  forces  are  sighted  on  the  legal  requirements,  best 
practice and guidance. 
 
4.2 
Expert  knowledge  within  a  national  capability:  The  ability  to  provide  expert  understanding,  with  a 
national  picture of  volunteering beyond policing, across all of the  work  streams, is  essential so that 
forces have the ability to involve and manage volunteers that ensures that we are able to tap into skills, 
knowledge and experience to help meet services demands. The value that volunteers bring  both in 
terms of their expertise and willingness to support and that of financial return (estimate value of £70-
80 million)1 is a resource that needs to be carefully managed, one that we cannot afford to  take for 
granted. 
 
 
 
1  http://www.ipscj.org/police-transformation-fund-cip-reports/ 

4.3 
Collaborative  working  (internal  and  external):  The  ability  to  link  best  and  emerging  practices  both 
within the policing service and across other sectors is key to prevent silo working, preventing a polarised 
approach and reduction in the duplication of effort, achieved via CiP infrastructure. 
 
4.4 
An  effective  volunteering  offer:  The  current  dedicated  resource  work  to  understand  and  improved 
practice  and  celebrate  successes.  Forces  are  supported  to  help  understand  and  make  appropriate 
changes to increase the value of volunteering within a policing culture. 
 
4.5 
Promoting a workforce mix: CiP has a proven track record in providing positive pathways into policing, 
ensuring  that  we  continue  to  attract  a  more  representative  workforce,  with  a  longer  term  positive 
impact on our overall representation. CiP is often used as a progression route, as volunteers, specifically 
the SC, move through to regulars and other paid roles within the police service prevalent in the help 
meet the aspiration of the uplift programme. 
 
o  A working figure on those moving from SC to regular officer is in the region of 40% a best 
estimation from research - numbers fluctuate from force to force and by time period. 
Official HO stats figures are much lower. There are those that take a course through 
PCSO into regular officer. Many forces would put their individual figure higher, into the 
60-70% range. 

 
o  National figures for BME are regulars 6.9%, Special Constables 10.0%, and Volunteer 
Police Cadets 27.2%. The Cadets position is particularly strong in some large urban 
centres which police recruitment has historically found hard to reach, e.g. Met's VPC is 
50.9% BME, and West Midlands Cadets are 62.1% BME. 

 
4.6 
Support critical incidents: There is the ability to mobilise additional resource in times of 
emergency/critical incident via the CiP work streams. 
Example 
Covid19 national reporting figures indicate 
  A 149% increase in ESP hours since lockdown began
 
SC Operational hours logged  - January 2020 216,069 hours increasing to 297,672 May 2020
(Care of DutySheet as of 01/06/20) 
 
4.7 
Direct  support to  forces: The current  dedicated resource supports forces on a  daily basis, providing 
guidance, training and expertise in relation to each area of the CiP agenda. This also includes a number 
of  events  and  conferences  which  are  well  attended.  These  are  further  supported  via  a  number  of 
systems that provide direct support to forces to manage and involve volunteers including, Marshall and 
Dutysheet as well as national public facing websites. 
 
5. 
National Strategy 
 
5.1 
The focus for the national capability will be to deliver against the outcomes and aspirations set out in 
the NPCC National CiP Strategies and work stream strategies. Shaped and informed by the national 
pilots, research and evaluation work, feedback from the work stream national working groups and 
crucially the ongoing involvement of forces via the CiP regional infrastructure, these provide a clear 
vision and focus to further progress the CiP agenda at a local, regional and national level over the next 
4 years. They are accompanied by over 100 supporting documents developed in collaboration with 
key stakeholders, expertise from the volunteering field, forces and CiP volunteers and include 
research and evaluation reports, case studies and guidance manuals. 
 
National NPCC CiP strategies include 
 
  National CiP Strategy for 2019 – 2023
  National Special Constabulary Strategy 2018 - 2023
  National Police Support Volunteers 2019 – 2023
  National Employer Support Policing 2019 - 2023
  Volunteer Police Cadets 2020 - 2024
National Police Chiefs’ Council 
 

 
 
 
6. 
Valuing Volunteer Framework 
 
6.1 
A key milestone is the development of the Valuing Volunteer framework (VVF), a self-assessment 
framework which aims to assist forces to identify their strengths and highlight areas for development, 
in relation to their Citizens in Policing programme. The document is reflective of the national CiP 
strategies, a continuous improvement framework based and designed utilising best practice from 
other sectors. 
 
