This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Information on Dunne, P. (Trans)forming single gender services and communal accommodations (2017)'.


Document 4
 
Dated: 5 September 2019
Scottish Government Library 
Literature Search 
Subject
 
Female services - legitimate  basis on which trans 
women might need  to be excluded  from some 
 
women-only  services 
Requested by 
[Redacted] Date Requested 21st August  2019   
Date Required By 5th September  2019  Date Delivered By 
 
 
 
 
Context (why) 
A new Equality  Impact  Assessment (EQIA)  is being  undertaken  for the 
proposed  changes to the Gender  Recognition  Act 2004 (see more here). This will be 
published  alongside  the forthcoming consultation.  This search is part of gathering 
evidence  for this EQIA. 
 
Topic (what) I need to identify research on women-only services, locations, or provisions and any 
reasons for which there might legitimately need to be provision for trans women to be excluded 
from these (either as users or service providers). 
 
 
Keywords   
Trans, transgender,  women, female, discrimination,  disadvantage, 
service, exclude,  venue,  location,  provision,  provider,  user, behaviour, 
prison, school, health,  healthcare,  refuge,  biolog*,  reproduct*, quota, 
education,  changing,  facilit*, accommodation 
 
In a sentence 
Evidence  on legitimate  basis on which trans women might need to be 
excluded  from some women-only  services, locations, or provisions,  or on 
which their presence might put non-trans women at a disadvantage. 
 
Limits   
No time restriction. Europe  or other  locations with similar societies to the 
UK. 
 
Please acknowledge the Library  in your  findings.  Thank you! 
  The  information  in  this  document  has  been  sourced  from selected trusted databases 
which the Library  subscribes to, and from publicly  available  resources on the internet. 
  All  the  selected  databases used are available for you to search via the how to carry out 
research  page  on  Saltire.  If  you  would  like  training  in  searching  these  resources  or  in 
searching the internet,  please contact the  Library  on [0131  24] 44556  or email Library. 
 
Resources searched 
Keywords  / Search Strategy 
KandE 
 
IDOX 
"female  services" OR "Women's services" 
Page 1 of 26 

 
Knowledge Network 
 
Proquest 
Trans OR transgender  AND  "women's 
Google Selected 
services"  
Google Advanced 
 
Google Scholar 
Trans OR transgender  AND  discrimination 
OR disadvantage  OR exclude  OR Exclusion 
AND  "Women's services"  OR "female 
services" OR services 
 
Heterosexism  OR "straight women" AND 
discrimination  OR disadvantage  OR exclude 
OR Exclusion 
 
Marginalisation  OR Marginalization  AND 
LGBT OR Heterosexual 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Findings 
  Please note that the literature search results should not be regarded as comprehensive 
as  the  Scottish  Government  Library  only  has  access  to  a  limited  number  of 
bibliographic  databases,  and  of  these  databases,  only  those  regarded  as  the  most 
relevant  bibliographic  databases  have  been  searched.    Should  you  wish  further 
searching  of  other  bibliographic  databases  available  to  the  Scottish  Government 
Library  please let the Library  team know. 
  We  have  used  our  expertise  to  select  the  sources  used  in  this  literature  search  but 
librarians  are not experts in your subject, so please consider these results carefully and 
apply  your own judgement  to the information  presented  here. 
 
Key results 
The following  results may be particularly  relevant: 
Transgender  Health 
 
Transgender  Studies Quarterly 
 
Stonewall  Scotland 
Fair Play for Women 
 
Page 2 of 26 

 
GenderPortal 
 
Women‐specific HIV/AIDS  services: identifying  and defining  the components of holistic 
service delivery  for women living  with HIV/AIDS  
 - lots of academics named with 
specialisms in Women’s studies this may be of use even if the report  itself isn’t. 
 
UN  Women Publications 
 
Women's Studies International  Forum Journal 
 
University  of York:  Centre for Women's Studies 
 
Institute  of Development  Studies: Pathways of Women’s Empowerment Research 
Programme Consortium 

 
The Centre for Gender  and Women’s Studies at Lancaster University 
 
The St Andrews  Institute  for Gender  Studies  (StAIGS) 
 
University  of Warwick: Centre for the Study of Women and Gender 
 
University  of Sussex: Centre for Gender  Studies 
 
Permissions 
  These  search  results  (except  results  under  the  heading  ‘Internet’)  are  sourced  from 
subscription  databases  licensed  for  Scottish  Government  use  only.    Therefore  you  are 
not permitted  to forward  these results outwith the Scottish Government. 
  Any  full  text  information  you  download  is  protected  by  copyright  and  therefore  should 
not  be  stored  in  eRDM  or  shared  electronically.  Further  copyright  information  can  be 
found  at the copyright  page  on Saltire. 
 
Results 
 
 
KandE 
 
 
Page 3 of 26 

 
KandE  Knowledge  and  Evidence:  lets  you  do  a  single search (like Google) across a range 
of quality  databases  selected by the librarians. 
How to access full text  
Click on the link in each record to access or request the full text 
Can a Trans-gendered Person be 'one of us'? Herizons 2001 Fall2001;15(2):22 
     Focuses on the involvement  of trans-gendered  persons in women's service agencies. 
Discussion on the complexity  of the physiology  of female sex; Testimony of a trans-
gendered  person; Efficacy of trans-gendered  persons in rape  crisis counselling  training. 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asn&AN=5401979&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Welfare In The Women's  Services. The British Medical  Journal 1942;2(4268):492 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.20324441&site
=eds-live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Report of the Committee  on Amenities  and Welfare Conditions in Three Women's 
Services. Soc.Serv.Rev. 1942;16(4):706
 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.30014052&site
=eds-live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Bakko M. The Effect of Survival Economy  Participation  on Transgender Experiences 
of Service Provider Discrimination.  Sexuality  Research & Social  Policy:  Journal of 
NSRC 2019 09;16(3):268-277
 
     This study determines  how transgender  involvement  in survival  economies, namely sex 
work and drug sales, affects transgender  experiences  of service provider  discrimination,  in 
comparison to discrimination  experienced  by transgender  people  not involved  in survival 
economies. It utilizes cross-sectional data from the 2008–2009  National  Transgender 
Discrimination Survey  (NTDS). Multivariate  logistic regression is conducted  on the sample 
(n = 4927)  to determine  the strength of association. Logistic regress ion sub-analysis  is 
used to compare discrimination  across different  service provider  contexts. Compared to 
those not participating  in survival  economies, participating  in sex work has almost three 
times greater  odds (OR 2.83,  CI 2.20–3.63),  and those participating  in drug sales have 
approximately  1.5 greater odds (OR 1.52, CI 1.16–1.99),  of experiencing  discrimination 
from service providers.  Participation  in survival  economies is a significant  predictor of a 
transgender  person's increased likelihood  of experiencing  service provider  discrimination. 
Findings  suggest that service providers  must attend  to the specificity of transgender 
experiences  in survival  economies. Harm reduction is offered  as a suitable  intervention 
approach.  ABSTRACT  FROM AUTHOR];  Copyright  of Sexuality  Research & Social Policy: 
Journal  of NSRC is the property  of Springer Nature  and its content may not be copied or 
emailed  to multiple  sites or posted to a listserv without  the copyright  holder's express 
written permission. However,  users may print,  download,  or email articles for individual 
use. This abstract may be abridged.  No warranty  is given  about the accuracy of the copy. 
Users should  refer to the original  published  version  of the material for the full abstract. 
(Copyright  applies  to all Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sxi&AN=137819902&site=eds-
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Beeman SK, Hagemeister AK,  Edleson JL. Child Protection and Battered Women's 
Services: From  Conflict to Collaboration.  Child Maltreat. 1999  05;4(2):116
 
     Presents information  on a study which reports the results of an effort  to systematically 
Page 4 of 26 

 
probe  the practices and views of both  child protective  services (CPS) workers and battered 
women (BW) advocates which practices might evolve  toward  cooperation.  Methodology  of 
the study; Results and  discussion on the study. 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asn&AN=1833649&site=eds-
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Blair KL, Hoskin RA.  Transgender exclusion from  the world of dating:  Patterns of 
acceptance and rejection of hypothetical  trans dating partners as a function of 
sexual and gender identity.  Journal of Social  & Personal Relationships  2019 
07;36(7):2074-2095
 
     The current study sought to describe the demographic  characteristics of individuals 
who are willing  to consider a transgender  individual  as a potential  dating  partner. 
Participants  (N = 958)  from a larger  study on relationship  decision-making  processes were 
asked to select all potential  genders  that they would  consider dating  if ever  seeking  a 
future  romantic partner.  The options  provided  included  cisgender  men, cisgender women, 
trans men, trans women, and genderqueer  individuals.  Across a sample of heterosexual, 
lesbian,  gay, bisexual,  queer, and  trans individuals,  87.5% indicated  that  they would  not 
consider dating  a trans person, with cisgender heterosexual  men and women being  most 
likely  to exclude  trans persons from their  potential  dating  pool. Individuals  identifying  as 
bisexual,  queer,  trans, or non-binary  were most likely  to indicate  a willingness  to date a 
trans person. However,  even  among those willing  to date trans persons, a pattern of 
masculine privileging  and  transfeminine  exclusion  appeared,  such that participants  were 
disproportionately  willing  to date  trans men, but not trans women, even  if doing  so was 
counter to their self-identified  sexual and gender  identity  (e.g., a lesbian  dating  a trans 
man but not a trans woman). The results are discussed within  the context of the 
implications  for trans persons seeking  romantic relationships  and the pervasiveness  of 
cisgenderism and transmisogyny.  ABSTRACT  FROM AUTHOR];  Copyright  of Journal  of 
Social & Personal  Relationships  is the property  of Sage Publications,  Ltd. and its content 
may not be copied  or emailed  to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without  the copyright 
holder's express written permission. However,  users may print,  download,  or email articles 
for individual  use. This abstract may be abridged.  No warranty  is given  about  the accuracy 
of the copy. Users should refer to the original  published  version  of the material  for the full 
abstract. (Copyright  applies  to all  Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asn&AN=136731831&site=eds-
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Browne K, Lim  J. Trans lives in the 'gay capital  of the UK'. Gender, Place & Culture: 
A  Journal of Feminist  Geography 2010 10;17(5):615-633
 
