This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456'.



AP3456 - 13-1 - Fractions and Decimals 
CHAPTER 1 - FRACTIONS AND DECIMALS 
Fractions 
1. 
Description.  Vulgar fractions are numerical quantities which are not whole numbers, expressed 
in terms of a numerator divided by a denominator.  There are two types: proper fractions which are less 
than  1 and improper fractions which are greater than 1.  Mixed numbers include whole numbers and 
vulgar fractions. 
2. 
Comparing Two or More Fractions.  To compare two or more fractions they must first be given 
the same denominator. 
Example: 
5
11
3
Arrange
,
, and
in order of si .
ze
7 14
4
The lowest common multiple of 7, 14 and 4 is 28. 
5
4
20
×
=
11
2
22
×
=
3
7
21
×
=
7
4
28
14
2
28
4
7
28
5
3
11
In o
  rder o
  f size
<
<
7
4
14
3. 
Reducing a Fraction to the Lowest Terms.  Reducing a fraction to the lowest terms, or simplest 
form, means finding the equivalent fraction with the smallest possible numerator and denominator. 
Examples: 
12
2
=
18
3   after dividing numerator and denominator by 6 
20
4
=
35
7   after dividing numerator and denominator by 5. 
4. 
Addition  and  Subtraction  of  Fractions.    If  the  denominators  of  the  fractions are the same the 
numerators may simply be added or subtracted. 
Example: 
3
7
1
3 + 7 +1
11
1
+
+
=
=
= 2
5
5
5
5
5
5
If the denominators are different it is necessary to find the lowest common multiple so that the fractions 
may be rewritten with the same denominator. 
Example: 
2
4
4
+
+
3
5
6   The lowest common multiple is 30. 
20
24
20
64
2
The fractions may be expressed as 
+
+
=
= 2
30
30
30
30
15
5. 
Multiplication  of  Fractions.    Fractions  may  be  multiplied  by  first  multiplying  the  numerators 
together and then multiplying the denominators. 
Example: 
10
9
10×9
90
6
×
=
=
=
15
7
15×7
105
7
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-1 - Fractions and Decimals 
6. 
Division of Fractions.  To divide one fraction by another, the divisor should be inverted and the 
fractions then multiplied. 
Example: 
3
5
3
7
21
1
÷
=
×
=
= 1
4
7
4
5
20
20
Decimals 
7. 
Description.  Decimals are fractions in which the denominators are powers of 10.  Decimals are 
written using a decimal point, instead of in the fraction form. 
8. 
Changing  Fractions  to  Decimals.    A  fraction  may  be  converted  to  a  decimal  by  dividing  the 
numerator by the denominator. 
Example: 
7 = 7 ÷ 8 = 0.875
8
It is also possible to convert a fraction to a decimal by expressing the denominator as a power of 10. 
Example: 
By multiplying numerator and denominator by 4 
13
52
=
25
100
and so 
52 = 0.52
100
9. 
Changing  Decimals  to  Fractions  in  their  Lowest  Terms.    To  change  a  decimal  to  a  fraction, 
the decimal should be written as a numerator with a denominator of a suitable power of 10. 
Example: 
Express 0.68 as a fraction. 
68
17
0.68 =
=
100
25
10.  Addition and Subtraction of Decimals.  When adding or subtracting decimals it is essential to 
ensure that the decimal points are in line. 
Example: 
212.2 + 14.9 + 6.3 + 0.36 
212.2
+14.9
+  6.3
+  0.36
233.76
11.  Multiplying Decimals By Powers of 10.  When multiplying by powers of 10, the decimal point is 
moved one place to the right for each power of 10. 
Example: 