6.2 
The tool has been successfully trialled at a force level and used within regional CiP meetings to help 
identify areas of good practice and identify projects for regional collaboration. The tool includes a 
cost benefit analysis element, to help capture the return on investment from a quantitative 
perspective. In addition, the information that forces record and capture via the VVF can be used to 
assist in the completion of the FMS which in turn will help forces to articulate their progress and 
overall status of their CiP programme, including the contribution that CiP makes to policing. The VVF 
is currently with the College of Policing to seek formal recognition and approval. In addition the 
NCALT Managing Volunteers package will be reviewed and rewritten in line with the criteria set out in 
the VVF. 
 
7. 
Infrastructure and Governance 
 
7.1 
National CiP Governance 
 
Significant work has been undertaken to embed the CiP agenda through the implementation of a 
robust local to national infrastructure, to ensure that the priorities and outcomes outlined in the 
national strategies are delivered and achieved. 
 
CC Olivia Pinkney NPCC – Local Policing Coordination Committee 
(CiP attends the Workforce Coordination Committee) 
CC Lisa Winward NPCC Lead CiP 
National CiP Board 
Working Group – CiP, Staff Associations & Unions 
Regional CiP Chief Officer Leads 
Regional CiP Meetings (strategic and tactical with local forces) 
CiP Work Streams 
Lead 
National Work 
Special 
DCC Richard Debicki – North Wales 
SC working group & 11 associated work 
Constabulary 
streams 
Police Support 
DCC Debbie Ford - Northumbria 
PSV working group 
Volunteers 
Volunteer Police 

CC Shaun Sawyer – Devon and 
VPC Programme Board 
Cadets 
Cornwall 
Gold Group Safeguarding 
Employer 
ACC Andrew Slattery – Cumbria 
ESP Network Group 
Supported Policing 
Innovation and 

Jim Lunn – College of Policing 
I&GP Working Group 
Good Practice 
Communication 

DCC Jason Harwin – Lincolnshire 
CiP Communication plan supports the 
promotion of the CiP agenda 
Partnerships 
Mary Bailey - National CiP 
Providing oversight to partnership 
Coordinator 
arrangements with key organisations to 
aid the development of the CiP agenda 
within and beyond the policing family. 
 

 
 
 
8. 
Challenges and Opportunities 
 
8.1 
There continues to be a number of key areas that remain unresolved and others that require further 
exploration and ongoing support. These include 
  The impact of Operation Uplift, specifically on the Special Constabulary. We know that a 
large percentage of those joining as Special Constables often apply to become regulars and 
with the numbers of SC’s continuing to fall, by some 41% across England and Wales since 
2012, there is a real risk that within the next 12 months we could see the number of SC 
officers drop below 10,000 for the first time in decades. The recognition of the role that CiP 
plays in this, “growing well” agenda, should not be under estimated, with a need to continue 
to recruit to the Special Constabulary against the requirement of the programme, providing a 
robust and supported pathway into the policing family.
  The need to resolve the representation of SC by the Federation which in turn could unlock 
resource to areas of policing e.g. the issuing of Tasers to SC’s.
  The untapped potential in terms of the allocation of designated powers to PSV’s.
 
9. 
Proposal 
 
9.1 
This proposal asks for consideration to provide ongoing resource to support a national CiP capability 
post March 2020, which longer term will be reviewed and aligned with the proposed NPCC capability 
model. The ultimate aim would be for the capability to migrate over the new arrangement over a 2 
year period alongside a “business as usual” approach within regions and forces. This proposal asks for 
consideration of funding to maintain momentum and continue activities highlighted previously to 
ensure consistency during this transition. There are five proposed options highlighted below. 
 
