This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Ground Support Equipment Weapons'.







UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
Issue 1, April 2015
(Formerly AP 119F-0001-5F)
AIRCRAFT GROUND SUPPORT
EQUIPMENT
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE (-5F)
Sponsored for use in the
United Kingdom Ministry of Defence
and Armed Forces
by
Defence Equipment & Support (DE&S) - Air Commodities Team
Publications Organisation:
Air Commodities Team
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page (i)

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CONDITIONS OF RELEASE
This information is released by the UK government for Defence purposes only.
This information must be afforded the same degree of protection as that afforded to
information of an equivalent classification originated by the recipient Government or as
required by the recipient Government's National Security regulations.
This information may be disclosed only within the Defence Department of the recipient
Government, except as otherwise authorized by the Ministry of Defence.
This information may be subject to privately owned rights.
THIS DOCUMENT IS THE PROPERTY OF HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S GOVERNMENT, and
is issued for the information of such persons only as need to know its contents in the course of
their official duties. Any person finding this document should hand it in to a British forces unit
or to a police station for its safe return to the Ministry of Defence, (DDef Sy), Main Building,
Whitehall London, SW1A 2HB, with particulars of how and where found. THE
UNAUTHORIZED RETENTION OR DESTRUCTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS AN OFFENCE
UNDER THE OFFICIAL SECRETS ACTS OF 1911-1989. (When released to persons outside
Government service, this document is issued on a personal basis. The recipient to whom it is
entrusted in confidence, within the provisions of the Official Secrets Acts 1911-1989, is
personally responsible for its safe custody and for seeing that its contents are disclosed only to
authorised persons.)
© CROWN COPYRIGHT RESERVED
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page (ii)

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
ISSUE RECORD
Issue
Number
Issue Date
Details of Issue
Conversion to DAP format of AP 119F-0001-5F 8th Edition
1
Apr 2015
including changes to or removal of Preliminary / Preface pages as
necessary. Technical content remains unchanged.
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page (i i)

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
Issue
Number
Issue Date
Details of Issue
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page (iv)

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CONTENTS
PRELIMINARY MATERIAL
Page
Front cover (title page).................................................................................................................................(i)
Issue record .............................................................................................................................................. (i i)
Contents (this page) .......................................................................................................... ........................(v)
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE (-5F)
Chapters
1
General information
2
Safety notes
3
Maintenance notes
4
Maintenance of GSE subject to the Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000
5
Truck forklift load arms and fork extensions - examination
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page (v)

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
TOPIC 5F
MAINTENANCE SCHEDULES
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page (i)

