This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Chief Constables Council meeting papers for 2020'.



 
Chief Constables’ Council  
Aviation Programme – Options: Service  
Optimisation, Funding & Finance, Governance 
& Delivery   
15 January 2020 / Agenda Item: 5  
Security Classification  
Documents cannot be accepted or ratified without a security classification in compliance with the NPCC Policy (Protective Marking has no relevance to 
FOI):  
OFFICAL-SENSITIVE -OPERATIONAL  
Freedom of information (FOI)  
This document (including attachments and appendices) may be subject to an FOI request and the NPCC FOI Officer & Decision Maker will consult with you 
on receipt of a request prior to any disclosure.  For external Public Authorities in receipt of an FOI, please consult with xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx  
Author:  
T/ACC J Masters  
Force/Organisation:  
NPCC  
Date Created:  
24/12/19  
Coordination Committee:  
Operations  
Portfolio:  
Aviation  
Attachments @ para  
App A, B and C (Presentation)  
Information Governance & Security  
In compliance with the Government’s Security Policy Framework’s (SPF) mandatory requirements, please ensure any onsite printing is supervised, and 
storage and security of papers are in compliance with the SPF.  Dissemination or further distribution of this paper is strictly on a need to know basis and in 
compliance with other security controls and legislative obligations.  If you require any advice, please contact  xxxx.xxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx  
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/security-policy-framework/hmg-security-policy-framework#risk-management  
1.  PURPOSE 
1.1 It is worthy of reflection that it was only on 17 July that Chief Constables gave their agreement to the new 
10  year  Police  Aviation  Strategy  and  supported  my  request  to  fund  a  small  Task  and  Finish  group.  I  am 
grateful that all forces contributed towards a £250k reserve to deliver the first stage of the strategy and 
work on matters of particular concern to Chief Constables. This has allowed for a three person team to be 
established and provided the necessary capacity and focus to produce evidence based proposals aimed at 
stabilising the service.  They have also been able to specifically address dissatisfaction raised by colleagues 
about  the  operational  delivery  of  air  support,  the  rate  of  rising  costs,  and  the  ongoing  impact  that  the 
Actioned Calls for Service (ACS) funding model is having on the value delivered through the use of aviation 
assets.   
1.2 Your support for this work has allowed for a great deal of ground to be covered in a short space of time.  
Having  completed  visits  to  all  forces  in  England  and  Wales  and  engaged  with  a  broad  range  of  related 
stakeholders, the team have undertaken an in depth analysis on our behalf to explain why from the outset 
national air support has been so challenging as a collaboration to get right. It uses this insight to suggest 
options for the future. Their work formally acknowledges the considerable commitment and hard work by  
 

a  range  of  colleagues  in  West  Yorkshire,  including  their  PCC  and  Chief  Constable  who  have  carried  this 
responsibility on behalf of policing in England and Wales since its inception. Thanks should also go to NPAS 
colleagues who have engaged positively with this programme, including the Director of Operations who has 
been seconded to the NPCC  team and been  instrumental  to the production of change  options for Chief 
Constables.  
  
1.3 The narrative of this report has passed through the Independent Assurance Group for Aviation, the NPCC 
Operations Committee and the NPAS National Strategic Board. It has also been socialised with the APCC, 
Home Office and the NPAS  management  team. A consensus exists that the programme has successfully 
identified the challenges and issues that underpin the range of options presented to Chiefs.   Financial data 
has been scrutinised by a Force Chief Accountant and a member of the NPCC Finance Committee has been 
engaged.  Cranfield  Aviation  University  has  assured  the  findings  from  an  industry  specific,  good  practice 
perspective.  
  
1.4 What follows is a paper that captures the issues that need to be addressed; the efforts to date made to deal 
with these persistent and seemingly intractable problems and then, as a result of evidence based analysis, 
it provides options for consideration - daring to recommend the pathway that Chief Constables may like to 
support, whilst welcoming discussion at Council.   
  