10.2 
Approval of the Committee 
 
10.2.1.  This paper was presented and discussed at the Local Policing and Coordination Committee on the 2 June 
2020.  There  was  strong  support  from  all  committee  members  for  the  continuation  of  funding  for  a 
dedicated resource. However, the preference of the Cadet workstream was for option 3 to ensure that 
the  critical  work  still  required,  and  in  particular  the  safeguarding  aspects  of  the  VPC,  would  not  be 
diluted. Following discussion, it was the overall view of the Committee that option 4 be the preferred 
option, with the understanding that the critical VPC work would still be undertaken as part of the wider 
remit of the coordinated team. 
 
10.3 
Details of the proposed costs 
 
10.3.1  Please see five options outlined below with costing’s per annum. 
National Police Chiefs’ Council 
 

Option 
Description 
Total Cost 
Objective 
Capability 
(approx) 

Continued 
Nil cost 
Maintain 
Effectively move to a BAU 
Support via 
9 x Regional 
relevancy and 
model now. 
existing Regional 
Coordinators 
strategic 
 
Infrastructure 
continue to be 
coordination of 
Strategic oversight and tactical 
funded via 
vision and high 
support, management, 
collaborative 
level support to 
coordination and influence 
agreement at a 
forces via the 
focused at a local and regional 
regional level 
regional 
level to support continuous 
arrangement led 
improvement. 
by 9 Regional CiP 
Individual forces and regions 
Chief Officer 
would be required to resource 
Leads. 
and take forward the areas for 
development without any 
centralised support. 

National oversight 
£85k 
Maintain 
Maintains momentum for the 
by maintaining 
(2k per force per 
relevancy and 
areas for development and 
the National CiP 
annum x 2 years) 
strategic 
creates        
coordinator only. 
Direct support to 
coordination of 
consistency/coordination of 
the 9 x Regional 
vision and high 
work. 
Coordinator 
level support to 
 
which would 
forces. Drive 
Strategic oversight, 
continue to be 
strategy. Build 
management, coordination and 
funded via 
case for BAU 
influence focused at a local 
collaborative 
capability. 
regional and national level to 
agreement at a 
support continuous 
regional level 
improvement. Limited support 
to the CiP work streams. 

An allocated 
1. £85k National 
Menu option to 
Dedicated support for 
costed resource 
CiP 
prioritise strategic 
completion of specific work 
per work stream –  2. £494.5k (11.5k 
oversight and/or 
stream actions and transition to 
menu option per 
x 43) for VPC (see 
work stream. 
BAU for specific areas. 
work stream 
below detail) 
 
3. £70K Special 
Dependant of selection - 
Constabulary 
disproportionate support across 
Subject Matter 
all of the CiP work streams. 
Experts x 4. 
However, please see below 
(£15k per force 
detail regarding VPC work still 
per annum x 2 
required. 
years) 
(9 x Regional 
Coordinator 
continue to be 
funded via 
collaborative 
agreement at a 
regional level) 

Core CiP Team 
£649.5K 
Maintain 
Dedicated team to deliver 
single investment, 
Current CiP 
relevancy and 
across CiP portfolio and flex to 
coordinated 
resource is 
strategic 
meet needs to embed BAU 
support across all 
realigned to 
coordination of 
across all aspects of CiP. 
CiP strands 
support whole 
vision and high 
 

 
 
portfolio to 
level support to 
Strategic oversight, 
progress. 
forces. Drive 
management, coordination and 
 
strategy. Build 
influence focused at a local 
(9 x Regional 
case for BAU 
regional and national level to 
Coordinator 
capability. 
support continuous 
continue to be 
improvement. 
funded via 
Tactical support for current 
collaborative 
change and future development. 
agreement at a 
Resources coordinated across 
regional level) 
the works stream to support the 
delivery of the national CiP 
strategies. 
Option 4 cost per annum per force against NRE 
Avon & Somerset 
2.50% 
 