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 1
GENERAL INFORMATION
CONTENTS
Para
1
Introduction
2
Mandatory requirements
3
Publications
4
Trades and skil levels
5
Additional maintenance
6
Glossary
7
Publication content
Annexes
A
Publications
B
Glossary
INTRODUCTION
1
This Maintenance Schedule has been produced by the Air Commodities Team (ACT) and is
authorised for use by the equipment Engineering Authority, AC GSE. It covers the scheduled preventive
maintenance for the Aircraft Ground Support Equipment.
MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS
2
Prior to undertaking any work directed by this maintenance schedule, personnel must read the
Safety and Maintenance Notes contained within this schedule. In addition, al personnel who operate or
maintain Ground Support Equipment (GSE) must comply with the requirements of JAP(D) 100E-10.
PUBLICATIONS
3
This publication has been produced for use within the Military Air Environment and al the
associated publications quoted at Chapter 1 Annex A are either of Single or Joint Service origin.
TRADES AND SKILL LEVELS
4
RAF trades and skil levels have been prescribed in this schedule however, both civilian and
Service equivalents apply. The attention of Line Managers is drawn to AP 100B-01, JAP(D)100E-10 and
MAP-01.
ADDITIONAL MAINTENANCE
5
The instructions contained in al parts of this schedule do not absolve personnel from responsibility
for acting upon circumstances which may come to their notice indicating the need for additional
maintenance.
GLOSSARY
6
The terms used within this schedule are defined at Annex A to this chapter.
Chap 1
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
PUBLICATION CONTENT
7
Queries concerning the content of this publication, or proposals for up-issue, are to be addressed to
the Air Commodities Team Engineering Authority, AC GSE.
Chap 1
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 1 ANNEX A
PUBLICATIONS
LIST OF ASSOCIATED PUBLICATIONS
Reference
Title
MAP-01
Manual of Maintenance and Airworthiness Processes
JAP(D) 100E-10
Military Aviation Ground Support Equipment Management and Policy
DEF STAN 05-123
Technical Procedures for Procurement
JDP 0-01.1
UK Glossary of Joint and Multinational Terms and Definitions
JSP 800
Mechanical Transport Regulations
JSP 375
MOD Health and Safety Handbook
JSP 418
MOD Environmental Manual
JSP 768
Personal Protective Equipment Catalogue
JSP 515
MOD Hazardous Stores Information System (CD ROM)
JSP 426
RAF Manual, Fire Services
JSP 509
Management of Test Equipment
AP 100B-01
RAF Engineering Policy and Regulation
AP 100C-10
Manual of Quality Assurance and Continual Improvement
AP 101A-0002-1
Maintaining Aircraft and Associated Equipment in Low Temperature
Conditions
AP 107D-0001-1
General Information on Aircraft Oxygen Equipment
AP 113A-0201-1
Earthing of Aircraft and Ground Support Equipment
AP 119A-0512-1
Component Cleaning Processes
AP 119A-0601-0A
Surface Finishing and Marking of Service Equipment
AP 119A-1100-2(NAR)
Personal Protective Equipment – Working at Height
AP 119A-1101-1
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Working at Height
AP 119A-1501-1
Storage Equipment
AP 119F-0010-5F
Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Electrical Equipment
AP 119K-0001-1
Lifting Equipment and Accessories for Lifting Standards and Practices
AP 119L-0001-1
Oxygen & Nitrogen-Characteristics, Associated Hazards & Safety
Precautions
AP 119L-0200-1
Inspection, Testing and Charging of Ground Transport Gas Cylinders
DAP 120A-0001-1
Precautions Against Electric Shock in Maintenance Facilities
AP 120C-0001-1
Battery Charging Room Requirements
AESP 2300-A-050-13
Mechanical Transport Maintenance Regulations for RAF
MTI
Mechanical Transport Instructions
GSE Schedule 11/02
GEMS Operators Manual
Chap 1 Annex A
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 1 ANNEX B
GLOSSARY
1
The terms defined within this schedule are based upon MAA02 and JAP(D) 100C-20.
TERM
DEFINITION
AMPLIFYING NOTES
(1)
(2)
(3)
Check
To make sure, measure or examine.
If the item does not meet the specified
standard, the supervisor is to be informed. No
remedial action is to be taken unless directed.
Disconnect
To cause a connection to come apart.
This task is to be performed in accordance
with authorised procedures and trade
practices.
Ensure
Make certain that the specified
If the item does not meet the specified
conditions are correct.
conditions, remedial action is to be taken to
restore the item to meet the specified
condition. However, such remedial action is
only to be undertaken if it is within the
capability of the individual concerned by virtue
of his rank, trade, training, physical ability and,
where appropriate, certification. If it is not
within his capability, his supervisor is to be
informed.
Examine
To undertake a comprehensive scrutiny, The item is to be cleaned as necessary prior
supplemented by measurement and
to examination. Physical testing is a manual
physical testing, as necessary, to find
activity and is to be carried out without the
the condition of the item. (BS3811).
use of test equipment. Any faults identified
Note: Physical testing is a manual
are to be reported to the supervisor; remedial
activity and is to be carried out without
action is not to be taken unless directed.
the use of test equipment.
Examine as
Within the physical constraints of the
This term acknowledges that a detailed
far as
location of the item carry out an
examination is not possible due to limited
possible
examination to determine the condition access. The item is to be cleaned as
of the item without removing or
necessary prior to examination. Any faults
disconnecting equipment.
identified are to be reported to the supervisor;
remedial action is not to be taken unless
directed.
Fit
The relationship between two related
This task is to be performed in accordance
parts; a limit of tolerance.
with authorised procedures and trade
To attach an item in, or to, a second
practices.
item.
Function
The operations that something must do If the item or system is found to be
or to operate a system or equipment.
unserviceable or to operate incorrectly, the
supervisor is to be informed. No remedial
action is to be taken unless directed. The term
"Function" is the preferred term for this usage
but the term "Operate" stil appears in
schedules and has the same definition.
Chap 1 Annex B
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
TERM
DEFINITION
AMPLIFYING NOTES
(1)
(2)
(3)
Inspect
Examination of product design, product, This is a quality control activity and is
service or plant and determination of
normal y to be undertaken by a supervisor
their conformity with specific
who is to determine that any work has been
requirements, or (on the basis of
performed properly in accordance with the
professional judgement) general
relevant authorised procedures and that the
requirements (BS 3811).
assessed condition of the item is correct.
Note:Within the Military Air Environment Implicit in this term is that good trade practice
(MAE), an inspection is a quality control must be seen to have been applied to the
activity to determine that any work has
item.
been performed properly.
Look for
Undertake a visual check for signs of a Any unserviceability is to be reported to the
specified unserviceability.
supervisor; remedial action is not to be taken
unless directed.
Note
Used to convey, or draw attention to,
(also NB)
information that is extraneous to the
immediate subject of the text.
Reconnect
Re-couple or reattach cables, pipelines This task is to be performed in accordance
or controls previously disconnected
with authorised procedures and trade
from the item.
practices.
Refit
To reattach an item in, or to, a second
This task is to be performed in accordance
item - eg an item removed to al ow
with authorised procedures and trade
access.
practices.
Remove
To take a piece of equipment from a
This task is to be performed in accordance
larger assembly.
with authorised procedures and trade
practices.
Replace
To remove an item and to instal a new This task is to be performed in accordance
or serviceable item.
with authorised procedures and trade
practices.
Replenish
To refil or restock a tank, bottle or
Where appropriate, locking devices and caps
other container to a predetermined
or covers are to be removed, orifices cleared
level, pressure or quantity. The work
of obstructions, the container is then to be
required includes al actions necessary refil ed or restocked as directed and, final y,
to achieve the required aircraft state on ensuring that gaskets and caps or covers are
completion of the task. This may
free from damage, caps or covers and locking
include removing and refitting caps and devices are to be refitted.
covers, clearing and cleaning orifices
and refitting locking devices, among
other tasks.
Test
That which you do, when you operate
If the item or system is found to be
or examine an item to make sure that it unserviceable or to operate incorrectly, the
agrees with the applicable specifications supervisor is to be informed. No remedial
(AECMA Simplified English). An
action is to be taken unless directed.
experiment carried out in order to
measure, quantify or classify a
characteristic or property of an item
(BS 4778).
Chap 1 Annex B
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 2
SAFETY NOTES
CONTENTS
Para
1
Health and safety at work
3
Electricity at work
5
Dangerous engineering substances and COSHH
7
Noise at work
8
Working at height
10
Manual handling
13
Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE)
14
Electric shock
16
Bonding and earthing
17
Portable electrical equipment
18
Electro-static hazards
19
Batteries
20
Hazards and precautions – safety signs
21
Cleanliness of work area
22
Control of hand tools
23
Training, testing and licensing of drivers and driving of self-propel ed GSE
24
Fuel ing and operation of engine driven GSE
25
Engine manual cranking
26
Starting engines with starting cord
27
Detachable flange and divided type wheel assemblies
28
Equipment safety guards
29
Oxygen equipment
32
Liquid nitrogen
34
Refrigeration equipment
36
Leak testing
37
Contractors owned (BOC) cylinders
39
Testing diesel engine injectors
40
Compressed gas and lubricating equipment
41
Fil ing and draining of cooling systems
42
Draining of lubrication systems
43
Towing GSE on public roads
44
Brake drums
HEALTH AND SAFETY AT WORK
1
Al maintenance activity carried out iaw this publication is to comply with the Health and Safety at
Work Act, 1974.
2
The RAF engineering organisation and responsibilities for health and safety are detailed in MAP-01.
ELECTRICITY AT WORK
3
Al maintenance activity carried out iaw this publication is to comply with Electricity at Work
Regulations (EAWR), 1989.
4
Guidance on the interpretation and application of EAWR is contained in JSP 375.
Chap 2
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
DANGEROUS ENGINEERING SUBSTANCES AND COSHH
5
Maintenance operations involving the use of dangerous engineering substances such as lubricants,
cleaning and protective materials are to be carried out in accordance with the relevant COSHH
assessment, AP 100B-10, JSP 375, JSP 515 the MOD Hazardous Stores Information System (HSIS) and
AP 119A-0512 1.
6
Before commencing any maintenance activity, a barrier compound must always be applied to the
hands in order to prevent the risk of infection from dermatitis.
NOISE AT WORK
7
It is MOD policy that the Noise at Work Regulations 1989 (NAWR) is to apply throughout al parts of
the MOD, regardless of the exemption of the NAWR Regulation 3 pertaining to ships and aircraft, but
subject to the conditions of the General Agreement between MOD and the Health and Safety Executive
on the observance and audit of Health and Safety legislation within MOD.
WORKING AT HEIGHT
8
Working at height is hazardous and personnel should not attempt to do so unless suitably qualified.
Personnel required to work at height should be aware that fal s from a height of less than 2 metres may
be as hazardous as fal s from a greater height. A suitable safe system of work is to be developed to
remove or reduce the risk. Appropriate Fal Restraint Personal Protective Equipment (FRPPE) may be
required when working at height which is below 2 metres. Guidance and interpretation on the above is
held in JSP 375.
9
In the event of an accident or incident involving damage to FRPPE or other safety equipment, or an
incident in which a fal is arrested as a result of being connected into a fal arrest system, the relevant
equipment is to be quarantined. In addition to any reporting action required by other instructions, al such
accidents/incidents are to be reported by signal to Abbey Wood ACT GSE 6. GSE 6 wil arrange for the
issue of disposal instructions for the equipment.
MANUAL HANDLING
10
It is the duty of line managers to ensure so far as is reasonably practicable that systems of work are
safe and without risk to health. They therefore have a duty to ensure that suitable and sufficient
assessments of the risk to the health and safety of their staff are carried out by a competent person.
11
Manual handling operations that may be hazardous should be avoided as far as reasonably
practicable by addressing the fol owing questions:
11.1
Can the movement of the load be eliminated altogether e.g. can the workplace or task be
redesigned to avoid moving loads or could delivery be arranged to the point of use?
11.2
Can the operation be automated?
11.3
Can mechanical devices be used?
12
Guidance and interpretation on the above is held in JSP 375.
PERSONNEL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
13
Personnel Protective Equipment (PPE) means al equipment and products designed to be worn or
held at work for the protection of personnel against risks to their health and safety. The requirement to
use PPE must always be considered as a final solution when assessing a task. The Personal Protective
Equipment (EC Directive) Regulations and the Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992
places a duty of care on both Line Managers and employees. Guidance and interpretation on the above
two regulations are held in JSP 375 and JSP 437.
Chap 2
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
ELECTRIC SHOCK
14
Where there is a risk of Electric Shock due to the voltage levels present in some equipment, the
safety precautions detailed in the DAP 120A-0001-1 and JSP 375 are to be strictly observed.
15
Personnel are to ensure that prior to working on equipment which contain suppression capacitors
that the electrical potential is reduced to zero after the voltage supply has been switched off.
BONDING AND EARTHING
16
Specific orders relating to the bonding and earthing of aircraft and GSE are contained in
JAP 100A-01, Chapter 6.4 and AP 113A-0201-1.
PORTABLE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
17
The Policy for the Operation and Maintenance of Electrical Equipment is contained in
AP 119F-0010-5F.
ELECTRO-STATIC HAZARDS
18
Friction or other contact between the human body and synthetic fibre materials used in the
manufacture of clothing and soft furnishings may cause a static electrical charge to col ect on the body.
The charge can increase until it is large enough to discharge in spark form. In certain circumstances, the
discharge could cause a fire or explosion. Reference is to be made to AP 100B-01.
BATTERIES
19
Care is to be taken when handling batteries. When removing batteries from GSE, the battery lead
that is connected to the chassis or frame is to be disconnected first and reconnected last when fitting a
battery. Particular care must be taken to prevent short circuit across the terminals. Charging of batteries,
disposal of waste batteries and electrolyte, spil age or contamination to the body/eyes/clothing by
electrolyte is to be dealt with in accordance with AP 120C-0001-1 and RAF Poster 174.
HAZARDS AND PRECAUTIONS – SAFETY SIGNS
20
There is a requirement for Safety signs to be prominently displayed within work areas. These
should give information for prevention of accidents, warning of health hazards and details of other
emergency situations. Details of Safety signs are outlined in JSP 375.
CLEANLINESS OF WORK AREA
21
It is the responsibility of al tradesmen to ensure that a high standard of cleanliness is maintained in
the work area during maintenance operations. On completion of maintenance, al tools and equipment
are to be cleaned and al materials and rags are to be removed from the work area. Additional y the
equipment that has undergone maintenance is to be thoroughly inspected and any foreign objects are to
be removed.
CONTROL OF HAND TOOLS
22
Control of hand tools is an important engineering function, and is essential to flight safety.
JAP 100A-01 Chapter 6.1 details the control principles and procedures that are to be fol owed within the
Military Air Environment and AP 100B-01 for Non Military Air Environments.
TRAINING, TESTING AND LICENSING OF DRIVERS AND DRIVING OF SELF-PROPELLED GSE
23
Certain items of GSE are self-propel ed and carry drivers. Other items are also self-propel ed but
are pedestrian operated. The regulations concerning responsibilities and procedures for training, testing
and licensing drivers and operators of self-propel ed GSE are detailed in JAP(D) 100E-10.
Chap 2
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 3