     Recent geographical  interventions  have  begun to question  the power relations  among 
lesbian,  gay, bisexual  and trans people,  challenging  assumptions that LGBT  communities 
have  homogeneous  needs or are not characterised  by hierarchies of power. Such 
interventions  have  included  examinations  of LGBT  scenes as sites of exclusion  for trans 
people.  This article augments academic explorations  of trans lives by focusing on 'the gay 
capital' of the UK, Brighton  & Hove,  a city that is notably  absent from academic 
discussions of gay  urbanities  in the UK, despite  its wider acclaim. The article draws upon 
Count Me  In  Too (CMIT),  a participatory  action research project that seeks to progress 
social change for LGBT people  in Brighton  & Hove.  Rather than focusing on LGBT scenes, 
the article addresses broader experiences  of the city, including  those relating  to the city as 
a political  entity  that seeks to be 'LGBT inclusive'  and those relating  to the geographies  of 
medical 'treatment' that relocate  trans people  outside the boundaries  of the city, 
specifically  to the gender  identity  clinic at Charing  Cross Hospital  in London.  It argues that 
trans lives are both excluded  from and inextricably  linked  to geographical  imaginings  of the 
Page 5 of 26 

 
'gay capital',  including  LGBT spaces, scenes and activism, such that complex sexual and 
gender  solidarities  are simultaneously  created and  contested. In  this way, the article 
recognises the paradoxes  of the hopes and solidarities  that co-exist - and should  be held 
in tension - with experiences  of marginalisation.  ABSTRACT  FROM AUTHOR];  Copyright 
of Gender,  Place & Culture:  A Journal  of Feminist Geography  is the property  of Routledge 
and its content  may not be copied or emailed  to multiple  sites or posted to a listserv 
without  the copyright  holder's express written permission. However,  users may print, 
download,  or email articles for individual  use. This abstract may be abridged.  No warranty 
is given  about  the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original  published 
version  of the material  for the full  abstract. (Copyright  applies  to all Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sxi&AN=53079296&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
CUTTING P, HENDERSON C. Women's  experiences of hospital admission.  Journal 
of Psychiatric  & Mental Health Nursing (Wiley-Blackwell)  2002 12;9(6):705-712
 
     The primary aim of this study was to examine  women's experiences  of inpatient 
psychiatric services. A  secondary aim was to use the emerging  themes in service planning 
and to develop  an evaluation  tool.  Focus groups and individual  interviews  with women in 
receipt of psychiatric services in Croydon  were used. The findings  suggest continuity  with 
both negative  and positive  aspects of institutional  care described before the policy  of 
community care was introduced.  The attempts to ‘normalize’ institutional  care by 
desegregating  wards appear  rather  to have  compounded  problems faced by women. 
Women were clear about  what they felt they  wanted  and needed.  Women are dissatisfied 
about  many aspects of care aside from the problems associated specifically  with mixed 
sex wards. This suggests that sexual segregation  of wards alone  is a necessary but an 
insufficient  measure to improve  inpatient  care. The findings  can inform development  of a 
women-only  service in Croydon and  of a tool to evaluate  it. ABSTRACT  FROM AUTHOR]; 
Copyright  of Journal  of Psychiatric & Mental  Health  Nursing  (Wiley-Blackwell)  is the 
property  of Wiley-Blackwell  and its content may not be copied  or emailed  to multiple sites 
or posted to a listserv without the copyright  holder's  express written  permission. However, 
users may print,  download,  or email articles for individual  use. This abstract may be 
abridged.  No warranty  is given  about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the 
original  published  version of the material  for the full  abstract. (Copyright  applies to all 
Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asn&AN=8633866&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Dagher V. Whose  Streets? Ms. 2007 Spring2007;17(2):18-18 
     The article discusses the development  of the RightRides for Women's Safety  Inc. in 
New York  City. The organization  provides  safe transportation  to women and transgender 
individuals  heading  home from late-night  shifts or evenings  out with friends.  It is stated that 
the organization  has been  rapidly  growing  due to the increasing callers asking for service. 
Detailed  information  regarding  the organization's  operation  is discussed. 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asn&AN=24772847&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Dunne P. (Trans)Forming  Single-Gender Services and Communal  Accommodations. 
Social & Legal Studies 2017  10;26(5):537-561
 
     The right of transgender  ('trans') persons to access gender-segregated  space is neither 
a new controversy  nor a conversation  which is unique  to the United  Kingdom.  Yet,  despite 
increasingly  charged  political  debates in North  America,  the question of trans access to 
single-gender  facilities  remains largely  underexplored  by British legal  academics. In 
Page 6 of 26 

 
January  2016, the UK House  of Commons Select Committee on Women and Equalities 
recommended expanding  trans entry into  single-gender  services and communal 
accommodations under the Equality  Act 2010.  Using  the Committee's report as a 
springboard  for debate,  this article considers the right  of trans populations  to use their 
preferred  women-only  and men-only  spaces. Critically  analysing  the existing  possibilities 
to exclude  trans persons from services and accommodations, as well as the policy 
arguments which motivate this approach,  the article demonstrates how, adopting  common-
sense, evidence-based  reforms, Parliament can introduce  legal  rules which both prioritize 
user safety  and respect trans dignity.  ABSTRACT  FROM  AUTHOR];  Copyright  of Social & 
Legal  Studies is the property  of Sage Publications,  Ltd.  and its content may not be copied 
or emailed to multiple  sites or posted to a listserv without  the copyright  holder's express 
written permission. However,  users may print,  download,  or email articles for individual 
use. This abstract may be abridged.  No warranty  is given  about the accuracy of the copy. 
Users should  refer to the original  published  version  of the material for the full abstract. 
(Copyright  applies  to all Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=i3h&AN=125605486&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Gottschalk  LH. Transgendering women's space:  A  feminist  analysis  of perspectives 
from  Australian  women's  services. Women's  Studies International Forum  2009 
05;32(3):167-178
 
     Synopsis: This article explores  the social and political  implications of transgenderism 
for women's groups and organisations.  One aim of transgender  support groups such as, 
The Gender  Centre Inc.  and others, is the right of male to female  transgenders (MTFs)  to 
enter what were previously  understood  to be women-only  spaces such as women's health 
centres, domestic violence  shelters, and rape crisis centres. MTFs whether  pre or post-
operative,  claim the right  to enter  these spaces as both  clients and workers. In-depth 
interviews  were conducted with managers of gendered  spaces and a small number of 
workers. Discussions centred around  their values  and policies about  gendered  spaces and 
the advantages  and disadvantages  of having  women-only  spaces, as well as their 
experience  of trans-inclusion  when it had occurred and the impact on staff and  clients of 
inclusion.  The majority of interviewees  supported women-only  space and employed  only 
female staff in their centres. Their  policy and practices around  the employment of MTFs,  or 
accepting MTFs  as clients, depended  on whether  or not they considered  MTFs to be 
women, a point  upon which there was significant  disagreement.  Those who believed  MTFs 
to be women supported  their inclusion.  Those who did not consider MTFs to be women felt 
that their  presence would  compromise women's feelings of safety and threaten  not only 
the very  existence of women-only  spaces, but also they  services they  provide.  Copyright 
&y& Elsevier];  Copyright  of Women's Studies International  Forum is the property  of 
Pergamon Press - An  Imprint  of Elsevier  Science and its content may not be copied  or 
emailed  to multiple  sites or posted to a listserv without  the copyright  holder's express 
written permission. However,  users may print,  download,  or email articles for individual 
use. This abstract may be abridged.  No warranty  is given  about the accuracy of the copy. 
Users should  refer to the original  published  version  of the material for the full abstract. 
(Copyright  applies  to all Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sxi&AN=43035902&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Moore A.  Shaping  the service to fit the person. Nursing Standard 2011 
02/02;25(22):20-22
 
     Alison  Moore  uncovers services that are taking  steps to improve care for lesbian,  gay, 
bisexual  and trans people.  ABSTRACT  FROM  AUTHOR];  Copyright  of Nursing  Standard 
Page 7 of 26 

 
is the property  of RNCi and its content  may not be copied or emailed  to multiple  sites or 
posted to a listserv without  the copyright  holder's express written permission. However, 
users may print,  download,  or email articles for individual  use. This abstract may be 
abridged.  No warranty  is given  about the accuracy of the copy. Users  should refer to the 
original  published  version of the material  for the full  abstract. (Copyright  applies to all 
Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asn&AN=58094198&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Neale J, Tompkins  CNE, Marshall AD,  Treloar C, Strang J. Do women with  complex 
alcohol  and other drug use histories want  women-only  residential treatment? 
Addiction  2018  06;113(6):989-997
 
