This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'FOI: Liaison Psychiatry Referral Policy'.



Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 
Standard Operating Procedure  
 
 
 
 
 
Mental Health Liaison Team 
Procedure Author: 
 
Practice Development Group 
Procedure Reference Number: 
MH006 
 
Date Ratified: 
April 2019 
 
Expiry Date: 
May 2022 
 
 
 
Procedure Statement/Key Objective: 
This SOP is to ensure best practice principles for LCFT staff to 
promote effective liaison between Acute Trusts and LCFT Mental 
Health Liaison Teams whilst maintaining the values of respect, 
compassion, excellence, accountability, integrity and teamwork 
 
 
 
 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 1 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
Summary 
Title of Procedure: 
Mental Health Hospital Liaison Standard Operating 
Procedure 
Applicable to: 
Mental Health Liaison Teams 
Governance group responsible  ☒Safety and Quality Governance Group 
for approving and monitoring 
☐Drugs and Therapeutics Committee 
implementation 
☐Medication Safety Group 
☐Safeguarding Group 
This group is responsible for 
☐Promoting Health, Preventing Harm Group 
approving that the document is fit 
☐Infection, Prevention and Control Group 
for purpose and for monitoring 
☐Mental Health Law Group 
adherence to the policy and for 

keeping an eye on the review 
People and Leadership Group 
date.  
☐Other: _______________________________ 
Linked Sub-Committee 
☒Quality and Safety Subcommittee 
 
☐People sub-committee 
☐Mental Health Law Subcommittee 
☐Other: _______________________________ 
People / Groups Consulted: 
Mental Health Liaison Teams 
CGM for Localities 
Service Manager for Localities 
Deputy Head of Operations 
To be read in conjunction with: 
  Clinical Record Keeping procedure CL027 
  Care  Programme  Approach  Policy  and  Procedure  - 
CL012 
  Care Planning Standards 
  LCFT Values and Code of Conduct 
  Supervision Policy – COR031 
  Safeguarding  and  Protecting  Children  Adults  Policy 
(SG007) 
  MHA and Code of Practice  
  Mental Capacity Act 2005  
  Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards 2007 
  Procedure  for  the  assessment  and  management  of 
clinical risk in mental health services CL028a 
  Clinical  Risk  Assessment  and  Management  in  Mental 
Health Services Policy (CL028). 
 
 
 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 2 of 31 

link to page 4 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 27 link to page 28 link to page 30 Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
Table of Contents 
 

1.0 
Introduction ....................................................................................................... 5 
2.0 
Scope ............................................................................................................... 6 
3.0 
Definitions ......................................................................................................... 7 
4.0 
Duties ............................................................................................................... 8 
5.0 
The Procedure .................................................................................................. 8 
6.0 
Training .......................................................................................................... 27 
7.0 
Monitoring ....................................................................................................... 28 
8.0 
References ..................................................................................................... 30 
 
MCA COMPLIANCE FORM  
Yes/No/ 
Please complete the questions below: 
Notes 
Unsure 
If ‘Yes’, the procedure must 
be compliant with the MCA. 

Does the procedure relate to Clinical practice?   
☒ Yes    ☐ No 
Please complete the 
questions below. 
If ‘No’ refer back to author – 

Does the procedure refer all users to the MCA 
all clinical procedures should 
policy?   
☒ Yes     ☐ No  be read in conjunction with 
 
the MCA policy. 
If ‘Yes’ is this MCA 

Does the procedure refer to any form of consent to 
☐ Yes    ☒ No 
compliant? 
treatment?   
 
If ‘Yes’ is this MCA 
Does the procedure stipulate a specific method of 
☐ Yes   ☒ No 
compliant? 
consent is required?   
 
Does the procedure exclude service users unable to 
If ‘Yes’ procedure is not MCA 
consent?   
☒ Yes    ☐ No 
compliant – refer back to 
 
author 
Does the procedure require staff to use any form of 
If ‘Yes’ refer procedure to 
restraint / restrictive practice?   
☐ Yes    ☒ No 
MCA lead who should review 
 
it (name) 
Policy  for  Implementing  the  Mental  Capacity  Act  and  Obtaining  Authorisation  for  Deprivation  of 
Liberty CL048 

 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 3 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 4 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
1.0  Introduction 
 
1.1  Liaison  psychiatry  /  Mental  health  liaison  is  a  specialty  concerned  with  the 
assessment and care of people with both physical and mental illness. However, 
this  does  include  individuals  presenting  to  an  ED  with  primarily  mental  health 
disorders.  
 
1.2  Physical  and  mental  health  are  a  key  component  of  a  person’s  “health”.  Poor 
physical health increases the rates of poor mental health; poor mental health can 
cause  or  worsen  physical  health.  This  improves  worse  outcomes  of  physical 
health  disorders  compared  to  someone  without  mental  disorder.  This  has 
significant financial impacts for the NHS and wider economy in increased costs 
and reduced productivity; not to mention the significant adverse impact on quality 
of life.  
 
1.3  A  functioning  liaison  mental  health  service  can  improve  patient  outcomes  and 
deliver  cost-savings  for  acute  hospitals  through  reduced  length  of  stay  and 
reduced  readmissions.  In acute  hospitals,  the  prevalence  of  co-morbid  mental 
health problems is extremely high; many of these problems go undiagnosed and 
untreated. Improvements in recognition, management and treatment of mental 
health conditions in hospital can significantly reduce the scale and cost of these 
problems. 
 
1.4  In younger inpatients the prevalence of mental disorders may be around half the 
rate of older people, implying an overall prevalence of physical/mental health co-
morbidities in the inpatient population of nearly 50%. This high prevalence comes 
about due to a number of factors pre-existing mental illness contributing to the 
development  of  physical  illness;  psychological  reactions  to  physical  illness; 
organic effects of physical illness on mental function, e.g. delirium; the effects of 
medically  prescribed  drugs  on  mental  functions  and  behaviour;  medically 
unexplained physical symptoms that mask underlying mental illness; and alcohol 
and drug misuse (Lloyd,  2012).  Many cases of mental illness among hospital 
patients  go  undetected  by  acute  clinical  staff  with  at  least  50%  unrecognised, 
and may be even lower for some conditions such as delirium (Fossey et al, 2012). 
 
1.5  Therefore, liaison psychiatry is a critical service that should be integral to all acute 
hospitals  (Joint  Commissioning  Panel  for  Mental  Health,  2012;  NHS 
Confederation,  2012).  Good  liaison  mental  health  care  is  needed  in  acute 
hospitals  across  the  country,  providing  a  24/7  urgent  and  emergency  mental 
health  response  for  people  attending  A&E  or  admitted  as  inpatients  to  acute 
hospitals.  Only  a  small  proportion  currently  (2018)  of  24  hour  EDs  have  24/7 
liaison  mental  health  services  that  reach  minimum  quality  standards,  even 
though peak hours for people presenting to A&E with mental health crises are 
11pm-7am.  
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 5 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
1.6  The NHS Five Year Forward View mandates that  no acute hospital should be 
without an all-age mental health liaison service by 2020/21; at least 50% of acute 
hospitals  should  have  a  minimum  Core24  level  of  service  (Mental  Health 
Taskforce, 2016). In addition it includes Recommendation 21 that states “NHS 
England should ensure that people being supported in specialist older-age acute 
physical health services have access to liaison mental health teams – including 
expertise in the psychiatry of older adults – as part of their package of care”. 

