Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.


Official- Sensitive 
 
 
 
 
Chief Constables’ Council                                          Appendix A
 
 
 
Aviation Programme – Service Optimisation, Funding & 
Finance, Governance & Delivery  
 
Author:   
 
 
Chief Constable Rod Hansen 
Force/ Organisation: 
 
Gloucestershire Constabulary 
Date created: 
 
 
23th December 2019 v.1O 
Coordination Committee:   
Operations 
Portfolio: 
 
 
Aviation 
Attachments @ paragraph: 
Appendices A-P Page 35   
 
1. 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
 
 
1 Index ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Page 1 
2 Glossary …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Page 1 
3 Purpose ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 2 
4 Executive Summary…………… ……………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 2 
5 Aviation Strategy Stage 1 & 2 …………………………………………………………………………………………..  Page 5 
6 Evidence Base ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Page 6 
7 Design Principles ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Page 10 
8 Optimised Service ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 12 
9 Funding and Finance …………………………………………………………………………………………. ............... Page 18 
10 Governance & Delivery Model…………………………...............................................................  Page 26 
11 Summary …………………………… ............................................................................................. Page 32 
12 Appendices ………………………………………………………… ............................................................ Page 35 

 
2. 

GLOSSARY 
 
ACPO – Association of Chief Police Officers 
LSB – Local Strategic Board (NPAS) 
ACS – Actioned Call for Service 
MCA – Maritime & Coastguard Agency 
AM – Accountable Manager 
NPCC – National Police Chiefs’ Council 
AOC – Air Operators Certificate 
NPAS – National Police Air Service 
APACCE – Association of Policing and Crime Chief Executives 
NSB – National Strategic Board (NPAS) 
APCC – Association of Police & Crime Commissioners 
PAOC – Police Air Operators Certificate 
BTP – British Transport Police 
PAYG –Pay As You Go 
BVLOS – Beyond Visual Line of Sight (drone) 
PCC – Police & Crime Commissioner 
CAA – Civil Aviation Authority 
RCB – Regional Collaboration Board 
CT – Counter Terrorism 
ROB – Regional Operations Board 
EVLOS – Extended Visual Line of Sight (drone) 
RUG – Regional User Group 
HMICFRS  -  Her  Majesty’s  Inspectorate  of  Constabulary  Fire  S22A – Section 22A of the Police Act 1996 
and Rescue Services 
 
IAG –Independent Assurance Group 
VLOS – Visual Line of Sight (drone) 
LGDB - Local Governance and Delivery Board 
WYP – West Yorkshire Police 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 - M  
 

 
3. 
PURPOSE 
 
  The NPCC Aviation Strategy was agreed in July. This paper provides strategic options for Chief Constables in 
relation to: 
 
  Optimised Service 
  Funding and Finance 
  Governance and Delivery Model 
 
4. 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
The  10  year  Police  Aviation  Strategy  was  agreed  in  July  2019  with  the  headline  aim,  ‘To  build  a  blended 
future national air support service that is affordable and available to deploy to the highest threat, harm, risk 
or vulnerability’.  This programme has focused on how best to use air support assets and tactics to keep the 
public safer. The first phase of delivering this has been to produce strategic options for Chief Constables and 
PCCs to consider in relation to how best to optimise the operational service provided to forces; to choose the 
most appropriate governance structure and delivery model and to suggest ways in which the service can be 
funded.  
The  research  conducted  has  involved  interviews  with  Chief  Officers  and  where  possible  OPCC  colleagues 
from all forces in England and Wales. This has been combined with analysis of the current NPAS operation 
and  has  been  reviewed  by  Cranfield  Aeronautical  University.  Financial  data  has  been  checked  by  a  police 
accountant and discussed at length with a member of the NPCC Finance Committee. 
 
The report explicitly acknowledges the contribution made by the Chair of the NPAS National Strategic Board 
(NSB) and to West Yorkshire Police (WYP) who on behalf of the police service, have hosted this,  the largest 
and most complex national collaboration, since its inception in 2012. 
 
Research shows: 
 
  Nearly  all  forces  have  a  continuing  operational  need  for  air  support  and  there  is  no  appetite  to 
return to individually owned and operated aircraft. 
  Unlike  other  forms  of  collaboration,  where  national  scale  can  be  expected  to  deliver  savings  and 
efficiencies – the original business case that created NPAS did not take account of the uniqueness of 
aviation  and  the  consequential  increase  of  about  £5M  p.a.  of  unavoidable  additional  cost.  When 
NPAS was formed, the police service created in regulatory terms its own airline
. The resulting funding 
pressure has contributed to the net reduction in the number of aircraft, thus becoming ineffective as 
a response service in some parts of the country. 
  It  is  now  widely  considered  that  the  Lead  Force  delivery  model  is  itself  a  sub-optimal  way  of 
managing collaborations and constraining to future ambitions.  
  NPAS inherited a network of legacy bases, not all of which are aligned with areas of threat, harm and 
risk, leading to wasted flight time and high rates of cancellations. 
  Current governance structures have evolved outside the scope of the collaboration agreement and 
are  impeded  by  ad  hoc  participation  by  some  forces;  turnover  of  representation  and  lack  of 
challenge from independent experts from the aviation industry. 
 
 
The operational challenges facing NPAS: 
 
  There has been a 1sharp reduction in the number of tasks for air support.  If this continues, it risks 
making the service non-viable in as little as 3 years. Despite this trend of falling tasks, flight hours 
have  been  stable  and  therefore  productivity  is  in  decline.    Current  funding  does  not  support  the 
                                                
1 A contributory factor was a change in the deployment model to Threat, Harm and Risk in 2015. 
2 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

level of flying being proposed, with the addition of up to 25% more hours through the introduction 
of  aeroplanes.  Due  to  performance  restrictions  that  are  attached  to  the  aeroplanes,  there  is 
mismatch between where they can operate and where the demand for their services exists. 
  The current funding model is a significant contributory factor in  driving the reduction in tasks and 
has created, in some forces, an artificial market for the use of drones, where a conventional aviation 
asset would be cheaper or more effective to use, but currently attracts an Actioned Call for Service 
(ACS) charge. 
  The sub-optimal location of some bases, is a key driver for a slow operational response and high rate 
of cancellation (c.40% overall). 
  The fleet is ageing which reduces the amount of time individual aircraft are available to be used and 
increases the cost of maintenance. 
  The development of line of sight drones across the country lacks consistency, but has revealed new 
demands for air support that can be fulfilled without the need for conventional aviation assets. It is 
accepted  by  forces  that  pursuits,  wide  area  searches  for  vulnerable  people  or  suspects  and  other 
dynamic incidents, cannot currently be effectively dealt with by drones. 
  It is realistically foreseeable that Beyond Visual Line of Sight Drones (BVLOS) will be operationally 
viable within 3 years in rural and coastal areas. These will have the same capability as a conventional 
police aircraft. 
Options for Change 
 
The service has a distinct choice to make regarding the future provision of air support.  To either continue to 
optimise  and  invest  in  expanding  and  updating  an ageing  fleet,  in  order  to  be  able  to  provide  an  effective 
service  as  a  standalone  police  capability,  or  seek  to  follow  an  incremental  path  towards  service  being 
provided by a strategic partner. This could then be expanded towards forming an ambitious partnership with 
other  related  functions,  including  the  Maritime  and  Coastguard  Agency  (MCA)  to  create  an  air  support 
service on behalf of all emergency services (centrally funded). 
  
Such an opportunity exists from 2023, with the re-tendering of the current Search and Rescue contract. The 
Police  Service  would  need  to  express  its  interest  by  April  2020.  The  MCA  contract  operates  from  10  bases 
with  22  helicopters  and  an  annual  budget  in  excess  of  £200M.    It  is  possible  that  some  air  ambulance 
charities may also want to join such a service, meaning that the current number of sites from which an air 
support response service to policing  could be delivered, would more than double. 
 
This  report  makes  the  case  for  the  latter,  by  recommending  the  service  now  prepares  itself  to  join  such  a 
partnership and proposes the following route options: 
 
  To stabilise operational delivery and cost, optimise base locations and tasks achieved from aviation 
assets. The first stage of this is process would involve a change in the role of NPAS, towards 
becoming a simpler, streamlined organisation, acting as an internal supplier of specific aviation 
services. This would involve each region then specifying the level of service they require. In practical 
terms – this would involve determining hours of operation, total flight hours, aircraft type (subject 
to availability). It is envisaged that this could be funded by assigning direct costs for the service 
specified by each region, as opposed to continuing with the subsidy based approaches that are 
associated with funding models or formulas. 
  NPAS would be the sole supplier to a region for its helicopter/aeroplane, maintenance, pilots, fuel 
and  certification  (Air  Operator  Certificate  (AOC)).  Regions  would  provide  local  management  and 
Constables,  as  Tactical  Flight  Officers,  trained  to  national  standards  and  have  responsibility  for 
tasking their local asset(s), using it/them to achieve as many tasks as they can within the flight hours  
 
that they agree to purchase. 
  Regions would then be charged for the direct cost of the service level that they request.  Ideally this  
3 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
should be stabilised over successive years to help with financial planning. 
 
It is proposed that governance structures are aligned to accord with the outcome of the joint APCC/Home 
Office/Specialist Capabilities and NPCC work focused on how best to lead collaborated functions.   
This being a 3 tier structure: 
 
o  Policing Board - chaired by the Home Secretary – includes NPCC, APCC and Home Office. 
Provides strategic overview of policing. 
 
o  Aviation Management Board – chaired independently.  Includes WYP PCC and NPCC  
Aviation lead.  Includes drone governance. Leads delivery of the Aviation Strategy 
 
o  Local Board/Service Provider Board – chaired by WYP – Focused on the operation of NPAS  
by WYP.  Flexible to change of operator, or type of aviation service being delivered. 
 
  It is proposed that Regional User Groups and the Independent Assurance Group would be replaced 
by existing Regional Collaboration Boards, where aviation would become an added area of business. 
Each regional would then have a Chief Officer and PCC representative at the Aviation  Management 
Board.    Local  variation  may  apply  where  forces  choose  to  use  other  regional  meeting  structures. 
 