     Abstract: Background:  Women-only addiction  services tend  to be provided  on a poorly 
evidenced  assumption that  women want single-sex  treatment. We draw upon women's 
expectations  and  experiences  of women-only  residential  rehabilitation  to stimulate debate 
on this issue. Methods:  Semi-structured interviews were undertaken  with 19 women aged 
25–44  years currently in treatment  (n = 9), successfully completed treatment  (n = 5), left 
treatment  prematurely  (n = 5)]. All  had histories of physical or sexual abuse, and  relapses 
linked  to relationships  with men. Interviews  were audio-recorded,  transcribed  verbatim, 
coded and analysed  inductively  following  Iterative  Categorization.  Findings:  Women 
reported  routinely  that they  had been concerned,  anxious  or scared about  entering 
women-only  treatment.  They attributed  these feelings  to previous  poor relationships  with 
women, being  more accustomed to male company and  negative  experiences  of other 
women-only  residential  settings. Few women said that  they had wanted  women-only 
treatment,  although  many became more positive  after entering  the women-only  service. 
Once in treatment,  women often  explained  that they  felt safe, supported,  relaxed, 
understood  and able  to open up and develop  relationships  with other female  residents. 
However,  they also described tensions, conflicts, mistrust and  social distancing  that 
undermined  their  treatment experiences.  Conclusions:  Women who have  complex 
histories of alcohol and  other drug use do not necessarily  want or perceive  benefit  in 
women-only  residential  treatment. ABSTRACT  FROM  AUTHOR];  Copyright  of Addiction  is 
the property  of Wiley-Blackwell  and its content may not be copied  or emailed  to multiple 
sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright  holder's  express written  permission. 
However,  users may print, download,  or email articles for individual  use. This abstract may 
be abridged.  No warranty  is given  about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to 
the original  published  version of the material  for the full  abstract. (Copyright  applies to all 
Abstracts.) 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sxi&AN=129473428&site=eds -
live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Osorio R, McCusker M, Salazar C. Evaluation of a women-only  service for substance 
misusers.  J.Subst.Use 2001(1):41
 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsbl&AN=RN114686890&site=e
ds-live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib* .  
 
Prock KA,  Kennedy AC.  Federally-funded transitional  living programs  and services 
for LGBTQ-identified homeless youth:  A  profile in unmet  need. Children and Youth 
Services Review 2017;83:17-24
 
     Adolescents  who identify  as lesbian,  gay, bisexual,  transgender,  or queer (LGBTQ) are 
overrepresented  among runaway  and homeless youth  (RHY)  and experience  increased 
rates of sexual  victimization,  mental health  issues, and substance use in comparison to 
their heterosexual  and  cisgender peers. Additionally,  some sexual minority  homeless 
Page 8 of 26 

 
youth  experience  discrimination  in RHY  programs, indicating  the  importance  of services 
tailored  to their specific needs. However,  we know very little  about  the availability  of these 
services, particularly  in transitional  living  programs (TLPs). This exploratory  study 
examines the services offered by the Family  and Youth  Services Bureau-funded  TLPs in 
the United  States—including  LGBTQ-specific services—and  examines the differences 
between  programs that  offer these specific services and those that do not. Participants 
(N=124  programs) completed  a survey  by phone or email  about  their program 
characteristics and services; we supplemented  the survey  with an analysis  of content  on 
programs' websites and Facebook  pages, including  program descriptions, service 
availability,  and LGBTQ-related  content. Fewer than half  (43.5%) of the participants 
reported  offering  LGBTQ-specific services; information  regarding  these services was 
minimally  present on the agency's websites (20.2%)  or Facebook  pages (5.3%).  These 
programs were more likely  to be located on the West Coast or in the Northeast  region,  and 
more likely  to offer counseling,  support groups, and recreation  or youth  development 
activities.  Our findings  add to the limited body  of knowledge  regarding  service provision  in 
TLPs, and  indicate high  unmet need among this vulnerable  population.  We conclude  with 
implications  for social work research, policy  and practice. 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edselp&AN=S0190740917307211
&site=eds-live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Pyne J. UNSUITABLE BODIES: Trans People and Cisnormativity  in Shelter Service s. 
Canadian  Social Work  Review / Revue canadienne de service social  2011;28(1):129
 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.41658838&site
=eds-live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
Rathbone EF. The Remuneration of Women's  Services. The Economic  Journal 
1917;27(105):55
 
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=edsjsr&AN=edsjsr.10.2307.22223
98&site=eds-live&custid=s2198163&authtype=uid&user=scotland&password=Sc0tgovlib*.  
 
 
 
IDOX 
 
 
IDOX:  covers  issues  concerning  local  government  and  the  public  sector  in  the  UK,  and  is 
available  to  core  Scottish  Government  staff.  Please  register  online to source these articles 
direct  from  IDOX. Registered users can request hard-copy publications, carry out their own 
information  searches,  and  sign  up  for  regular  topic  updates.  If  you  require  any  help  in 
registering,  searching  the  database,  or  sourcing full text articles please  email the Library or 
call ext. 44556. 
 
Evidence  on legitimate  basis on which trans women might need to be excluded  from some 
women-only  services, locations,  or provisions,  or on which their  presence might put non-
trans women at a disadvantage. 
 
Response:  
Page 9 of 26 

 
Searches were conducted  on the Idox  database  using various key  terms including  those 
suggested.  This returned  just a few results, presented  below and  with links  provided  to full 
text. 
Perhaps of most interest,  will be the House of Commons Women and  Equalities 
Committee report on transgender  equality  (Ref. B44347)  which considers ‘exemptions  in 
respect of trans people’.  It  notes that the inquiry  heard  a range  of views on this difficult  and 
sensitive  issue, with Women Analysing  Policy on Women saying: 
There are situations  such as women-only  domestic and sexual violence services where 
vulnerable  women  surviving in crisis find  it very difficult  to feel  safe. Some of these 
women  may feel unable  to access services provided  by or offered jointly  to all women 
including  transwomen;  this produces a clash with  the rights of transwomen  to be treated 
exactly the same as other women.  In such cases when  the safety, wellbeing  and 
recovery of women  are reliant  upon their  ability to access services the law  has created 
exemptions to allow  for women  only services that do not include  some transwomen,  in 
some circumstances

This came from the evidence  submission from Women Analysing  Policy on Women to the 
transgender  Equality  Inquiry.  It  considers the implications  of some proposals for legal 
changes made by some transgender  groups which would  remove the protection  in the 
Equality  Act for women only spaces. It  sets out the need  for women only  spaces before 
going  on to describe the current legal  situation.  It  then details  the calls for change  that 
have  been made and identifies  the  ways in which these would reduce the protection  for 
women only spaces currently  provided  in the Equality  Act. Similarly,  the  Prison Reform 
Trust’s submission 
stated: 
Some organisations  working  with  female  prisoners, such as those providing  support  for 
women  who  have experienced  domestic violence or sexual assault may decide  not to 
provide services to transwomen  as long  as the decision is legitimate  and proportionate. 
We support the current position. 

 
As there was limited material,  further  searches were also undertaken  online,  which 
returned  the following  material that may also be of interest: 
Trans Inclusion in Women Only Spaces, Concept, Vol 10 No 1 Spring 2019  – aims to 
provide  a reflective  account within the following  topics: 1.An   exploration   of  the  
consciousness-raising  process  that  violence   against   women services  are  borne   from,  
and  how  that  process  can  now  be  used  to  expand   our understanding  of solidarity 
and liberation;  2.An   exploration   of  the  purpose   of  women-only   spaces  within  sexual   
violence  and domestic abuse service provision;  3.A  discussion  of  the  experiences   of  
transgender   survivors   of  sexual  violence  and  domestic abuse and their barriers to 
accessing services; and 4.A   practical  exploration   of  solutions that   can  ensure  that   all  
survivors  of  sexual  violence   have   swift  access  to  effective   support   services  to  allow  
them  to recover  from trauma. 
Supporting  trans women  in domestic and sexual violence services: Interviews  with 
professionals  in the sector.
 Stonewall  (2018) – provides  views and  experiences  of service 
providers.  Participants  overwhelmingly  told us that  services’ thorough  risk assessment 
processes would continue  to safeguard  against  an incident  of a violent  man attempting  to 
access services, while  ensuring that all  women receive  the support they need. 
Page 10 of 26 

 
The Economist’s Open Future series of articles on transgender  may be of interest, 
particularly  the one on women’s concerns over trans women accessing women’s spaces .  
It  seems that the main reason for arguing  against including  trans women in all  women-only 
spaces/services is the fear among women around  the potential  for predatory  men to abuse 
self-identification  to gain access to women-only  spaces. 
Which Gender is More Concerned  About Transgender  Women in Female Bathrooms?, 
Gender Issues, Vol 34 No 3 2017
  
– explores  public  opinion  about  safety and privacy  when 
transgender  women use female bathrooms. In  these comments, we find that cisgender 
males are around  1.55× as likely  to express concern about  safety and  privacy as 
cisgender females. Moreover,  we find that  when expressing concern (a) cisgender  females 
are around  4× as likely  as cisgender males to assert that transgender  women do not 
directly  cause their safety and  privacy concerns, typically  emphasizing their  concerns are 
about  ‘perverts’  posing as transgender  females, and (b) cisgender males are around  1.5× 
as likely  as cisgender females to assert that transgender  females directly  cause their 
safety and privacy  concerns. 
(Trans)forming  single gender  services and communal accommodations . Social and Legal 
Studies, 26(5)  University of Bristol (2017)
  – sets out the broad relationship  between 
transgender  identities  and single-gender  spaces, and explains  the operation  of single-
gender  services and communal accommodations under  the Equality  Act 2010  and 
considers how transgender  individuals  may be excluded  from their  preferred  facilities 
without  breaching  equality  guarantees.  Addresses the two overarching  motivations  for 
excluding  transgender  persons from single-gender  spaces: the phenomenon  of non-
transgender  ‘discomfort’; and  the fear of ‘misconduct’ in segregated  facilities.  Considers 
three possible  routes for reforming  UK law. Focusing on body  type,  legal  status and the 
obligation  to increase private  space, the article  embraces the Committee’s recent 
recommendations and  also suggests an alternative  policy which would create a safe, 
workable  model for respecting both  transgender  and non-transgender  rights. 
 