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
FUELLING AND OPERATION OF ENGINE DRIVEN GSE
24
Operation, handling and refuel ing of engine driven GSE can be very hazardous under certain
circumstances. The safety precautions to be observed when fuel ing and operating engine driven GSE
are detailed in JAP(D) 100E-10.
ENGINE MANUAL CRANKING
25
Manual cranking of engines is a potential y hazardous operation. Particular care is to be taken
when cranking engines manual y. The starting handle is to be gripped firmly with the thumb on the top
side of the grip, not around it. Additional y correct interlocking of the dog and pawl should be assured
prior to cranking the engine. The Operator should ensure that al personnel are standing at a safe
distance, in the event of a hand slipping off the starter handle.
STARTING ENGINES WITH STARTING CORD
26
When starting an engine using a starting cord, the cord is to be wound a maximum of THREE times
around the pul ey in the direction of rotation of the engine. UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES is the cord to
be wrapped around the hand.
DETACHABLE FLANGE AND DIVIDED TYPE WHEEL ASSEMBLIES
27
Extreme care is to be taken during the removal, fitting and ventilation of tyres on detachable flange
and divided wheels fitted to GSE. The fol owing safety precautions are to be observed:
27.1
Do not remove a divided wheel or unscrew any nuts on the wheel until the tyre has been
deflated and the valve core removed, the wheel clamping nuts (painted red) may then be removed.
Failure to comply with these precautions may cause the wheel halves to blow apart and cause
serious injury to personnel.
27.2
Do not attempt to remove a detachable flange or locking device from any wheel until the
tyre has been deflated and the valve core removed.
27.3
Do not assemble a tyre and wheel without checking the flanges, rings and grooves are
clean, undamaged and free from distortion.
27.4
Before commencing inflation of the wheel it should be placed behind an authorised guard.
The wheel should be inflated slowly to not more than 1 bar (15lbf/in2) ensure al flanges and rings
are correctly seated before continuing to inflate, over inflation of the wheel is to be avoided.
EQUIPMENT SAFETY GUARDS
28
Before removing a safety guard, the equipment is to be switched OFF and isolated, or the ignition
key is to be removed. When it is necessary to function equipment during maintenance with safety guards
removed, extreme care is to be taken by personnel directly involved in the maintenance operation.
Precautions are to be taken to protect personnel that are not directly involved by displaying signs and if
necessary by restricting access.
OXYGEN EQUIPMENT
29
Due to the risks involved only personnel holding appropriate TQA’s are to operate or use Liquid
Oxygen (LOX). Extreme care is to be taken to obviate any risk of contact between oxygen equipment
and oil or grease which are combustible materials and have a high affinity to oxygen and may ignite
spontaneously under high pressure. Accidental contamination of equipment by oil or grease is to be
removed immediately by an approved process.
30
Smoking or naked lights are not permitted when working in the vicinity of Oxygen equipment.
31
LOX is subject to particular regulations and precautions concerning pressure, clothing, first aid and
fire risks. Al tradesmen involved in the handling and maintenance of LOX and associated equipment are
to be thoroughly conversant with the requirements specified in JSP 319.
Chap 2
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 4

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
LIQUID NITROGEN
32
Extreme care is to be taken to obviate any risk of asphyxiation. Liquid Nitrogen (LIN) should only
be used and stored in wel ventilation areas.
33
LIN is subject to particular regulations and precautions concerning pressure, clothing and first aid.
Al tradesmen involved in the handling and maintenance of LIN and associated equipment are to be ful y
conversant with the requirements specified in JSP 319.
REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT
34
The principal hazard arising from the use and maintenance of refrigeration equipment is in the
discharge, accidental or otherwise, of liquid refrigerant. Contact between skin and refrigerant may cause
frostbite. Particular care is to be taken to prevent refrigerant coming into contact with the eyes. Should
refrigerant, come into contact with the eyes, or cause frostbite then medical assistance must be obtained
immediately. First Aid treatment should be carried out by applying warmth to the affected area through
the medium of COLD water. Smoking is prohibited in any area in which refrigerant is in use or being
stored. The user must take al precautionary measures practicable to recover the substances during
maintenance and decommissioning of equipment, and minimise leakage and prevent avoidable
emissions of the substances during equipment operation.
35
The deliberate venting to atmosphere of any of the substances, as a means of disposal, is a
criminal offence.
NOTE
Al personnel employed in the handling of refrigerants should hold the Trade Qualification Annotation
(TQA) Q-GE-ODS), in order to comply with the regulations of the Montreal Protocol.
LEAK TESTING
36
Although leaks can be readily detected by inspection, only the soaps and solutions depicted in
AP 107D-0001-1 are authorised as an aid to leak testing.
CONTRACTORS OWNED (BOC) CYLINDERS
37
The BOC supplied cylinders utilised with this equipment are subject to a ten-year periodic test.
Information on how to determine the test due date of a cylinder is detailed in DAP 119F-2743-123. The
cylinders are to be examined for damage in accordance with JSP 319.
38
Before any contractors owned (BOC) cylinders are recharged by a detachment/Out of Area
deployment the Front Line Command (FLC) is to apply to Defence Fuels Group (DFG) for authority to
recharge cylinders.
38.1
Safeguards have to be put in place by the detachment/Out of Area deployment CFS
operating staff to ensure that MoD charged contractor owned (BOC) cylinders are not mixed with
contractor charged and owned (BOC) Cylinders.
38.2
On completion of the requirement for MoD charged contractor owned (BOC) cylinders, the
cylinders are to be quarantined, then returned thought the DFG as unserviceable assets to the
contractor (BOC) clearly annotated “Requires Internal Inspection”.
TESTING DIESEL ENGINE INJECTORS
39
The testing of diesel engine injectors must be carried out with extreme caution as the spray from an
injector nozzle undergoing test can, if in close proximity to the skin, penetrate the skin with subsequent
risk of infection. Any such accidental penetration from an injector should receive immediate medical
attention through the Station Medical Centre.
Chap 2
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 5

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
COMPRESSED GAS AND LUBRICATING EQUIPMENT
40
Injection of compressed gases or lubricants can result in serious injury. Any accidental injection
into the skin is to receive immediate medical attention. Al personnel involved in the maintenance or use
of such equipment are to comply with the regulations for the specific equipment and the procedures
contained in MAP-01 and AP 100B-01.
FILLING AND DRAINING OF COOLING SYSTEMS
41
Extreme care is to be taken whilst fil ing and draining hot cooling systems, to prevent the threat of
burns and scalding. Unless operations dictate otherwise, the system should be al owed to cool and
pressure dissipate before any part of the system is opened.
DRAINING OF LUBRICATION SYSTEMS
42
Care is to be taken during the draining of hot lubrication systems, to prevent the threat of burns and
scalding.
TOWING GSE ON PUBLIC ROADS
43
The fol owing regulations are to be strictly adhered to if it is intended to tow an item of GSE on the
Public Roads.
43.1
Tyres must be checked in accordance with AESP 2300-A-050-13.
43.2
Brakes are to undergo an efficiency test in accordance with AESP 2300-A-050-13. This
operation is to be carried out by the supervisor in conjunction with MT Tech/Gen Mech tradesmen
during ADM/12 Monthly Maintenance. Details of the test are to be annotated on MOD Form 755G.
43.3
The lighting system, is to be ful y serviceable when connected to a vehicle, otherwise, a
Lighting Board is to be used in accordance with JSP 800 and MT Instructions.
43.4
Speed Restriction Sticker and Reflectors are to be fitted in accordance with JSP 800 and
MT Instructions.
BRAKE DRUMS
44
The shoe linings used on equipment may contain asbestos. Therefore asbestos dust may be
present in the brake drum. The accumulated dust is to be removed using Cleaner Vacuum Zephyr,
Type H (4G/4954491) and the brake drums cleaned using solvent (33D/1923265). Oil or grease
contaminated brake shoes are to be replaced; no attempt is to be made to clean them.
Chap 2
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 6