1.5 Delivered in stages, this paper provides strategic recommendations for Chief Constables and PCCs in relation 
to:   
  
1.5.1   Optimised Service  
1.5.2   Funding and Finance   
1.5.3   Governance and Delivery Model  
  
1.6. The single biggest strategic choice for Chief Constables is whether to continue to invest the necessary £70M 
of additional capital and £3-5M p.a. of revenue funding in order to restore standalone police air support, 
capable of providing a level of operational effectiveness that attracts the broad confidence of forces. Or in 
contrast, to pursue a new direction towards stable cost and higher gain options by engaging with a strategic 
partner, whilst also exploring opportunities to exploit economies of scale and improve service by creating 
an ambitious integrated emergency services air support organisation with agencies such as Maritime and 
Coastguard Agency (MCA and other ‘blue light’ organisations.  
  
2.  BACKGROUND  
  
2.1.  The  10  year  Police  Aviation  Strategy  has  at  its  heart  the  principle  aim  of  keeping  the  public  safe  and 
reassured by seeking ‘to build a blended future national air support service that is affordable and available 
to deploy to the highest threat, harm, risk or vulnerability’.    
  
2.2.  An  evidence  base  has  been  derived  from  interviews  with  Chief  Officers  and,  where  possible,  OPCC 
colleagues  from  all  forces  in  England  and  Wales  (incl.  British  Transport  Police  –  (BTP)),  combined  with 
independent analysis of the current air support service delivered by NPAS.  
  
2.3. Research and analysis shows:  
  
2.3.1. Nearly all forces have a continuing operational need for air support and there is no discernible 
appetite to return to individually owned and operated aircraft.  London has the necessary scale 
where such a move could be considered, but currently has no desire to pursue this. Only Norfolk 
and Suffolk have expressed the view that they no longer require conventional air support.  
  
2.3.2. Unlike other forms of collaboration, where national scale can be expected to deliver savings and 
efficiencies – the original business case that created NPAS did not take account of the uniqueness 
of aviation and the consequential increase of up to £5M p.a. of unavoidable additional cost. When 
NPAS was formed, the police service created, in regulatory terms, its own airline
. The resulting 
2  
  
  

funding pressure has contributed to the reduction in the number of aircraft, moving the service 
in some areas of the country towards becoming ineffective and thus poor value.  
  
2.3.3. It is now widely acknowledged that the Lead Force delivery model is itself a sub-optimal way of 
managing collaborations due to the necessity to pursue low risk operational and financial options 
that protect the host force and its local tax payers.  
  
2.3.4. NPAS inherited a network of legacy bases, not all of which are aligned with areas of threat, harm 
and risk, leading to wasted flight time and high rates of cancellations. (c.40% overall)  
  
2.3.5. Current governance structures have evolved outside the scope of the original collaboration and 
have  missed  the  opportunity  to  utilise  ideas  and  experience  from  the  commercial  aviation 
industry. High turnover of representation and serial absences have been an added challenge to 
both of the main governance boards.  
  
2.3.6. The number of requests by forces for air support assets has been in steep decline over the last 3 
years. If this continues, it risks making the service non-viable in as few as 3 years. Despite this 
trend, flight hours have been stable and therefore productivity is declining.  The addition of up 
to 25% more flight hours through the introduction of aeroplanes will exacerbate this further.  
  
2.3.7. The recent certification process for the aeroplanes has led to significant operational restrictions 
being  imposed  on  the  airfields  from  which  they  can  operate.  This  means  that  the  additional 
capacity  (and  cost)  of  this  fleet  does  not  align  geographically  with  where  demand  for  service 
exists, in a way that allows for a commensurate reduction in helicopter use.  
  
2.3.8. The current funding model is a significant contributory factor in driving the reduction in tasks and 
has  created,  in  some  forces,  an  artificial  market  for  the  use  of  drones,  where  a  conventional 
aviation asset could be cheaper or more effective to use, but currently attracts an ACS.  
  
2.3.9. The fleet is ageing which reduces the amount of time individual aircraft are available to be used 
and increases the cost of maintenance.  
  
2.3.10.  The  development  of  visual  line  of  sight  drones  across  the  country  lacks  consistency  but  has 
revealed new demands for air support that can be fulfilled without the need for conventional 
aviation assets. It is accepted by forces that pursuits, wide-area searches for vulnerable people 
or suspects and other dynamic incidents, cannot currently be effectively dealt with by drones.  
  