Idox database results 
Ref No: B53144 
Neill,  Gail;  McAlister,  Siobhan 
The missing  T: baselining attitudes towards  transgender people in 
Northern Ireland 

ARK 
(Report available  on the internet  at: http://ow.ly/7zhn30p0I3a) 
2019   
 
Pages: 5    Price: na 
ISBN:    
Explores  public attitudes  towards transgender people  in Northern  Ireland, 
drawing  on analysis of data from national  social attitudes  surveys. Describes 
the increased public  focus on transgender people  and the inequalities  they 
face, and the challenges  involved  in using existing  surveys to explore  public 
attitudes  towards transgender people.  Outlines the definitions  used in 
surveys, and provides  overall  findings  on public  prejudices and attitudes 
towards transgender people.  Looks at attitudes  towards lesbian,  gay  and 
bisexual  compared with transgender people.  Examines  levels of public 
Page 11 of 26 

 
comfort/approval  of transgender people using  public toilets, refuges 
and changing  birth certificates
. Concludes that the survey results suggest 
positive  attitudes  towards transgender  people  and fairly  high  levels of support 
in realising  their rights. 
Ref No: B51511 
Beard, Jacqueline 
Transgender prisoners (House of Commons  Library  briefing paper no 
7420) 

House  of Commons Library 
(Report available  on the internet  at: http://ow.ly/lcLx30lTGMS) 
2018   
 
Pages: 13   Price: na 
ISBN:    
Provides  an overview  of policy  towards transgender people  in prisons in the 
UK. Outlines the key  legal  provisions in the Equality  Act 2010 and Gender 
Recognition  Act 2004.  Looks at transgender prisoners in England  and 
Wales, including  estimated  numbers, and describes the policy framework, 
including  initial  guidance  issued in 2011  and revised guidelines  developed  in 
response to a report on transgender equality  by the House  of Commons 
Women and Equalities  Committee in 2016. Outlines  policy towards 
transgender prisoners in Scotland,  based on a 2014  policy document,  and 
indicates that  there is no formal policy towards  transgender prisoners in 
Northern  Ireland. 
Ref No: B44347 
House  of Commons Women and Equalities  Committee 
Transgender equality:  first report of session 2015–16  (HC 390) 
The Stationery  Office (TSO), PO Box 29, Norwich,  NR3 1GN 
(Report available  on the internet  at: http://ow.ly/X2TDG) 
2016   
 
Pages: 98   Price: na 
ISBN:    
Presents the outcome of the House of Commons Women and  Equalities 
Committee's inquiry  into  equality  issues affecting  transgender people. 
Describes the cross-government strategy  on advancing  transgender equality. 
Discusses issues relating  to the Gender  Recognition  Act 2004 and Equality 
Act 2010.  Considers general and specific NHS services relating  to 
transgender patients.  Examines the ways in which everyday  transphobia  is 
being  tackled.  Provides conclusions and recommendations covering  the 
issues addressed. Highlights  key  findings,  including:  high  levels  of 
transphobia  are experienced  by individuals  on a daily  basis, with serious 
consequences; the Gender  Recognition  Act was pioneering  but is now 
outdated,  as are the terms used in the Equality  Act; the NHS  is letting 
transgender people  down and failing  in its legal  duty; and,  across the board, 
government  departments  are struggling  to support  transgender people 
effectively. 
 
Page 12 of 26 

 
 
Knowledge Network 
 
 
Knowledge  Network:  the national  knowledge  management  platform for health  and social 
care in Scotland.  Register for an Open Athens  password to access all these resources 
To request the full text  of any  of these references please  contact the Library. 
 
 
Ben-Ari A.  Homosexuality  and heterosexism:  views from  academics  in the helping 
professions. British Journal of Social Work  2001;31(1):119
 
     This study describes and analyses attitudes  towards homosexuality  among faculty in 
departments  of three  helping  professions: social work, psychology  and education.  The 
sample consists of 235 faculty members in the five main universities  in Israel.  Out of 849 
questionnaires  that were sent to all faculty members of the relevant  departments  of social 
work, psychology  and education,  103 were completed and returned  from social work, 56 
from psychology  and  76 from education,  representing  a 27.7 per cent total response rate. 
The instrument used was the Index  of Homophobia  (IHP)  (Hudson  and Ricketts, 1980)  in 
addition  to professional  background  and demographic  information.  Findings show that, 
overall,  members of academic departments  of the helping  professions present 'low-grade 
homophobic'  attitudes  (Hudson and  Ricketts, 1980).  Statistically  significant  differences 
surfaced among the three departments,  with faculty members in schools of education 
emerging  as most homophobic,  followed  by social work and psychology.  Several 
explanations  are put forward in an attempt to account for such differences,  including  the 
theoretical  framework  of marginality,  the variables  traditionally  associated with 
homophobia,  and professional  training.   
Berkman CS. Homophobia  and Heterosexism in Social  Workers. Soc.Work 
1997;42(4):319-333
 
     Evidence  suggests that social workers may be biased when dealing  with gay  and 
lesbian  populations.  The study discussed in this article attempted  to measure the extent  of 
homophobia  and heterosexist  bias and their correlates in a cohort of 187 social workers 
using the index  of Attitudes  toward Homosexuality,  the Attitudes  toward Lesbians and Gay 
Men  Scales, and a newly  created scale to measure heterosexist  bias. We found  that 10 
percent of respondents  were homophobic  and that  a majority  were heterosexist.  Levels of 
homophobia  and heterosexism were negatively  correlated  with amount  of social contact 
with homosexual  men and women. Religiosity  was associated with higher  levels  of 
homophobia  and heterosexism, and  having  been  in psychotherapy  was associated with 
more positive  attitudes  toward gay  men and lesbians.  Amount  of education  on topics 
related  to homosexuality  was not correlated with levels  of homophobia  and heterosexism. 
Health  Business Elite; Health  Business Elite.   
Brennan J. Syndemic  Theory and HIV-Related Risk Among  Young Transgender 
Women:  The Role of Multiple, Co-Occurring Health Problems  and Social 
Marginalization.  Am.J.Public  Health 2012;102(9):1751-1758
 
     Objectives. We assessed whether  multiple  psychosocial factors are additive  in their 
relationship  to sexual risk behavior  and self-reported  HIV  status (i.e.,  can be characterized 
as a syndemic) among young  transgender  women and the relationship  of indicators of 
social marginalization  to psychosocial factors. Methods.  Participants (n = 151)  were aged 
15 to 24 years and lived  in Chicago or Los Angeles.  We collected data on psychosocial 
Page 13 of 26 

 
factors (low self-esteem, polysubstance  use, victimization  related  to transgender  identity, 
and intimate  partner  violence)  and social marginalization  indicators (history of commercial 
sex work, homelessness, and incarceration)  through  an interviewer-administered  survey. 
Results. Syndemic factors were positively  and additively  related  to sexual risk behavior 
and self-reported  HIV  infection.  In  addition,  our syndemic index  was significantly  related  to 
2 indicators of social marginalization:  a history of sex work and previous  incarceration. 
Conclusions. These findings  provide  evidence  for a syndemic of co-occurring psychosocial 
and health  problems in young  transgender  women, taking  place in a context  of social 
marginalization. 
Health  Business Elite; Health  Business Elite.  
Brenner BR, Lyons  HZ, Fassinger RE. Can heterosexism harm  organizations? 
Predicting the perceived organizational citizenship behaviors of gay  and lesbian 
employees.  Career Development Quarterly 2010;58(4):321
.   
Callahan  J, Mann B, Ruddick S. Editors' Introduction  to Writing  against 
Heterosexism. Hypatia  2007;22(1):vii-xv
 
     & discussing what love  has to do with being  against  compulsory heterosexuality.  J. 
Stanton  © ProQuest LLC All  rights reserved 
Chinell J. Three Voices: Reflections on Homophobia  and Heterosexism in Social 
Work  Education.  Social Work  Education 2011;30(7):759-773
 
     students' expectations  of their social work education.   
Eisikovits Z,  Band-Winterstein T. Dimensions  of Suffering among  Old and Young 
Battered Women.  J Fam  Viol  2015;30(1):49-62
 
     and accumulated life  wisdom. These themes constitute the basis for the forthcoming 
analysis and  discussion.  
Ford CL, Slavin T, Hilton KL, Holt SL. Intimate  Partner Violence Prevention Services 
and Resources in Los Angeles:  Issues, Needs, and Challenges for Assisting 
Lesbian, Gay,  Bisexual, and Transgender Clients. Health Promotion  Practice 
2013;14(6):841-849
 
     nevertheless,  nearly  50% of them reported  having  assisted LGBTs “sometimes” or 
“often”  in the past year. Nearly  all (92%) reported  that  their agencies/programs  lack staff 
with dedicated  responsibilities  to LGBT  IPV.  The most frequent  requests for assistance 
respondents  reported  receiving  from LGBTs were for counseling,  safe housing,  legal 
assistance, and assistance navigating  the medical system. The findings  suggest that staff 
believe  their agencies/programs  inadequately  address LGBT IPV  but that many of the 
inadequacies  (e.g., lack of staff training  on LGBT  IPV)  are remediable.   
Fredriksen-Goldsen K, Kim  H, Bryan AEB,  Shiu C, Emlet CA.  The Cascading  Effects 
of Marginalization  and Pathways  of Resilience in Attaining  Good Health Among 
LGBT Older Adults.  Gerontologist 2017;57:S72-S83
.   
Gledhill C. Queering State Crime Theory: The State, Civil Society and 
Marginalization.  Crit Crim 2014;22(1):127-138
 
     This article  argues that criminology  desperately  needs  to look  at the ways in which 
states marginalize  and persecute lesbian,  gay,  bisexual,  trans* and  queer (LGBTQ) 
identities.  It critically  examines the ways in which states reproduce  hegemonic dictates that 
privilege  those who adhere to gendered  heterosexual  norms over all others. This article 
further  considers how the application  of state crime theories, in particular  Michalowski’s 
Page 14 of 26 