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 3
MAINTENANCE NOTES
CONTENTS
Para
1
Introduction
2
Equipment function
3
Montreal protocol
4
Coolants and anti freeze solutions
5
Fire extinguishers
6
Painting of ground support equipment
7
Wheel rims
8
Engine decarbonisation
9
Bore glazing
12
Engine lubrication
14
Fuel replenishment using DIESO
15
Hydraulic fluid contamination
16
Hydraulic oil quality monitoring and filter replacement policy
17
When hydraulic oil monitoring is available
19
When hydraulic oil monitoring equipment is not available
21
Diesel engine fuel injectors
22
New equipment or equipment fitted with replacement engines
23
Fan belt tension and replacement
24
Air restriction indicators/air filter elements
25
Hydraulic reservoir replenishment – forklift trucks
26
External supply cables and hoses
27
Local y manufactured ground support equipment
28
Insulation testing
29
Circuit protective conductor testing
30
Phase sequencing
31
Ferrite rings
32
Plug security of cable retaining screws
33
Retention of locking devices and pennants
34
Storage equipment – racking, shelving, binning and pal ets
35
Equipment cleaning
INTRODUCTION
1
The fol owing notes are published for the guidance of trade supervisors and managers concerned
with the maintenance of Ground Support Equipment (GSE). Items of equipment of the same make and
type may vary in minor details. The maintenance in the schedule applies to the types current at the time
of preparation. Units are to check the maintenance details against the actual equipment concerned and
advise the Publication Sponsor by Unsatisfactory Feature Report of any anomalies that could require a
general amendment to the schedule.
EQUIPMENT FUNCTION
2
The term ‘Function’ is used in this maintenance schedule (see glossary). In certain circumstances,
personnel carrying out the maintenance of the equipment may not be able to satisfy the ‘Function’
requirement as they are not qualified operators. Where this situation occurs:
2.1
Under ‘Preparation for Maintenance’, the operator is to be directed to Function the
equipment. If this is not feasible, then it is to be taken that the equipment is serviceable from its last
operation and maintenance is to proceed.
Chap 3
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
2.2
Under ‘Completion of Maintenance’, the operator is to be directed to Function the
equipment. If this is not immediately possible, the scheduled maintenance is to be signed for as
complete and the Supervisory Checks are to be carried out and signed for. A MOD Form 755G is
to be left with the operator detailing the requirement to Function the equipment.
MONTREAL PROTOCOL
3
The Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the Ozone Layer was signed by over 50
countries including the UK. The original objective of the Montreal Protocol was to control the production
and consumption of source gases.
3.1
The fol owing chemicals have been identified as having a significant effect on the rate of
ozone depletion:
3.1.1
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). There are several forms of CFCs which are used
in a variety of products, eg foams, aerosols, refrigeration, solvents and air conditioning.
3.1.2
Halons. The two main halons are bromotrifluoromethane (halon 1301) which is
used for total flooding applications, and bromochlorodifluoromethane (halon 1211) which is
used in fire extinguishers.
3.1.3
Carbon Tetrachloride. Traditional y used as a solvent, this is now used in the
manufacture of CFCs.
3.1.4
1,1,1-Trichloroethane (Methyl Chloroform). This non-flammable solvent is often
used as a cleaning agent.
3.1.5
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons. These transitional substances may be used to
replace CFCs, and although less potent they do have depletion potential.
3.1.6
Methyl Bromide. This is widely used as a fumigant.
3.2
Under the Montreal Protocol the fol owing actions are mandatory and in accordance with
JSP 418:
3.2.1
Venting of protocol substances to atmosphere is to cease.
3.2.2
Where and as acceptable alternative substances are identified, existing
equipment is to be modified to permit introduction.
3.2.3
Future equipment designs are to eliminate the need for protocol substances.
3.2.4
Standards and specifications which provide for the use of protocol substances
are to be identified and wherever possible amended to eliminate the requirement to use
them.
3.2.5
Progress in reducing the use made of protocol substances.
3.2.6
When equipment containing protocol substances is withdrawn from service,
action must be taken to prevent venting to atmosphere by recovering, recycling and
stockpiling for future use.
COOLANTS AND ANTI FREEZE SOLUTIONS
4
Information on coolant mixing and specific gravity checks is contained in Annex A to this chapter.
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
5
Details of Inspections and Maintenance Instructions for first aid fire appliances, where fitted, are
contained in JSP 426.
Chap 3
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
PAINTING OF GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
6
Information on the painting of Ground Support Equipment can be found in MAP-01,
JAP(D) 100E-10 and AP 119A-0601-0A.
WHEEL RIMS
7
Wheel rims are not subject to periodic maintenance but are to be given anti-corrosion treatment, if
required, when the tyres are removed for renewal or repair.
ENGINE DECARBONISATION
8
Engine decarbonisation has not been included as part of periodic maintenance but should be
carried out only when the performance of the engine indicates that it is necessary.
BORE GLAZING
9
Bore glazing is a condition which can occur when a diesel engine has been run for long periods on
a light load. The result is a reduction of power output caused by the loss of effective sealing between
piston rings and the cylinder bore. The symptoms of bore glazing are as fol ows:
9.1
Excessive blue smoke or oil emission from the exhaust.
9.2
Increased oil consumption.
9.3
A tendency for the engine to falter when ful load is applied.
10
If bore glazing is suspected, progressively load the engine to ful load and run it for a minimum of
30 minutes. When it is known that an engine is being run constantly on a light load, then the engine is to
be run on ful load for 30 minutes during the first major Hourly Servicing Maintenance.
11
Where bore glazing symptoms persist the equipment is to be declared unserviceable and the
engine is to be removed and examined. Severe bore glazing can only be removed by honing out the
cylinder bores. This operation would normal y be carried out at 3rd/4th Line.
ENGINE LUBRICATION
12
OMD-90 (NATO 0-1176) is suitable for ambient temperatures down to minus 20°C. However, for
temperatures persistently below minus 20°C, OMD-55 (NATO 0-1178) is to be used.
13
When reverting to normal temperatures OMD 55 need not be replaced until next oil change is due.
FUEL REPLENISHMENT USING DIESO
14
General purpose UK DIESO is suitable for use in ambient temperatures down to minus 12°C.
DIESO military NATO F-54 is suitable for use in ambient temperatures down to minus 15°C. Below these
temperatures refer to AP 101A-0002-1 ‘Maintaining Aircraft and Associated Equipment in Low
Temperature Conditions’.
HYDRAULIC FLUID CONTAMINATION
15
Tradesmen are to ensure that the hydraulic fluid is not contaminated in any way. The presence of
water promotes fungal growth. If fungal contamination is noted during the internal examination of a
hydraulic tank, it wil be necessary to:
15.1
Drain the tank, fil with Solvent (33D/1923265), flush and drain.
15.2
Strip the hydraulic system and components, clean and flush with Solvent (33D/1923265).
Chap 3
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 3

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
15.3
Al ow the hydraulic system to dry.
15.4
Reassemble the hydraulic system and replenish with clean hydraulic fluid.
HYDRAULIC OIL QUALITY MONITORING AND FILTER REPLACEMENT POLICY
16
Hydraulic oil quality monitoring and filter replacement policy is dependent upon the availability of in-
line hydraulic oil monitoring equipment.
When hydraulic oil monitoring is available
17
When in-line hydraulic oil monitoring equipment is available, then the quality of the output hydraulic
oil is to be measured:
17.1
Every 3 and 12 monthly scheduled maintenance.
17.2
Whenever quality is in doubt.
17.3
After the hydraulic system has been disturbed.
18
The oil quality is to be checked until NAS Class 6 or better has been achieved under normal
operating conditions on at least 2 consecutive results. Filters that have blockage warning devices are to
be left in-situ until:
18.1
The required quality of oil cannot be achieved.
18.2
The output flow/pressure of the equipment is unacceptable and the cause is known to be
filter blockage.
18.3
A ful or partial filter blockage warning persists.
When hydraulic oil monitoring equipment is not available
19
When in-line hydraulic oil monitoring equipment is not available then hydraulic oil sampling is to be
carried out, using the patch test, as fol ows:
19.1
Every 3 and 12 monthly scheduled maintenance.
19.2
Whenever contamination of the hydraulic system is suspected.
19.3
After the hydraulic system has been disturbed.
20
Hydraulic oil filters are to be replaced as fol ows:
20.1
When the patch test shows a contamination problem.
20.2
When output flow/pressure becomes unacceptable.
20.3
When a ful or partial filter blockage warning persists.
DIESEL ENGINE FUEL INJECTORS
21
Fuel injectors are not subject to routine maintenance. They should be replaced on defect, or when
the performance of the engine deteriorates sufficiently to warrant replacement.
NEW EQUIPMENT OR EQUIPMENT FITTED WITH REPLACEMENT ENGINES
22
Where new equipment is received, or equipment is fitted with a replacement engine, after 50 hrs
engine running there is a requirement to check and tighten nuts, bolts and unions, paying particular
attention to correct torque loading of cylinder heads and manifolds.
Chap 3
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 4