0.7 × 10 = 7.0
.
0 7 × 100 =
0
7 0
.
.
0 7 × 10 0
, 00 = 0
7 0 .
0 0
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-1 - Fractions and Decimals 
12.  General  Multiplication  of  Decimals.    To  multiply  decimals  the  numbers  should  be  multiplied 
together and then the number of decimal places should be counted and the point set accordingly. 
Examples: 
0.9 × 0 0
. 07 = 0 0
. 063
(decimal places 1 + 3 = 4) 
2.652 × 0.04 = 0.10608
(decimal places 3 + 2 = 5) 
410 × .
0 12 = 4 .
9 20
(decimal places 0 + 2 = 2) 
13.  Division  of  Decimals  by  Powers  of  10.    When  dividing  decimals  by  powers  of  10  the  point 
should be moved one place to the left for each multiple of 10. 
Example: 
0.7 ÷ 10 = 0 0
. 7
.
0 7 ÷ 100 = 0.007
0.7 ÷ 1 ,
0 000 = 0 0
. 0007
14.  General  Division  of  Decimals.    To  divide  decimals,  both  numbers  should  be  multiplied  by 
whatever power of 10 is required to convert the denominator into a whole number, then division may be 
carried out in the normal fashion. 
Examples: 
4.55 ÷ .
0 ,
5 may be written as
.
4 55
10
45 5
.
×
=
= 9 1
.
.
0 5
10
5
42.6 ÷ 0.0 ,
3 may be written as
4 .
2 6
100
4260
×
=
= 1420
.
0 03
100
3
0.0272 ÷ 0. ,
4 may be written as
0.0272
10
0 2
. 72
×
=
= .
0 068
0 4
.
10
4
15.  Significant  Figures.    If  a  number  is  given  as  an  approximation  it  may  be  rounded  to  a multiple 
of 10.    Thus,  76,282  may  be  given  as  76,000  which  is  accurate  to  the  nearest  thousand  or  to  2 
significant  figures,  the  7  and  the  6.    To  3  significant  figures  it  would  be  76,300  because  76,282  is 
nearer to 76,300 than to 76,200.  The general rule is to consider the next digit to the right of the one to 
which 'significant figure' accuracy is required.  If it is greater than 5, then the previous figure should be 
increased  by  one,  and  the  appropriate  number  of  noughts  appended.    If  it  is  less  than  5,  then  the 
previous figure should stand, again with the appropriate number of noughts added. 
16.  Decimal  Places.    Numbers  are  often  rounded  off  or  given  correct  to  a  certain  number  of  decimal 
places, depending on the degree of accuracy required.  A calculator may give pi as 3.141592654 which, for 
most purposes, will be given to 3 decimal places and written as 3.142. 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-1 - Fractions and Decimals 
17.  For some fractions, the division never ends, but numbers (or a series of numbers) are repeated: 
1 = .
0 333 .
3 ..
3
4 = .
0 571428571 2
4
.
8 . e
. tc.
7
Such  decimals  are  called  recurring  decimals.    The  repeating  pattern  can  be  shown  by  placing  a  dot 
over the first and last digits in the recurring group: 
1
3
.
0 &
=
3
4
&
=
7
5
.
0
14 8
2&
7
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-2 - Percentages and Proportion 
CHAPTER 2 - PERCENTAGES AND PROPORTIONS 
Definition of Percentage 
1. 
Percent  means  'per  hundred'.    A  percentage  is  a  fraction  with  a  denominator  of  100.    Thus  13 
13
percent means 13 divided by 100 or 
, and is written as 13% or 13pc. 
100
Percentages as Fractions or Decimals 
2. 
To convert a percentage into a fraction or a decimal, it should be divided by 100. 
Examples: 
42
21
42% expressed as a fraction  