16,268.67 
Bedfordshire 
0.93% 
 
6,050.02 
Cambridgeshire 
1.20% 
 
7,761.64 
Cheshire  
1.59% 
 
10,310.74 
City of London 
0.50% 
 
3,265.52 
Cleveland  
1.10% 
 
7,123.46 
Cumbria   
0.91% 
 
5,906.29 
Derbyshire 
1.48% 
 
9,644.12 
Devon & Cornwall 
2.60% 
 
16,867.81 
Dorset   
1.12% 
 
7,252.54 
Durham   
1.02% 
 
6,611.25 
Dyfed-Powys 
0.89% 
 
5,772.87 
Essex 
 
2.47% 
 
16,048.07 
Gloucestershire 
0.98% 
 
6,378.63 
Greater Manchester 
4.88% 
 
31,723.32 
Gwent   
1.08% 
 
7,029.93 
Hampshire 
2.80% 
 
18,215.84 
Hertfordshire 
1.69% 
 
11,004.13 
Humberside 
1.54% 
 
10,032.57 
Kent 
 
2.58% 
 
16,775.41 
Lancashire 
2.36% 
 
15,313.15 
Leicestershire 
1.56% 
 
10,107.56 
Lincolnshire 
1.01% 
 
6,574.82 
Merseyside 
2.74% 
 
17,765.34 
Metropolitan Police 
22.28%   
144,693.44 
Norfolk   
1.36% 
 
8,847.15 
North Wales 
1.30% 
 
8,462.32 
North Yorkshire 
1.29% 
 
8,371.94 
Northamptonshire 
1.12% 
 
7,263.21 
Northumbria 
2.34% 
 
15,210.97 
Nottinghamshire 
1.72% 
 
11,181.49 
South Wales 
2.38% 
 
15,441.47 
South Yorkshire 
2.16% 
 
14,034.82 
Staffordshire 
1.62% 
 
10,521.06 
Suffolk   
1.04% 
 
6,731.22 
Surrey 
 
1.94% 
 
12,600.72 
Sussex   
2.37% 
 
15,420.73 
Thames Valley 
3.49% 
 
22,685.04 
Warwickshire 
0.84% 
 
5,449.69 
West Mercia 
1.83% 
 
11,917.39 
West Midlands 
4.70% 
 
30,531.48 
West Yorkshire 
3.69% 
 
23,981.42 
Wiltshire 
0.98% 
 
6,350.75 
National Police Chiefs’ Council 
 


No National 
Nil 
N/a 
No National coordination and a 
Capacity 
return to 43 forces undertaking 
activities independently 
 
Current resourcing 
 
10.3.2  In addition to the infrastructure supported via the Chief Officer CiP Leads, the work of the portfolio is 
currently supported by a number of paid roles. This current model was agreed, via Chiefs Council up 
until September 2020 for the National role and an annual request for the VPC team which present an 
unsustainable approach to support the delivery of future work if the future funding is not agreed. 
 
National CiP Coordinator and support officer – 3 year fixed term role until September 2020 – a role 
that supports the NPCC lead to build the CiP infrastructure across, the 9 regions and 7 work streams 
supporting the development and implementation of national strategy. Cost per annum £97.6K 
VPC Hub Team – a team of 9 officers with addition in kind contribution of £62K from Devon and 
Cornwall. Introduced, the VPC has maintained a small team to support police forces to introduce and 
develop their VPC programmes. This team has accessed external funding to the value of over £4.8 
million in support of VPC, which until March 2018 provided additional resources of this national 
infrastructure. Since April 2018, a contribution of £7500 has been provided by each police force to 
support this national infrastructure. As of March 2020, the Volunteer Police Cadet (VPC) National 
Team has 9 members in a variety of full and part time roles. This team have accumulated significant 
expertise, which has allowed them to develop the VPC strategy 2020 to 2024, based on evidenced 
good practice both within the VPC and wider youth sector. This strategy will bring a more consistent 
approach and support forces to evidence their efforts in ensuring their VPC is delivered within Youth 
Sector standards providing forces with standard of practice regardless of their operating model. In 
addition the academic evidence gathered since 2013 has identified that running a national uniformed 
youth groups requires a high level of expertise, both in developing a worthwhile offer to the young 
people while ensuring everyone involved is safe. It is acknowledged that the College of Policing do not 
have the capacity nor should they be expected to have an in-depth knowledge of youth sector good 
practice and as a result the VPC national has assumed the role of a national expertise centre on behalf 
of the police forces in England and Wales. 
 