  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
o  No changes are proposed for: Birmingham, Redhill, Carr Gate, St Athan or Almondsbury. 
 
  Recommendations are shown at Appendix A.  
  It is intended by these changes to further reduce the number of hours flown by helicopters from 
16,500 towards 13,500, with the gap being filled by the new aeroplanes.  It is assumed that in the 
absence of the ACS funding model and the delivery of the 20k officer uplift – that the number of air 
support tasks will be no lower than they currently are. 
 
  The net effect of the reduced hours of base operation, together with increased use of aeroplanes in 
place of helicopters and the re-distribution of the existing rotary fleet, would provide opportunities 
to increase aircraft availability whilst the issue of fleet replacement is resolved. 
 
 
 
 
 
Next Steps 
 
It is proposed that the strategic options selected by Chiefs and PCCs are then subject to a focused 3 month 
period of detailed cost analysis by the NPCC Aviation Programme  Team,  working in partnership  with WYP, 
Home Office, ACC and NPAS in order to produce a fully costed and risk assessed business case.   
 
 
4 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 


 
 
 
 
       Actionable Calls to Service (ACS) 2016-2018 
 
5. 
AVIATION STRATEGY – STAGE 1 & 2 
 
The work commissioned by Chief Constables in July has been focused on producing optioned proposals that 
are intended to stabilise and optimise the current provision of air support services. 
 
 
The evidence base amassed as part of this work includes: 
 
  Interviews  with  Chief  Officers  from  every  force  in  England  &  Wales,  including  BTP,  in  order  to 
understand the local context and requirement for present and future forms of air support. (Where 
possible OPCC representatives were also seen during these visits). 
  An independent analysis of current air support service delivery, alongside the distribution of threat, 
harm and population within England & Wales. 
  Benchmarking  against  aviation  industry  best  practice  and  the  sector  specific  strategic  partner 
comparator provided to Police Scotland. 
  The methodology and conclusions arising from this scrutiny have been  independently reviewed by 
Cranfield  Aeronautical  University.  Financial  data  has  been  checked  by  a  police  accountant  and 
discussed at length with a member of the NPCC Finance Committee. 
This report acknowledges with thanks the  cooperation of NPAS, West Yorkshire Police and their PCC – who 
have  for  the  last  7  years,  carried  the  significant  additional  responsibility  of  operating  a  complex  airline  on 
behalf of policing in England and Wales.  
 
This programme is cognisant of and has engaged with the following related pieces of national strategic work: 
 
-  The NPCC Specialist Capabilities Programme 
-  APCC/Home  Office  scoping  of  organisational  models  to  host  national  capabilities.  (Local 
Partnerships) 
-  Review of aviation use by Maritime & Coastguard Agency. (MCA) 
-  APCC review of Section 22 (Police Act) agreements 
5 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
6. 
EVIDENCE BASE 
 
6.1  
Service Optimisation: 
 
  In 2010 the police service operated  33 aircraft from 31 bases and flew 29,840hrs p.a. There is no 
reliable data on tasks completed at that time. An agreement was reached by the then ACPO Aviation 
Lead with  forces,  to retain their aircraft  pending the commencement  of NPAS  - 2 years later.  This 
included plans to reduce the size of the total fleet from 33 to 26 aircraft. By 2018 NPAS operated 19 
aircraft and flew 16,833 hours p.a.  
  Air  support  tasks  have  declined  by  10,000  (36%)  since  2016,  whilst  flying  hours  have  remained 
stable.    Although  NPAS  was  commissioned  based  on  delivering  an  equitable  20  minute  response 
service to 98% of the population of England and Wales – it is now resourced to deliver an effective 
response service to a smaller area, focused mainly on the main conurbations.  It is acknowledged the 
implementation of the Threat, Harm and Risk operating model has played a part in the reduction of 
tasks. 
  Over  40%  of  NPAS  Actioned  Calls  for  Service  (ACS)  are  cancelled  before  take-off,  or  prior  to 
 arrival.  This  equates  to  over  1,000  flying  hours  at  a  gross  cost  in  excess  of  £1m.  This  occurs  for  a 
variety of reasons – but is largely due to long transit times where bases are in sub-optimal locations, 
or where the incident, for which the aircraft has been  justifiably requested, is resolved prior to its 
arrival.  
  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  The  operational  deployment  model  for  the  use  of  aeroplanes  is  developing.  The  type  chosen 
 has  only  a  modest  speed  advantage  over  a  helicopter  and  cannot  deploy  quickly  from  its 
 base  due  to  having  to  ground  taxi  (position  itself  for  take-off)  and  complete  more  extensive  pre-
flight checks.  At provisioned usage rates it is estimated that each aircraft will need to be offline in 
maintenance for one week in every four.  The capability has benefits in terms of endurance and will 
be  able  to  perform  pre-planned  tasks.  Aeroplanes  can  also  transit  in  more  marginal  weather 
conditions,  although  still  needs  to  be  in  sight  of  the  ground  overhead  the  scene  of  incidents. 
Unfortunately,  performance  limitations  imposed  on  the  use  of  these  aircraft  mean  that  they  can 
operate from only a limited number of airfields – which are not necessarily located in areas where 
there is a demand for their service. 
 
6.1.1  
Feedback from Forces and Stakeholders – Service Requirement: 
 
  Prompt attendance at incidents is desirable – usually within 15 minutes in larger urban areas. Forces 
are keen to see a higher proportion of incidents categorised as requiring a priority response. 
  The  relationship  between  NPAS  bases  and  their  local  forces  is  perceived  as  having  become 
 too  distant.  Local  priorities  are  not  understood  and  NPAS  staff  have  inconsistent  access  to 
 monitor  command  and  control  systems  and  Airwave  Talk  groups  in  order  to  seek  out 
 opportunities to add value. 
  A reliable service is wanted where forces are kept up to date with an estimated arrival time for an 
assigned air support asset in order to improve deployment decision making and reduce cancellation 
rates. 
  Tactical air support advice is welcomed for the commanders of large events and significant incidents 
– including during the planning phase. 
  A  monthly  performance  report  that  shows  outcomes  and  outputs  from  air  support  –  linking 
 conventional aviation with drones and showing value added against local priorities. 
  For NPAS staff to add value during periods of aircraft maintenance or poor weather, by   supporting 
local work with drones or joining local colleagues to enhance policing skills. 
6 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

  Simpler  tasking  arrangements  –  avoiding  the  delays  associated  with  a  national  control  room 
 that acts as intermediary between local forces and their respective base.  
 
6.2  
Funding & Finance 
 
  NPAS has a forecast budget for 2020/21 of £44.8m revenue and £22m capital. The revenue budget 
has a significant proportion of fixed costs estimated at approximately 75%. 
  NPAS has received £98m of capital in the form of Home Office Grants since 2012/13. 
  The  National  Police  Air  Service  (NPAS)  was  formed  incrementally  between  2012  and  2016 
 with  the  intention  of  delivering  a  borderless  operation,  with  economies  of  scale  for  forces 
 across  England  and  Wales.  At  its  inception,  there  were  31  bases  operating  a  mix  of  33  aircraft 
(predominantly  helicopters  with  a  few  aeroplanes),  flying  a  total  of  29,840  hours  at  a  combined 
revenue  and  capital  cost  of  around  £63.5m  p.a.  The  gross  cost  of  a  flying  hour  pre  NPAS  can 
therefore be calculated as £2,128 per hour based upon total cost of £63.5m divided  by total flying 
hours at 29,840 p.a. 
  In 2019, the NPAS revenue budget  £42.563m  with a  capital budget of £10.485m (after deducting 
capital credits to forces) meaning the annual cost of NPAS flying is £53.048m.   The  helicopter  fleet 
has reduced to 19 aircraft, at 13 bases and flying 16,500 hours annually.  The gross cost of a flying 
hour can therefore be calculated as £3,215 which represents a significant increase when compared 
with 2012. NPAS has also   procured four aeroplanes which are awaiting full commissioning and will 
incrementally  enter service from December 2019.  These will further increase flying hours capacity 
and revenue cost.  NPAS has estimated the current revenue budget will increase by 4% in 2020/21 to 
£44.8m). 
  Running  a  national  air  support  service  adds  an  estimated  £5m  per  annum  of  additional  cost 
 that is attributed to the administrative operation of what is now in regulatory terms, an  airline;  the 
command and control of the fleet and the financial risk-based shortcomings of   the 
lead 
force 
delivery model. This additional cost was not identified upon the creation of NPAS and resulted in a 
structural deficit in the NPAS revenue budget which was recognised and paid for on a one-off basis 
by  the  Home  Office  in  2013/14.  The  desire  of  the  NSB  to  avoid  significant  budget  increases  in 
subsequent  years  has  created  an  additional  pressure  to  reduce  the  number  of  aviation  assets 
available for use.  It is a significant causal factor in the service becoming ineffective in some areas of 
the  country,  in  that  the  removal  of  additional  helicopters  from  service  and  closure  or  merging  of 
bases has stretched the remaining service provision beyond operational effectiveness in areas. 
  Over the last 4 years: 
-  Cost  to  forces  has  increased  by  just  6.4%.  (Apr  2016  -  Mar  2020)  A  further  4%  increase  is 
planned for 2020/21. 
-  The number of ACS has decreased by 35.6% 
-  The cost of every ACS has increased by 66.7% 
-  The flying hours used by NPAS have remained at a fairly consistent level near to 16,500 p.a. 
 
  In 2019 the gross cost of operation per flying hour is £3,215, excluding the capital paid back to forces 
each year in lieu of their previous helicopter ownership2.  This compares with £3,560 per hour for an 
outsourced service where no helicopter purchase is required. 
  