2.3.1. ******************************************. S31 S24  
  
2.3.12.  The  Operations  Coordination  Committee  has  approved  this  submission  on  the  12  December 
2019  
  
  
3.  PROPOSAL  
  
3.1.  Proposals for Change  
  
3.2. If the challenge that we are trying to overcome is how best to win the confidence of forces and invite more 
tasks from policing by optimising an ageing fleet; spending a higher proportion of the money that forces 
currently contribute to NPAS on operating more aircraft, at more locations in order to make the service 
effective  – Chief Constables should be clear about whether they believe this can be achieved through a 
standalone police air support organisation – regardless of who the lead force is. This paper makes the case 
that this now appears to be beyond the financial envelope that is currently available to police forces. The 
scale of additional investment in the current delivery model exceeds £70M of capital due to a backlog in 
fleet replacement and £3-5M p.a. in revenue due to the fleet being too small to meet the current responsive 
operational requirements of forces. For this reason and the lack of perceived appetite during visits with 
3  
  
  

forces across England and Wales to invest on this scale, this option is not discussed further. It is instead 
proposed  that  this  ambition  can  only  be  realistically  achieved  by  accessing  the  efficiencies  available  to 
strategic  partners,  especially  if  this  was  to  be  part  of  a  stepped  process  towards  a  £300M  p.a.  joint 
emergency services air support network, together with the MCA and other ‘blue light’ services.  
  
3.3.  In practical terms it is envisaged that such a partnership would deliver operational benefits through the 
police being able to access more assets at more bases,******************************************. 
S31  S24  It  is  also  likely  to  have  the  scale  of  resources  to  sponsor  new  developments  in  air  support 
technology, including the commissioning of BVLOS drones, which the MCA is currently leading on for the 
Department for Transport.  
  
3.4. In the shorter term it is suggested that NPAS could be re-configured to become an internal service provider 
of helicopters/pilot/crew/maintenance/fuel and CAA regulation, allowing forces on a regional basis to 
contribute Tactical Flight Officers and manage their own command, control and tasking – incurring a 
direct cost for the service that they have specified. This is similar to the relationship that could then exist 
with a strategic partner and is how this service is currently delivered on behalf of Police Scotland.    
  
3.5. Optimised Service  
  
3.5.1. We have listened to forces and sought to optimise the air support service that could be provided in terms 
of  availability  and  responsiveness.  This  could  be  achieved  without  increasing  the  current  level  of 
investment  from  forces,  beyond  inflation,  if  combined  with  a  move  to  regional  deployment  and  an 
internal supplier focus for NPAS. The proposals below are interim measures only until Chief Constables 
and PCC’s make key decisions on delivery model:  
  
3.5.1.1.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
   
3.5.1.2.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
3.5.1.3.   *******************S31 & S24*******************************  
  
3.5.1.4.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
3.5.1.5.  *******************S31 & S24*******************************  
  
3.5.1.6.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
3.5.1.7.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
 
3.5.1.8.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
 
 
  
3.5.1.9.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
3.5.1.10.   *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
3.5.2 *******************S31 & S24******************************* 
  
3.5.3 The net effect of the reduced hours of base operation in some areas, based on demand, together with 
increased use of aeroplanes in place of helicopters and the re-distribution of the existing rotary fleet, 
would  provide  opportunities  to  increase  aircraft  availability  whilst  the  issue  of  fleet  replacement  is 
resolved.  
3.6. Finance & Funding  
  
3.6.1. This work has highlighted 3 main options to fund air support.  These are:  
  
4  
  
  


3.6.1.1. Continue with the current ACS model  
3.6.1.2. Develop a funding model that continues to share costs  
3.6.1.3. Apply direct costs to regions, based on the service level specified locally  
  
3.6.2. The ACS charging model is not considered by a majority of forces to be a viable or sustainable means 
of funding air support. Over 60 alternative funding models were considered – including work by the 
Specialist Capabilities Programme.  Each of these requires Chief Constables and PCCs to accept the 
principle that they will either pay more than the cost of the service they receive, or they will be 
subsidised by other forces, by paying less.  Different models exaggerate this effect and given the 
quantum of money involved in aviation, these surpluses’ and deficits are commonly in the region of 
hundreds of thousands of pounds per year per force.   
  