 
Specialised support provided via the VPC National Hub 
 
Safeguarding policy, procedures, standards and training - Due to the very nature of Safeguarding, 
changes to policy and guidance happen regularly. By having a national policy with national standards 
and training it ensures that every force is providing a VPC that is in line with youth sector standards. A 
national training package ensures that all cadet leaders have the opportunity to learn about 
safeguarding and their responsibilities and how it fits into VPC. 
 
National safeguarding manager post - The National Safeguarding Manager has a duty to report to the 
Home Office, to ensure that Working Together to Safeguard Children guidelines are being followed 
consistently throughout the VPC organisation. To share lessons learned, near misses and good 
practice with colleagues nationally, will identify local, regional and national trends, will be a single 
point of contact for all forces and other youth organisations to ensure we keep abreast of national 
working practices and emerging issues and to translate this into VPC practice.To arrange useful 
training to assist leaders. 
 
Developing and delivering adult training for everyone involved in VPC- This ensures that there is 
consistency across the country in the standard of training delivered which is relevant to working with 
young people and of course within the VPC. Force training departments have neither the capacity nor 
the expert knowledge to develop and deliver such training packages. It is imperative for safety and 
standards that leaders are adequately equipped to run VPC units and that training records are 
maintained both locally and nationally. Also any approach to any specialist training external provider 
 

is far more attractive if presenting as a national entity such as the recent partnership with Mental 
Health first aid England has seen a commitment to deliver 1 free training session in each region, this 
again maintains consistency. E-learning packages for safeguarding training purchased at a national 
level for distribution is proven to be far more cost effective due to bulk purchase. 
 
Share learning both in delivery of the VPC and safeguarding- To ensure that the VPC is a safe place 
for adult leaders and young people. To ensure that the VPC is a quality offer that provides 
opportunities for leaders and young people and helps to develop their skills and motivate them to 
volunteer in their community. By ensuring that good practice but also lessons learned are shared to 
prevent similar incidents occurring in more than one unit. 
 
Developing and implementing a continual improvement framework- 
To ensure that the VPC is a safe place for adult leaders and young people and those involved are not 
put at risk unnecessarily. To ensure leaders and young people know what is expected of them and 
their organisation and to ensure that a VPC unit works towards implementing standards similar to 
other youth sector organisations. 
 
Designing and delivering a consistent ‘VPC learning journey’ from child to adulthood- 
To ensure that young people and adult volunteers have an opportunity to stay with the organisation 
for a significant period of time. From 8-18 and beyond. That the experience a young person has at 
one end of the country is not significantly different to a young person at the other end of the country. 
To ensure that a young person learns skills and morals that will have a positive impact as they enter 
adulthood. 
 
Design and support the implementation of a structured ‘Youth Voice’ framework- This ensures the 
voice of young people and wider communities are heard within the VPC and Policing in the wider 
sense, particularly across the CiP Portfolio as this voice could be representative across the whole 
portfolio as many young people have taken up roles as PSV’s, SC, VPC Leaders or into full time 
employment within Policing. Such an important element needs proper guidance and control to 
maximise such a key benefit Nationally, regionally and locally in force but also ensures community 
involvement. 
 
 
 
 
Support forces with the implementation of stronger oversight processes- Being recognised as the 
uniform youth group of the Police should quite rightly ensure maximum standards are maintained 
and where possible exceeded, in line with youth sector standards. Such processes give Forces 
confidence that their VPC scheme is safely operating at the required standards, again to introduce 
such processes requires expert guidance, knowledge and central co-ordination to ensure national 
consistency and safe local delivery. 
 
Oversee and manage externally funded projects in support of VPC- A central point of consistency is 
required in maximising opportunities of project delivery with potential national partners work at a 
national level is a much more attractive proposition for potential partners ensuring a wider reach, 
which also ensures a consistent approach to the rollout of such projects at a national, regional and 
local level which also aim to benefit wider communities and Policing particularly in support of 
national policing priorities or key topics. 
 