  The estimated capital cost of the fleet replacement programme for just 5 new helicopters is £38m 
which  is  likely  to  be  spread  over  3  financial  years.  When  considering  the  cost  of  this  investment 
amortised  over  10  years  it  amounts  to  £3.8m  annually  or  an  additional  £230  per  flying  hour.  This 
additional capital cost would need to be considered when calculating the gross hourly cost in years 
to come, especially given that at least 10 helicopters are currently in need of replacement. In reality 
– a minimum of 10 new helicopters are required now –to deal appropriately with the ageing fleet. 
 
                                                
 
2 Capital credits have been paid to forces since the inception of NPAS, in 2019/20 they amounted to 
£2,468,661. 
7 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

  The  trend  of  the  reducing  numbers  of  tasks,  with  stable  flying  hours  infers  that,  in  common 
 with  other  areas  of  policing,  there  is  not  yet  a  culture  of  commercial  expedience  expected  from 
operational air crew. 
 
  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  There is currently no means to migrate funding from conventional aviation to drone technology or 
for the current delivery model to cope with the continuing decline in tasking, as drone use increases. 
 
6.2.1 
Feedback from Forces 
 
Stakeholders are asking for: 
 
  A more reliable and timely service before they will consider spending more on air support. 
  A say in the type of service that they commission from NPAS in terms of hours and tasks. 
  A funding formula that provides a multi-year settlement. 
  A funding formula that promotes increased productivity from air support. 
  Flexibility to incrementally invest in drone capability and capacity. 
  Forces do not want a subsidy based model where they are paying for another force’s service. 
 
6.3 

Governance & Delivery Model 
 
  On 28th June 2012 the Secretary of State made an order under Section 22A (S22A) of the  Police Act 
1996 mandating police air support as a police function that must be delivered through a  single 
national
 collaboration. The mandate does not specify how this should be achieved.  
 
  Section 22A (S22A) of the Police Act 1996 collaboration agreement set out how  collaboration  would 
be achieved and its governance. The original S22A did not define a legal framework within which to 
operate NPAS other than the role of the lead force Police & Crime Commissioner (PCC). 
 
  Only  after  consultation  with  the  NPAS  National  Strategic  Board  (NSB)  or  by  order  of  Secretary  of 
State can the agreement be varied. 
 
  Should the lead force wish to pull out of the agreement, it has to be ratified by the NSB, giving a 12 
month notice period. 
 
  Under  the  current  S22A  individual  forces  cannot  leave  NPAS  unless  75%  of  policing  bodies 
 agree and a 12 month notice period is given.  Although referred to here in the singular,   there  are  a 
number of S22As pertaining to singular forces or collective of forces, as and when they   made 
the 
transition to NPAS. The last (Humberside) joined on 27th September 2016. 
 
  Work on the revised S22A, which would have consolidated all of the single force agreements, has 
been  on  hold  since  2017  which  coincided  with  the  publication  of  the  HMICFRS  report,  ‘Planes, 
Drones and Helicopters’.  See Appendix B 
 
  It was agreed by all PCCs and Chief Constables (CCs) that NPAS would be delivered as  a lead force 
model  by  the  PCC  for  West  Yorkshire  and  that  the  CC  of  WYP  would  be  responsible  for  the 
operational delivery.  All parties to the agreement would share financial liabilities.  
 
  The lead force CC holds the Police Air Operator Certificate (PAOC).  The Chief Superintendent (Chief 
Operating  Officer),  who  leads  NPAS  on  a  daily  basis,  undertakes  the  aviation  regulatory  role  of 
Accountable  Manager  (AM)  and  reports  to  the  Lead  CC.  The  AM  has  legal  responsibility  and  is 
accountable to the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) for  managing  operational  risk  and  ensuring  safe 
operation of the service. 
 
  The PAOC holder and the AM are the highest policing roles recognised under CAA legislation.  The 
CAA legislation does not recognise the PCC role.  
8 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

  
  The  original  S22A  did  not  define  the  roles  and  responsibilities  of  either  the  NPAS  Local  Strategic 
Board (LSB) or the Independent Assurance Group (IAG). 
 
  The  NSB  sets  the  strategic  direction  for  NPAS  and  requires  the  CC  (WYP)  to  account  for  the 
 operational  delivery  of  the  service.  The  LSB  supports  the  NSB  and  manages  the  operational 
 and  financial  performance  of  NPAS.  The  IAG  represents  the  operational  users  of  air  support 
 and monitors NPAS’ delivery for consideration of the NSB. 
  The Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) of WYP is the legal entity for NPAS for the purposes of 
governance,  including  contractual  arrangements,  ownership  and  management  of  assets,  audit, 
assurance and public accountability.  The Lead PCC holds the view that because he is the legal entity 
and carries the associated risks, it is also necessary for him to  be  the  Chair  of  both  the  NPAS  NSB 
and LSB. 
  The obvious benefits of the presiding Chair have been the stability, knowledge and understanding of 
the opportunities and challenges since commencement of the collaboration. However the lead force 
model places potential for conflicts of interest on the PCC, as there is no clear delineation between 
the two roles.  
  The  HMICFRS  report  highlighted  that  responsibility  for  the  governance  of  police  air  support  is 
primarily divided between the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) lead for Aviation, the NSB, the 
 NPAS lead CC and lead local policing body.  
 
  The Inspectorate made a recommendation that, ‘a local policing body member of the Board, other 
than  the  lead  local  policing  body,  should  be  appointed  as  Chair  of  the  Board.’    This  was  formally 
tabled at NSB but the decision was taken to retain the status quo. 
 
  The National Aviation Programme Team made a decision not to explore the internal management 
structures of NPAS as it was deemed to be out of the scope of this programme. 
 
6.3.1   Feedback from Forces & Stakeholders 
 
  There  was  strong  support  amongst  forces  for  the  continued  availability  of  conventional  air 
 support. 
 
  Perception  that  current  board  membership  lacks  broad  regional  representation.    The  view  was 
expressed that some Chief Constables and PCCs  feel they have not been able to influence services 
and  consequential  cost.    (The  recommendation  to  align  the  five  NPAS  regions  with  the  nine  NPCC 
regions should mitigate this). 
 
  The  NSB  is  perceived  by  some  to  endorse  and  ratify  decisions,  as  opposed  to  being  the  strategic 
decision-making body that leads, sets direction for NPAS and holds it to account for delivery.   Some 
of the current board membership challenge this perception. 
 
  Attendance  and  appropriate  representation  from  forces,  particularly  at  the  Regional  User 
 Groups (RUG) is often poor and inconsistent. 
 
  The  only  opportunity  for  most  police  services  to  influence  the  direction  of  NPAS  is  through 
 attendance  at  the  RUGs  –  this  follows  the  previous  point  about  the  NPAS  regions,  however 
attendance and proper representation at the respective Boards is often poor and inconsistent. 
 
  Although  the  NSB  is  advised  by  NPAS  officials  with  significant  aviation  expertise  (as  well  as  some 
members of the Board), the Board  lacks broader independent industry experience that would bring 
further professional challenge and scrutiny.    
 
  All  forces  recognise  the  advances  in  conventional  aviation  capability  and  drones,  but  do  not 
 have the expertise to help inform the Board’s future vision or to set strategy. 
9 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

  
  There  is  a  desire  to  revise  the  S22A  agreement.  Despite  efforts  to  do  so,  there  is  yet  to  be  a 
consolidated and ratified S22A due to the emergence of this programme and other work. 
 
  There  is  an  insufficient  understanding  of  the  demand  of  air  support  and  future  operational 
 requirement,  both  internally  and  externally.  There  is  a  lack  of  clarity  of  customer/force 
 requirement.  (This is despite the NPCC review and HMICFRS report putting these issues to policing 
in 2017). 
 
  With  one  exception,  no  forces  are  seeking  the  local  return  of  management  of  their  own  air 
 asset. 
 
  Some chief officers do not feel sufficiently informed about how air support budgetary decisions are 
made.  Currently only PCCs on the NSB can vote on the budget; the NPCC would like this extended to 
CCs.  This request was formally posed to the NSB in December but deferred until after the outcome 
of this paper.   
 
  Some forces have a desire for the NSB to be responsible for the strategic governance of drones. 
 
 
7. 
DESIGN PRINCIPLES 
 

7.1 
Service Optimisation is defined as….. 
 
  Bases  located  to  provide  areas  highlighted  as  a  priority  by  forces  with  a  response  time  that 
 meets local standards, minimises cancellations and reduces unproductive flight time. 
  Simple tasking processes that deliver quicker deployments. 
  Freedom  for  air  support  assets  to  complete  secondary  tasks  without  incurring  additional 
 costs. 
  BVLOS development is accelerated and owned by nationally. 
  The uniqueness of the scale and complexity of London in terms of congested airspace, obstacles and 
navigation requirement calls for continuity and consistency of experience. 
 
7.2  
Funding & Finance 
 
To create a funding model that promotes optimal decision making in relation to air support by: 
 
  Making the best use of a scarce resource 
  Supporting  the  efficient  and  effective  determination  of  the  most  appropriate  air  asset  to 
 fulfil an individual operational need. 
  Optimising the effective deployment of air support in accordance with threat, harm, risk  and 
vulnerability.  
  Ensuring that the fixed costs of providing the service are fully covered. 
  Ensuring costs charged are reflective of what the service actually costs to deliver. 
  Ensuring there is no financial risk carried by the lead force. 
 
Implement the funding model in a way that: 
 
  Gives forces the opportunity to influence the capacity and cost of the services that they  receive. 
  Bring greater predictability, stability and financial efficiency by enabling charging across  multiple 
financial years. 
  Promote fairness to all parties but accept the costs of a national service. 
10 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

  Is  simple  to  understand  and  flexible  enough  to  be  modified  in  future  as  technology  impacts 
 upon demand. 
  Encourages the delivery of efficiencies and continuous improvement. 
  Encourages the maximisation of every minute flown for the benefit of policing. 
  Is non-discriminatory and acknowledges differing response levels and hours of operation. 
  Ensures that no force is subsidising the service provided to another. 
  Makes it possible to move funding from one area of air support to another for example   from 
between helicopters, aeroplanes and various levels of drone operation. 
7.3 
Governance & Delivery Model 
 
  Build  a  more  integrated  and  collegiate  approach  to  collaboration  by  broadening  the  influence  of 
APCC and NPCC members to the strategic financial leadership and service delivery of police aviation. 
 