 
1.7  Mental health liaison is able to provide a detailed biopsychosocial assessment 
and  employs  this  model  in  the  assessment  and  treatment  of  all  individuals 
assessed.  Mental  health  liaison  services  usually  operate  separately  (but  in 
collaboration  with)  community  and  inpatient  mental  health  services.  Liaison 
services are multidisciplinary and include a consultant psychiatrist with special 
interest  or  expertise  in  liaison  psychiatry.  Liaison  psychiatry  services  have 
enhanced/expert knowledge on the safe operation of the Mental Health Act and 
Mental Capacity Act in general hospital settings.  
 
2.0  Scope 
 
2.1  This document applies to all the staff employed by LCFT working within Mental 
Health Liaison Teams settings or contracted to provide services for the Trust on 
either an agency or locum basis. This policy supports the MHLT SOP on a page.  
 
2.2  This  policy  will  be  subject  to  regular  review  and  amendments  to  reflect  any 
changes  or  improvements  in  the  current  clinical  practice  as  directed  by  the 
clinical policies within Lancashire Care Foundation Trust. 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 6 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
3.0  Definitions 
 
ACE-III 
ACE III – Addenbrookes Cognitive Examination III 
AUDIT-C 
AUDIT-C (AUDIT alcohol consumption questions) 
CCG 
CCG – Clinical Commissioning Group 
CGI-I 
Clinical Global Impression – Improvement Scale 
CHC 
Continuing Health Care 
CROM 
Clinician Rated Outcome Measure 
eCPA 
Electronic Care Programme Approach 
ECR 
Electronic Care Records 
ED 
Emergency Department 
EDMS 
Electronic Document Management System 
EMIS 
Egton Medical Information Systems 
EPR 
Electronic Patient Record 
ePDR 
Electronic Performance Development Review 
FFT 
Friends & Family Test 
FBC 
Full Blood Count 
GDS 
Geriatric Depression Scale 
GP 
General Practitioner 
ICD-11 
International  Statistical  Classification  of  Diseases  and  Related  Health 
Problems 11th Revision 
IRAC 
Identify the aim / rate achievement of the aim 
QOF 
Quality and Outcomes Framework 
LCFT 
Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust 
M-ACE 
Mini-Addenbrookes Cognitive Examination 
MAS 
Memory Assessment Service 
MCA 
Mental Capacity Act 
MDT 
Multidisciplinary Team 
MH 
Mental Health 
MHDU 
Mental Health Decisions Unit 
MHLT 
Mental Health Liaison Team 
NICE 
National Institute for Health & Care Excellence 
NCRS 
NHS Care Records Service 
NMP 
Non-medical prescriber 
OA 
Older Adult  
PHQ2 
Patient Health Questionnaire (2 item version) 
PHQ9 
Patient Health Questionnaire (9 item version) 
PREM 
Patient Reported Experience Measure 
SPoA 
Single Point of Access 
U&Es 
Urea and Electrolyte 
UCC 
Urgent Care Centre 
 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 7 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
4.0  Duties 
4.1  Operational Leads 
 
Have  responsibility  to  ensure  this  policy  is  promoted  and  implemented  within 
their area of responsibility.  
 
4.2  Operational / Service Managers  
 
Have responsibility for ensuring that this policy is effectively implemented in their 
areas of responsibility. 
 
4.3  Team Leaders / Managers 
All  managers  are  responsible  for  ensuring  that  this  policy  is  effectively 
implemented  in  the  area  that  they  manage,  including  the  monitoring  and 
supervision activities in accordance with section 8 (monitoring) of this policy. 
  
4.4  All  LCFT  clinical  staff  and  other  integrated  staff  groups  will  ensure  that  the 
procedure is followed and that they act in line with their professional standards 
of conduct, performance and ethics. 
 
5.0  The Procedure 
 
5.1  The Service 
 
In line with our Standard Operating Procedure, we will provide  flexible, needs-
led support, interventions and planning in partnership with patients, carers and 
colleagues 
in each locality. 
 
5.2  Mental Capacity Act (2005) 
 
MHLT staff working should understand legislation relevant to capacity, consent 
and  information  sharing  as  outlined  in  the  Mental  Capacity  Act  (HMSO,  2005) 
and Mental Capacity Act Code of Practice. Mental health professionals should 
pay particular attention to sections 1 to 6 of the Mental Capacity Act in order to 
understand legal duties and limitations.  
 
 
Guidelines on capacity and information sharing should always be followed and 
considered at all times throughout the pathway. 
 
5.3  Referral Criteria  
 
The Mental Health Liaison Team will offer mental health assessments and care 
planning to people aged 16 years or above presenting with acute mental health 
needs  on acute trust  hospital  sites;  this  includes  inpatient  wards, Urgent  Care 
centres, and Emergency Departments (ED). 
 
 

 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 8 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
Inclusions
 
A person has an apparent mental health need which the acute trust care team 
want assessed before their discharge from care, particularly for cases involving 
complexity or where risks are identified. Complexity can refer to decisions where 
there are differences of opinion with regards to capacity, or where mental health 
needs  are  significantly  impacting  on  recovery  or  treatment  of  mental  health 
needs. 
 
 
Where a specialist mental health assessment is required as a part of a holistic 
and comprehensive approach to care. 
 
 
Where there is a suspicion of a mental health disorder, but specialist assessment 
is required to identify or exclude such a disorder. 
 
Exclusions 
 
 
Patients  without  a  primary  psychiatric  condition  or  comorbidity,  this  includes 
patients  diagnosed  with  a  primary  neurological  condition  without  comorbidity 
(even where they are requiring a CHC assessment). 
 
 
Patients with a very low level of mental health / psychological support needs not 
impacting  on  management  of  their  physical  disorder  or  delaying  discharge. 
These patients can be signposted back to their GP or to other support options. 
 
 
It is likely that a patient can only be excluded by an initial brief assessment or 
where a request for telephone advice is made and a shared outcome is agreed. 
 
5.4  Pre-assessment information to be included with referral 
  Full patient details including DOB, gender, NHS Number, and GP. 
  Referrers name and contact details. 
  The primary reason for referral and associated risks. 
  The reason for their current admission and ongoing management plan. 
  Indication of the urgency of the referral in line with the NICE Response Time 
Standards  (Section  6.6)  –  remember  that  all  ED  referrals  are  treated  as 
emergency referrals. 
  An indication of whether the patient has consented and is agreeable to the 
referral, or where lacking capacity it is in their best interests. 
 
5.5   Emergency Department Referrals 
  Referrals  from  the  emergency  department  will  usually  be  via  telephone  or 
bleep. 
  Any patient  with mental illness should  undergo a risk assessment at  triage 
(RCEM, 2017). This basic review should be conducted by ED triage staff or 
appropriate  staff  on  the  ward  and  undertaken  with  compassion  and 
understanding. 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 9 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
  It should include (NICE, 2017): 
o  A  physical  assessment;  a  decision  as  to  whether  they  need  emergency 
physical care should be taken as a priority. 
o  A personalised risk assessment, including a decision as to the appropriate 
action needed should the person leave the ED while waiting for review by 
the liaison MH team. 
o  Observations on behaviour and mental state. 
  In some cases the triage process will identify patients without physical illness 
who may be appropriate for a "fast track" referral directly to MH liaison (RCEM, 
2017). 
  ED nursing staff should have access to regular training in MH so that they are 
able to assess risk and contribute in a positive way to the patient's condition 
(RCEM,2017). 
 
5.6  Response Time Standards 
 
NICE have outlined a series of standards that are recommended as part of the 
Evidence Based Treatment Pathway (EBTP). These rely on definitions of acuity. 
 
Emergency Referrals – within 1 hour: An emergency is an unexpected, time-
critical  situation  that  may  threaten  the  life,  long-term  health  or  safety  of  an 
individual or others and requires an immediate response.  This includes ALL ED 
and Urgent Care Centre (UCC) referrals. 
 