Provide on-hand specialist advice and support- The experience gained and academic evidence 
gathered since 2013 has identified that running a national uniformed youth group requires a high 
level of expertise, both in developing a worthwhile offer to the young people while ensuring everyone 
involved is safe. It is acknowledged that the College of Policing do not have the capacity nor should 
they be expected to have an in-depth knowledge of youth sector good practice and as a result the 
VPC national has assumed the role of a national expertise centre on behalf of the police forces in 
England and Wales. Police senior managers are not able to offer advice on the day to day running of a 
uniform youth group, but do want assurance that the Police cadets in any force are being operated 
National Police Chiefs’ Council 
 

safely with leaders being equipped to deliver cadets to a standard representative of British policing. 
The benefit to forces is the knowledge that there is a core team who can be drawn upon for on-hand 
specialist advice and guidance which is consistent across the country and does not vary force to force. 
 
Representing and promoting the VPC at a national level within government and strategic partners- 
The Volunteer Police Cadets is widely recognised as the Police’s uniform youth group with the VPC 
national team being the central voice representing all 44 Forces delivering Volunteer Police Cadets 
with Government departments and strategic partners, quite simply a core team with a central 
purpose and identity can speak once to the benefit of 44 Forces or such influence can be tried with 44 
or more different representatives speaking with one local voice. This approach has seen influence 
within the All Party Parliamentary group for Police engagement with Children & Young people which 
resulted in oral evidence and VPC being mentioned in a key Recommendation, The Home Office 
Modern Crime Prevention Strategy asserts the value of the VPC in strengthening the character and 
resilience of young people, both traits identified in the strategy as ‘drivers’ of crime, The Youth 
Violence Commission Interim Report identifies the root causes of youth violence as including 
childhood trauma and the importance of early intervention, which the Mini Police seeks to support. 
The VPC being recognised as a key delivery partner of the #Iwill campaign are just a few examples of 
benefits to speaking with one central voice. 
 
Seeking national funding to support the VPC across all police forces- Since the introduction of the 
NPCC agreed VPC framework in 2013, the portfolio has maintained a small team to support police 
forces to introduce and develop their VPC programmes. This team has accessed external funding to 
the value of over £4.8 Million in support of VPC, which maintained the core team until March 2018. 
The National VPC are widely recognised in the youth sector as the overarching representatives of the 
forces that deliver their VPC. This national, consistent representation is invaluable in accessing funds 
to support local delivery and growth. It also enables continual organisational learning with trusted 
partners and further developmental experiences within this sector. 
 
Maintaining and developing the Marshall online VPC management platform- A national cadet 
management system was developed at the request of leaders, this system has evolved not only as a 
cadet management system but as a safe way of communicating with young people. The data held 
within the system sits firmly in line with recent recommendations from the IOPC with regard to an 
ongoing historic investigation within a police force. The use of this system will give confidence to 
Forces that necessary records of cadets and leaders are being maintained, communication is taking 
place safely via single auditable system, with the core functionality of the system hugely mitigating 
risk. The system will continue to be enhanced according to users’ needs, with forces also benefitting 
from good management data. 
 
On hand technical support for the Marshall platform- There are VPC team members who have 
intricate knowledge of the MVP system who are able to offer technical support and input to users, 
this again reduces the demand and burden on force departments, we have a tiered support system 
set up for the system with a dedicated 24/7 customer service desk capability. 
Regional CiP Coordinators - a mixed approached has been adopted with some regions investing a 
designated post whilst others have uplifted an existing CiP Coordinator role resulting in mixed 
outcomes in terms of progress. Regional coordinator provides direct support to force interpreting 
national strategy into tactical and operational delivery. The costs are covered and determined by 
each Region. 
 
 
10.3.3  Support to CiP from the College of Policing 
 
One of the College of Policing’s (CoP) primary objectives is around developing evidence-based 
standards for use by police forces. The CoP want to ensure this approach is taken in the work 
produced within the CiP portfolio, enabling transparency in decision-making and providing those at 
various levels in the service such as strategic leads, operational managers, practitioners, supervisors 
and volunteers themselves with the evidence, knowledge and skills they require to deliver an 
effective service to communities. 
 

The CoP are also committed to driving the ongoing professionalization of the police service. This 
applies to members of the Special Constabulary, whose voluntary nature does not detract from their 
valuable service as warranted officers. The launch of the SC PEQF provides a starting point, but 
further professionalization initiatives are likely to follow. It is important the Special Constabulary are 
included in the scope of any such work and the College will engage with the portfolio accordingly to 
ensure this is considered. 
 
