This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'University policies on gender-based violence'.





  
  
  
 
Policy on Dignity and Respect (Students)  
  
Scope and Purpose of the Policy  
  
This policy relates to all students of DMU. Every student is personally liable under the 
Equality Act and is expected to treat staff and students with dignity and respect and in turn to 
be treated with the same. DMU has a firm commitment to equality and diversity and will not 
tolerate the discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation of one member of the DMU 
community by another. DMU believes that each individual should be afforded dignity and 
respect and that each individual should in turn treat others with dignity and respect.  
  
‘We are a University of quality and distinctiveness, distinguished by our life-changing 
research, dynamic international partnerships, vibrant links with business and our 
commitment to excellence in learning, teaching and the student experience. We 
celebrate the rich cultural diversity of our staff, students and all our partnerships’. 
(DMU mission statement 2011 http://www.dmu.ac.uk/about-dmu/mission-
andvision/mission-and-vision.aspx
)
  
  
The purpose of this policy is to promote the development of a working environment in which 
these unlawful actions are known to be unacceptable and where individuals have the 
confidence to report these, should they arise, in the knowledge that their concerns will be 
dealt with appropriately and fairly. The policy outlines procedures to be followed if a student 
or potential student feels they are being discriminated against, harassed, bullied or 
victimised during their engagement with DMU.  
  
A separate policy on Bullying and Harassment at Work exists for staff and advice on this 
may be obtained from the People and Organisational Development Directorate.  
  
All students are reminded of the relevant clauses in the Disciplinary Code of the 
Student Regulations http://www.dmu.ac.uk/documents/about-
dmudocuments/quality-management-and-policy/students/student-regulations-
2012-
 
2013/chapter-2-2012-2013.pdf, in particular paragraphs 5.3 and 5.4.  
  
5.3  
Violent, indecent, disorderly, threatening, abusive or offensive behaviour to 
any student, employee of the university or the De Montfort Students’ Union or 
any visitor to the university or any member of the local community or any 
behaviour which in the reasonable opinion of the designated senior member 
of staff or relevant Provost is likely to be regarded as constituting such 
misconduct;   
  
5.4  
Abusive, threatening or offensive language (verbal or written – including 
social media websites) to any student, employee of the university or the De 
Montfort Students’ Union or any visitor to the university or any member of the 
local community.   
  
1. Definitions   
  
 

1.1  The Equality Act 2010 identifies nine protected characteristics. These are: age, 
disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and 
maternity, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation.   
  
  
  
1  
 

  
1.2  
Unlawful discrimination - is behaviour or a policy or procedure which intentionally or 
unintentionally prevents individuals or groups who have a protected characteristic, 
from engaging or taking part in an activity. This may include selection for a course, 
job, promotion, award and so on. For example:   
  
• 
A student is excluded from a course related visit or placement because they are 
disabled.   
• 
A student is told to leave her course because she is pregnant.   
• 
Students or staff are compulsorily segregated, for meetings or events, on the 
basis of their religion, sex, sexual orientation or other protected characteristics.  
  
1.3  
Harassment is unwanted conduct that has the purpose or effect of creating an 
intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for the 
complainant, or violating the complainant’s dignity. Individuals or groups may be 
protected from harassment because they are from a protected group (Equality  
Act 2010), or because they are associated with the protected group. For example:   
  
• 
Unwanted conduct of a sexual nature (sexual harassment).   
• 
Treating a person less favourably than another person because they have either 
submitted to, or did not submit to, sexual harassment or harassment related to 
sex, sexual orientation or gender reassignment.   
• 
Treating someone less favourably because they associate with gay, lesbian,  
 
bisexual or transgendered people.   
• 
Treating someone less favourably because they are or are perceived to hold a 
particular religion or belief.   
  
1.4 
Bullying may be characterised as offensive, intimidating, malicious or 
insulting behaviour, an abuse or misuse of power through means that 
undermine, humiliate, denigrate or injure the recipient.   
  
Bullying can take the form of shouting, sarcasm, derogatory remarks concerning 
academic or practical vocational performance or constant criticism and undermining. 
Bullying is to be distinguished from vigorous academic debate or the actions of a 
teacher or supervisor making reasonable (but perhaps unpopular) requests or 
analysis of performance of their students.   
  
1.5 
Victimisation takes place where one person treats another less favourably 
because they have asserted their legal rights in line with the Equality Act or 
helped someone else to do so. For example:   
  
• 
A student alleges that they have encountered racism from a tutor, and as a result 
they are ignored by other staff members.   
• 
A student who previously supported another student or member of staff in 
submitting a formal complaint for sexist behaviour is then treated in a hostile  
 
manner by staff.   
• 
Staff brand a student as a ‘troublemaker’ because they raised a lack of 
opportunities for disabled students as being potentially discriminatory.   
  