=
or as a decimal 42% = 0.42 
100
50
1
26⅓% expressed as a fraction   =  26
79
3 =
or as a decimal = 0.263 
100
300
9 8
.
98
49
9.8% expressed as a fraction  

=
=
or as a decimal 0.098. 
100
1000
500
Fractions or Decimals as Percentages 
3. 
To convert a fraction or decimal to a percentage it should be multiplied by 100. 
Examples: 
3
3
 as a percentage = 
× 100% = 60% 
5
5
7
7
 as a percentage = 
× 100% = 87½% 
8
8
0.62 as a percentage = 0.62 × 100% = 62% 
Finding a Percentage 
4. 
To  find  a  percentage  of  a  given  quantity  the  quantity  should  first  be  multiplied  by  the  required 
percentage and then divided by 100. 
Example: 
Find 36% of 180 
36
180 ×
= 6 .
4 8
100
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-2 - Percentages and Proportion 
Expressing One Quantity as a Percentage of Another 
5. 
To  express  one  quantity  as  a  percentage  of  another,  first express one as a fraction of the other 
and then multiply by 100. 
Example: 
Express 49 miles as a percentage of 392 miles. 
49 ×100  = 12.5% 
392
Percentage Increase or Decrease 
6. 
To increase or decrease an amount by a given percentage the amount should be multiplied by the 
new percentage. 
Examples:  
Increase 650 by 6% 
106
650 ×
 = 689 (or 650 × 1.06 = 689) 
100
Decrease 650 by 6% 
94
650 ×
 = 611 (or 650 × 0.94 = 611) 
100
7. 
To find an original quantity, given a quantity which has been increased or decreased by a percentage, it 
is necessary to first divide the quantity by the new percentage, and then multiply by 100. 
Example: 
After an increase of 8% a quantity is 178, what was the original quantity? 
The increased quantity is 108% of the original. 
108% of original quantity is 178 
178
1% of original is 
108
178
So 100% of original is 
×100  = 164.81 
108
Ratios 
8. 
A  ratio  enables  the  comparison  of  two  or  more  quantities  of  the  same  kind  and  is  calculated  by 
dividing one quantity by the other. 
Example: 
375
3
The ratio of 375 to 500 = 
=  and is written as 3:4. 
500
4
5000
To find the ratio of 5 km to 700 m:  Ratio = 
= 50 : 7
700
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-2 - Percentages and Proportion 
9. 
Division  in  a  Given  Ratio.    To  divide  a  quantity  according  to  a  ratio  3:4:5,  the  quantity  is  first 
divided by 3+4+5, then 3 parts, 4 parts and 5 parts are allocated. 
Example: 
Divide 2400 in the ratio 3:4:5 
2400
2400
=
= 200
3 + 4 + 5
12
Sums are 600, 800 and 1000 
10.  Increasing and Decreasing in a Given Ratio. 
Example: 
If  fuel  consumption  of  60  kg  per  minute  is  increased  in  a  ratio  of  5:4  what  is  the  new 
consumption? 
Consumption =  5 × 60  = 75 kg per min. 
4
Scales 
11.  If  a  map  has  a  scale  of  1:50,000  it  means  that  l  cm  on  the  map  represents  50,000  cm  on  the 
ground.  In the same, way l km on the ground is represented by 
10 ,
0 000 cm  or 2 cm. 
50 0
, 00
The scale 1:50,000 could also be given as '2 cm to l km'. 
Proportion 
12.  If  two  quantities  are  in  direct  proportion  then  an  increase  in  one  quantity  causes  a  predictable 
increase  in  the  other.    An  inversely  proportional  relationship  means  that  an  increase  in  one  quantity 
causes a predictable decrease in the other. 
Examples: 
a. 
Direct Proportion
If 400 cards cost £28 find the cost of 650 cards. 
650
Cost of 650 cards = 
× 28  = £45.50 
400
b. 
Inverse Proportion
If it takes 6 men 12 days to paint a hangar, how long will it take 9 men? 
6
Time for 9 men = 
×12  = 8 days 
9
The 1 in 60 Rule 
13.  The  1  in  60  rule  is  used  as  a  method  of  assessing  track  error  and  closing  angle,  and  has  long 
been  favoured  as  a  mental  deduced  reckoning  (DR)  navigation  technique  because  of  its  flexibility, 
ease of use and relative accuracy (up to about 40º).  The 1 in 60 rule postulates that an arc of one unit 
at a radius of 60 units subtends an angle of one degree (see Fig l). 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-2 - Percentages and Proportion 
13-2 Fig 1 The 1 in 60 Rule 
1o
60 Units
1 Unit
60 Units
14.  In practical use, this 1 in 60 rule may be applied equally well to a right-angled triangle.  It may be 
accepted that, in a right-angled triangle, if the length of the hypotenuse is 60 units, the number of units 
of length of the small side opposite the small angle will be approximately the same as the number of 
degrees in the small angle (see Fig 2). 
13-2 Fig 2 Application to a Right-angled Triangle 
1o
60 Units
1 Unit
This approximation can be compared with the exact computation below: 
Short Side  Sine of Angle 
Angle 
1 unit 
  1/60 = .0167 
  0º 57' 
10 units 
10/60 = .1667 
  9º 36' 
20 units 
20/60 = .3333 
19º 28' 
30 units 
30/60 = .5000 
30º 
35 units 
35/60 = .5833 
35º 41' 
40 units 
40/60 = .6667 
41º 49' 
15.  Furthermore,  since  the  navigator  is  likely  to  have  distances  on  the required track marked on his 
map,  the  approximation  is  just  as  good  if  the  distance  gone  is  measured  along  the  required  track 
(see Fig 3).  In either case, the distance gone is compared with the distance off track and the ratio of 
one to the other is reduced to an angle. 
Distance off Track × 60
Track error (degrees)  = Distance along Track
13-2 Fig 3 Calculation of Track Error 
Pin Point Fix
Track Made Good
2 nm
4o
Required Track
30 nm
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-2 - Percentages and Proportion 
Thus, an aircraft passing over a feature 2 miles port of the required track, after flying 30 miles has a 
track error of: 