3.6.3. It is recommended instead that regions could be charged for the direct cost of the service level that 
they have a role in specifying. This would allow them to choose hours of operation, flight time and 
the number and type of aviation assets.  This could be stabilised over successive years to help with 
financial  planning.  In  reality  –  if  the  decision  was  taken  to  pursue  a  partnership  with  a  strategic 
provider, either on a police only basis, or as a broader emergency service, it is envisaged that this 
internal supplier structure could be in place for up to 3 years as the interim solution.  
  
3.6.4. Advice received regarding budget setting for NPAS next year indicates it is now too late to institute 
a  new  funding  formula  in  time  for  the  beginning  of  the  2020/21  financial  year.    It  is  therefore 
proposed that NPAS should apply the contribution for each force based on 2019 ACS data – but  
then release forces from similar task based measures that would be used to define their contribution 
from 2021.  Forces could then be allocated a set number of flying hours that equates to the value of 
their  ACS  contribution  –  to  use  as  they  see  fit  and  thereby  maximising  the  potential  for  further 
tasking.   
  
3.6.5. The diagram overleaf illustrates the trend of reducing productivity/increasing costs over time for air 
support.  
  
  
  
  
3.7  Governance and Delivery Model  
  
3.7.1   It is proposed that governance structures are aligned to accord with the outcome of the joint 
APCC/Home Office/Specialist Capabilities and NPCC work focused on how best to lead collaborated 
functions.  This being a 3 tier structure that could be applied to either a standalone police air support 
(as is) model, or to an internal/external service supplier service to regions:  
  
5  
  
  

3.7.2   Existing:  Policing  Board  -  chaired  by  the  Home  Secretary  –  includes  NPCC,  APCC  and  Home  Office. 
Provides strategic overview of policing, but has no current oversight of police aviation.  
  
3.7.3   New: Aviation Management Board – chaired independently. (Independent chair to be sought)  
Includes WYP PCC and NPCC Aviation lead.  Includes drone governance. Owns and leads delivery of the 
Police Aviation Strategy.  
  
3.7.4   Adaptation: Local Board/Service Delivery Board – chaired by WYP PCC – focused on the  operation of 
NPAS by WYP.  Flexible to change of operator or aviation delivery model.  
  
3.7.5  It is proposed that Regional User Groups and the Independent Assurance Group would be replaced by 
existing Regional Collaboration Boards, where aviation would become an added area of business. Each 
NPCC  region  would  then  have  a  Chief  Officer  and  PCC  representative  at  the  Aviation  Management 
Board. Local variation may apply where forces choose to use other regional meeting structures.  
  
3.7.6  
The full report arising from this work is available at Appendix A.   
  
3.7.7  
A full list of recommendations is shown at Appendix B.  
  
  
  
  
  
4.  DECISIONS REQUIRED  
  
4.1 Chief Constables’ Council is invited to determine the following:   
  
4.1.1 Re-confirm its commitment to the continuation of the current S22 Air Support collaboration involving all 
forces.   
4.1.2  Give  outline  support  for  the  interim  optimisation  of  the  current  base  locations,  aircraft  deployment 
configuration and operational processes. (Recommendations 1-23)  
4.1.3 A preferred method of future funding. (Recommendation 24-27)  
4.1.4 An interim approach to funding for 2020/21. (Recommendation 28)  
4.1.5 A future delivery model for air support services. (Recommendation 29)  
4.1.6  An  accompanying  governance  structure  to  lead  the  future  delivery  of  all  forms  of  police  aviation. 
(Recommendations 30-37)  
4.1.7 Commissioning of the Aviation Programme team to produce within 3 months a detailed, costed business 
plan of the Council’s preferred option of delivery model and accompanying funding structure. This work 
would engage with NPAS, APCC and the Home Office as well as involving detailed discussions with forces 
regionally to specify the scale and cost of services. (Note: This team is already funded until April 2020)  
  
  
  
Name:  Rod Hansen MBA, BSc (Hons), Dip Appl Crim  
Title:     Chief Constable of Gloucestershire NPCC Aviation Lead  
January 2020  
  
  
  
  
  
   
6