  Governance  structures  that  are  flexible  and  adaptive  to  changes  in  service  provider  and  can  be 
responsive to the shifting balance from conventional aviation to drone use. 
 
  Ensure  that  key  governance  boards  have  access  to  senior  leaders  and  practitioners  from  the 
 aviation industry to offer operational and commercial perspectives from outside of policing.  
 
  Utilise an independent chair for the highest level of governance board to bring greater challenge to 
those that deliver all forms of aviation service operationally. 
  Service  aims  should  incorporate  safe  operation,  effective  response  to  threat,  risk  and  harm, 
 value  for  money,  sustainable  economic  and  environmental  outcomes;  a  robust  risk 
 management and performance framework. 
  The  chosen  governance  model  needs  to  ensure  it  has  the  appropriate  representation  and 
 decision-making responsibilities at every level. 
 
  Each  force  must  take  on  responsibility  for  ensuring  proper  and  appropriate  representation  at  the 
relevant future governance boards.  
 
  NPCC would like voting rights on the budget extended to CCs on the current NSB. 
  Any  future  design  needs  to  be  cognisant  of  current  work  being  undertaken  by  the  Specialist 
 Capabilities Programme and should align to the developing national S22A agreements being led by 
the APCC. 
 
  Emerging and advancing technology, including BVLOS drones must be considered in any  future 
design options.  
 
  Future  governance  arrangements  should  be  adaptable  to  accommodate  collaborative  working 
opportunities, for example with the MCA.  
 
  The relationship between NPAS and forces is ambiguous and ranges from collaborative stakeholder 
to customer/supplier. 
 
8. 
OPTIMISED SERVICE 
 
8.1 
Tasking & Deployment 
 
8.1.2  Current Delivery Model 
 
Tasks  are  referred  by  forces  to  the  NPAS  Operations  Centre  in  Wakefield.    Once  graded  –  they  are  then 
communicated  to  local  bases.  Staff  at  these  bases  have  limited  means  of  monitoring  local  incidents  to 
identify early opportunities for them to add value, or to provide aviation tactical advice to local commanders. 
11 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
8.1.3  Feedback from Forces 
 
There were mixed views from forces regarding the benefits of the NPAS Operations Centre.  This facility costs 
c. £1.5M p.a. in staffing costs alone. Some groups of forces have asked that tasking be returned to them on a 
regional  basis.    Others  see  this  as  a  retrograde  step  that  would  lead  to  a  lack  of  equitability  in  service 
provision, favouring ‘those who shout loudest.’   
 
8.1.4  Analysis 
 
The current model is additive in terms of response time, where calls effectively pass via the national  centre, 
rather  than  directly  to  a  local  base  from  the  requesting  force.  The  grading  system  used  by  NPAS  does  not 
explicitly take account of local priorities and an average of 9% are assigned a priority grading, which does not 
meet the expectations of most forces. There is also evidence that some forces task helicopters too quickly  – 
without  considering  viable  operational  alternatives  that  avoid  an  NPAS  deployment,  thus  preserving  flying 
hours and controlling costs. 
 
8.1.4  Models Considered 
 
  Enhance current national tasking model 
  Promote regional tasking model 
  Outsource to a strategic partner 
  (Return to single force air support)  – not supported by forces, so not considered further 
8.2 
Recommendations 
 
 
 
 
1. 
Trial the concept of regional tasking in the East Midlands, the North West and London.   This 
 
 
would involve a lead force being identified in each region that would task their  respective 
 
 
 
air  support  asset.  This  could  be  further  enhanced  by  bases  becoming  more  engaged  with 
 
 
their  local  forces  through  monitoring  incidents,  looking  for  opportunities  where  air  support 
 
 
could deliver outcomes.   A change of funding formula away  from  ACS  to  a  system  based 
 
 
on flight hours will also unlock new potential for secondary   tasking   and  a  significant  increase 
 
 
in tasks/outcomes, without being cost additive. 
 
 
 
2.  NPAS to ensure that predicted arrival times are provided to forces at the point at which the air 
  asset is tasked in order to inform local decision making and to reduce the number of cancelled 
8.2.1  Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation 
flights. 
 
 
Local  tasking  existed  prior  to  the  inception  of  NPAS.  Although  it  passes  work  to  forces,  it  is  spread  across 
control  room  operators  and  as  such  is  unlikely  to  require  additional  staff/cost.  Protocols  will  need  to  be 
established  in  order  to  facilitate  borderless  operations  and  maintain  the  integrity  of  a  national  service.    A 
regional control centre will also need to offer a simple ‘flight follow’ radio service to check on the welfare of 
the crew when airborne and for take-off and landing. 
 
 
8.3  
Helicopter Basing 
 
8.3.1  Current Delivery Model 
 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.3.2  Feedback from Forces 
 
A response service to priority areas within Norfolk, Suffolk, Lincolnshire, Cumbria, Humberside, Dyfed Powys, 
the  majority  of  Cornwall  and  parts  of  Lancashire  takes  over  30  minutes  and  does  not  meet  the  local 
operational need. 
 
12 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

Long response times lead to high cancellation rates and wasted flight time. 
 
8.3.3  Analysis 
 
Demand analysis and force feedback indicates that the following bases could be operated less than 24/7  – 
with  some  having  the  potential  to  be  reduced  to  12/7.  (Paired  regionally  with  a  24/7  base).  Newcastle, 
Hawarden, St Athan, Exeter, Benson, Bournemouth, Redhill, Husbands Bosworth. 
 
8.4 
Recommendations 
 
All  bases  locations  optimised  by  mapping  ‘real  life’  response  arcs  against  desired  attendance  times  and 
priority locations set by forces and aligned with threat, harm and risk. 
 
 
1. 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
2. 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
3. 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
 
4. 
  
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
5. 
  
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
   
 
 
 
 
6.  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
7.    *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.    *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
9.  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
10. *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
 
8.4.1  Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation 
 
A detailed implementation plan is required to confirm the indicative cost benefits attributed to each of these 
change options.  An indicative operational performance forecast is shown at Appendix C. 
 
8.5 
Understanding London 
 
8.5.1  Current Delivery Model 
 
London receives an uninterrupted service primarily from bases at North Weald near Stansted, Redhill near 
Gatwick and RAF Benson in Oxfordshire. Tasking is managed through NPAS’s national Operations Centre. 
13 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
8.5.2  Feedback from Force 
 
It is perceived by MPS commanders that crews who are not trained and regularly operating within London – 
are less likely to be effective at providing an air support service to the capital.   
 
8.5.3  Models Considered 
 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
8.6 
Recommendations 
 
   
 
10.  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
8.6.1  Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation 
 
 
11.  *******************S31 & S24*******************************  
 
 
 
 
 
8.7 
Promoting & Supporting Drones 
 
8.7.1  Current Delivery Model 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.7.2  Feedback from Forces 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.7.3  Independent Analysis 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.7.4  Models Considered   (Appendix D) 
 
  No change 
  Deliver all aspects of drones nationally 
  Hybrid  – national governance of procurement, training and operational standards, with local 
deployment. 
 
8.8 
Recommendations 
 
 

 
 
12. Create  a  capacity  within  NPAS/National  Aviation  to  provide  national  leadership  of  drone 
 
procurement, training and operational standards. 
 
 
 
13. Create a national capacity to support forces to deliver safe drone practices.  
 
   
 

14. Mandate the adoption by all forces of the National Operations Manual. 
 
 
 
15. Integrate drone tactics into broader guidance material in support of APP. 
 
 
 
   
 
 
16. *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
 
17. Tactical deployment of visual line of sight drones should be funded, managed and led by local forces. 
14 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 
 
18. Minimise  the  risk  of  collision  between  drones  and  conventional  aviation  assets  by  adopting  the 
learning from the North West De-Confliction Project. 
 
19. Help  forces  to  establish  effective  local  decision-making  structures  to  ensure  that  the  most 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8.8.1  Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation 
 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.9 
Aeroplane Deployment 
 
8.9.1  Current Delivery Model 
 
Four Vulcanair P68 aeroplanes were delivered in early 2019 at a cost of £12.5M* and are due to become fully 
operational during 2020. A purpose built base was also established for these aircraft at Doncaster airport at a 
cost of @£5M. 
 
8.9.2  Feedback from Forces 
 
Given  that  these  aircraft  are  not  primarily  intended  for  urgent  deployments,  unless  already  airborne,  a 
number of forces have  expressed the view that there is no operational requirement  for this capability and 
that they do not wish to pay for their services. 
 
8.9.3  Independent Analysis 
 
The primary benefits of these aircraft are the cost to operate, flight endurance and ability to transit in poorer 
weather.  At  NPAS  projected  usage  rates,  this  type  of  aeroplane  will  require  an  average  one  week  of 
maintenance each month. These aircraft are only marginally faster in flight than a helicopter and so are not 
capable  of  making  quick  transit  between  regions.  Recent  performance  restrictions  placed  on  these  aircraft 
will limit the airfields that they can operate from. 
 
 
8.9.4  Models Considered 
 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
o  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
8.9.5  Option   (For predicted performance see Appendix C) 
 
1.  *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
2.  Optimise  the  use  of  MCA  tasking  of  Search  and  Rescue  (SAR)  aircraft  where  their  criteria  is 
 met. 
 
15 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

8.10 
Recommendation 
 
 
9. 
Deploy  2  aeroplanes  to  Bournemouth.  Retain  2  at  Doncaster  for  services  to  the 
 
 
NorthEast, Lincolnshire and Norfolk. 
 
 
8.10.1  Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation 
 
   The revenue budget allocation and business case for these assets is still unclear.  
 
   Force  tasking  of  aviation  assets  is  reducing  –  but  flight  hours  has  remained  stable,  making 
 net productivity poorer. The addition of the additional 4300 flying hours (25%) projected by NPAS, 
will further exacerbate this. The revenue budget for these assets is still unclear. It is proposed here, 
instead, that helicopter flight hours should be reduced and replaced with aeroplane utilisation. 
 