 
(State crime in the global  age, pp. 13–30,  Devon, Willan, 2010)  tripartite  framework,  might 
further  foreground  the responsibility  of the state in protecting  LGBTQ identities.  Examples 
of how this framework could be applied  are given,  with the case study of criminalization  of 
same sex relations  being  focused on in depth.  The article  concludes by positing  four key 
points to be considered in any analysis  that attempts to critique  the role of the state in the 
perpetuation  of heterosexual  hegemony.   
Hyers L. Resisting Prejudice Every Day:  Exploring  Women's  Assertive Responses to 
Anti-Black  Racism,  Anti-Semitism,  Heterosexism, and Sexism.  Sex Roles 2007;56(1-
2):1-12
 
     Past lab and scenario research on sexism suggests that women are more likely  to 
contemplate  than to engage  in assertive confrontation  of prejudice.  The present study was 
designed  to explore  how the competing cultural  forces of activist norms and gender  role 
prescriptions for women to be passive and accommodating may contribute  to women's 
response strategies. Women were asked to keep diaries  of incidents  of anti-Black  racism, 
anti-Semitism, heterosexism,  and sexism, including  why they  responded,  how they 
responded,  and the consequences of their responses. Participants were about  as likely  to 
report they  were motivated  by activist goals as they were to report being  motivated  by 
gender  role consistent goals to avoid  conflict.  Those with gender  role-consistent  goals 
were less likely  to respond assertively.  Participants  were more likely  to consider assertive 
responses (for 75% of incidents) than  to actually  make them (for 40%  of incidents). 
Assertive  responders did, however,  report  better outcomes on a variety  of indicators of 
satisfaction and closure, at the expense  of heightened  interpersonal  conflict. Results are 
discussed with respect to the personal and  social implications  of responding  to 
interpersonal  prejudice.  PUBLICATION  ABSTRACT].   
Jackson  S. Achieving clinical  governance in Women's  Services through the use of 
the EFQM Excellence Model. Int.J.Health Care Qual.Assur.  2000;13(4):182-190
 
     Following  a brief explanation  of the concepts inherent  within  the European  Foundation 
for Quality  Management  Excellence  Model,  the experience  of using the framework  as a 
mechanism for delivering  clinical governance  is described. The framework was utilised  by 
a Women's Services Directorate  of an acute National  Health  Service Trust in the UK,  who 
concluded  that the Model  was an ideal  tool  for supporting  the delivery  of clinical 
governance.  However,  this was only the case when a number of factors were taken  into 
consideration.  For instance, the Directorate  found  that the change programme required  a 
phased implementation  process, sound leadership,  expert  facilitation,  good information 
systems, numerous training  and development  opportunities  for managers, teamwork and 
the application  of best practice in relation  to project improvement  teams. Moreover,  the 
absence of all the aforementioned  ingredients  had the potential  to compromise any 
successful outcome. Emerald Management  (Emerald Group);   
Lamb  SJ. Bridging the Gap Between Practice and Research : Forging Partnerships 
with Community-Based  Drug and Alcohol  Treatment. : Washington,  D.C., National 
Academies  Press; 1998
 
     and looks in detail  at the issue from the perspective  of the community-based provider 
and the researcher. 
eBook  Collection  (EBSCOhost); eBook  Collection  (EBSCOhost).  
Logie C, James  L, Tharao W, Loutfy  M. "We don't exist":  a qualitative study  of 
marginalization  experienced by  HIV-positive lesbian, bisexual,  queer and 
transgender women  in Toronto, Canada.  Journal Of The International Aids  Society; 
J.Int.AIDS  Soc. 2012;15(2)
.   
Page 15 of 26 

 
Lombard  N. The Routledge handbook  of gender and violence. First Edition.. ed.: 
New York : Routledge; 2017
 
44NHSS  ALMA;  44NHSS  ALMA.   
Lorvick J, Comfort  M, Krebs C, Kral A.  Health service use and social vulnerability  in 
a community-based  sample  of women  on probation and parole, 2011–2013.  Health 
Justice 2015;3(1):1-6
.   
Mankowski  M. Aging  LGBT Military Service Members and Veterans. 
Annu.Rev.Gerontol.Geriatr. 2017;37(1):111-IX
 
     The purpose of this chapter  is to highlight  the experiences  and  needs of aging  sexual 
and gender  minority  (SGM)  veterans.  Significant  demographic  changes in the composition 
of aging  military veterans  have  taken place.  Most noticeably  since the repeal  of "don't ask, 
don't tell"  attention  has been drawn  to this population  of older veterans  and their  specific 
mental, physical,  and psychosocial health  care needs. Recent policy,  program, and 
research initiatives  have  begun  to address the significant  health  disparities  of this 
population  of older  adults. SGM  veterans  are more likely  to report  higher  rates of sexual 
harassment and sexual assault, and are more vulnerable  to homelessness and 
unemployment  when compared to the general  population  of older  lesbian,  gay, bisexual, 
and transgender  (LGBT)  adults. Aging  SGM  veterans  may also carry a heavy  burden  as a 
result of their experiences  as service members and may be reticent to disclose their  sexual 
identity  with formal veteran  service programs. Access to and utilization  of social care 
networks and social support for SGM  aging  veterans  is a serious concern. Isolation,  poorer 
health  outcomes, and  increased chronic health  conditions  may exacerbate  the 
marginalization  this older adult  population  has experienced.  A majority of SGM  veterans 
will utilize  community-based services, and  it is essential  that all health  care professionals 
understand  the unique  needs of this cohort of older  adults. Future  directions for research, 
policy,  education,  and service delivery  are explored.   
Miner KN, Costa PL. Ambient  workplace heterosexism:  Implications  for sexual 
minority  and heterosexual employees.  Stress Health 2018;34(4):563-572
 
     This study examined  the relationship  between  ambient  workplace  heterosexis m, 
emotional  reactions (i.e.,  fear and anger), and  outcomes for sexual minority  and 
heterosexual  employees.  Five hundred  thirty‐six  restaurant employees  (68% female,  77% 
White) completed an online  survey assessing the variables  of interest.  Results showed 
that greater  experiences  of ambient workplace  heterosexism were associated with 
heightened  fear and  anger and,  in turn,  with heightened  psychological  distress (for fear) 
and greater  physical health  complaints, turnover  intentions,  and lowered  job satisfaction 
(for anger). Fear also mediated  the relationship  between  ambient workplace  heterosexism 
and psychological  distress. In  addition,  sexual  orientation  moderated  the relationship 
between  ambient workplace  heterosexism and  fear such that sexual minority  employees 
reported  more fear than  heterosexuals  with greater  ambient heterosexism.  These effects 
occurred after controlling  for personal  experiences  of interpersonal  discrimination.  Our 
findings  suggest that ambient workplace  heterosexism can be harmful to all  employees, 
not only  sexual minorities  or targeted  individuals.   
Orza L, Bass E, Bell E, Crone ET, Damji  N, Dilmitis  S, et al. In Women’s  Eyes;  Key 
Barriers to Women’s  Access  to HIV Treatment and a Rights-Based Approach  to their 
Sustained Well-Being. Health Hum.Rights  2017;19(2):155-168
 
     and (3) three country case studies (phase three). The results presented  here are based 
predominantly  on women’s own experiences  and  are coherent  across al  three  phases. 
Recommendations are proposed  regarding  laws, policies, and programs which are rights -
Page 16 of 26 

 
based, gendered,  and embrace diversity,  to maximize women’s voluntary,  informed, 
confidential,  and safe access to and  adherence  to medication,  and optimize their  long-term 
sexual  and reproductive  health. 
U.S. National  Library  of Medicine  (NIH/NLM);  U.S.  National  Library  of Medicine 
(NIH/NLM).   
Payne D. Heterosexism in Health and Social  Care.(Brief article)(Book review). 
Nursing Standard 2007;21(22):30
.   
Peitzmeier SM, Agénor  M, Bernstein IM, Mcdowell M, Alizaga  NM, Reisner SL, et al. 
“It Can Promote an Existential Crisis”:  Factors Influencing Pap Test Acceptability 
and Utilization Among  Transmasculine  Individuals.  Qual.Health Res. 
2017;27(14):2138-2149
 
     a modified  grounded  theory  approach informed  the analysis.   
Rathbone E. Eleanor Rathbone on the Remuneration of Women's  Services. 
Population  and Development Review 1999;25(1):145-158
 