Urgent referrals – within 24 hours (but aim for same day): An urgent situation 
is serious,  and an individual may require timely advice, attention or treatment, 
but it is not immediately life threatening.  
 
Within 1 hour there should be a response to the referrer (telephone or face-face) 
to  a  referral  graded  as  an  emergency  or  urgent  from a  general  hospital  ward. 
This is to ascertain its urgency, the type of assessment needed and resources 
required for the assessment. (All ED/UCC referrals should receive a face-face 
response within 1 hour as above) (NICE, 2016). 
 
Emergency Department: within four hours of arriving in an ED or being referred 
from a ward it is recommended that the person should (NICE, 2016): 
  have  received  a  full  biopsychosocial  assessment,  have  an  urgent  and 
emergency mental health care plan in place, and at a minimum, be en route 
to their next location if geographically different; or, 
  have  been  accepted  and  scheduled  for  follow-up  care  by  a  responding 
service; or, 
  have been discharged because the crisis has resolved; or, 
  have started a Mental Health Act assessment. 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 10 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
Within 24 hours of presenting with a suspected urgent mental health problem on 
a general hospital ward it is recommended that a person should:  
  have received a full biopsychosocial assessment, and  
  have an urgent and emergency mental health care plan in place, and  
  at a minimum, be en route to their next location if geographically different, or 
  have  been  accepted  and  scheduled  for  a  follow-up  appointment  by  the 
responding service, or  
  have been provided with advice or signposted, where appropriate. 
 
Routine referrals – within 48 hours. This time frame does not exclude earlier 
triage and appropriate gathering of information.  
 
The MHLT will provide a response to all ward referrals at the earliest opportunity, 
ideally  this  should  be  a  telephone  response  within  1  hour  (unless  urgent  or 
emergency where this should be undertaken immediately) to confirm receipt of 
referral and our estimated response time.  
 
5.7  Where a hospital has a 24/7 Emergency Department (ED), then it should have a 
core 24 service level as a minimum to ensure 24/7 mental health cover excluding 
MHLT Central (NICE,2017). This will include access to a consultant psychiatrist 
(on-call out of hours), the ability to provide a response to mental emergencies in 
EDs and inpatient wards within 1 hour and to all urgent ward referrals within 24 
hours. 
 
5.8  Assessment Pathways 
 
The MHLT will operate an integrated all-age (adult), needs-led service in line with 
the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health (MH Taskforce, 2016). 
 
 
The  MHLT  will  identify  the  most  appropriate  practitioner  within  the  team  to 
undertake  the  initial  assessment.  A  patient’s  age  alone  will  not  be  used  to 
differentiate who undertakes this assessment. Within LCFT we have developed 
Advanced Care Criteria which  identify if a patient has “advanced care” needs. 
This will enable the team to identify a practitioner with specific older adult skills 
where appropriate.  
 
 
At the point of referral, an initial discussion with the referrer may take place to 
clarify whether a patient is fit for assessment and as to the urgency of the referral. 
 
 
In  some  cases  it  may  be  identified  that  a  person  is  too  unwell  or  unfit  for 
assessment; in these cases there should be a joint agreement with the referrer 
whether  the  assessment  can  be  delayed  or  whether  the  patient  should  be  re-
referred at a point where they are fit for assessment. This will particularly be the 
case if someone is under care on an intensive care unit. 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 11 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
In cases of self-harm where they are undergoing active treatment as a result of 
self-harm  and full assessment  is  not  possible,  then  an  initial  brief  assessment 
should  be  conducted  and  the  referral  kept  open  until  further  assessment  and 
management can take place.  
 
 
Only after attendance and review of the clinical presentation can an option for 
discussion  can  be  made  as  to  whether  a  routine  or  enhanced  assessment  is 
required and whether this can take place in parallel alongside ongoing physical 
health care treatment where deemed appropriate. 
 
 
If after this initial face to face review it is felt that the person is not able to engage 
in a MH assessment then as much information as possible will be documented 
on  the  electronic  care  record  and  arrangements  made  to  complete  the 
assessment at an appropriate time. 
 
 
Responsibility  of  care for  the  individual  sits  within  the  acute trust, but  we  also 
have a duty to provide a timely response, and to support them in managing risk. 
 
 
Medical responsibility will remain with the relevant consultant of the acute trust. 
 
 
A  Routine  Assessment  describes  the  standard  assessment  that  takes  place 
and can be used to quickly identify if an Enhanced Assessment is required. A 
routine assessment only, is appropriate when the presenting problem is at a level 
appropriate  for  management  in  primary  care  or  signposting  to  third  sector 
services.  These  presentations  would  not  be  associated  with  any  active  or 
ongoing indicators of risk to self or others, and/or with no indicators of immediate 
vulnerability. 
 
 
A routine assessment can be recorded within a daily  contact/face-face contact 
entry and is not expected to require completion of an enhanced risk assessment 
or health & social needs document.   
 
 
An Enhanced Assessment is more appropriate where additional needs or risks 
are  identified  following  an  initial  routine  assessment  (i.e.  to  include  referral 
information, 5P formulation and plan).  This will include patients presenting with 
symptoms  of  psychosis,  thoughts  of  self-harm  or  self-harm  behaviours,  and  a 
severity of mental illness that would require referral to secondary care services. 
 
 
An  enhanced  assessment  will  require  a  detailed  risk  formulation  and 
management  plan.  This  includes  an  assessment  based  on  an  individual’s 
strengths & needs, completion of an Enhanced Risk Assessment incorporating 
a 5Ps formulation and an agreed plan. 
 
 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 12 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
Any patients being admitted or referred on to secondary mental health services 
require the assessments indicated above an enhanced assessment as well as a 
completed health & social needs assessment. In some areas (where applicable) 
a  risk  assessment  and  H&SN  assessment  may  also  be  required  for  patients 
being transferred to the MHDU. 
 
5.9  Assessment tool / form 
It  is  appropriate  for  a  paper  based  tool/pro-forma  to  be  used  for  recording  of 
information  and/or  as  an  aide-memoire  for  practitioners  to  ensure  that  all 
appropriate information is gathered at an assessment. 
 
These  assessment  tools  are  not  to  be  regarded  as  indicators  of  risk  in 
themselves. No risk assessment tool has been shown to have sufficient ability to 
predict risk. 
 
Best practice as advocated by the DoH (2007) involves making decisions based 
on  knowledge  of  the  research  evidence  on  risk,  knowledge  of  the  individual 
service user (their social context and own experiences) and clinical judgement. 
Practitioners will therefore use a structured professional judgment approach to 
the assessment of risk. 
 
It is essential where any assessment tool/form is used for assessment and where 
the practitioner relies on that for prompting risk indicators, it covers the following 
essential elements where applicable to the presenting complaint (DOH, 2007): 
  
Risk factors for suicide: 
  Demographic  factors:  male,  Increasing  age,  Low  socioeconomic  status, 
relationships  status  (unmarried,  separated,  widowed),  living  alone, 
unemployed. 
  Background history: deliberate self-harm (especially with high suicide intent), 
childhood  adversity  (e.g.  sexual  abuse),  family  history  of  suicide,  family 
history of mental illness. 
  Clinical history: mental illness diagnosis (e.g. depression, bipolar disorder, 
schizophrenia),  personality  disorder  diagnosis  (e.g.  borderline  personality 
disorder),  physical  illness,  especially  chronic  conditions  and/or  those 
associated  with  pain  and  functional  impairment  (e.g.  multiple  sclerosis, 
malignancy,  pain  syndromes),  recent  contact  with  psychiatric  services, 
recent discharge from psychiatric in-patient facility. 
  Psychological and psychosocial factors: hopelessness, impulsiveness, low 
self-esteem, life event, and relationship instability. Lack of social support 
  Current  ‘context’:  suicidal  ideation,  suicide  plans,  availability  of  means, 
lethality of means. 
 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 13 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
When you have identified suicidal thoughts/feelings or assessment follows an act 
of self-harm, you should always explore this further. This includes asking about 
the frequency of the thoughts they have, how long they have been present and 
whether they have worsened recently. Equally it is important to check if they have 
considered specific methods, and/or have a plan, and whether they have access 
to means. Check what factors increase the risk and what factors make the risk 
less likely this will need to include ways of mitigating any risk.  
 