8.11  Air Support Performance 
 
8.11.1 Current Delivery Model 
 
Forces receive a  monthly performance report  that has  recently been revised and includes quantitative  and 
limited  qualitative  information  across  a  range  of  headings  that  relate  to  aircraft  availability,  tasking  and 
response  times.    Performance  Delivery  is  also  a  standing  item  at  the  NPAS  Independent  Assurance  Group 
(IAG)  that  comprises  regional  representatives  from  across  operational  policing  at  Assistant  Chief  Constable 
level.  The  performance  report  has  developed  out  of  the  original  service  offer  that  underpinned  the  S22 
collaborative  agreement  that  formed  NPAS  and  hence  has  been  focussed  on  being  a  test  of  contract 
compliance, rather than enabling forces to gauge the value added by air support. It also does not include any 
links to local force drone performance. 
 
8.11.2 Feedback from Forces 
 
The  new  report  format  has  been  welcomed.    Almost  all  forces  commented  that  they  would  like  more 
information  about  the  qualitative  benefits  that  air  support  has  delivered  –  preferably  linked  to  the 
achievement of local priorities and objectives to assist them to assess the value. 
 
 
 

8.11.3 Independent Analysis 
 
In those areas where response time is poor, or availability is insufficient, cancellations are high and wasted 
flight time is incurred. Only a small proportion of flights are graded as requiring a  priority attendance time. 
The majority of forces want this to be the standard of service assigned to more incidents. 
 
8.11.4 Models Considered 
 
  Continued use of monthly reporting. 
 
  Use of real time information sharing technology to allow forces to access and analyse data in order 
to be more intrusive in relation to the effectiveness of their own requests and NPAS performance. 
 
8.12  Recommendations 
 
 
 
20.  Force command, control and tasking processes should be designed to identify and utilise the right 
 
aviation asset for the right task as part of delivering a blended service – both in a pre-planned and 
spon  taneous context. 
 
 
21.  ****  
***************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
 
22.  Exp  
lore the use of web-based systems that allow forces to analyse real-time air  support  service 
deliv  ery performance. 
16 | P
  a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 
23.  Provide  forces  with  regular  qualitative  feedback  on  delivery  –  especially  against  local 
priorities/police and crime plans. 

 
 
 
 
 
8.12.1 Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation 
 
  Forces have a key role and responsibility to work with NPAS to reduce cancelled requests for service. 
 
  Timely  performance  data  that  forces  can  access  themselves  gives  local  managers  options  to 
 enhance the working relationship with their local base in order to maximise outcomes. 
 
 
9. 

FUNDING & FINANCE 
 

9.1 
Delivery Models 
 
9.1.1  Current Delivery Model 
The S22A collaboration agreement for the provision of police air support allows the NPAS National Strategic 
Board (NSB) to determine funding arrangements for NPAS. Forces are then charged for revenue funding via 
invoice issued by West Yorkshire Police on behalf of NPAS as the lead force. At the point of creating NPAS, a 
funding model was adopted based largely upon delivery of flying hours and a principle that every force would 
save  money  at  the  point  of  entry.  All  forces  that  had  access  to  air  support,  with  the  exception  of  the 
Metropolitan Police Service, entered NPAS with an initial revenue cost of less than they were paying for their 
local collaboration or force owned aircraft.  
 
Actioned Calls for Service  
In the 2016/17 financial year a funding model based upon Actioned Calls for Service (ACS) was implemented. 
This  involved  charging  for  NPAS  based  on  the  previous  years’  use  of  the  service.  A  call  for  service  is 
considered  actioned  when  an  NPAS  aircraft  arrives  at  the  scene  of  a  task.  This  means  that  if  they  are 
cancelled prior to arrival, any flying time used and its associated costs are spread across all 43 Home Office 
forces and British transport Police. It is estimated that cancellations account for at least 1,000 wasted flying 
hours annually at a cost well in excess of £1m based upon a direct operating cost of at least £1,000 per flying 
hour. 
 
Over  the  last  4  years  the  NPAS  budget  has  increased  as  illustrated  in  the  table  below  and  the  NPAS  MTFF 
shows a predicted revenue budget for 2020/21 of £44.8m, an increase of £1.8m (4%). At the same time as 
this cost increase, there has been a corresponding decrease in requests for service as forces seek to control 
costs by managing downwards their air support needs. The impact of this reduced utilisation of available air 
support capacity, is an increase in the cost per unit of service (ACS) to every force.  
 
Financial 
Revenue 
Change % 
ACS3 
Change % 
Cost per 
Change % 
year 
Budget 
ACS 
2016/17 
£39,990,569 

29,185 

£1,370 

2017/18 
£38,724,000 
↓3 % 
23,039 
↓21% 
£1,681 
↑ 23% 
2018/19 
£40,472,000 
↑5% 
20,945 
↓ 9% 
£1,932 
↑ 15% 
2019/20 
£42,562,7504 
↑6% 
18,7935 
↓ 10% 
£2,285 
↑ 18% 
2020/21 
£44,758,4596 
↑4% 
17,0007 
↓ 10% 
£2,635 
↑ 15% 
 
Consultation with forces has shown that the current funding model is unpopular, especially with high-volume 
users  and  the  Programme  Team  have  received  strong  representations  for  change.  Under  the  ACS  model 
every air  support  task, no matter how simple to achieve is charged to forces at the same rate. This means 
                                                
3 flying hours and ACS are calculated on a calendar year basis 2016, 2017 & 2018 figures have been used 
4 Cost of NPAS for 2019/20 taken from total force contributions 2019/20 figure 
5 Predicted ACS as per NPAS Management Report Oct 2019  
6 Predicted budget for 2020/21 from MTFF not ratified by the national board at time of writing 
7 Assuming 2020 levels of ACS continue to reduce at a rate of 10% annually 
17 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

that a task taking 5 minutes of flying time to complete and perhaps attached to another task is charged at the 
same rate as a task that takes 45 minutes to complete with a transit to and from it of some 30 minutes each 
way.  This  individual  task  cost  has  removed  from  air  support  a  significant  proportion  of  the  value-added 
tasking that air support could routinely deliver to forces in the form of additional tasks undertaken when in a 
specific locality or area. A concern was raised by HMICFRS that there was a significant latent demand for air 
support  and  conversations  with  forces  has  confirmed  this.  This  model  also  allows  for  forces  to  request  a 
service and cancel it at any point prior to arrival and incur no cost. 
 
The  reduction  in  air  support  service  demand  can  be  attributed  to  a  mix  of  poor  service  availability  (slow 
response,  lack  of  aircraft  and  crew  availability),  demand  suppression  by  forces  to  cut  costs  and  the  use  of 
alternative  air  support  methods  such  as  drones.  The  evidence  shows  that  in  the  four-year  period  between 
2016  and  2020  the  cost  to  deliver  air  support  has  increased  beyond  anticipated  levels,  in  part  due  to  the 
unpredictable  nature  of  aviation  inflation  rates  –  however  the  output/productivity  of  air  support  has 
decreased over the same period. This trend has seen the service reach a point whereby it will soon become 
unsustainable without significant change.  
 
Over the last 4 years up to 2019/20: 
 
  NPAS revenue cost will have increased by 6.4% with a further 4% increase for next year 
  NPAS output (ACS) has decreased by 36% 
  The cost of every ACS has increased by 67% 
  The flying hours used by NPAS have remained at a fairly consistent level near to 16,500 
 
See graph at Fig 1 (Page 21) 
 
10.1.2 Feedback from Forces 
 
Forces  value  the  contribution  that  air  support  brings  to  policing  with  many  adding  to  their  air  support 
capability through the use of drones. The consensus of opinion is that drones are not a direct replacement 
for conventional air support and almost all forces see a continuation of the use of helicopters  to deliver air 
support services in future. The introduction of the aeroplane fleet has received a mixed response with many 
forces  stating  that  they  see  no  use  for  the  aeroplanes  to  support  their  policing  objectives.  This  position  is 
perhaps understandable as the capability is yet to enter active service and as such is unproven.  
Forces believe that air support is expensive and no longer represents value for money.  The increasing costs 
and declining service output supports this view. Forces are supportive of a restructured air support capability 
with  a  funding  model  based  upon  actual  service  cost  and  without  a  subsidy  element.  In  common  with  the 
principles of local funding for policing,  forces do not  want  to spend money subsidising  the service in other 
areas. Forces expressed a desire to work collaboratively with regional partners and support a transparent and 
stable funding model based upon actual cost of service within which they can maximise their operational use 
of air support as appropriate. 
Forces expressed a desire for predictability in relation to air support costs and it was suggested that a 3 or 
ideally 4 year forward looking settlement be agreed. If this could be timed to coincide with PCC tenure of 4 
years then this has additional support and benefits to forces for planning purposes. 
Forces understand that aviation can be expensive and that a significant proportion of air support  costs are 
fixed  and  as  such  must  be  funded  at  the  point  of  delivery  by  West  Yorkshire  Police.  A  two-part  tariff,  is 
outlined by the Specialist Capabilities Programme, whereby fixed costs and a proportion of variable costs are 
covered  by  a  subscription  charge  with  insurance  elements  and  then  the  remainder  of  the  variable  costs 
covered by a pay as you go component. This model  was described to forces and received positive support, 
however,  it  is  still  a  net  subsidy  model.  Forces  stated  that  they  liked  the  transparency  that  such  a  funding 
model provides however, they do not wish to subsidise the costs of service provided outside  of their force 
area, or for assets that will deliver no benefits to their respective force area. There is a real desire amongst 
forces to pay the actual cost of the air support service they receive and no more. 
18 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 


Fig 1 – NPAS cost, ACS and flying hours 2016-2020 (2020 ACS predictions assumes a continued annual reduction in ACS at 10%) 
 
19 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 - M  
 

9.2 
Understanding the NPAS budget (Appendix M) 
 

The  NPAS  forecast  revenue  budget  for  2020/21  of  £44.8m  has  been  examined  in  detail  and  the  following 
general conclusions can be drawn: 
  £17.9m  is  spent  directly  upon  the  maintenance  and  parts  required  to  deliver  flying  hours, 
 
insurance and other direct operating costs. 
  £21.9m is spent on personnel costs (WYP employed staff, seconded and commissioned services) 
  £5m is spent on other costs and commissioned services fees 
 
9.2.1  Fixed and variable costs  
 
The specialist capabilities programme looked at the NPAS budget in 2018 and concluded that the fixed budget 
could  be  considered  to  be  as  high  as  85%.  Further  analysis  has  concluded  that  at  least  71%  of  the  revenue 
budget is fixed and this is increased to 82% if the engine maintenance contract (PBH) is included.  
 