     Humans are dependent  on others for their  livelihood  for many years before they 
become economically productive  and self‐supporting.  In modern industrial  societies 
productivity  and the capacity to be self‐supporting  also require  costly investments in 
human capital.  What is the proper division  of responsibilities  between  parents and other 
members of society for rearing  children and  thus, collectively,  reproducing  the population? 
And  how equitable  is the sharing between  husband  and wife of the burdens  that fall on  the 
immediate family?  To what extent  should social responsibilities  for childrearing  be 
formalized in explicit  institutional  arrangements?  While certainly  long‐standing,  these 
questions acquired  a special urgency  in industrial  countries beginning  with the second 
decade of the twentieth  century  as a result of the convulsive  experience  of the world war. 
(In  subsequent decades, below‐replacement‐level  fertility  amplified  such concerns.) Total 
mobilization  for war resulted  in the massive influx  of female workers into industry,  thus 
undercutting  prevailing  assumptions about  the logic and equity  of an industrial  system 
characterized by sharp divisions  of labor  by sex, discrimination  in hiring  and remuneration 
in the job market, and routine  reliance  on unpaid  female labor  in childrearing.  In the March 
1917  issue of , Eleanor  F. Rathbone  addressed  these issues in an article titled  “The 
remuneration  of women's services.” This article is reproduced  below  in ful .  “Perhaps the 
most important function  which any State has to perform—more important  even  than 
guarding  against its enemies—is to secure its own periodic renewal  by providing  for the 
rearing  of fresh generations,”  asserted Rathbone.  How is this burden paid  for? She saw 
the existing  system as iniquitous  and haphazard—requiring  a disproportionate  and 
unremunerated  contribution  from the adult female  population,  a contribution  supplemented 
only  in a “hesitating  and  half‐hearted  way” by the state. The modern state gradual y 
accepted responsibilities  to cover some of the costs of formal education  and started to 
make minor provisions for child nurture  and medical expenses. Stil ,  she noted,  “the great 
bulk  of the main cost of population]  renewal  the state] stil  pays for… by the indirect and 
extraordinarily  clumsy method of financing  the male parent”—thus  accomplishing the task 
“in a very  defective  and blundering  way.” Rathbone  argued  for a radical rethinking  and 
revision  of the existing  system. She further  elaborated  her proposals in a book,  , published 
in 1924.  This book  was republished  posthumously  in 1949 under  the title . Lord Beveridge, 
father  of the post–World War II  British welfare  state, in an Epilogue  written for that book, 
attributes  the intel ectual  preparation  of the 1945 Family  Al owances  Act “first and 
foremost” to the author  of . Eleanor  Rathbone  was born in 1872 to a prominent Liverpool 
family.  Educated at Oxford in classics and philosophy,  she played  an active  public role as 
Page 17 of 26 

 
a suffragist, feminist, and advocate  of social reforms. She was a member of the British 
Parliament,  as an Independent,  from 1929 to her death  in 1946.   
Riggs DW, Fraser H, Taylor  N, Signal T, Donovan C. Domestic  Violence Service 
Providers’ Capacity  for Supporting  Transgender Women:  Findings  from an 
Australian  Workshop.  British Journal of Social Work  2016;46(8):2374-2392
 
     Previous research has consistently  found that  transgender  women experience  high 
levels  of domestic violence  and abuse (DVA).  Yet,  to date, no studies have explored  the 
efficacy of training  workshops aimed at increasing the capacity of service providers  to 
meet the needs of transgender  women. This paper reports on findings  from one such 
workshop developed  and run in South Australia.  Workshop participants  ( n = 25) from 
three domestic violence  services completed both  pre- and post-workshop measures of 
attitudes  towards working with transgender  women, comfort in working  with transgender 
women and confidence in providing  services to transgender  women. In  addition, 
participants  responded  to open-ended  questions regarding  terminology,  and awareness of 
referrals related  to the link  between DVA  and  animal abuse. Statistically  significant 
changes were identified  on all measures, with workshop attendees  reporting  more positive 
attitudes,  greater  comfort and greater  confidence  after completing the workshop.  Analysis 
of open-ended  responses found  that attendees  developed  a better  understanding  of both 
appropriate  terminology,  and referrals for women who present to services with animal 
companions. We conclude with suggestions for how programmes and services may 
become more welcoming and inclusive  of transgender  women experiencing  DVA.   
Sweeney B. Trans-ending women's rights:  The politics  of trans-inclusion  in the age 
of gender. Women's  Studies International Forum  2004;27(1):75-88
 
     Despite the 1970s' radical feminist critique  of transsexualism,  transgenderism and its 
international  movement has rapidly  expanded  its fight  for acceptance  and rights for trans-
people.  In  particular,  trans-women are currently claiming  their right to participate,  and be 
included  in, women-only  events,  organizations,  and service provisions.  This paper  will 
argue  that the protection  of gender  is imperative  to the goals of trans-activists and their 
supporters. As a result, the movement  to insist on, through  human rights law, the right  of 
trans-women to access women-only organizations  could be seen as a part of an effort  to 
grant gender  categories  absolute social authority.  Specifically,  I  will be addressing  one of 
the latest studies in “trans-inclusion,”  the Trans Inclusion  Policy Manual  for Women's 
Organisations  (2002). I  will argue that this focus on gender  undermines feminist 
campaigns to challenge  gender  oppression, and  the importance of women-only  spaces to 
this project.  
Szymanski  D, Henrichs-Beck C. Exploring  Sexual Minority  Women's  Experiences of 
External and Internalized Heterosexism and Sexism  and their Links  to Coping and 
Distress. Sex Roles 2014;70(1-2):28-42
 
     This study examined  experiences  of external  and internalized  heterosexism and sexism 
and their  links to coping  styles and psychological  distress among 473 sexual minority 
women. Using an online  sample of United  States lesbian and  bisexual  women, the findings 
indicated  that many participants  experienced  heterosexist  and sexist events at least once 
during  the past 6 months, and  a number of participants  indicated  some level  of internalized 
oppression.  Supporting  an additive  multiple  oppression  perspective,  the results revealed 
that when examined  concurrently  heterosexist  events,  sexist events,  internalized 
heterosexism,  and internalized  sexism were unique  predictors of psychological  distress. In 
addition,  suppressive coping and  reactive coping,  considered to be maladaptive  coping 
strategies, mediated  the external  heterosexism-distress, internalized  heterosexism-
distress, and internalized  sexism-distress links but did not mediate  the external  sexism-
Page 18 of 26 

 
distress link.  Reflective  coping, considered  to be an adaptive  coping strategy,  did not 
mediate  the relations between  external  and internalized  heterosexism and sexism and 
psychological  distress. Finally,  the variables  in the model accounted for 54 % of the 
variance  in psychological  distress scores. These findings  suggest that maladaptive  but not 
adaptive  coping strategies help  explain  the relationship  between various  oppressive 
experiences  and psychological  distress.PUBLICATION  ABSTRACT].   
Tabaac AR,  Benotsch EG, Barnes AJ.  Mediation Models of Perceived Medical 
Heterosexism, Provider–Patient Relationship Quality,  and Cervical Cancer 
Screening in a Community  Sample  of Sexual Minority Women  and Gender 
Nonbinary  Adults.  LGBT Health 2019;6(2):77-86
 
     trust in providers  (b  = 0.05,  p  = 0.001,  95% confidence  interval  CI]  0.02–0.08)  and 
provider-patient  communication quality  ( b  = 0.06, p  = 0.003,  95% CI 0.02–0.10)  were 
positively  associated with future screening intention,  and  their total indirect  effect mediated 
the relationship  between  perceived  medical heterosexism and intention  ( b  = −0.03, 95% 
CI −0.05 to −0.02, β  = −0.25, 95% CI −0.39  to −0.15).  Similarly,  the total indirect  effect of 
provider–patient  communication quality  mediated  the relationship  between  perceived 
medical heterosexism and odds of routine  screening ( b  = −0.03, 95% CI −0.06 to −0.01).   
Conclusion:  These findings  point  to the need for cancer prevention  and control  strategies 
for SMW to target  provider  education  and policy  interventions  that improve  SMW's 
relationships  with their  providers and  improve cervical cancer screening  rates.  
Telford BR, Stichler J, Ivie SD, Schaps  MJ, Jellen BC. Model approaches to women's 
health centers. Womens  Health Issues 1993;3(2):55-62
.   
Terplan M, Longinaker N, Appel  L. Women-Centered Drug Treatment Services and 
Need in the United States, 2002-2009.  Am.J.Public  Health 2015;105(11):E50-E54
 
     We examined  options and need  for women-centered  substance use disorder  treatment 
in the United  States between  2002 and  2009. We obtained  characteristics of facilities  from 
the National  Survey  of Substance Abuse  Treatment Services and treatment need  data 
from the National  Survey  on Drug Use and Health.  We also examined  differences  in 
provision  of women-centered  programs by urbanization  level  in data from the National 
Center for Health  Statistics 2006 Rural-Urban  County  Continuum.  Of the 13 000  facilities 
surveyed  annually,  the proportion  offering  women-centered  services declined  from 43%  in 
2002  to 40% in 2009  (P < .001). Urban  location,  state population  size, and Medicaid 
payment  predicted  provision  of such services as trauma-related  and domestic violence 
counseling,  child care, and housing assistance (all, P < .001). Prevalence  of women with 
unmet need ranged  from 81%  to 95% across states. Change  in availability  of women-
centered  drug treatment services was minimal from 2002  to 2009, even  though  need for 
treatment  was high  in all states.  
Thomas  N, Bull M. Representations of women  and drug use in policy:  A  critical 
policy  analysis.  International Journal  of Drug Policy;  International  Journal of Drug 
Policy  2018;56:30-39
 
     •Investigates  whether  and how Australian  drug and health  policy  documents attend  to 
women’s drug  use.•Methods  involved  a policy audit  and critical policy analysis  of 
Australian  federal  and state and territory  drugs and health  policy documents.•Two  major 
problematisations  are identified:  effects on women’s reproductive  role and  women’s 
vulnerability  to harm.•Policy  gaps resulting from these problematisations  are discussed. 
Contemporary  research in the drugs field  has demonstrated  a number of gender 
differences  in patterns  and experiences  of substance use, and the design and  provision  of 
gender-responsive  interventions  has been  identified  as an important policy  issue. 
Page 19 of 26 

 
Consequently,  whether  and how domestic drug policies attend  to women and gender 
issues is an important question  for investigation.  This article presents a policy  audit  and 
critical analysis of Australian  national  and state and territory  policy  documents.  It identifies 
and discusses two key styles of problematisation  of women’s drug use in policy:  1) drug 
use and  its effect on women’s reproductive  role  (including  a focus on pregnant  women and 
women who are mothers), and 2) drug use and its relationship  to women’s vulnerability  to 
harm (including  violent  and sexual  victimisation,  trauma, and mental health  issues). Whilst 
these are important areas for policy to address, we argue  that such representations  of 
women who use drugs tend  to reinforce  particular  understandings  of women and drug use, 
while at the same time contributing  to areas of ‘policy  silence’ or neglect. In  particular,  the 
policy  documents analysed  are largely  silent  about the harm reduction  needs of all women, 
as well as the needs of women who are not mothers, young  women, older  women, 
transwomen or other  women deemed  to be outside  of dominant  normative  reproductive 
discourse. This analysis is important  because understanding  how women’s drug use is 
problematised  and  identifying  areas of policy silence provides  a foundation  for redressing 
gaps in policy, and for assessing the likely  effectiveness  of current and future policy 
approaches.   
Weisman  CS, Curbow B, Khoury  AJ.  The national survey of women's  health centers: 
Current models  of women-centered care. Womens  Health Issues 1995;5(3):103-117
.   
 