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
FAN BELT TENSION AND REPLACEMENT
23
Fan belts are normal y to be replaced every 2000 hours regardless of condition. However, where a
manufacture’s policy dictates otherwise, the Maintenance Schedule (Topic 5F) wil reflect the alternative.
AIR RESTRICTION INDICATORS/AIR FILTER ELEMENTS
24
The red indicators in the window of the gauges gradual y rise as the filter elements become choked
with dirt. The elements are normal y cleaned or replaced when the red indicators are ful y exposed.
During the Hour Maintenance the opportunity should be taken to examine the elements, dependent upon
condition, the elements should be cleaned or replaced as necessary. Fol owing replacement of the filter,
the air restriction indicator must be reset.
HYDRAULIC RESERVOIR REPLENISHMENT – FORKLIFT TRUCKS
25
Forklift Truck forks must be in the ful y lowered position prior to replenishing the hydraulic system.
EXTERNAL SUPPLY CABLES AND HOSES
26
Al Ground Support Equipment, with supply cables or hoses to and/or from equipment, must have
them stowed correctly before being towed to another location. Hydraulic hoses, pipes and couplings are
particularly prone to damage arising from misuse and care is to be exercised in their handling, storage
and use. Hydraulic pumps can be damaged by cavitation caused by hoses and pipelines fol owing routes
that wil impede the flow of hydraulic fluid.
LOCALLY MANUFACTURED GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
27
The use of non-standard ground equipment for maintenance is prohibited, unless the regulations
contained in JAP(D) 100E-10 are complied with.
INSULATION TESTING
28
Prior to carrying out insulation tests on equipment, ensure reference is made to the equipment’s
publication and the fol owing instructions:
28.1
Pilot or indicator lamps and capacitors are disconnected from circuits, thus averting
possible damage by test voltages.
28.2
Voltage-sensitive electronic devices are disconnected, thus avoiding damage by test
voltages.
28.3
There are no electrical components connected between any live conductor and earth.
CIRCUIT PROTECTIVE CONDUCTOR TESTING
29
Testing of circuit protective conductors is to be carried out as directed within the main equipment
publication. Where the equipment includes a Protective Earth Neutral (PEN) conductor, this conductor is
to be treated as the circuit protective conductor and tested accordingly, e.g. output neutral of
the 200 V 400 Hz system.
PHASE SEQUENCING
30
A test is to be carried out on completion of any scheduled maintenance or rectification that may
affect phase rotation or output polarity at the main output cables or auxiliary sockets. The phase
sequence is to be A, B and C.
FERRITE RINGS
31
The ferrite rings are for high frequency suppression and form an important part of the EMC system.
They are very fragile and extreme care is to be taken when handling these components.
Chap 3
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 5

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
PLUG SECURITY OF CABLE RETAINING SCREWS
32
Certain types of plugs used for connecting power to electrical ground equipment and electrical y
operated GSE have the cable cores secured by screws in pin buckets. When subject to vibration or
misuse these screws can become loose, creating a safety hazard to personnel and equipment. When
fitting a plug, the screws securing the cable cores are to be tightened and locked with locking compound
(33H/2248425). Before using equipment fitted with this type of plug, the operator is to examine the plug
pins for security of attachment.
RETENTION OF LOCKING DEVICES AND PENNANTS
33
The fol owing method of retention is to be used on items of GSE contained in the
AP 119F publication series, or other, when specified by the relevant topic 5F, to secure the various smal
pins, clips, pennants etc not covered by the Talurit wire clamping process. Further, replacement of
broken or worn cables is to be effected as soon as possible using the same method:
33.1
Measure and cut a piece of 18 swg wire 29H/1250098 to length al owing extra material for
the formation of the loops at each end of the finished cable.
33.2
Cut a ¼ inch length of copper tube
inch x 22 swg 20B/9611032 or
inch x 20 swg
30B/9487506 and slightly flatten.
33.3
Thread the end of the wire through the tube and double back through the tube to form a
loop.
33.4
Secure by the use of cable crimping machine 1M/1300399 or by hammering and soldering.
33.5
Repeat Sub-paras 33.2 to 33.4 above for the other end.
33.6
Attach finished cable to structure and pin, etc using Ring Split 29H/1250109 or 29H/4100.
NOTE
Brazed Brass oval link chain may be used in preference to wire where appropriate to secure locking
pins, pennants and clips.
STORAGE EQUIPMENT – RACKING, SHELVING, BINNING AND PALLETS
34
Storage equipment is defined in GAI 4001 and is to be maintained in accordance with
AP 119A-1501-1, AP 119A-1501-5F and JSP 886.
EQUIPMENT CLEANING
35
Equipment is to be in a clean condition prior to and fol owing maintenance work. Unit management
is to decide the extent and method of any general cleaning necessary. Guidelines for cleaning processes
are contained in AP 119A-0512-1. Specific cleaning tasks required during scheduled preventive
maintenance are detailed in the relevant equipment maintenance schedule.
Chap 3
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 6

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 3 ANNEX A
SAFETY NOTES
INTRODUCTION
1
The basic liquid used in the cooling system of al liquid cooled engines is water, this has the
disadvantage of enhancing corrosion and being of a relatively high freezing point. In order to prevent
damage to engines by corrosion and low temperatures, the cooling system must be protected with an
antifreeze mixture of water and Fluid Miscel aneous AL-39.
ANTIFREEZE INHIBITED ETHANEDIOL AL-39
2
Antifreeze Inhibited Ethanediol AL-39 (34D/2250424) is supplied in 25 Litre (5 gal on) containers.
The mixture ratios of AL-39 to water depends on the lowest temperature of the location that the
equipment is expected to operate in. The freezing point of the antifreeze is lowered as the percentage of
AL-39 is increased and the initial mixture ratios and their freezing points are as fol ows:
2.1
One part (25%) AL-39 to three parts (75%) water has a freezing point of -12°C.
2.2
One part (33.3%) AL-39 to two parts (66.6%) water has a freezing point of -17°C.
2.3
45% AL-39 to 55% water has a freezing point of -32°.
TESTING OF ANTIFREEZE INHIBITED ETHANEDIOL AL-39
3
The testing of antifreeze AL-39/water mixture is to be carried out using a Hydrometer
(63C/2204375). The hydrometer has an integral thermometer graduated from +70°C to -40°C and a
hydrometer float with graduations from 15 to 85. The float graduations represent the percentage by
volume of AL-39 to water when it is at a temperature of 26.7°C.
4
A mixture of AL-39 and water has a higher specific gravity than water alone. As the proportion of
AL-39 to water is increased the depth of float immersed wil be less, so the float scale reading wil give an
indication of specific gravity. Therefore the float reading can be used to indicate the degree of frost
protection given by the added AL-39.
5
The specific gravity of anti-freeze wil vary with engine temperature, so a float reading taken when
the coolant is at engine working temperature wil differ from a reading taken when the coolant is at a
ambient temperature. Float reading alone should not be relied upon for an indication of the coolant
freezing point and some al owance has to be made for fluid temperature. This temperature can be read
directly from the thermometer in the hydrometer. Once the float reading and fluid temperature have been
obtained the freezing point of the coolant mixture can be found by reference to Fig 1.
Chap 3 Annex A
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE OF THE HYDROMETER
6
The procedure for testing of antifreeze AL-39/water mixture using a Hydrometer (63C/2204375), is
as fol ows:
WARNINGS
(1)
ANTIFREEZE. AL-39 (NATO S-757) IS A HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. REFER TO THE
RELEVANT COSHH ASSESSMENT AND SAFETY DATA SHEET DETAILED IN JSP 515, THE
MOD HSIS.
(2)
PRESSURISED FLUIDS.
THIS EQUIPMENT PRODUCES FLUID PRESSURES
HAZARDOUS TO PERSONNEL.
PRESSURES ARE TO BE DEPLETED PRIOR TO
MAINTENANCE.
(3)
HOT SURFACES AND FLUIDS. THIS EQUIPMENT PRODUCES HEAT. PARTICULAR
CARE MUST BE TAKEN TO AVOID BURNS AND SCALDING WHEN MAINTAINING AND
OPERATING THIS EQUIPMENT.
6.1
Draw a charge of coolant mixture from the radiator into the hydrometer, then expel it, this
wil equalise the temperature of the hydrometer to the coolant.
6.2
Draw a second charge into the hydrometer sufficient to raise the float, ensuring that the top
of the float does not touch the rubber cap of the glass cylinder. If initial y there is insufficient charge
to al ow the float to raise to its operating level then, lift the side of the rubber bulb to expel the air
and extract more charge.
6.3
Read the figure on the float scale immediately above the top of the coolant mixture, and the
temperature displayed on the thermometer.
6.4
Refer to Fig 1 with the results of para 6.3 above ie. if the float reading was 35 and the
thermometer reading was 15ºC, then the freezing point of the coolant is -17ºC.
6.5
On completion of testing the coolant, rinse the hydrometer with water, fit the rubber tubing
through the eyelet on the wire clip and stow in its box.
WASTE AL-39 DISPOSAL
7
Waste AL-39 is to be disposed in accordance with local regulations.
Chap 3 Annex A
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
FLOAT READINGS
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
70
-14
-20
-25
-37
-44
65
-13
-16
-22
-32
-40
60
-12
-15
-20
-27
-36
-46
55
-11
-13
-18
-24
-32
-40
50
-9
-11
-16
-23
-30
-35
45
-8
-10
-15
-22
-27
-33
-43
40
-7
-9
-14
-20
-25
-32
-41
C
S
E
35
-6
-9
-13
-17
-22
-30
-37
-43
E
R
EG
30
-5
-8
-12
-16
-20
-27
-34
-40
D