Risk Factors for Violence: 
  Demographic  factors:  male,  young  age,  socially  disadvantaged 
neighbourhoods, lack of social support, employment problems, criminal peer 
group. 
  Background history: childhood maltreatment, history of violence, first violent 
at  young  age,  history  of  childhood  conduct  disorder,  history  of  non-violent 
criminality. 
  Clinical  history:  psychopathy,  substance  abuse,  personality  disorder, 
schizophrenia,  executive  dysfunction,  non-compliance  with  treatment. 
Patients with dementia may also be at increased risk for violence and often 
have  difficulties  communicating  their  needs/feelings  which  can  lead  to 
frustration or lack of social awareness. 
  Psychological and psychosocial factors: anger, impulsivity, suspiciousness, 
morbid jealousy, criminal/violent attitudes, command hallucinations, lack of 
insight. 
 
Perinatal: Any patient who has given birth (or been pregnant) within the last 12 
months  should  be  screened  for  symptoms  of  depression,  anxiety  (including 
obsessional thoughts), and insomnia. They should be asked about any thoughts 
or acts of self-harm, worries about their ability to care for their child/children, or 
feeling detached/estranged from the baby/infant.  It should be clarified whether 
there have been any significant changes in mental state or new symptoms. 
 
Professional  judgement  should  be  used  to  decide  what  is  a  normal  aspect  of 
parenthood  (e.g.  isolated  tiredness),  versus  something  pathological,  e.g. 
constant feelings of inadequacy or persistent low mood. 
 
Carry out a risk assessment in conjunction with the woman and, if she agrees, 
her partner, family or carer. Focus on areas that are likely to present possible 
risk such as self-neglect, self-harm, suicidal thoughts and intent, risks to others 
(including the baby), smoking, drug or alcohol misuse and domestic violence and 
abuse (see Domestic Abuse Policy/Procedure – SG006/SG006a)
 
The above risk indicators should not be regarded as an exhaustive list. 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 14 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
5.10  MDT Working 
MH patients presenting in acute trusts (especially EDs) have a high rate of co-
morbidities  with  alcohol,  substance misuse or  other  vulnerabilities.  Close  links 
with safeguarding (see Safeguarding and Protecting Children and Adults Policy 
– SG008) 
also promote good holistic care.  
 
There needs to be a MDT that can deliver joint assessments in a timely fashion. 
LCFT  does  not  hold  responsibility  for  dealing  with  patients  with  primary 
substance  misuse  difficulties  (unless  otherwise  contracted).  It  is  therefore 
important that timely access to other services is also available. 
 
5.11  Risk Assessment 
Risk management is a fundamental requirement of the delivery of safe, effective 
and high quality mental health services. 
 
All staff who assess individuals presenting to Mental Health Services within LCFT 
are required to assess the likelihood of harm to self or others as part of an overall 
assessment of need.  
 
Clinical risk assessment is the process by which risk is assessed. Best practice 
as advocated by the DoH (2007) involves making decisions based on knowledge 
of the research evidence on risk, knowledge of the individual service user (their 
social  context  and  own  experiences)  and  clinical  judgement.  Practitioners  will 
therefore use a structured professional judgment approach to the assessment of 
risk. 
 
All  staff  involved  in  risk  management  should  receive  relevant  training,  which 
should be updated at least every three years (DOH, 2007). 
 
LCFT has developed an Enhanced Risk Tool and a Standard Risk Tool which 
sits  in  the  electronic  patient  record  and  should  be  used  to  record  risk 
assessments.  For  routine  assessments  in  MHLTs  not  requiring  an  enhanced 
assessment  or  care  plan  from  the  MHLT,  or  where  no  MH  need  is  identified, 
completion  of  the  Standard  Risk  Tool  is  appropriate  although  any  relevant 
information can be incorporated within a structured daily contact entry.  
 
An  Enhanced  Risk  Tool  should  be  completed  for  every  assessment  where  a 
more detailed or “Enhanced Assessment” (as defined by  the SOP CL028a) is 
undertaken, or where there are identified risks of harm to self, to others, and risks 
associated with vulnerability or all forms of exploitation. 
 
The risk assessment tools should always be finalised and not left in draft other 
than  in  situations  whereby  a  practitioner  has  been  called  away  in  an  urgent 
situation. 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 15 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
 
All clinically trained staff are required to attend a one-day essential training which 
will support staff in using the 5P's risk assessment and formulation model.  
 
Staff  are  expected  to  be  able  to  use  the  5P's  'headings'  when  completing  an 
Enhanced Risk Assessment. 
 
See the LCFT Procedure in relation to assessment and management or risk for 
further information related to risk assessment and recording of risk assessment 
(CL028A).  
 
5.12  Managing patients who leave / or may leave: 
If a Mental Health Act assessment has been arranged and the need for urgent 
and emergency mental health care is still in place, then the EBTP clock does not 
stop  if  the  person  leaves  the  ED  or  ward  and  is  reported  to  the  police  as  a 
‘missing person’ (NICE, 2016).  
 
If there are concerns that the person is likely to leave before an assessment and 
there  are  concerns  regarding  immediate  harm,  all  efforts  should  be  made  to 
support the person.  The following should also be considered:  
 
Whether there is reason to suspect the person lacks mental capacity and powers 
to hold under the Mental Capacity Act can be used.  
 
Whether  it  is  appropriate  to  contact  the  police  to  consider  the  use  of  Mental 
Health Act section 136 
(can be used in any location other than a private dwelling 
or  the  private  garden  or  buildings  associated  with  that  (this  does  not  apply  to 
communal buildings. (Section 136(a)), or  
 
Whether Mental Health Act holding powers should be used:  
  If a person is already receiving physical health treatment, the doctor in charge 
of their care can apply section 5(2) holding powers.  
  If no urgent and emergency mental health care is required and the person 
leaves  the  general  hospital  of  their  own  accord,  the  EBTP  CLOCK  STOPS 
and  the  conditions  under  which  they  left  should  be  recorded.  The  MHLT 
should then consider whether further referral and/or follow up is necessary. 
 
5.13  Patients who refuse assessment 
Where  a  patient  that  has  been  referred  refuses  assessment  then  a  capacity 
assessment should be undertaken. If this demonstrates a lack of capacity, then 
a best interests judgement will need to be made (probably in consultation with 
the referred) to establish whether to continue with assessment. 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 16 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
 
Where it is identified that a person lacks capacity then assessment will need to 
take place as far as possible to ascertain  their needs and associated risks.  In 
circumstances where they present with a mental disorder and a risk to their own 
health,  safety  or  that  of  others,  a  Mental  Health  Act  assessment  may  be 
indicated. 
 