9.2.2  Cost increases 2020/21 
 
The  cost  increases  predicted  in  2020/21  relate  primarily  to  the  new  maintenance  contract  that  came  into 
effect half way through 2019/20 and is now charged at full year costs. Additional HR related expenditure on 
pilot pay uplift, pension and salary increases have been determined my aviation market forces. 
 
9.2.3  Costs of running a national air support service 
  
Analysis  has  shown  that  whilst  there  were  undoubtedly  some  efficiencies  to  be  gained  through  national 
collaboration  for  air  support  in  areas  such  as  fuel  procurement,  insurance,  maintenance  and  aircraft 
equipment  procurement,  the  move  overall  was  cost  additive.  The  regulation  of  small  local  air  support  units 
under Civil Aviation Publication (CAP612) and a Police Air Operator Certificate (PAOC) was considered ’simple’ 
by the CAA as regulator, but it is unlikely the Authority would allow  return to that system. The creation of a 
national police air  service however, created a  small airline which  is considered  ‘complex’ by the CAA and as 
such  requires  a  significant  uplift  in  regulatory  oversight  and  required  staff  with  aviation  experience.  NPAS 
operates under a full (Police) Air Operator Certificate (PAOC) and as such is treated no differently to any other 
airline operating in the UK airspace. 
 
Analysis has shown that the additional cost of running a national service is in the region of £5m annually and 
this can be explained as follows: 
 
  The  requirement  for  mandatory  posts  to  satisfy  the  AOC,  these  posts  are  known  as  CAA 
 
Form4  Holders  and  cover  critical  functions  of  ground  operations,  flight  operations, 
continuing  airworthiness  management,  compliance  monitoring,  safety  management  &  crew 
training as well as an accountable manager.  The continuing airworthiness function that is now 
required  for  all  maintenance  activities  would  have  been  required  under  the  old  structure 
however, the costs of achieving this for NPAS are not high. 
 
  The headquarters functions such as HR, IT, legal, procurement, finance, Q & A, health & safety 
and performance must now be paid for in full. The air support set up pre-NPAS involved a very 
small percentage of all of these functions which were provided from within force resources. The 
move to NPAS did not reveal savings in these areas. When aggregated on a national scale – this 
became a significant financial undertaking that is recoverable by WYP. 
 
  The air support units pre-NPAS were despatched and controlled by local force control rooms as 
part of business as usual. This function for the whole country was transferred to West Yorkshire 
Police and has added a significant additional cost.  
 
The  collaboration  for  air  support  is  mandated  through  a  statutory  instrument  and  as  such  the  43  forces  in 
England and Wales are not able to obtain this service by any other means. This requirement to have a national 
air support provision and the added costs that this brings is presently being funded by forces. 
 
20 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 - L  
 

The  Home  Office  were  approached  with  a  proposal  for  an  annual  revenue  grant  to  cover  the  costs  of  a 
delivering a national air support service. This grant of up to £5m annually would cover these additional costs 
and enable forces to be charged for the service provision locally rather than covering the national costs.  
 
Capital Expenditure – in 2012 a decision was taken to provide the capital required by NPAS through a direct 
capital grant from the Home Office. This is ‘top sliced’ at from the police capital grant nationally. The rationale 
for the capital provision was the replacement of the air support fleet and role equipment, a function previously 
funded by local forces with a Home Office grant contribution of 40%. 
 
The capital grant allocated to NPAS in the 8 years between 2012/13 and 2019/20 has been £98m. 
 
NPAS have procured four aeroplanes during the last 8 years however, no helicopters have been procured and 
the  newest  in  the  fleet  is  now  10  years  old.  Fleet  replacement  plans  are  underway  to  procure  5  new 
helicopters (@£38M) and this will see a proposed capital requirement for 2020/21 of £22.4m of which £21m 
will be Home Office grant. In reality – at least 10 helicopters are presently due for replacement. 
 
During  this  time  NPAS  have  paid  a  proportion  of  capital  back  to  forces  annually  as  compensation  for  their 
original investment in the helicopter fleet that was transferred to West Yorkshire Police as lead force, as part 
of them joining NPAS. In 2019/20 this amounted to £2.4m with further payments due until 2024/25. 
 
Analysis has shown also that NPAS typically spend £4.6m of capital on the purchase of large spare parts for the 
helicopter and aeroplane fleet. Any part with a value exceeding £10k is considered a capital purchase and as 
such a  significant  capital element  must  be considered part  of the  annual running costs of air  support  as if it 
were an element of the revenue budget. 
 
Calculating  the  total  cost  of  a  flying  hour  –  in  aviation  the  currency  used  is  a  flying  hour  which  enables  the 
service to be delivered. To calculate the actual cost to policing of delivering a single flying hour the entire NPAS 
budget of capital + revenue is divided by the number of flying hours delivered.  
In 2019/20 the costs are as follows: 
 
-  £42.563m  (revenue)  +  £10.485m  (capital  after  force  capital  credits)  =  £53.048m  ÷  16,500  = 
 £3,215 per flying hour. 
 
In 2020/21 the predicted costs if fleet replacement is approved will be as follows: 
 
-  £44.758m  (revenue)  +  £20.389m  (capital  after  force  capital  credits)  =  £65.047m  ÷  18,5008  = 
 £3,516 per flying hour. (or £3942 per flying hour if 16,500hrs is maintained) 
 
This assumes that the aeroplanes enter operational service in late 2019 successfully and deliver at least 2,000 
additional  flying  hours  in  2020/21.  The  proposed  fleet  replacement  of  5  helicopters  will  also  see  elevated 
capital expenditure over the next 3 financial years after which 5 new helicopters will have entered operational 
service. 
 
9.3 
Commercial Comparator 
There  are  a  number  of  alternative  commercial  models  available  for  the  delivery  of  air  support  services.  A 
complete  package  including  all  staff  and  aircraft  is  used  by  the  Maritime  and  Coastguard  Agency  (MCA)  for 
search and rescue activities. Their service is provided at present by Bristow Group Inc. Police Scotland have a 
slightly different service provided by Babcock Onshore Limited and can be described as follows: 
 
9.3.1  Police Scotland (Babcock Onshore) 
 

*******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
9.4  
Models Considered (Appendix G) 
 
1.  Current ACS funding model 
                                                
8 Flying hours increased by 2,000 assuming aeroplanes deliver this in their first year of operation. Assumes 
current predicted budgets and also that fleet replacement finance is forthcoming. 
21 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
The continuation of the current ACS funding model is not considered viable. NPAS service utilisation is 
dropping and the cost per ACS is increasing. The impact of this is an overall reduction in the value for 
money of the service. There is evidence that some forces are reducing their ACS usage in order to save 
money, this has increased the predicted costs of the service to every other user. The predicted 2020/21 
costs based upon the ACS model are illustrated in Appendix G. Continuing with the current ACS based 
funding model is not recommended. 
 
2.  A two-part funding model (subscription with insurance + PAYG) 
 
The Specialist Capabilities Programme guide to economic pricing models recommends a two-part tariff 
for collaborations of the scale and type of NPAS. The nature of the high fixed costs associated with air 
support,  together  with  the  limited  ability  to  flex  the  total  capacity  of  the  service  to  meet  transient 
demand,  means  that  neither  a  pure  subscription  only  approach,  or  a  PAYG  model  is  likely  to  be 
successful. 
 
Many  attempts  have  been  made  to  develop  a  model  that  meets  the  needs  of  all  forces.  As  models 
attempt  to  simulate  a  fair  apportionment  of  cost  –they  all  by  design  involve  an  element  of  inbuilt 
subsidy.    This  means  that  forces  are  either  subsidised  by  others,  or  are  themselves  providing  a  net 
subsidy to others. In the case of aviation this is typically a figure measured in hundreds of thousands of 
pounds per year. The model included here is a best fit approach, taking the learning from the Specialist 
Capabilities Programme.  
Part 1 - Subscription charge with insurance elements 
This would see the agreed fixed costs of NPAS recovered through a subscription charge. This would be 
paid by all forces and the proportion for each being based upon ability their income (grant + precept), 
factored against historic usage and predicted future demand. 
A significant proportion of the variable costs (e.g. 70% with exact percentage to be agreed) would then 
by  covered  by  an  up-front  purchase  of  insurance  flying  hours  based  upon  an  agreed  percentage  of 
historic flying hours use (e.g. 70% with exact percentage to be agreed). 
 
Part 2 – PAYG 
Forces would then have the choice as to how much of their remaining 30% of flying hours/demand that 
they would like to fund at a higher PAYG rate. 
Details of how this model may work and costs based upon the 2020/21 revenue budget is included in 
Appendix G. This is still a subsidy-based model which sees many forces pay significantly more than the 
cost of the service they actually receive. 
 
3.  Actual cost charging (national + regional elements) 
 

The commercial aviation world offers a two-part funding approach whereby the fixed costs are covered 
by a  flat monthly fee  which  is payable regardless of the rate of  flying.  This  fee covers  all of the fixed 
costs associated with the delivery of the specific service required. The actual flying hours used are then 
charged at an agreed hourly rate + fuel costs. 
 