The CoP have a full-time staff member in the role of Citizens in Policing Policy Manager, working 
alongside the NPCC, forces and other stakeholders. This role sits within the Uniformed Policing  
Faculty and is line managed by the Policing Standards Manager for Local Policing. At present there is 
no plan to amend the existing arrangement, so while it is not possible to categorically confirm the role 
will remain in place indefinitely, we fully recognise the value volunteers add to policing, and that  
there is a need to support forces in establishing and maintaining nationally consistent approaches and 
standards, with supporting APP, advice and tools to do so successfully. 
 
The CoP are committed to seeking to identify, develop and promote good practice examples based on 
robust evidence and the Local Policing Standards Manager will continue to chair a cross-agency 
Innovation and Good Practice meeting in support of the NPCC CiP Strategy. There are various other 
ways that policing stakeholders and NPCC portfolios (such as CiP) can look to raise points for 
consideration. At a strategic level, the College Professional Committee provides an initial point to 
raise high-level issues, whilst at more operation level the College Solutions Panel (Chaired by a 
Director) provides an opportunity to raise issues/request College support – the Panel will seek to 
understand the issue and desired outcome, and either advise or provide support (from across the 
College) to achieve it. The CiP Policy Manager is the best point of contact initially to advise on how 
best to raise issues to the Solutions Panel. 
 
11. 
Recommendation 
 
11.1 
The intention of the National Citizens in Policing portfolio is to develop and complete the outstanding 
aspects of the work streams to embed them into BAU by 2023. This can be most effectively achieved 
by supporting a dedicated resource across the work streams to link in to the regional structure 
outlined in Option 4. This would be a total cost of £649,500 with a total cost of £15,000 per annum 
per force for a 2 year period to bridge the transition of the capability to the new NPCC capabilities 
model alongside BAU in forces. This would enable the delivery and implementation of the National 
CiP Strategies supporting and engaging with all forces and providing support across all areas of the 
portfolio. It also provides the flexibility to utilise the team to meet the varying demands across the 
portfolio rather than dedicated teams for specific aspects of the portfolio and recognises that the 
level of resource would be proportionate to address the key priorities e.g. the safeguarding work of 
the VPC. 
 
 
11.2 
However, if forces would prefer to invest their own resources to develop and undertake this work either 
locally or as a regional option it would be recommended that as a minimum the National coordinator 
role would be required at the very least to support the delivery of this work. 
 
12. 
Conclusion 
 
12.1 
Significant progress has been made to establish an infrastructure that supports the development of 
this agenda at a force level, coordinated at regional level and driven at a national level. The 
introduction of national strategies, informed and reflective of a robust evidence base, provide clarity 
and focus like never before. In addition continuous improvement tools provide forces with the ability 
to track and measure progress to inform strategic planning. In order to realise the benefit of the 
investment to date, the support of national capability is critical to avoiding divergence from core 
principles and effective practices. Without this there is a risk that we revert back to locally developed 
approaches and practice, resulting in a duplications of effort and increased cost to forces as they 
independently source systems, research and evaluation, training and develop practice and policy, 
National Police Chiefs’ Council 
 

including safeguarding, that often requires expert knowledge not just in relation to volunteering but 
also in working with young people. 
 
12.2 
Forces are now provided with a more consistent and professional approach and if lost, there is a real 
risk of a splintering and dilution of this key and coordinated approach. There is also a reputational 
risk to the consistency of our current volunteering offer with a clear need to ensure that we provide a 
quality volunteering experience in achieving our strategic vision “Every volunteer, in every force will 
be engaged, effective, integrated and valued.” 
 
13. 
Decision required 
 
13.1 
A decision is required to either: 
 
a)  Support the preferred option of a cross portfolio CiP team – option 4. 
b)  Maintain the National coordinator only – option 2. 
c)  Support the costed work stream option – option 3. 
d)  Continue to contribute to the Regional Coordination model – option 1. 
e)  Cease the support altogether – option 5. 
 
 
Lisa Winward 
Chief Constable North Yorkshire Police 
NPCC lead for Citizens in Policing