Likewise even if someone does not appear to lack capacity, but there are clearly 
identified risks in the presence of a suspected or known mental disorder, a Mental 
Health  Act  assessment  may  be  indicated.  It  is  however,  rare,  that  a  truly 
capacitous person will refuse assessment. Consideration needs to be given to 
the circumstances in which that person has presented and the likely impact that 
has on their mental state. 
 
5.14  Proxy Decision Makers 
Where a patient lacks capacity to make specific decisions for themselves, every 
effort should be made to ensure that there is not an existing Lasting Power of 
Attorney, Court Appointed Deputy, or Advanced Decision To Refuse Treatment 
(ADRT) in place. 
 
Where  a  person  lacks  capacity  to  make  a  specific  decision,  then  the  person 
holding deputyship/LPA should be treated as the decision maker. 
 
It should always be checked whether someone holds a relevant authority (e.g. 
LPA) to make decisions on a patient’s behalf. This may be by asking them to 
provide a copy of the LPA certified by the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG). 
An alternative course of action is to make a request via the OPG for a search of 
the Public Guardian Registers (known as an OPG100). This form can be found 
online. 
 
An  Advanced  Decision  does  not  have  to  be  written  down  except  in  cases 
whereby it relates to life sustaining; in such cases it must explicitly relate to the 
identified circumstances and state that the decision applies even if their life is at 
risk  /  they  are  likely  to  die.    In  such  cases  the  advance  decision  needs  to  be 
written, signed by the person themselves and a witness. 
 
An Advanced Statement is NOT the same as an ADRT. An advance statement 
is  a  written  statement  that  sets  down  your  preferences,  wishes,  beliefs  and 
values regarding your future care. It is designed to support those if need to make 
best interest decisions in relation to your care. It does not have to be adhered to 
but anyone making decisions MUST take it into account. An advanced statement 
is written by someone who has mental capacity to make those statements. 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 17 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
An Advanced Decision is legally binding if it complies with the MCA, is valid and 
applies to the specific decision. An ADRT is valid if: 
  The  person  is  aged  18  or  over  and  had  capacity  to  make  the  specific 
decision. 
  It specifies clearly the treatments being refused. 
  The person has not demonstrated they are likely to have changed their mind. 
  A valid ADRT takes precedence over others making decisions under the best 
interest principles of the MCA. 
 
For decisions around treatment in someone who lacks capacity please consult 
the MCA Code of Practice for specific guidance. 
 
5.15  MHA Section 136 
These  are  powers  under  the  MHA  which  are  available  to  police  officers.  ‘If  a 
person appears to a constable to be suffering from mental disorder and to be in 
immediate need of care or control, the constable may, if he thinks it necessary to 
do  so  in  the  interests  of  that  person  or  for  the  protection  of  other  persons  (a) 
remove that person to a place of safety…or (b) if … already at a place of safety 
…keep  the  person  at  that  place  or  remove  the  person  to  another  place  of 
safety.
’(RCPsych, 2018). 
 
Section 136 can now be used in any place other than a private dwelling or the 
private garden or buildings associated with that place (s.136 1A). 
 
Police must consult a registered medical practitioner, a registered nurse or an 
approved mental health professional or other persons specified in the Act or its 
regulations,  if  practicable,  before  using  s.136  (s.136(1C)).  The  regulations 
specify  that  an  occupational  therapist  or  a  paramedic  may  also  be  consulted 
(Statutory Instrument, 2017). 
 
Where police officers have removed someone to a place of safety under s.136 
MHA, the person remains in the custody of the detaining officers until such a time 
that  another  organisation  agrees  to  take  over  the  legal  detention.  The  chief 
constable would be liable for negligence for any claim if the police withdrew from 
a situation where someone was still subject to legal detention, without ensuring 
a safe handover of care. 
 
The  maximum  period  of  detention  under  S136  (MHA)  is  24  hours;  it  can  be 
extended  by  a  further  12  hours,  but  only  if  the  registered  medical  practitioner 
decides  it  is  necessary  because  it  has  not  been  possible  to  complete  the 
assessment within  the first  24 hours directly as a result of  their condition. The 
“clock” starts as soon as a person arrives at the place of safety. 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 18 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
Where  extension  is  required  in  a  health-based  place  of  safety  (HPOS),  this 
should be a decision made by a doctor who is approved under Section 12 (MHA). 
Unavailability of a MH bed is not a valid reason for an extension to Section 136. 
 
HPOS  should  be  secure  enough  and  sufficiently  staffed  to  manage  the  vast 
majority  of  patients  on  s.136  without  requiring  the  assistance  of  the  police.  In 
some  circumstances,  a  person  may  be  assessed  as  being  too  aggressive  to 
safely manage the person in the HPOS at that time. In such circumstances police 
officers should be asked to remain in the place of safety until there is sufficient 
staff/further  assessment  to  allow  a  safe  handover  of  care  to  take  place 
(RCPsych, 2018). 
 
Police  officers  frequently  come  across  situations  where  there  is  no  immediate 
need for care or control and where further information about the person such as 
background information, risk history or crisis plan may help their decision making. 
In the absence of an immediate need for care or control it may be appropriate, if 
safe to do so, for mental health services to offer an alternative response to the 
mental health crisis. This may include an emergency assessment by the mental 
health team if the person is able to give consent to the assessment or arrange 
further community support/review if the person is well known to the service and 
such a response is clinically indicated (RCPsych, 2018). 
 
Use of ED as a place of safety: 
Assessment at an A&E/ED may be required where there are concerns about a 
person’s physical health. 
 
The needs of individual persons held under S136 patient must be paramount and 
healthcare professionals and the police need to work in partnership to ensure a 
safe and timely assessment of both physical and mental health needs. 
 
Every  patient  admitted  to  the  HPOS  should  have  the  following  physical 
observations:  pulse  rate,  blood  pressure,  respiratory  rate,  temperature,  urine 
drug screen and urine ‘dipstick’ (protein, white cells, urea, and ketones), plasma 
glucose and Glasgow Coma Scale assessment or other simplified measure of 
consciousness.  These  should  be  completed  by  the  accepting  nurse.  Early 
warning systems e.g. Modified Early Warning System (MEWS) are useful tools 
to track physiological observations during detention under s.135/136 (RCPsych, 
2018) 
 
Detention under S136 ends as soon as the assessment has been completed and 
necessary  arrangements  have  been  made.  (Code  of  Practice  16.50).  Such 
arrangements  might  include  detention  under  the  MHA,  informal  admission  or 
arrangements made for community treatment or social arrangements necessary 
for a safe discharge. 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 19 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
The  s.136  cannot  be  discharged  without  the  AMHP  making  any  necessary 
arrangements  for  the  person’s  treatment  or  care  except  where  the  registered 
medical  practitioner  concludes  that  the  person  is  not  suffering  from  mental 
disorder  (as  defined  in  the  MHA).  A  doctor  must  discharge  the  person  from 
detention under s.136 if there is no evidence of mental disorder.  
 
The doctor undertaking the examination, or at least one doctor if two doctors are 
involved,  should  ensure  documentation  of  the  assessment  and  plan  in  the 
patient’s records on the system available to the HPOS. 
 
5.16  “Positive risk taking” 
The use of this phrase and its implementation should be done carefully. It refers 
to  risk  taking  where  there  has  been  a  serious  consideration  about  the  issues 
which  have  been  discussed  with  the  patient.  It  is  about  deciding  on  a  plan  of 
actions  that  has  recognised  associated  risks,  but  when  the  potential  benefits 
outweigh the potential negative consequences of the plan (Hart, 2014).  
 
It primarily relates to where a risk can’t be completely eliminated but an approach 
taken is more beneficial than another course of action (such as admission under 
the MHA).This approach allows a  patient  to maintain a degree of manageable 
responsibility  for  their  safety,  improves  engagement,  and  takes  advantage  of 
their participation in risk management. 
 