S
25
-5
-7
-11
-15
-19
-25
-31
-37
-45
G
IN
D
20
-5
-6
-10
-14
-18
-23
-29
-35
-42
-49
EA
R
R
15
-4
-6
-10
-13
-17
-21
-26
-32
-39
-46
TE
E
M
10
-4
-6
-9
-12
-15
-20
-24
-29
-36
-41
-49
O
M
R
5
-4
-5
-8
-12
-15
-18
-22
-27
-33
-39
-44
-50
E
TH
0
-4
-5
-7
-11
-14
-18
-21
-26
-31
-35
-40
-45
-5
-3
-5
-7
-10
-13
-17
-20
-25
-30
-34
-39
-44
-10
-6
-9
-10
-16
-19
-24
-26
-32
-36
-41 -47
-15
-15
-17
-22
-25
-30
-34
-39 -44
-20
-16
-20
-23
-28
-32
-37 -42
-25
-27
-30
-35 -40
-30
-33 -37
Fig 1 Freezing points of AL-39/water mixture - degrees C
Chap 3 Annex A
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 3

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 4
MAINTENANCE OF GSE SUBJECT TO THE PRESSURE SYSTEMS SAFETY REGULATIONS 2000
CONTENTS
Para
1
Introduction
2
General summary of the PSSR 2000
3
Associated publications
4
Definitions
5
Applicability of the PSSR 2000 to GSE
6
Written Scheme of Examination (WSE)
7
Competent Person (CP)
8
Examination report
9
Pressure system categories
10
Minor system
11
Intermediate systems
12
Major system
15
Exemption
16
Written scheme of examination general information (WARNING)
17
Compressed air systems
18
Gas charging systems incorporating transportable gas containers/cylinders
19
Hydraulic systems
20
Gas loaded/hydro-pneumatic accumulators
21
Cryogenic systems
22
Refrigeration systems
INTRODUCTION
1
The aim of the Pressure Systems Safety Regulations (PSSR) 2000 is to prevent serious injury from
the hazard of stored energy as a result of the failure of a pressure system or one of its component parts.
The regulations are concerned with steam at any pressure, gases which exert a pressure in excess of
0.5 bar above atmospheric pressure and fluids which may be mixtures of liquids, gases and vapours
where the gas or vapour phase may exert a pressure in excess of 0.5 bar above atmospheric pressure.
Transportable gas containers are covered by the Carriage of Dangerous Goods (Classification,
Packaging and Label ing) and Use of Transportable Pressure Receptacles Regulations 1996 as
transportable pressure receptacles.
GENERAL SUMMARY OF THE PSSR 2000
2
The PSSR 2000 requires the user/owner of a pressure system to:
2.1
Establish the safe operating limits of the system.
2.2
Have a suitable written scheme of examination (WSE) drawn up or certified by a
Competent Person (CP). The WSE must include al protective devices. Any pressure vessel,
pipework section or pipeline, in which a defect may give rise to danger, must also be included. The
WSE is to be reviewed at appropriate intervals by a CP.
2.3
Have examinations carried out by a CP at the intervals set out in the WSE.
2.4
Provide adequate operating instructions to ensure that equipment is operated within the
safe working limits and to cover emergency situations.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
2.5
Ensure that equipment is properly maintained modified and repaired.
2.6
Keep adequate records of the most recent examinations, details of modifications/repairs
and any information supplied with new equipment.
ASSOCIATED PUBLICATIONS
3
JSP 375 – MOD Health and Safety Handbook.
DEFINITIONS
4
Throughout this chapter the fol owing terms wil be used:
4.1
Pressure System. A pressure system is defined as one of the fol owing if it contains, or is
liable to contain, a relevant fluid:
4.1.1
A system comprising one or more pressure vessels of rigid construction, any
associated pipework and protective devices.
4.1.2
The pipework with its protective devices to which a transportable gas cylinder is,
or is intended, to be connected to.
4.1.3
A pipeline and its protective devices.
4.2
Relevant Fluid. A relevant fluid is defined as:
4.2.1
Steam, at any pressure.
4.2.2
Any fluid or mixture of fluids which is at a pressure greater than 0.5 bar above
atmospheric pressure, and which fluid or mixture of fluids is either:
4.2.2.1
A gas.
4.2.2.2
A liquid which would have a vapour pressure greater than 0.5 bar
above atmospheric pressure when in equilibrium with its vapour at either the
actual temperature of the liquid or 17.5ºC.
4.2.3
A gas dissolved under pressure in a solvent contained in a porous substance at
ambient temperature and which could be released from the solvent without the application
of heat.
4.3
Protective Devices. Devices designed to protect against system failure or to give warning
that system failure might occur. Bursting discs are included as wel as any equipment which is
essential to prevent a dangerous situation from arising. Instrumentation and control equipment is
included where it has to function correctly to protect the system or it prevents safe operating limits
being exceeded.
4.4
Pipework. The pipework of a pressure system – pipes, valves, pumps, compressors,
pressure containing components including hoses or bel ows, but does not include any protective
devices.
4.5
Pipeline. A pipe or system of pipes used for conveying fluid across the boundaries of
premises, together with any apparatus for inducing the flow of a relevant fluid through, or through
part of, the pipe or system, and any valves, valve chambers, pumps, compressors and similar works
which are annexed to, or incorporated in the course of, the pipe or system.
APPLICABILITY OF THE PSSR 2000 TO GSE
5
Operating Instructions and Safe Operating Limits. Al items of GSE which are, or which contain a
pressure system, are to be categorised as Major GSE. As such, the operating instructions and safe
operating limits wil be detailed in the relevant equipment AP Topic 1 or manufacturer’s handbook.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
WRITTEN SCHEME OF EXAMINATION (WSE)
6
The WSE format and preparation should be as fol ows:
6.1
Format. The WSE for any item of GSE wil be in the form of a separate maintenance
schedule within the relevant Topic 5F or GSE Schedule. This wil be known as the Pressure
System Examination (PSE).
6.2
Preparation. The relevant equipment Support Authority (SA) is responsible for ensuring
that WSE’s are provided for al relevant equipment, by tasking the GSE Desk Officer, or another
competent agency, to include it within the requirements of para 6.1 above. Units identifying
applicable GSE for which there is no WSE are to apply, through their parent Command, to the
relevant equipment SA for one to be produced.
COMPETENT PERSON (CP)
7
The term CP is used in connection with the fol owing two distinct functions:
7.1
Drawing up or Certifying WSE. For the purpose of drawing up or certifying WSE, the level
of expertise which is advised of the CP is detailed in the PSSR 2000 Approved Code of Practice
(para 106).
7.2
Carrying out the Examination. For the purpose of carrying out the examination in
accordance with the WSE, the CP is that tradesman identified in the relevant Topic 5F or GSE
Schedule and wil in most cases be a SNCO Gen Tech (M). The examination is only to be
delegated to a subordinate on the authority of OC Eng Wg.
EXAMINATION REPORT
8
The format of the examination report wil be a MOD F755G/JAMES Worksheet.
PRESSURE SYSTEM CATEGORIES
9
Pressure systems are divided into three categories. However, in practice there are no clear dividing
lines. The three categories should be taken as an indication of the range of systems covered rather than
providing clear cut divisions. Each system should be individual y assessed and an informed decision
made on which category is most appropriate.
MINOR SYSTEM
10
Minor systems include those containing steam, pressurised hot water, compressed air, inert gases
or fluorocarbon refrigerants which are smal and present few engineering problems. The pressure (above
atmospheric pressure) should be less than 20 bar (2.0 MPa) (except for systems with a direct-fired heat
source when it should be less than 2 bar (200 kPa)). The pressure-volume product for the largest vessel
should be less than 2 x 105 bar litres (20 MPa m3). The temperatures in the system should be
between -200°C and 2500°C except in the case of smal er refrigeration systems operating at lower
temperatures which wil also fal into this category. Pipelines are not included.
INTERMEDIATE SYSTEMS
11
Intermediate systems include the majority of storage systems and process systems which do not fal
into either of the other two categories. Pipelines are included unless they fal into the major system
category.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 3