ProQuest 
 
 
ProQuest: a collection  of social science abstract and index  databases. Login  (username: 
bkw37,  password: bkw3737) 
To request the full text  of any  of these references please  contact the Library. 
 
 
Highlights From  the California Report on Lesbian, Gay,  Bisexual, and Transgender 
Domestic  Violence 2000. 2001
 
     This document provides  information  on lesbian,  gay,  bisexual,  and  transgender  (LGBT) 
domestic violence  in California  during  the year 2000.  In California  in 2000, attention  was 
drawn to LGBT domestic violence  through  a community-wide  educational  campaign, 
enhanced  client screening,  an in-depth  study, and a comprehensive  service provider 
needs assessment. As a result, reported  incidents jumped dramatically.  Advocates  and 
policy  makers now have data  to help  inform domestic violence  services for youth  and 
inform planning  to reduce service gaps affecting  the highly  diverse  LGBT community. It is 
important  to recognize  that the increases still represent  only a small fraction of the cases 
of LGBT domestic abuse. Only five  agencies in California  specifically address the problem 
of LGBT battering.  There are only  about 20 agencies that  address the problem in the other 
49 States. LGBT domestic violence  victims face enormous barriers in getting  help from law 
enforcement,  the medical system, and  from traditional  battered  women’s services and 
related  social service providers.  The additional  burdens of homophobia  and  heterosexism 
make seeking  help more difficult,  leaving  victims isolated  and more vulnerable  to their 
partner’s  violence.  In  2000, reported  incidents  of LGBT  battering  totaled  2,837  incidents  in 
California  -- an increase of 740 incidents  over 1999.  All  of the additional  incidents were 
tallied  in Los Angeles  (LA),  which had a 58 percent increase in incidents with 2,146 
incidents reported.  San Francisco saw a slight drop in incidents,  down to 691  from 741 in 
Page 20 of 26 

 
1999.  California’s  total  number of reported  incidents  accounted for 70 percent of the 
national  total. The LA  Gay  & Lesbian Center  is a powerful,  non-profit  force for gay and 
lesbian  rights and home to a wide array of free or low cost legal,  employment,  educational, 
cultural,  and social programs for the LGBT community. The Center’s STOP Partner 
Abuse/Domestic Violence  Program is the most comprehensive  LGBT-specific  domestic 
violence  program in the Nation.  9 footnotes  National  Criminal  Justice Reference  Service 
(NCJRS) Abstracts Database.  
Browne K. Womyn's  separatist spaces:  rethinking spaces of difference and 
exclusion.  Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers 2009  Oct 
2009;34(4):541-556
 
     This paper  rethinks  geographical  explorations  of social difference  by interrogating 
ameliorative  and pleasurable  aspects of marginal  spaces. Re-introducing  womyn's 
separatist spaces contests feminist geographical  writing in this area, requiring  an 
examination  of both the alternative  ways of living  that are created, and the pain  of 
producing  `womyn-only'  spaces in order for such spaces to exist. The paper draws on 
qualitative  research with 238 attendees  at the 31st Michigan  Womyn's Music Festival. 
Womyn spoke of the pleasures of the festival  and positive  affinities  with other womyn,  as 
well as the festival's herstory  of conflict, negotiation  and compromise. Although  accounts 
relay  `growing pains' that constitute  the festival's current form, the current temporal  and 
spatial  segregations  of `womyn', through  the womyn-born  womyn policy,  has resulted  in 
something of an impasse. Rather than  reductively  posing `the latest problem' of feminist 
separatism as the exclusion of trans women because of this policy,  or unequivocally 
celebrating  the festival's role in womyn's lives and herstory,  these polarised 
conceptualisations  are held  in tension.  This enables  a consideration  of the paradoxes  and 
juxtaposition  of womyn's space and  Camp Trans (a protest camp that opposes the womyn-
born womyn policy) as productive.  In  this way, the paper  argues for an engagement  with 
marginalised  and alternative  spaces of difference  that allow  for positive  affectivities  and 
productive  tensions that  do not neglect  relations  of power. Reprinted  by permission of 
Blackwell  Publishers International  Bibliography  of the Social Sciences (IBSS).   
Chambers  L. Unprincipled Exclusions:  Feminist  Theory, Transgender 
Jurisprudence, and Kimberly  Nixon. Canadian  Journal of Women  and the Law 
2007;19(2):305
 
International  Bibliography  of the Social Sciences (IBSS).   
Currah P. EXPECTING BODIES: THE PREGNANT MAN AND  TRANSGENDER 
EXCLUSION FROM THE EMPLOYMENT NON-DISCRIMINATION ACT. Women's 
Studies Quarterly 2008  Fall 2008;36(3/4):330-336
 
     (This dissonance,  to be clear, belongs  not to the trans body  but to those gazers who 
have  conventional  gender  expectations.)  The more easily read  and specific physical 
terrains of bodies, such as the presence or absence of facial hair,  baldness, or patterns of 
musculature, can add  a third layer  of potential  contradiction.  After  decades of lobbying,  in 
2003  transgender  rights advocates and their  allies thought  they  had succeeded in 
persuading  key  gay rights advocacy  players in Washington,  including  the Human Rights 
Campaign,  to support  only "transgender-inclusive"  legislation  (National  Center 2003;   
Egan R, Hoatson L. Desperate to Survive: Contracting Women's  Services in a 
Region in Melbourne. Australian  Feminist  Studies 1999  October 1999;14(30):405-414
 
     Conflict in Australian  feminist organizations  is studied  to provide  lessons for handling 
such conflict & ensuring  the vitality  of such organizations.  Comparative  interview  data from 
6 female workers in organizations  concerned with feminist services & 10 female workers 
Page 21 of 26 

 
who participated  in a workshop that addressed  the issue of women & conflict in 
Melbourne,  Australia,  indicate  that ideological  conflict arose in feminist philosophical 
perspectives,  management & decision-making  techniques,  the nature  of feminist services 
work, & collaboration  with external  groups. It is asserted that these conflicts have been 
exacerbated  by the general  dislike  of feminist philosophy  in Australian  politics & society. 
The possibility  of feminist organizations  losing those characteristics that  make them 
feminist is acknowledged,  concluding  that they  must struggle  to preserve key  feminist 
principles.  J. W. Parker Sociology  Collection.   
Gehi PS, Arkles  G. Unraveling Injustice:  Race and Class  Impact  of Medicaid 
Exclusions  of Transition-Related Health Care for Transgender People. Sexuality 
Research and Social Policy:  Journal  of NSRC 2007 December 2007;4(4):7-35
 
     This article  explores how Medicaid  policies excluding  or limiting coverage  for transition-
related  health  care for transgender  people  reproduce hierarchies  of race and class. In 
many legal  contexts, a medical model informs views of transgender  experience(s),  often 
requiring  proof of specific types of surgery  prior to legal  recognition  of transgender 
people's  identity  and rights. Simultaneously,  state Medicaid  programs disregard  the 
medical evidence  supporting  the necessity of transition-related  care when considering 
whether  to cover it. In  this article, the authors  analyze  the contradiction  between  the 
medicalization  of trans experience(s)  and  government's refusal  to recognize the legitimacy 
and necessity of trans health  care. The authors examine  the social, economic, legal, 
political,  medical, and  mental health  impact of these policies on low-income trans 
communities, paying  particular  attention  to the disproportionate  impact on communities of 
color. The authors conclude with recommendations  for legal  and health  care systems to 
improve  access to transition-related  health  care for low-income trans people.  Adapted  from 
the source document. Sociology  Collection.   
Pitts M, Couch M, Mulcare H, Croy  S, Mitchell A.  Transgender people in Australia 
and New Zealand:  health, well-being and access to health services. Feminism  and 
psychology  2009 Nov 2009;19(4):475-495
 
     This research had its beginnings  in an act of trans activism, including  a campaign  by a 
number of trans organizations  advocating  the need  for research dealing  with health,  well-
being  and access to health  services in relation  to this population.  This study set out to 
recruit the broadest possible  community sample by using a range  of recruitment 
techniques  and an online  survey. In  total,  253 respondents  completed the survey.  Of 
these, 229 were from Australia  (90.5%) and 24 (9.5%)  were from New Zealand. 
Respondents  rated their health  on a five-point  scale; the majority  of the sample rated their 
health  as 'good' or 'very good'.  On the SF36 scale, respondents  had poorer  health  ratings 
than the general  population  in Australia  and  New Zealand.  Respondents  reported  rates of 
depression  much higher  than  those found  in the general  Australian  population,  with 
assigned males being  twice as likely  to experience  depression  as assigned females. 
Respondents  who had experienced  greater  discrimination  were more likely  to report being 
currently  depressed. Respondents  were asked  about their  best and worst experiences  with 
a health  practitioner  or health  service in relation  to being  trans. They contrasted 
encounters where they  felt accepted and supported  by their  practitioners with others where 
they  were met with hostility.  Reprinted  by permission of Sage Publications  Ltd International 
Bibliography  of the Social Sciences (IBSS).   
Samudzi  Z, Mannell J. Cisgender male and transgender female sex workers in South 
Africa:  gender variant identities and narratives of exclusion.  Culture, health and 
sexuality  2016  0, 2016;18(1):1
 