Positive risk taking must only take place following a robust risk assessment and 
management  plan.  It  requires  a  shared  understanding  of  potential  risks  to  the 
patient of their own behaviours, and the drivers of these behaviours, were they 
carried  out.  The  positive  benefits  of  the  use  of  agreed,  adaptive  coping 
mechanisms  to  combat  their  behaviours.  This  will  involve  a  focus  on,  and 
understanding of, the patient and their support network. 
 
A  positive  risk  approach  should  be  something  that  is  regularly  discussed  in 
individual  and  team/peer  supervision  to  ensure  appropriate  and  safe  decision 
making. Clinical decisions should always be defensible rather than defensive, in 
the best interests of the patient (Hart, 2014) and in accordance with the principles 
of the Mental Capacity Act (2005). 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 20 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
A  suggested  checklist  for  guidance  in  positive  risk  management  (O’Brien  and 
Hart, 2013) is shown in table 1. 
   
Table 1: Good practice considerations in undertaking a “positive” 
approach to risk management. 
1.  Are you clear about the patient’s experiences and 
understanding of risk? 
2.  Are you clear about the carer experiences and 
understanding of risks (including any responsibilities they 
may be placed upon them)? 
3.  Have you clearly defined potential risks and their context? 
4.  Has there been a clearly defined identification of strengths 
and coping mechanisms? 
5.  Is everyone clear about the planned stages for risk taking? 
6.  Has there been an estimate of potential pitfalls and 
estimated likelihood? 
7.  What potential safety nets are in place, including 
identification of early warning signs linked to a crisis and 
contingency plan? 
8.  Have you and the patient explored the “what if” scenarios? 
9.  What was the outcome of previous attempt(s) at this 
course of action? 
10. How was it managed, and what will now be done 
differently? 
11. What needs to, and can, change? 
12. How will progress be monitored? 
13. Who agrees to the approach (and who disagrees)? 
14. When will it be reviewed? 
 
5.17  Medication Management  
It is appropriate for the care team of the acute trust to request support or advice 
in regard to a patient’s mental health medication. 
 
5.18  Consultation & Advice 
Some referrals may only require brief consultation and advice this can be in the 
form of signposting. 
 
The most appropriately skilled member of the MHLT should be the one to deal 
with these requests. 
 
5.19  Discussion treatment plan / care plan 
All assessment information and care plan recommendations should be recorded 
within the patients’ EPR. 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 21 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
Key information & recommendations around risks,  follow up and management 
should  be  documented  clearly  within  the  patient  record  for  the  acute  trust 
following every contact or assessment. 
 
The  care  team  should  have  the  ability  to  contact  the  MHLT  for  advice  or 
clarification as required including knowledge of their phone or bleep number. 
 
It  is  recommended  that  each  MHLT  makes  use  of  a  care  plan  which  can  be 
attached  to,  or  included  within,  the  patient’s  notes.  This  will  identify  the  key 
information 
around 
assessment, 
risks, 
and 
management 
(including 
recommendations for the acute staff around observations and actions should a 
patient leave). It can also enable a record of when assessments take place and 
a management plan is changed.  
 
As well as assessment outcomes being recorded in notes they should also be 
discussed directly with a member of the referring team.  
 
5.20  Responsible Clinician Duties 
In cases where a patient is detained under the MHA (1983) whilst under the care 
of the acute trust, or where awaiting a MH inpatient admission, then there should 
be  an  arrangement  in  place  between  the  acute  trust  and  local  MH  trust  as  to 
identification of a responsible clinician. 
 
The  responsible  clinician  is  the  approved  clinician  who  will  have  overall 
responsibility for the patient’s mental health care. 
 
Hospital managers should have local protocols in place for allocating responsible 
clinicians to patients (DH, 2015).  
 
5.21  Outcome measures 
Demonstrating  the  quality  and  effectiveness  of  liaison  mental  health  services 
should be embedded within the service. 
 
We will collect data that allows us to populate a Balanced Scorecard for internal 
quality control and also report against external stakeholder (e.g. Commissioner) 
mandated standards. 
 
Outcome  measures  can  measure  process  (e.g.  time  to  assessment;  referral 
numbers),  clinical  outcomes  (i.e.  Clinical  Reported  Outcome  Measures  or 
CROMs),  and  patient  rated/reported  outcomes  (Patient  Recorded  Outcome 
Measures (PROMS) and Patient Reported Experience Measures (PREMS). 
 
The  Liaison  Psychiatry  Faculty  at  the  Royal  College  of  Psychiatrists  has 
developed  a  Framework  for  Routine  Collection  of  Outcome  Measurement  in 
Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP).  
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 22 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
Suggested patient and clinical outcome measures are highlighted in table 2. 
 
From  April  2017  (NICE,  2016),  liaison  mental  health  services  are  expected  to 
record specific data: 
  the time of the referral received by the liaison mental health team  
  the time of the initial response by the liaison mental health team  
  that a full biopsychosocial assessment has taken place  
  that an urgent and emergency mental health care plan has been agreed and 
is in place  
  the time that the person is either en route to their next location if geographically 
different,  or  has  been  accepted  and  scheduled  for  follow-up  care  by  a 
responding service, or has been discharged because the crisis has resolved  
  the time that a Mental Health Act assessment started. 
 
Table 2. Suggested Clinical and Patient Reported  
Outcome Measures (based on FROM-LP 2015; NICE, 2016) 
Outcome Measure 
Single Contacts 
Multiple Contacts 
 
Patient Experience 
Friends & Family Test 
Friends & Family Test 
CGI-I (at baseline and final 
Clinical Global Impression – 
Outcomes – clinician rated 
assessment) 
Improvement Scale (CGI-I) 
 
Generic - CORE10 
At beginning and end of 
series of contacts 
 
Condition specific: 
  Dementia / Cognitive: m-
ACE; MOCA; MOCA-
Blind 
Outcomes - patient rated 
  Delirium: S-CAM or 4AT 
 
 
  Depressive disorder: 
PHQ2; PHQ9; GDS 
  PND: Edinburgh 
Postnatal Depression 
Scale  
  Anxiety disorders: GAD-7 
  Psychosis: HoNOS 
  Alchohol: AUDIT-C 
  MUS: EQ-5D-5L 
Response time (routine/urgent/emergency - avoidance of 
Process Measures 
breaches) 
 
IRAC (Identify the aim / rate achievement of the aim) 
Referrer Satisfaction 
Referrer satisfaction scale (case by case or as regular 
 
survey) 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 23 of 31 







Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
5.22  Decision to admit from Emergency Department 
Following a decision to admit to a mental health unit, there is a national standard 
around  the  maximum  waiting  time  in  an  ED.    Any  breaches  of  this  12  hour 
standard  are  considered  serious  and  should  result  in  a  report  by  the  CCG  to 
NHSE’s  Lancashire  Area  Team  (see  12  Hour  Breach  Standard  Operating 
Procedure for Lancashire 2018
). 
 
“The  waiting time for an emergency admission via  A&E is measured from the 
time when the decision is made to admit, or when treatment in A&E is completed 
(whichever  is  later)  to  the  time  when  the  patient  is  admitted  (leaves  the 
department) or is transferred to another Trust (this now includes Mental Health 
Trusts)”.  
 
5.23  Discharge 
A patient may be discharged from the MHLT when their specific input is no longer 
required or the patient is discharged from hospital. 
 
The MHLT has an important role to play in referral and transfer of care to other 
mental health services. A number of options are available for patients who have 
been assessed by the MHLT. 
 