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
MAJOR SYSTEM
12
Major systems are those which because of their size, complexity or hazardous contents require the
highest level of expertise in determining their condition. They include steam-generating systems where
the individual capacities of the steam-generators are more than 10 MW, any pressure storage system
where the pressure-volume product for the largest pressure is more than 106 bar litres (100 MPa m3) and
any manufacturing or chemical reaction system where the pressure-volume product for the largest
pressure vessel is more than 105 bar litres (10 MPa m3). Pipelines are included if the pressure-volume
product is greater than 105 bar litres.
13
Pressure systems that fal below the Minor System category do not require a PSE, but must be
subject to scheduled preventive maintenance.
14
It is unlikely that any GSE wil be in the Major System category and with few exceptions the majority
of GSE, subject to the regulations, wil be in the Minor System category.
EXEMPTION
15
Some pressure systems are ful y or partial y exempt from the regulations, those which could be
relevant to GSE are:
15.1
Ful Exemptions. These include:
15.1.1
A pressure system which forms part of any braking, control or suspension
system of a wheeled, tracked or rail mounted vehicle.
15.1.2
Any tyre used or intended to be used on a vehicle.
15.1.3
Any water cooling system on an internal combustion engine or any compressor.
15.1.4
Any part of a tool or appliance (designed to be held in the hand) which is a
pressure vessel.
15.1.5
Any vapour compression refrigeration system incorporating compressor drive
motors, including standby compressor motors, having a total instal ed power not exceeding
25 kW.
15.2
Partial Exemptions. These include a pressure system, containing a relevant fluid (other
than steam) where the product of pressure and volume of the largest storage vessel is less than
250 bar litres. In this case the only regulations appertaining to the user/owner are that it should be
properly maintained.
WRITTEN SCHEME OF EXAMINATION GENERAL INFORMATION
16
The periodicity, extent and detail of the examination of any pressure system, including any
specific preparatory work and functional checks, wil be defined in the relevant equipment Maintenance
Schedule. The fol owing paragraphs detail general information on the examination of pressure systems
and components which the schedule may make reference to.
WARNING
PRIOR TO DISMANTLING OR REMOVING ANY COMPONENT FROM A PRESSURE SYSTEM
ENSURE THAT ALL SOURCES OF PRESSURE HAVE BEEN ISOLATED AND/OR ALL
RESIDUAL PRESSURE HAS BEEN EXHAUSTED FROM THE SYSTEM AND COMPONENTS.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 4

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEMS
17
Compressed air systems are to be examined as directed below:
17.1
Air Receiver Preparation, Extension and Testing is as fol ows:
17.1.1
Preparation.
17.1.1.1
Where necessary isolate the equipment/system from the electrical
supply.
17.1.1.2
Isolate receiver from al sources of pressure supply.
17.1.1.3
Drain receiver of al residual pressure and any drying medium.
17.1.1.4
Remove al inspection covers, plugs and fittings.
17.1.1.5
Clean al internal and external surfaces to enable a thorough
examination to be carried out.
17.1.1.6
Remove al protective devices and fittings.
17.1.2
Examination.
17.1.2.1
Visual y examine al accessible internal and external parts,
including supports, plugs, threaded inserts, covers and their securing devices
for, cracks, fractures, corrosion, distortion, chafing, damage to thread forms,
loose rivets and damage due to external sources. If internal access is limited,
visual aids should be utilised.
17.1.2.2
Areas of corrosion are to be noted and the degree of corrosion is to
be assessed to determine if the air receiver is serviceable, requires
supplementary tests or is to be condemned and a replacement fitted.
17.1.3
Supplementary Tests. If the examiner has doubts as to the serviceability of a
receiver, one of the fol owing supplementary tests is to be carried out:
17.1.3.1
Hydrostatic Pressure Test. Using water as the hydraulic medium
the receiver is to be subjected to a hydrostatic pressure test. During the test the
receiver is to be pressurised to the figure specified in the schedule and
maintained at that pressure for at least 15 minutes. Pressurisation can be
achieved using a Tangye ‘Hydrapak’ Hydraulic Test Pump (71BG/2073214),
see AP 119L-0102-1 for details. Fol owing the test the receiver is to be drained
of al water and thoroughly dried and vented prior to refitting.
17.1.3.2
Non-Destructive Tests (NDT). Various methods of Non-destructive
testing may be used dependant on the particular circumstances. Typical
techniques which could be used are Ultrasonic thickness checks and crack
detection. This work is normal y outside the scope of units and assistance
should be sought from the relevant regional NDT team via the unit NDT co-
ordinator.
17.1.4
Recording. After satisfactory examination, the date of examination is to be
painted on the body of the air receiver. Additional y, details of any supplementary tests are
to be entered on the relevant job card and, if a hydrostatic pressure test is carried out, the
date of the test is to be stamped on the body of the receiver.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 5

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
17.2
Protective Devices (excluding gauges) are to be examined and tested as defined below:
17.2.1
Pressure Relief/Limiting Valve.
17.2.1.1
Examine. Carry out a thorough visual examination and particularly
for:
17.2.1.1.1
Damage due to external sources.
17.2.1.1.2
Corrosion, contamination, deterioration.
17.2.1.1.3
Faulty or broken locking devices.
17.2.1.1.4
Obstructions and signs of leaks.
17.2.1.2
Test. When cal ed for in the schedule the valve is to be tested
using one of the fol owing methods:
17.2.1.2.1
Hydraulic Test. Hydraulical y test using a Tangye
‘Hydrapak’ hydraulic test pump with water as the medium (if water
is al owed in the valve). Ensure the gauge fitted to the Tangye
pump is calibrated and of a suitable range to provide the required
degree of accuracy. Ensure al traces of moisture are removed
from the valve prior to re-fitting.
17.2.1.2.2
Pneumatic Test. Pneumatical y test using a suitable
pneumatic test rig or compressed gas supply with regulator.
Ensure the regulated pressure gauge is calibrated and of a suitable
range to provide the required degree of accuracy. Ensure the
valve is suitably restrained during the test.
NOTE
Valves that fail either the functional check or hydraulic/pneumatic test are to be
replaced. ‘L’ class stores are to be scrapped local y, ‘P’ class stores are to be returned
R3/4. No attempt is to be made to adjust the operating pressure.
17.2.2
Bursting Discs. Carry out a thorough visual examination and particularly for
signs of deterioration and damage. Replace if suspect.
17.3
Gauges. Carry out a thorough visual examination and particularly for:
17.3.1
Damage due to external sources.
17.3.2
Loose or missing nuts, bolts, screws or rivets.
17.3.3
Condition of face and glass.
17.3.4
Ensure calibrated, refer to the schedule for details.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 6

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
17.4
Pipework. Pipework wil be included in the schedule if its mechanical integrity is likely to be
reduced to any significant degree by corrosion, erosion, fatigue or any other factor and the service
and location are such that failure could give rise to danger. When pipework is included it is to be
examined as fol ows:
17.4.1
Pipes and Hoses. Carry out a thorough visual examination and particularly for:
17.4.1.1
Correct item fitted.
17.4.1.2
Cracks and/or fractures.
17.4.1.3
Corrosion, contamination, deterioration.
17.4.1.4
Distortion.
17.4.1.5
Chafing, loose clips or packing.
17.4.1.6
Leaks or obstructions.
17.4.1.7
Damage due to external sources.
17.4.1.8
Correct routing.
17.4.2
Valves – Excluding Pressure Relief Valves. Carry out a thorough visual
examination and particularly for:
17.4.2.1
Cracks and/or fractures.
17.4.2.2
Corrosion, contamination, deterioration and signs of leaks.
17.4.2.3
Damage due to external sources.
17.4.2.4
Ease of operation (if manual y operated).
GAS CHARGING SYSTEMS INCORPORATING TRANSPORTABLE GAS CONTAINERS/CYLINDERS
18
Gas charging systems which incorporate transportable gas containers/cylinders are to be examined
as fol ows:
18.1
Transportable Gas Containers. The internal examination and maintenance of al ground
transportable gas containers is the responsibility of the authorised contractor and is carried out in
accordance with the relevant specification. Al ground transportable gas containers fitted to GSE
are subject to a periodic test. The date of last test is stencil ed on containers at the base (or plug)
end and is also stamped on the col ar face immediately beneath the valve, or on the neck. During
the PSE the test date is to be checked and any containers due re-test are to be returned. Returned
containers are to be conditioned T3/4 and have the MOD F731 annotated ‘Due Re-Test’.
18.2
Where the test periodicity of a container/cylinder, fitted to an item of GSE, is in doubt, units
are advised to contact the SA for the main equipment to obtain clarification.
18.3
Protective Devices. As per para 17.2 above.
18.4
Gauges. As per para 17.3 above.
18.5
Pipework. As per para 17.4 above.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 7