Cyber bullying occurs when the internet, social media, phones or other devices are 
used to send or post text or images intended to hurt or embarrass another person, 
known or unknown to the individual.  
 

  
  
  
  
  
  
2  
 
 

  
2. DMU's Commitment  
  
2.1  
DMU welcomes diversity and believes that every student has a right to work and 
study in an environment which encourages good relationships. DMU is committed to 
preventing unlawful discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation. The 
university's commitment to cultural diversity is expressed in its mission and vision 
statements.   
  
2.2  
DMU is a member of the Leicestershire ‘Stamp it Out’ Hate Crime Partnership led by 
Leicestershire Constabulary.   
  
2.3  
DMU Security take all incidents of bullying, harassment and victimisation very 
seriously and will record such reports and investigate as appropriate.   
  
2.4  
The Student at Risk Committee (SAR) within SAAS sits regularly to review cases of 
students deemed to be at risk to themselves or of posing a risk to others.   
  
2.5  
Every student is also personally liable under the Equality Act 2010 for their own 
actions. In cases of unlawful discrimination, harassment, bullying, or victimisation the 
University is required to consider students as third-party players. DMU is required to 
protect its staff, students, contractors and visitors from unlawful discrimination, 
harassment, bullying or victimisation. Students who are found to have committed 
these offences will be referred to the university’s disciplinary policies and procedures.   
  
2.6  
DMU will ensure that any student raising a genuine concern under this policy is not 
victimised as a result.   
  
2.7  
As allegations of discrimination, harassment, bullying and victimisation are very 
serious, DMU will also treat very seriously any such allegations proven to be 
malicious or untrue and these are also likely to be the subject of disciplinary action.   
  
3. Reporting and Responding  
  
3.1  
The over-riding principles in dealing with allegations or concerns of discrimination, 
harassment, bullying and victimisation are that they must be taken seriously, 
considered carefully and addressed speedily and where possible, in confidence.   
  
3.2  
Any student who feels that they are the subject of discrimination, harassment, 
bullying or victimisation, either by a fellow student, a member of staff or anyone else 
with whom they come into contact in the course of their period of study at DMU, may 
wish to make a note of incidents, dates, times and any witnesses, for future 
reference. Any student who considers themselves to have been the subject of 
discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation has the right to be listened to 
and to be given informed advice on how the matter may be resolved. There are 
usually a number of options.   
  
3.3  
In the event that a student considers that they are experiencing discrimination, 
harassment, bullying or victimisation, they have a number of options open to them. 
They may be able to speak directly to the individual concerned or to write to them 
expressing their concerns and requesting that the behaviour stop immediately. 
Alternatively, or subsequently if they achieve no success, they may wish to talk to 
3  

someone in order to obtain another perspective on the situation and to ensure that 
someone else knows about it and can take action with them to ensure that it stops. It   
  
  
 

is envisaged that the large majority of cases will be resolved by such informal 
procedures, which are described in more detail below, but a final option is to make 
a formal complaint.  
  
3.4  
Incidents of bullying, harassment or victimisation may be reported to:   
  
• 
The Security Team. The team is available 24 hours a day and can be telephone 
on 0116 2577642 or email in strict confidence xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.   
  
• 
Programme leaders, personal tutors or faculty provosts.   
  
• 
The Student Appeals & Conduct Officer, email in strict confidence to 
xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx.   
  
• 
Wardens in halls of residence.   
  
• 
Staff in the Leisure Centre.   
  
• 
De Montfort Students’ Union.   
  
3.5  
Where an incident is not resolved through an informal route, students may place a 
complaint through the Student Complaint Procedures (see 
http://www.dmu.ac.uk/dmu-students/student-and-academic-
services/academicsupport-office/student-complaints/student-complaints-
procedure.aspx
) to the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer.   
  
4. Informal Processes  
  
4.1  
Confidentiality is very important in dealing with cases of alleged discrimination, 
harassment, bullying or victimisation as experience shows that they will be much 
more difficult to resolve informally if information about the matter becomes common 
knowledge. Anyone approaching a member of staff or other individual for advice 
may, however, wish to be accompanied by a friend.   
  
4.2  
If, after having been approached, the adviser wishes to obtain guidance on how to 
deal with an alleged case of discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation they 
should seek the agreement of the person who has confided in them to that course of 
action and then consult with the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer. If the 
individual does not feel able to help in a particular case, they should explain the 
reasons to the complainant and refer them to another adviser.   
  