If  not  MH  need  is  identified  then  a  patient  may  be  discharged  or 
signposted/referred  to  another  service  if  additional  needs  are  identified  (e.g. 
substance misuse). 
 
Patients with low level MH conditions may be discharge direct back to GP care 
and/or  self-referral  to  services  that  provide  psychological  therapies  at  primary 
care level (e.g. MindsMatter), or relevant 3rd sector agencies. 
 
For patients who have undergone an Enhanced Assessment, then a number of 
outcomes are available (in addition to those above): 
  Admission  to  the  Mental  Health  Decisions  Unit  to  allow  a  period  of  further 
assessment before a final plan is formulated, 
  The Acute Therapy Service (ATS); ATS is available as an alternative to being 
admitted  to  hospital  or  to  reduce  time  spent  in  hospital  by  way  of  early 
discharge.  It  helps  people  to  focus  on  problem  solving  and  use  of  skills  to 
manage situations independently.. 
  Crisis  Houses  which  offer  short-term  placements  in  addition  to  crisis 
interventions, 
  Other MH Crisis Accommodation (including those providing support for people 
with substance misuse), 
  Social Care, 
  Direct  referral  to  other  MH  services  such  as  Crisis,  CMHTs,  or  Early 
Intervention. 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 24 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
If no alternatives to admission are available then admission to hospital may be 
indicated. If an individual lacks capacity then a MHA assessment will need to be 
undertaken before the person can be admitted to hospital for treatment of mental 
disorder. 
 
5.24  Role of Consultant Psychiatrist 
Mental  health  liaison  teams  within  LCFT  are  nurse  led.  However,  consultants 
within the team can provide senior clinical leadership, clinical input and advice, 
and provide a specific role in relation to the MHA.  
 
The hospital consultant liaison psychiatrist provides mental health assessment, 
advice and shared management of people with both physical and mental health 
symptoms  under  the  care  of  hospital  teams,  including  in  the  emergency 
department, medical and surgical admissions, and the wards (RCPsych, 2014). 
 
Hospital  consultant  liaison  psychiatrists  can  offer  expertise  to  inform  hospital 
security and safety policies. They are often uniquely positioned to identify issues 
concerning  human  behaviour  and  how  these  might  affect  the  safe  delivery  of 
services. 
 
In  addition,  the  hospital  consultant  liaison  psychiatrist  will  support  mental 
capacity assessments and the use of the mental health legislation. 
 
To  attend  weekly  complex  case  meetings.  Generally,  a  psychiatrist  should  be 
involved in the care of any patient who has a mental disorder, or possibility of a 
mental  disorder,  and  when  one  or  more  of  the  following  factors  are  in  place 
(RCPsych, 2014): 
 
 
  Uncertainty about diagnosis and formulation. 
  The nature of the mental disorder requires psychiatric care, including all cases 
of psychosis, complex disorders, severe disorders and disorders that are not 
resolving. 
  Risk to self or others. 
  Poor engagement with service or abnormal illness behaviour. 
  A need to respond authoritatively to another agency. 
  Complex psychopharmacology is required or being prescribed. 
  Patients  who  have  mixed  diagnoses,  for  example  mental  disorder  and 
substance misuse, mental and physical health problems or mental illness in 
the context of personality disorder. 
 
The consultant within the MHL team will work within their own specialist field (e.g. 
working age adult or older adult/advanced care).  
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 25 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
Older  Adult  Psychiatrists  have  a  key  role  in  assessing  older  adults  presenting 
with complex or atypical problems, integrating psychological, cognitive, physical 
and social components of the presentation. This does not  necessarily exclude 
them providing wider advice to the team or other colleagues.  It is expected that 
like all members of the liaison service within LCFT, they will function within the 
framework of the Advanced Care model which ensures patients at the interface 
between working age and “older adult” received input that is most appropriate to 
their needs. 
 
If  a  service  user  is  referred  to  the  team  and  does  not  attend  his/her  initial 
appointment,  or  is  not  available  when  a  community  assessment  is  attempted, 
advice  will  be  sought  when  needed  from  the  clinical  lead  or  the  manager  (via 
MDT  meetings)  and  a  plan  of  action  agreed  taking  into  account  known 
information and levels of risk.  Feedback will always be given to the referrer and 
GP of the non-attendance, where clinically indicated. 
 
5.25  Role of a specialty doctor: 
The specialty doctor (SD) is embedded within the team and is expected to work 
across the adult age range (including older adults). This will include supporting 
patients requiring assessment in other clinical settings such as physical health 
wards and MHDUs. 
 
All  SDs  will  have  at  least  one  designated  consultant  supervisor.  SDs  are 
expected  to  work  within  the  clinical  competence  and  seek  appropriate 
advice/supervision for cases in which senior clinical input would be beneficial. 
 
The specialty doctor will is embedded within and will support the wider MDT by 
providing  specialist  knowledge  around  assessment  &  diagnosis  of  mental 
disorder, use of pharmacology, and use of the MHA / MCA.  
 
5.26  Medical Cover within a Team: 
Consultant cover should be provided by a reciprocal arrangement with another 
locality consultant. When consultant input is not available from within the team, 
there should be an arrangement that ensures cover during working hours. This 
may  be  through  provision  of  a  daytime  “on-call”  rota  or  other  specific 
arrangements. 
 
Routine  clinical  work  can  be  covered  by  another  grade  of  doctor,  such  as 
specialty doctor, however the team should always have access to a consultant 
psychiatrist when required. 
 
Cover  for  specialty  doctors  will  often  have  to  be  from  within  the  team  (e.g. 
consultant) unless other medical staff are available that agree to provide cover 
for annual leave etc. 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 26 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
5.27  Education & Training of Acute Hospital Staff 
Where  possible,  providing  informal  and  formal  education/training  to  acute 
hospital  staff  is  a  core  function  of  a  liaison  mental  health  service.    Training 
improves the ability of hospital staff to identify mental health conditions.  
 
Better identification of mental health conditions is likely to improve the quality and 
timeliness  of  referrals  to  the  MHLT.    This  is  important  in  achieving  cost-
effectiveness,  as  delays  in  the  engagement  of a  liaison psychiatry  service  are 
strongly associated with increased lengths of inpatient stay (Kishi et al., 2004). 
 
Training  improves  the  quality  of  care  provided  by  acute  hospital  staff.  When 
mental health problems are detected, treatment is often sub-optimal by hospital 
staff and training can help to remedy this deficiency (Parsonage et al, 2012). 
 
Training increases the overall capacity of the hospital to manage patients with 
co-morbid physical and mental health problems. The number of such patients is 
large, and therefore some rationing or targeting of liaison psychiatry services is 
unavoidable. The availability of  trained general hospital staff allows the liaison 
psychiatry team to concentrate on the more severe and complex cases. 
 
6.0  Assessment Environments 
The Royal College of Emergency Medicine (2017) recommends that:  
 
Any assessment area needs to be safe for staff, and conducive to valid mental 
health assessment. 
 
The assessment room must be safe for both the patient and staff. There should 
be  no  ligature  points,  and  nothing  that  can  be  used  as  a  weapon.  The  room 
should  have  an  alarm  system  and  2  doors  (that  open  both  ways).  It  is  not 
acceptable to use a room that doubles as an office. 
 
 
7.0  Training 
Regularly  team  meetings  (including  monthly  team  business  meeting)  will  take 
place to ensure appropriate peer supervision and ongoing training. 
 
All Liaison clinicians will have access to relevant training to ensure competence 
in practice, utilising up-to-date research and evidence based learning. 
 