     Sex workers are often  perceived  as possessing 'deviant'  identities,  contributing  to their 
Page 22 of 26 

 
exclusion  from health  services. The literature  on sex worker identities  in relation  to health 
has focused primarily  on cisgender female sex workers as the 'carriers of disease', 
obscuring the experiences  of cisgender male and transgender  sex workers and  the 
complexities  their gender  identities  bring  to understandings  of stigma and exclusion.  To 
address this gap, this study draws on 21 interviews  with cisgender male and  transgender 
female sex workers receiving  services from the Sex Workers Education  and Advocacy 
Taskforce in Cape Town, South Africa.  Our findings  suggest that the social identities 
imposed upon sex workers contribute  to their  exclusion from public, private,  discursive and 
geographic  spaces. While many transgender  female sex workers described  their identities 
using positive  and empowered  language,  cisgender male sex workers frequently 
expressed shame and internalised  stigma related  to identities,  which could be described 
as 'less than masculine'. While many of those interviewed  felt empowered  by positive 
identities  as transgender  women, sex workers and  sex worker-advocates, 
disempowerment and  vulnerability  were also linked  to inappropriately  masculinised and 
feminised identities.  Understanding  the links between  gender  identities  and social 
exclusion  is crucial to creating effective  health  interventions  for both  cisgender men and 
transgender  women in sex work. Reprinted  by permission of Taylor  & Francis Ltd 
International  Bibliography  of the Social Sciences (IBSS).   
Seelman KL. Transgender Individuals' Access  to College Housing and Bathrooms: 
Findings  from the National Transgender Discrimination  Survey. J.Gay  Lesbian 
Soc.Serv. 2014;26(2):186
 
     Within higher  education  settings, transgender  people  are at risk for discrimination  and 
harassment within housing  and bathrooms. Yet,  few have examined  this topic using 
quantitative  data or compared the experiences  of subgroups  of transgender  individuals  to 
predict denial  of access to these spaces. The current study utilizes the National 
Transgender  Discrimination  Survey to research this issue. Findings  indicate  that being 
transgender  and having  another  marginalized  identity  matters for students' access to 
housing  and bathrooms. Trans women are at greater risk than gender-nonconforming 
people  for being  denied  access to school housing  and bathrooms. Implications  for practice 
and research are detailed. 
Sociology  Collection.   
Sharpe AN.  Transgender performance and the discriminating  gaze: a critique  of 
anti-discrimination  regulatory  regimes. Social and legal studies 1999 Mar 
1999;8(1):5-24
 
International  Bibliography  of the Social Sciences (IBSS).   
Valenti K, Katz A.  Needs and Perceptions of LGBTQ Caregivers: The Challenges of 
Services and Support. J.Gay  Lesbian Soc.Serv. 2014;26(1):70
 
     Increasing  attention  has been  paid to the lack of services and support afforded  older 
lesbian,  gay, bisexual,  transgender,  and queer  (LGBTQ) women in same-sex 
relationships,  including  caregivers. This study was designed  to investigate  the needs and 
perceptions  of LGBTQ women from ages 35 to 91, including  informal caregivers  and older 
adults regarding  services and support from health  care providers.  Questionnaires  were 
completed by older  LGBTQ women (N = 76), and  follow-up  interviews  were conducted  with 
25% of caregiver  respondents.  The majority of subjects indicated  a fear of future 
challenges  and discrimination.  Four main themes emerged  when analyzing  the open-
ended  responses: the need  for health  care workers who were both supportive  and 
knowledgeable  about  LGBTQ issues; better and  consistent recognition  of same-sex 
partners and their  rights to make decisions as primary caregivers;  increased sensitivity 
training  regarding  the needs of LGBTQ patients and  caregivers; and more open and 
Page 23 of 26 

 
accepting environments  where LGBTQ patients and  caregivers could feel comfortable 
discussing issues with the staff. [PUBLICATION  ABSTRACT]  Sociology  Collection.   
Esther L. Wang.  Transgender persons seeking services: Barriers, supportive 
factors, and suggestions  for practitioners
 
     Although  trans gender  persons comprise a relatively  small percentage  of the 
population,  as a group,  they experience  elevated  levels of discrimination  as well as 
disparities  in health  and mental health.  This study examined  the experiences  of adult 
transgender  individuals  who have  sought social services, mental health  services, and 
medical care and who live  in southern California.  This study also explored  the suggestions 
transgender  people  themselves have  for service providers on how to best deliver  culturally 
competent care. Fifteen  face-to-face interviews  were conducted with transgender 
individuals  using open-ended  questions.  Grounded  theory  was used to identify  common 
themes. These themes were organized  into  four categories: experience  summary, 
negative  experiences,  methods of coping,  and suggestions for allies and  peers. Copies of 
dissertations may be obtained  by addressing  your request  to ProQuest, 789 E. 
Eisenhower  Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann  Arbor,  MI  48106-1346.  Telephone  1-800-521-
3042;  e-mail: xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx Sociology  Collection.   
White CR, Jenkins DD. College students' acceptance of trans women  and trans men 
in gendered spaces:  The role of physical  appearance. J.Gay  Lesbian Soc.Serv. 2017 
Jan-Mar 2017;29(1):41-67
 
     Transgender  people  often  face prejudice  and  discrimination in school, employment, 
housing,  and health  care, and this can affect their psychological  well-being.  Although  the 
literature  on prejudice  toward  transgender  people  is growing,  there is limited  research that 
has examined  differences in attitudes  toward trans women and trans men separately. 
Specifically,  the current study examined  the role  of physical  appearance  in the acceptance 
of transgender  women and  men in gendered  spaces, including  bathrooms, locker rooms, 
residence halls, and  sorority and fraternity  organizations.  Participants  viewed  masculine-
appearing  and feminine-appearing  images of a trans woman and  trans man. 
Measurements  of overall  transacceptance  and gendered-space  acceptance were 
assessed. Results indicated  that, in general,  trans women were less accepted than  trans 
men. The masculine-appearing  trans woman was less accepted in the gendered  spaces 
compared to the feminine-appearing  trans woman and both  images of the trans men. Also, 
female participants  were generally  more accepting  of transgender  people  than male 
participants  were. These findings suggest that,  compared to trans men, discrimination  of 
trans women is more likely,  especially  when the trans woman's physical appearance 
transgresses traditional  gender  expectations.  Sociology  Collection.   
Wilber S, Brown B, Celestine A.  LGBT Youth in Detention: Understanding and 
Integrating Equitable Services. 2012
 
     This publication  presents the objectives  and content of a workshop designed  to improve 
jail  administrators’ understanding  and  integration  of equitable  services for juvenile  jail 
detainees  who are lesbian,  gay, bisexual,  or transgender  (LGBT).  Workshop participants 
are first presented  with a quiz that assesses what they currently  know about  juvenile  LGBT 
jail  detainees.  Questions address the prevalence  of LGBT  youth  in detention  facilities; 
whether  every person has a gender  identity;  the meaning  of “transgender;”  the percentage 
of LGBT students who missed a day of school in the last month because they  felt unsafe 
at their school; rate of sexual  victimization  for LGBT  youth  compared to heterosexual 
youth;  percentage  of LGBT youth  of various races; detention  rate for LGBT girls; 
homelessness among these youth;  and protective  factors against suicide for LGBT youth. 
Answers are provided  for each question.  The workshop then traces the experiences  of a 
Page 24 of 26 

 
hypothetical  LGBT  youth admitted  to detention.  The experiences  pertain  to intake  and risk 
assessment, determination  of gender  and sexual  orientation,  name and pronoun,  risk 
assessment, the detention  decision and  family involvement,  jail  housing,  and race. 
National  Criminal Justice Reference  Service (NCJRS) Abstracts Database.   
 
Internet 
Please use the Library’s  Evaluating Information  quick guide to help you  assess the 
quality  of results sourced from the Internet 
 
 
 
Results from  Selected Google: 
 
Please find a couple of selected reports from the results above: Unfortunately most 
are involved mainly  on the rights for transgender, but some may  include exceptions 
 
Government  Equalities  Office: Providing  services for transgender  customers A guide 
November  2015  
(Includes  exceptions) 
 
European  Parliament:  TRANSGENDER  PERSONS' RIGHTS  IN  TRANSGENDER 
PERSONS' RIGHTS  IN   THE EU MEMBER  STATES 
 
Government  Equalities  Office: Government  Response to the Women and  Equalities 
Committee Report on Transgender  Equality  July  2016    
 
 
Results from  Advanced  Google on Transgender exceptions in academic  literature  
 
Results from  Advanced  Google on Transgender exceptions in general 
 
Google Scholar results 
 
Critical Identities:  Rethinking  Feminism Through  Transgender  Politics 
 
Building  Effective Responses: An Independent  Review of Violence  against  Women, 
Domestic Abuse and  Sexual  Violence  Services in Wales 

 
Structural Interventions  for HIV  Prevention  Among  Women Who Use Drugs 
 
Transgender  Law Concerns Meeting  House of Commons 31st October 2017 
 
A sanctuary of tranquillity  in a ruptured  world: Evaluating  long-term counselling  at a 
women’s community health  centre 

Page 25 of 26 

 
 
Tracing erasures and imagining  otherwise:  theorizing  toward an intersectional 
trans/feminist politics of coalition 

Redefining  Gender  and Sex: Educating  for Trans, Transsexual  and  Intersex  Access and 
Inclusion  to Sexual  Assault Centres and Transition  Houses 

 
Page 26 of 26