It  is  possible  to  replicate  this  commercial  charging  structure,  whilst  also  allowing  for  a  reinvestment 
back  into  aviation  assets  in  areas  where  the  service  is  currently  deficient,  by  simplifying  the  role  of 
NPAS to that of an internal service provider. This would involve charging regions the exact cost of the 
service provision required. This would bring several benefits: 
 
-  Regions  would  only  pay  for  the  service  they  receive  and  there  would  be  no  subsidy  whereby  they 
were paying for the service of others.  
-  There is an opportunity for forces to specify the exact service they require in terms of operating hours 
and flying capacity. 
-  A  national  capability  is  still  maintained  for  the  provision  of  helicopters,  maintenance,  pilots, 
 spare parts, insurance etc. with local base, personnel and command and control costs   picked 
up 
locally.  This  retains  the  elements  of  a  national  collaboration  that  are  known  to  deliver  the  most 
significant benefits. 
 
22 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

It  is  difficult  at  present  to  predict  precise  costs  for  individual  forces  using  this  approach,  until  a 
discussion  has  taken  place  with  each  region  and  the  specifics  of  the  base  configuration,  aircraft  type 
and operating hours have been confirmed.  
 
9.5  Recommendations  
 
    24.  Replacement of the current Actioned Call for Service (ACS) funding model with actual costs being 
 
charged to regions, based on the level of service that they specify. 
 
 
 
25. 
Deploy air support in a way that gains maximum operational benefit from every deployment, by 
 
completing additional tasks where possible whilst transiting to and from a primary incident.  
  
 
26. 
Create an internal air support service provision modelled upon those provided commercially and 
 
retain  the  benefits  of  national  collaboration  whilst  enabling  an  operational  delivery  model  that  is 
 
commissioned according to regional and local need. 
  
 
27. 
Remove  the  subsidy  element  of  air  support  funding  where  forces  are  in  many  cases  actively 
 
subsidising the service provided to other forces. 
 
 
 
9.6 
Risks, Interdependencies and Implementation  
 
  There  is  a  risk  that  the  predicted  NPAS  revenue  budget  increase  for  £2020/21  of  £1.8m  will 
 mask benefits gained from the move to a new funding model. 
 
  The ACS based funding model has seen a significant and sustained decline in requests for air support 
of  around  10%  in  2019  (36%  over  3  years)  and  if  this  trend  continues  the  value  for  money  for  this 
service will continue to reduce. 
 
  Improved availability and responsiveness from optimised bases and aviation assets could lead to an 
increase in requests for air support and a decrease in some line of sight drone utilisation. 
 
  Forces  have  a  key  role  and  responsibility  to  work  with  NPAS  to  reduce  cancelled  requests  for 
 service. 
 
 
10. 
GOVERNANCE & DELIVERY MODEL 
 

10.1   Delivery Models 
 
10.1.1 Current Delivery Model 
 
The current governance arrangements are intended to support all 43 Policing Bodies and areas in England and 
Wales.  In particular the key functions of the lead Policing Body is to  secure the maintenance of an efficient 
and effective police collaborative service and to hold the lead CC to account for the exercise of their functions 
and those of persons under his/her direction and control. 
 
The NSB should set the strategic direction for NPAS and requires the CC (WYP) to account for the operational 
delivery of the national air support service.  The Board also sets and approves the annual revenue and capital 
budget and determines the operational model for the delivery of air support across England & Wales.  The lead 
PCC  is  Chair  of  the  NSB,  with  6  NPAS  regions  each  nominating  a  PCC  and  CC  representative  from  separate 
forces.   
In addition to the regional representatives, the Board includes ex-officio members, for example, the AM, NPCC 
Aviation Lead, a Home Office representative, IAG Chair and the LSB Chair, who is also the Lead PCC.  
23 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 


The LSB supports the NSB and manages the operational performance of NPAS.  The LSB considers all matters 
bought  to  the  Board  by  the  AM,  NPAS’  Director  of  Operations  and  Head  of  Business  Services.    A  key 
responsibility is to ensure there is an efficient and effective service delivered within the assigned budget. 
The IAG represents the operational  users of air  support  and monitors NPAS’  delivery  and reports this  to the 
NSB.  In turn, the IAG is supported by the 6 regional Chairs of the RUGs. 
The S22A Agreement sets out the detail of the existing Governance Structure. 
 
 
10.1.2 Stakeholder Feedback 
 
-  The National Strategic Board would benefit from industry experts within its membership. 
 
-  The NPAS board relies too heavily on its internal knowledge and expertise (drawn from NPAS itself) 
rather  than  adopting  a  more  balanced  view  with  more  varied  representation.  Such  broader 
membership would provoke discussion and challenge.  
 
-  The  Strategic  Board  would  benefit  from  having  an  independent  chair,  ideally  someone  with  no 
aviation  experience  to  challenge  some  of  the  conventions  that  have  constrained  police  air  support 
and encourage more commercial disciplines.  
 
-  The  board  would  benefit  from  external  members  with  a  financial,  business  and  legal  acumen.  This 
expertise would help in discharging governance duties. 
 
-  A new vision and business plan would provoke renewed interest, define priorities and secure financial 
planning for the future.  
 
-  The  whole  Service  needs  to  be  engaged  and  help  shape  the  future  of  police  aviation  with  a  new 
governance model. 
 
10.1.3 Document review and research 
 
HMICFRS – An independent study of Police Air Support November 2017 
Nineteen recommendations made.  
3 relate to Governance Structure and Delivery  
 
24 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

Chief Constables Council – Aviation National Strategy July 2019 
Recommendation 6  
Chief Constables Council agreed to recommendation 6 to review alternative Governance models. 
 
Police Aviation Strategy 2019-2029 
Stage 2 - January – December 2020  
Optimise: Identify and Implement a new model for organisation management and delivery of all forms 
of air support.  
 
APCC Briefing – Guidance note: Developing National Section 22a Agreements   
A  team  of  lawyers  has  been  tasked  to  prepare  a  new  template  agreement  for  use  in  all  national 
collaborations. It is intended that, once approved, it shall be rolled out for use in respect of existing and 
new national collaboration units. A key area is Governance and Accountability. 
 
             CAP1864 – CAA Onshore Helicopter Review Report 
            Provides analysis of safety around police operations in the wake of Glasgow and other accidents/near   
 
misses.  Highlights concerns over interaction between conventional and remotely-piloted aircraft. 
 
10.1.4 Models Considered  
 
There is a widely held view within the service, across different types of collaborations and not specific to NPAS, 
that the lead force model is sub optimal. Options assessed: 
 
1A - Optimise current NPAS governance - with no structural change. 
 
1B  -  Optimise  NPAS  governance  and  create  a  new  ovrarching  National  Police  Aviation  Management 
Board.  
 
2  - Adopt the governance model currently being developed for national Section 22A agreements   and 
incorporate all forms of air support.   
 
It  should  also  be  noted  that the  recently  published  CAA  review  of  Onshore  Helicopter  Safety  made  a 
specific recommendation (R16) that:  “Operational control and supervision of all Police Aviation activity 
should be undertaken by one entity to ensure that all airborne assets are under central control.” 
 
Appendix E – Governance structure charts 
 
10.2  Potential Future Models 
 
10.2.1 Model 1A:  Optimise NPAS current governance 
 
Maintain  the  current  governance  and  delivery  model,  but  review  membership  and  reconfigure  the  regional 
membership from the 6 NPAS regions to the 9 NPCC regions.  NSB would continue to be chaired by the Lead 
Policing Body (PCC WYP).  Incorporate drone governance within this new structure. 
 
25 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 


 
 
The  current  governance  and  delivery  model  would  benefit  from  a  broader  membership.  The  6  NPAS  police 
regions would be reconfigured to the 9 police regions.  Forces would be represented by a PCC and CC (both 
from  different  forces  within  a  given  region)  who  would  represent  the  views  and  interests  of  their  region  in 
relation to the delivery of air support.  
 
The  benefits  of  this  revised  model  are  very  limited  due  to  a  continued  lack  of  independence,  challenge  and 
scrutiny at strategic level. This option could be sub-optimal in terms of potential to maximise performance and 
deliver future innovation.  
 
10.2.2  Risks 
 
  A  lead  force  PCC  Chair  would  continue  to  attract  a  potential  conflict  of  interest  and  restrict 
challenge to strategic decision-making. 
  The Lead force model is reliant on the continued willingness of the force concerned to maintain 
the role. There is currently no other force offering to undertake this role. 
  The NSB is not sufficiently independent of the lead local policing body for NPAS. There should be 
clear separation between strategic leadership on police air support and day-to-day management 
of NPAS. 
  The  influence  of  the  NPCC  Aviation  Lead  is  limited  under  this  model  and  so  the  goals  of  the 
Police Aviation Strategy 2019-2029 are unlikely to be delivered in full. 
  Interviews  with  forces  revealed  that  there  is  a  lack  of  confidence  from  the  service  in  NPAS’ 
ability to deliver effective and efficient air support. 
 
10.2.3  Interdependencies and implementation 
 
  The current S22A agreement would need to be revised and ratified. 
  All  PCCs  and  CCs  would  need  to  feel  they  are  informed,  empowered  and  able  to  influence 
 
decision making and budget setting in particular 
  All  PCCs  and  CCs  would  also  need  to  fully  engage  in  the  collaboration  with  appropriate 
 
representation at the Boards. 
 
This model can be adapted to support only 1 of the 3 Service Delivery options, this being: 
  Optimised lead force model – standalone police air support. 
 
10.2.5 Model 1B:  Optimise NPAS governance and create a National Police Aviation Management Board 
 
Current  governance  structures  have  evolved  outside  the  scope  of  the  collaboration  agreement  and  are 
impeded by ad hoc participation and appropriate representation by some forces.  There is also a high turnover 
26 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 


of  representatives,  especially  CCs,  and  a  lack  of  challenge  from  independent  experts  from  the  aviation 
industry. 
 