All  Liaison  clinicians  will  engage  in  supervision  in  line  with  LCFT  Supervision 
Policy COR031. 

 
All  Liaison  clinicians  will  engage  with  LCFT  ePDR  process  or  alternative 
profession specific framework. 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 27 of 31 






Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
Liaison  clinicians  will  need  protected  time  for  learning  and  reflection  and 
professional development.  
 
8.0  Key competencies 

It is essential that the liaison workforce has the right skills to deliver care in line 
with  NICE  guidance.  The  necessary  competencies  for  a  liaison  mental  health 
service to deliver urgent and emergency mental health care are described below 
for  each  professional  group  (where  applicable;  further  information  is  provided 
within  the  Psychiatric  Liaison  Accreditation  Network  (PLAN)  Standards 
(RCPsych, 2011): 
 
8.1  Generic competencies 
  Up-to-date knowledge of  relevant legal frameworks (Mental Health Act and 
Mental Capacity Act). 
  Ability to complete personalised risk assessments, including for self-harm and 
suicide prevention. 
  Up-to-date knowledge of the general hospital system. 
  Knowledge and skills around the care and treatment of older adults, people 
with drug or alcohol use problems, people with learning disabilities and people 
with physical health problems. 
  Skills in providing training and support to general hospital staff around mental 
health problems. 
  Knowledge of local services for people who use drugs or alcohol, including 
social care and voluntary sector services. 
 
8.2  Medical competencies 
  Expertise in pharmacological treatments 
  High level of competence in biopsychosocial assessment 
  High level of leadership 
  Specialist training in working with older adults. 
 
8.3  Nursing competencies 
  High degree of clinical leadership, providing clinical expertise and supervision 
  Specialist training in working with older adults and people who use drugs or 
alcohol 
  Ability to work autonomously and complete biopsychosocial 
  Assessments 
  See also the competence framework for liaison mental health nursing (London 
Liaison Mental Health Nurses’ Special Interest Group; 2014). 
 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 28 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
8.4  Occupational Therapy competencies 
The Occupational Therapy interventions that will be offered as part of Inpatient 
services, based on NICE guidance recommendations, PBR clustering and Royal 
College  of  Occupational  Therapy  (RCOT)  guidelines.  The  assessments  and 
interventions  may  be  delivered  as  part  of  a  1:1  or  group  intervention.  The 
principles of all the interventions are based on enabling people to make choices, 
personalised  care  and  Models  of  Occupational  Therapy  they  will  be  delivered 
within  a  philosophy  of  Recovery  and  Wellbeing.    To  define  specific  OT 
intervention type they have been grouped accordingly: 
 
  Occupation as Therapy 
  Self-management through Occupational Therapy 
  Occupational Therapy to enable social and community inclusion 
  Occupational therapy :consultancy, Education ,Liaison 
 
Occupational therapy therapeutic interventions will be included in the care plan 
and documented under title Occupational Therapy. 
 
9.0  Shared governance arrangements 
It  is  important  that  there  are  strong  links  with  the  acute  trust  and  provider  of 
liaison  MH  services.  There  should  be  regular  meetings  between  the  acute 
trust/ED (in each locality) and LCFT to increase cooperation and understanding. 
 
Shared  governance  structures  may  be  appropriate  in  regard  to  MHLTs.  It  is 
important that the acute trust and LCFT share learning from any serious incidents 
involving a patient under shared care. 
 
10.0  Monitoring    
Time 
Standard 
frame/ 
How 
Whom 
format 
Contractual – Activity 
Reporting generated manually by 
Data (No. referrals A&E, 
MHLT team and validated by 
MHLT 
no. referrals wards, No. 
Monthly 
Performance team as part of the 
Admin 
seen, No. not seen, 
working day model. 
average wait) 
Contractual – Activity 
Reporting generated manually by 
Data (No. of 4 hour 
MHLT team and validated by 
MHLT 
Monthly 
breach and 12 hour 
Performance team as part of the 
Admin 
breaches) 
working day model. 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 29 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
11.0  Key Related National Guidance 

  Alcohol-use Disorders: Diagnosis and Management (NICE quality standard 
11) 
  Antenatal  and  postnatal  mental  health:  clinical  management  and  service 
guidance. Clinical guideline [CG192] (NICE, 2014). 
  Borderline  Personality  Disorder:  Recognition  and  Management  (NICE 
clinical guideline 78) 
  Dementia: Support in Health and Social Care (NICE quality standard 1) 
  Identifying  and  assessing  mental  health  problems  in  pregnancy  and  the 
postnatal period (NICE Pathways, 2018). 
  Personality Disorders: Borderline and Antisocial (NICE quality standard 88) 
  Self-harm (NICE quality standard 34) 
  Self-harm in over 8s: short-term management and prevention of recurrence. 
Clinical guideline [CG16] (NICE, 2004). 
  Service  User  Experience  in  Adult  Mental  Health  Services  (NICE  quality 
standard 14) 
  Service User Experience in Adult Mental Health: Improving the Experience 
of Care for People Using Adult NHS Mental Health Services (NICE clinical 
guideline 136) 
  Violence and Aggression: Short-term Management in Mental Health, Health 
and Community Settings (NICE guideline 10).  
 
12.0  References 
  Department  for  Constitutional  Affairs.  Mental  Capacity  Act  2005:  Code  of 
Practice. London: Office of the Public Guardian; 2005. 
  Department of Health (2007) Best Practice in Managing Risk: Principles and 
evidence for practice in the assessment and management of risk to self and 
others  in  mental  health  services.  Department  of  Health  National  Mental 
Health Risk Management Programme, London. 
  Department of Health (2015). Mental Health Act 1983: Code of Practice. TSO 
(The Stationery Office). 
  LCFT (2015). Procedure for the assessment and management of clinical risk 
in mental health services (CL028A). 
  MH  Taskforce  (2016).  A  report  from  the  independent  Mental  Health 
Taskforce to the NHS in England.  
  NICE (2016). Achieving Better Access to 24/7 Urgent and Emergency Mental 
Health Care - Part 2: Implementing the Evidence-based Treatment Pathway 
for  Urgent  and  Emergency  Liaison  Mental  Health  Services  for  Adults  and 
Older Adults - Guidance. (NHS England, the National Collaborating Centre 
for Mental Health and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) 
  NICE (2006). Dementia: supporting people with dementia and their carer’s 
in health and social care. NICE Guideline 2006; 42, www.nice.org.uk 
 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 30 of 31 

Mental Health Liaison Team (MHLT) 
 Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
  NICE (2010) Quality Standard 1: Dementia. June 2010 
  HMSO. Mental Capacity Act 2005. London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office; 
2005. 
  Royal College of Emergency Medicine 2017. Mental Health in Emergency 
Departments: A toolkit for improving care. RCEM: London. 
  Royal College of Psychiatrists 2011. Quality Standards for Liaison Psychiatry 
Services (3rd ed.) www.rcpsych.ac.uk/PLAN.  
  Royal  College  of  Psychiatrists  2014. When  patients  should  be  seen  by  a 
psychiatrist. College Report CR184.  
  Royal  College  of  Psychiatrists  2015.  Framework  for  Routine  Outcome 
Measurement in Liaison Psychiatry (FROM-LP). Faculty Report FR/LP/02.   
  Royal College of Psychiatrists 2018. Frequently asked questions (FAQs) on 
the use of sections 135 and 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (England and 
Wales). College Report 213
  Statutory Instrument 2017 No 1036 “The Mental Health Act 1983 (Places of 
Safety) Regulations 2017” at 8 (1) a,b. 
See intranet for latest version of this document 
 
Page 31 of 31