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS
19
Pure hydraulic systems are not subject to the regulations.
GAS LOADED/HYDRO-PNEUMATIC ACCUMULATORS
20
Gas-loaded/hydro-pneumatic accumulators which contain a relevant fluid (eg Nitrogen) are to be
considered as part of a Pressure System and, as such, are subject to the controls imposed by the
regulations. Hydraulic systems are to be examined as fol ows:
20.1
Gas Loaded Accumulators.
Dependant on environmental conditions, operating
temperature, susceptibility to damage and internal corrosion, the schedule wil cal for one of the
fol owing examinations:
20.1.1
External Examination. This is to consist of an in-situ examination of the
accumulator and particularly for:
20.1.1.1
Corrosion cracks or fractures.
20.1.1.2
Damage due to external sources.
20.1.1.3
Security of mountings/fixings.
20.1.1.4
Signs of leaks.
20.1.1.5
Condition of protective devices, bursting disc, fusible plug etc.
20.1.2
External and Internal Examination. This is to consist of the fol owing:
20.1.2.1
Isolate the accumulator from the rest of the hydraulic system.
20.1.2.2
The gas and the liquid pressures in the accumulator must be
discharged to zero prior to any dismantling taking place.
20.1.2.3
Remove the accumulator and carry out a thorough external
examination as per sub para 20.1.1 above.
20.1.2.4
Dismantle accumulator and carry out a thorough internal
examination.
NOTE
Accumulators that fail either the external or internal examinations are to be replaced.
CRYOGENIC SYSTEMS
21
Cryogenic systems are to be examined as fol ows:
21.1
Receiver/Tanks. Cryogenic receivers/storage tanks are to be examined external y. The
examination is to consist of a thorough visual examination and particularly for:
21.1.1
Cracks and/or fractures.
21.1.2
Signs of leaks.
21.1.3
Distortion.
21.1.4
Damage due to external sources.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 8

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
21.1.5
Corrosion, contamination, deterioration.
21.1.6
Undue external frosting.
21.2
Protective Devices. As per para 17.2 above.
21.3
Gauges. As per para 17.3 above.
21.4
Pipework and Valves. As per para 17.4 above.
REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS
22
Smal refrigeration systems under 25 kW in capacity are exempt from the regulations. Those
systems subject to the regulations are to be examined as fol ows:
22.1
Liquid Receivers. As per para 20.1 above.
22.2
Protective Devices. Examine as per para 17.2 above.
22.3
Gauges. Examine as per para 17.3 above.
22.4
Pipework and Valves. Examine as per para 17.4 above.
Chap 4
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 9

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 5
TRUCK FORKLIFT LOAD ARMS AND FORK EXTENSIONS - EXAMINATION
CONTENTS
Para
1
Introduction
2
Applicability
3
Glossary
4
Procedures
5
Repairs to load arms and fork extensions
6
Replacement of fork arms/extensions
Annex
A
Fork load arm - checks
INTRODUCTION
1
Truck forklift fork load arms and fork extensions are to be examined by a competent person at the
intervals specified in the Maintenance Schedule. This chapter specifies the areas to be examined with
the aim of detecting damage, failure, distortion etc. which might impair safe use. Any fork load arm or
fork extension found to be faulty is to be withdrawn from use and not returned for use until it has been
satisfactorily repaired/replaced.
APPLICABILITY
2
Truck Forklift-al variants.
GLOSSARY
3
Competent Person (CP). A person deemed competent on the basis of experience, training and
knowledge. For the purpose of this publication the CP is to be an NCO Gen Tech (M).
PROCEDURES
4
The fol owing procedures are not to be commenced until reference has been made to Annex A of
this Chapter.
4.1
Surface Cracks. The fork load arm and fork extension are to be thoroughly examined
visual y for cracks and, if necessary, subjected to a non-destructive crack detection process (advice
is to be sought from Unit NDT NCO). Special attention is to be paid to the heel and top and bottom
hooks including their attachment to the shank. The fork load arm or fork extension is to be
withdrawn from use if surface cracks are detected which may impair its safe use.
4.2
Straightness of Blade and Shank. The straightness of the upper face of the blade and the
front face of the shank is to be checked. If the deviation from straightness exceeds 0.5% of the
length of the blade and/or the height of the shank respectively, the fork load arm is to be withdrawn
from use. The rejected arm is to be re-set and tested before being returned to use.
4.3
Fork Angle. The angle between the upper face of the blade and the front face of the shank
is to be checked. If this angle exceeds 93º, the fork load arm is to be withdrawn from use. The
rejected arm is to be re-set and tested before being returned to use.
Chap 5
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1

UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
4.4
Tip Height Alignment. The difference in height of a set of fork load arms and/or fork
extensions when mounted on the fork carrier is to be checked. If the difference in tip heights
exceeds 3% of the length of the blade, the rejected arm or fork extension is to be re-set as
necessary and tested before being returned to use.
4.5
Positioning Lock. The fork load arm positioning lock is to be examined to ensure that it
operates correctly. If any fault is found, the arm is to be withdrawn from use until satisfactory
repairs have been effected.
4.6
Legibility of Marking. Each fork shal be permanently marked with its specified capacity and
the specified load centre distance ‘D’ in accordance with BS 5639 in the format shown in the
examples at Annex A. If the fork load arm marking is not clearly legible, the arm is to be withdrawn
from use until it has been re-marked. Marking of the forks is to be carried out by Gen Tech
GSE/(M) tradesmen using 12.7 mm (0.5 in ) stamps and finished by light smoothing of the surface
with medium grade emery cloth.
NOTE
Care is to be taken to ensure that, if fitted, the anti-spark pads are excluded from these
calculations.
4.7
Wear of Fork Load Arm Blade and Shank. The fork load arm blade and shank are to be
checked for wear. Special attention is to be paid to the vicinity of the heel. If the thickness is
reduced to 90% of the original thickness, the arm is to be withdrawn from use.
4.8
Wear of Fork and Arm Hooks. The support face of the top hook and the retaining face of
the top and bottom are to be checked for wear, crushing and other distortion. If these faults are
apparent to such an extent that the clearance between the fork arm and fork carrier is considered
excessive, the arm is to be withdrawn from use.
REPAIRS TO LOAD ARMS AND FORK EXTENSIONS
5
Before attempting the repair of load arms and extensions the fol owing must be considered:
5.1
Al repairs/replacement of load arms/fork extensions for forklift trucks that are stil under
Warranty/Sale of Goods Act are the responsibility of the contractor.
5.2
Only the prime Contractor of the forklift is to decide whether a load arm or fork extension
may be repaired for continued use. Repairs are only to be carried out by such agencies.
5.3
Surface cracks or wear are not to be repaired by welding.
5.4
When repairs necessitating re-setting are required, the fork load arm should subsequently
be subjected to an appropriate heat treatment.
5.5
A fork load arm or fork extension that has undergone repairs other than repair or
replacement of the positioning lock and/or re-marking, should only be returned for use after being
tested by the repairing agency and the issue of a test certificate. Such tests are to be carried out at
3 X Rated Capacity of the truck (3W) for standard forklifts and 8 X Rated Capacity of the truck (8W)
for rough terrain forklifts.
REPLACEMENT OF FORK ARMS/EXTENSIONS
6
Fork arms/extensions are to be changed in pairs.
Chap 5
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 2





UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
DAP 119F-0001-5F
CHAPTER 5 ANNEX A
FORK LOAD ARM - CHECKS
EXAMPLES
1
Marking of a fork arm having a specified capacity of 750 kg at 500mm specified load centre
distance: 750 x 500.
2
Marking of a fork arm having a specified capacity of 1500 kg at 610mm specified load centre
distance: 1500 x 610.
Chap 5 Annex A
Apr 2015
UNCONTROLLED COPY WHEN PRINTED
Page 1