This model would replace the NSB with the National Police Aviation Management Board (NPAMB).  The Board 
could  be  chaired  either  by  an  independent  person,  lead  PCC  or  from  another  policing  body  (although  an 
appointment  of  an  independent  chair  would  support  the  delineation  of  governance  between  the  national 
board and the LSB).  The Lead force CC, together with nine PCC’s and CC’s as regional representatives and  ex 
officio
 members would also sit alongside the NPCC Aviation lead and representatives from CAA, HO, BTP and 
other partners.  It would also be an opportunity to invite industry experts to offer challenge and advice that 
promotes informed discussion and decision-making. 
 
The  proposed  migration  of  the  existing  strategic  drone  governance  into  this  structure  would  see  that 
respective NPCC lead become a member of the Board.  This would bring a coordinated and blended approach 
to all forms of current police aviation and complement existing structures. 
 
The NPAS Local Governance and Delivery Board (LGDB) would replace the LSB in name but would continue to 
discharge its responsibilities in the same way.   
 
It is proposed that Regional User Groups and the Independent Assurance Group would be replaced by existing 
Regional  Collaboration  Boards  (RCB),  where  aviation  would  become  an  added  area  of  business.  Each  region 
would  then  have  a  Chief  Officer  and  PCC  representative  at  the  NPAMB.    In  turn,  the  existing  Regional 
Operations’ Boards (ROB) would provide the assurance role and report or recommend findings to their RCB. 
Benefits from this model include the opportunities to streamline the governance  structures, provide greater 
oversight  of  procurement,  training  standards,  current  and  future  aviation  strategy.    It  also  ensures  greater 
representation, engagement and opportunity to influence current and future police operational requirements.  
It would also achieve greater scrutiny, transparency and challenge. 
 
10.2.6 Model 1B:   
 
 
10.2.7   Risks 
 
-  As lead force PCC, to Chair the NPAMB would continue to attract a conflict of interest and focus all 
elements of organisational risk on that individual and the lead force. 
-    Continuing with a lead force model is predicated on the continued willingness of WYP to undertake 
this role, which has been carried on behalf of policing for the last 8 years. 
 
10.2.8   Interdependencies 
27 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
  The NSB would also need to sanction these proposals and move to 9 police regions rather 
than the current 6. 
  The NSB would also have to agree on the appointment of Chair and the revised membership. 
  The  current  RCBs  and  ROBs  would  need  to  agree  to  absorb  the  current  roles  and 
responsibilities of the RUGs and IAG. 
  The Metropolitan Police structures sit outside this model but would be expected to mirror 
the structure for engagement. 
  The current S22A would need to be revised to take account of these changes and ratified by 
the NSB. 
  This  model  would  not  be  onerous  to  implement  but  it  may  require  additional  business 
support. 
 
10.2.9   Delivery Model Options Supported by this Governance Proposal 
 
This model can be adapted to support the following 2 of the 3 service delivery options: 
 
  Optimised lead force model – standalone police air support. 
  Regional Hubs – Internal market solution.  Preparatory step for commercial partner by 
transitioning to an internal supplier and providing individualised services to police regions. 
 
 
 
 
 
10.2.10  Model 2:  Adopt the governance model currently being developed for National Section 22A  
 

  Collaboration Agreements 
 
It  is  proposed  that  governance  structures  are  aligned  to  accord  with  the  outcome  of  the  joint  APCC/Home 
Office/Specialist Capabilities and NPCC work focused on how best to lead collaborated functions.  This being a 
3 tier structure: 
  Policing  Board  -  chaired  by  the  Home  Secretary  –  includes  NPCC,  APCC  and  Home  Office. 
Provides strategic overview of policing. 
  Aviation  Management  Board  –  chaired  independently.  Includes  WYP  PCC.  Lead  CC  and  NPCC 
Aviation lead.  Includes drone governance. Leads delivery of the Aviation Strategy. 
  Local Board/Service Provider Board – chaired by WYP  – Focused on the operation of NPAS by 
WYP.  Flexible to change of operator or type of aviation function being delivered. 
The  Association  of  Policing  and  Crime  Chief  Executives  (APACCE)  has  developed  a  national  template 
collaboration  agreement.  The  governance  model  gives  an  opportunity  for  all  PCCs  and  CCs  to  influence 
relevant collaborations.  The model is illustrated below and involves the APCC, the NPCC and a management 
board for all forms of Aviation – the National Police Aviation Management Board (NPAMB).   
 
PCCs make decisions on the matters for which they are responsible in relation to NPAS through the statutory 
governing  body  of  the  Association  of  Police  &  Crime  Commissioners  (APCC),  i.e.  the  budget  and  strategy.  
Likewise the CCs make the decisions on the matters for which they are responsible in relation to NPAS through 
the statutory governing body, the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), i.e. the operational requirements. 
 
An  independent  Chair  sits  on  the  NPAMB  with  a  broad  membership  that  includes  industry  experts,  HO 
representation, LSB Chair, NPCC leads for Aviation and Drones, BTP and CAA.  The NPAMB would be able to 
incorporate all forms of air support and invite or adopt other aviation related programmes of work to sit within 
the governance structure, e.g. outsourced Beyond Visual Line of Sight Drone (BVLOS) activity and MCA Search 
and Rescue. (Illustrated at Appendix E)  
 
The NPAMB would act on the broader influence of PCC’s and CC’s through  the APCC and NPCC.  This process 
ensures  both  governing  bodies  are  fully  informed,  engaged  and  empowered  to  make  decisions  on  police 
aviation.  It also removes the need for regional PCC and CC representation on the Management Board. 
28 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

(APCC Briefing can be seen at Appendix F) 
 
9.2.11 Risks 
 
  WYP may feel that this model provides them with insufficient influence over risks that they own 
and as a result, may give notice to end their hosting as lead force. 
  The current NSB may not support this model. 
 
9.2.12 Interdependencies 
 
  A key interdependency is for the National Collaboration Section 22A template to be ratified and 
adopted by the APPC and NPCC. 
  This model would not be onerous to implement but it would require additional support from the 
HO in terms of presence, support and oversight. 
 
9.2.13 Delivery Model Options Supported by this Governance Proposal 
 
As  a  national  police  collaboration,  NPAS  would  be  included  within  National  Section  22A  Governance  and 
Delivery Arrangements.   
 
This model can be adapted to support any of the 3 service delivery options: 
 
  Optimised Lead Force Model 
 
  Regional  Hubs  –  Internal  market  solution.    Prepared  for  commercial  partner  by  transitioning  to  an 
internal supplier and providing individualised services to police regions. 
 
  Strategic  Delivery  Partner  –  External  market  solution  –  including  extended  partnership  with  other 
emergency services. 
 
10.3  Recommendations 
 
 
 
29.  Adopt a 3 tier governance structure as recommended by the APACCE. 
 
 
29 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
32.   The existing Police Aviation Sec22a agreement should be revised and ratified to take account 
 
of options agreed by Chiefs. 
 
 
33.   Remove the Independent Assurance Group and establish an aviation assurance process within 
 
the Regional Collaboration Boards’ framework. 
 
 
34.  Migrate current NPCC drone governance and align with broader air support governance 
 
structures. 
 
 
35.  Recruit an independent chair for the newly proposed National Police Aviation Management 
 
Board. 
 
 
36.  Board membership should be broadened to incorporate industry experts and other key 
 
agencies. 
 
 
37.  Clear delineation is required between the roles and responsibilities of the National Police 
 
Aviation Management Board and the Local/Service Providers Board. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11.      
  SUMMARY 
 
 
Whilst contin
  uing to focus on how best to keep the public safe - the single biggest strategic choice for Chief 
Constab les is whether to continue to invest the necessary scale of additional capital (£70M+) and £3-5M p.a. 
of revenue funding in order to restore standalone police air support, capable of providing a level of operational 
effectiveness  that  attracts  the  broad  confidence  of  forces.  Or  in  contrast,  pursue  a  new  direction  towards 
stable cost  and higher gain options by engaging with a  strategic partner with commercial aviation expertise. 
This could be further enhanced by exploring opportunities to exploit economies of scale and improve service 
by  creating  an  ambitious  integrated  emergency  services  air  support  organisation  with  agencies  such  as 
Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA and other ‘blue light’ organisations. 
 
12. 
SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS      
12.1  A summary of recommendations is illustrated at Appendix A 
 
 
30 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 

 
 
 
Chief Constable Rod Hansen 
NPCC Aviation Lead 

31 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 









 
11. 
APPENDICES 
 

Summary of recommendations 
****S31 & S24***** 
 
 
****S31 & S24***** 
HMICFRS Report ‘Planes, Drones 

and Helicopters’ 
Apendix B HMICFRS - 
Planes Drones and Aeroplanes - Nov 2017.pdf
 
Optimised Response Performance 

****S31 & S24***** 
Forecast 
Analysis of current drone usage by 

S31 S24 
police in England & Wales 

Governance models - diagrams 
Appendix E 
Governance Models.pdf 
APCC Briefing – National S22 

Agreements 
Appendix F APCC 
Briefing .pdf
 

Funding Models 
Appendix G - NPAS 
Funding Model options.pdf
 

NPCC Aviation Strategy 
Appendix H -  NPCC 
Police Aviation Strategy 2019.pdf
 

NPCC Aviation User Requirement 
Appendix I Air 
Support Operational User Requirement CC Council Oct 18 v1.pdf
 

Summary of feedback from forces 
****S31 & S24***** 

Modelling assumptions 
Appendix K- 
Model ing Assumptions.pdf
 
Graph showing NPAS costs and 

output trends 2016-2020 
Appendix L NPAS ACS 
per hour 2016-2018 v3.pdf
 
32 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O  
 





Understanding NPAS budgets 
Appendix M 
Understanding NPAS costs v4.pdf
 
Specialist Capabilities – Funding 

Model 
Appendix N Spec Cap 
User Guide.pdf
 

Forces Questionnaire 
Appendix O 
Questionnaire.pdf  
Examples of NPAS demand heat 

****S31 & S24***** 
maps 
 
 
 

33 | P a g e  
N a t i o n a l   P o l i c e   C h i e f s   C o u n c i l  
v 1 O