4.3  
Once the facts about the incident and the context of the action or behaviour that 
caused concern are established, there are a number of informal options available to 
the adviser to facilitate resolution of the matter. For example, the person who has 
experienced discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation could be 
encouraged to talk to the alleged perpetrator on their own or with a friend, who 
should be a member of DMU, accompanying them. The purpose of the conversation 
would be to make the perpetrator aware of the way their behaviour has been 
perceived and ask them not to repeat it. Alternatively, the adviser could facilitate a 
meeting between both parties to give the complainant the opportunity to talk to the 
alleged perpetrator and explain their view of the offending behaviour. Normally, the 
adviser should not take action following an informal approach concerning   
5  

  
  
   
discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation without the agreement of the 
individual concerned.  
  
4.4  
As well as aiming to resolve matters informally, advisers should consider appropriate 
action to facilitate the restoration of working relationships after the event.   
  
4.5  
The action outlined above will be appropriate in many cases and will often be 
sufficient to resolve the matter. If, however, an informal approach does not achieve 
satisfactory results, or the nature of the incident(s) prompts the person who feels 
harassed to take a more formal approach, a formal complaint can be made in writing 
to the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer or the Head of Security.   
  
4.6  
In order to ensure consistency of approach and accurate statistical data with relation 
to cases of discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation all cases (however 
minor) should be reported to the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer by any 
member of staff who has counselled a student. Information should be sent via email 
and detail the names of the students involved and basic facts about the nature of the 
case. All such information will be treated with the utmost confidentiality.   
  
5. A Formal Complaint   
  
5.1  
It is envisaged that the great majority of cases of discrimination, harassment, bullying 
and victimisation will be resolved by the informal procedures outlined above. 
However, Formal action may be considered where informal action proves ineffective, 
or where a student feels that an informal approach is not appropriate. A formal 
complaint must normally be registered in writing, as soon as possible after the 
incident concerned, with the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer.   
  
5.2  
A formal complaint of discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation should 
include the nature of the complaint, with reference to dates, times and places (where 
possible) in relation to a specific incident(s). The names of any witness(es) to the 
incident(s) should also be included.   
  
6. Investigating a Formal Complaint   
  
6.1  
On receipt of a formal complaint where the alleged perpetrator is another student, the 
Student Appeals and Conduct Officer will handle the matter according to DMU's 
Disciplinary Code and Procedure as described in the General Regulations. 
Accordingly, the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer will discuss with the 
complainant whether further action should be taken under the Disciplinary Code and 
whether or not the police should be informed.   
  
6.2  
Where the alleged perpetrator is a member of staff, the Student Appeals and 
Conduct Officer will discuss with the complainant whether further action should be 
taken and, if so, will refer the complaint to the Director of People and Organisational 
Development. The Director will then inform the student of the procedure to be 
followed.   
  
  
6  

6.3  
Where the situation is more complex than outlined above, for example in cases of 
alleged group discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation involving both staff 
and students, the Student Appeals and Conduct Officer will liaise with the Director of 
People and Organisational Development to decide how best to proceed.   
  
  
  
6.4  
Formal complaints about a Dean, or Pro Vice Chancellor should be referred to the 
Vice Chancellor. A complaint about the Vice Chancellor should be addressed to the 
Chair of Governors.   
  
6.5  
Formal Complaints about a Director should be made to the Chief Operating Officer.   
  
6.6  
Details of the arrangements for appeals are available from the Student Appeals and 
Conduct Officer and the Director of People and Organisational Development.   
  
7. Monitoring of the Policy   
  
7.1  
The Director of Student and Academic Services will keep the implementation of this 
policy under review and will monitor its use through the Academic Support Office.   
  
8. Personal Relationships at Work   
  
8.1 DMU also has a Code of Conduct on personal relationships at work, which applies in 
circumstances where personal and professional relationships overlap. The Code can 
be found on the People and Organisational Development web site.   
  
9. Use of DMU Computers and ID   
  
9.1  
Discrimination, harassment, bullying or victimisation may occur online and could be 
considered as misuse of DMU's computing services where this takes place using a 
DMU email account or from a DMU-provided piece of equipment or network. This 
includes potentially discriminative or offensive material posted on public access 
websites or social networking sites. Online harassment and bullying (cyber bullying) 
will be dealt with under the procedures outlined above. As well as infringing the DMU 
Policy on Dignity and Respect, such abuse of DMU facilities will also breach the 
University’s IT Regulations and may be subject to disciplinary procedure. The IT 
Regulations may be found on the DMU website.   
  
October 2012  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
7  

  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
   
  
8  

Document Outline