×  60 = 4º 
30 
Page 5 of 5 

AP 3456 – 13-3 - Averages 
CHAPTER 3 - AVERAGES 
Introduction 
1. 
Averages  are  discussed  in  some  detail  in  Volume  13,  Chapter  16,  where  it  can  be seen that an 
'average'  might  mean  any  one  of  three  quite  different  values.    Of  these  the  most  useful  and  most 
commonly used is more accurately described as the arithmetic mean. 
Arithmetic Mean 
2. 
The arithmetic mean of a set of values is defined as: 
The sum of
 
all th  
e values
The number o
  f  values
Examples: 
a. 
A rugby scrum has players of weights 92 kg, 89 kg, 86 kg, 94 kg, 97.5 kg, 97 kg, 96 kg, 
and 95.5 kg.  The arithmetic mean (or average) weight of the players may be calculated as 
follows: 
Average weight 
=   92 + 89 + 86 + 94 + 97.5 + 97 + 96 + 95.5
8
 
 
 
 
 
 
= 93.375 kg 
b. 
The times taken to travel to work from Monday to Friday are 1 hr 12 min, 1 hr 18 min, 
1 hr 14 min, 1 hr 21 min, and 1 hr 22 min.  The average time taken in travelling to work can 
be calculated as follows: 
Average time =  72 + 78 + 74 + 81+ 82 mins 
5
= 1 hr 17.4 mins 
3. 
The  arithmetic  mean  is  useful  for  presenting  large  amounts  of  data  in  a  simplified  form,  and  is 
most  accurate  when  used  in  calculations  involving  data  which  do  not  include extreme  values.    This 
form  of  average  may  also  yield  data  which  are  capable  of  further  statistical  analysis  or  mathematical 
treatment.    It  uses  every  value  in  a  distribution,  and  is  the  most  readily  understood  and  commonly 
accepted representation of the term 'average'. 
Page 1 of 2 

AP 3456 – 13-3 - Averages 
Limitations in the Use of Arithmetic Mean 
4. 
The arithmetic mean may produce distortions because of extreme values in a distribution. 
Example: 
The  values  of  stamps to be auctioned are estimated at £15, £17, £23, £24, £20, and £500.  
The average (arithmetic mean) of their values is given by: 
15 +17 + 23 + 24 + 20 + 500 = £99.83
6
However, it would clearly be misleading to describe the stamps as being of average value of 
approximately  £100.  A more accurate and fair description would be that with one exception 
the average value of the stamps is approximately £20. 
5. 
The arithmetic mean can also produce impossible quantities where data is necessarily in discrete 
values, (e.g. 1.825 children in an average family). 
Weighted Averages 
6. 
When  calculating  an  average  from  more  than  one  set  of  data,  the  figures  cannot  be  combined 
without giving due regard to the relative sizes of the samples. 
Example: 
A  class  of  40  students  score  an  average  of  60  marks  and  a  class  of  20  students  score  an 
average 68 marks.  The average might be calculated as: 
60 + 68 = 64  but this is clearly incorrect. 
2
The marks should be weighted according to the number of students in each group thus: 
6 (
0 4 )
0 + 6 (
8 2 )
0
2400 +1360
=
= 62 6
. 6
40 + 20
60
This  is  termed  the  weighted  average,  and  it  gives  a  more  accurate  measure  in  this  type  of 
situation.  Weighted averages may also be used when it is desired to give certain quantities 
greater importance than others within a distribution. 
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 - 13-4 - Basic Vector Processes 
CHAPTER 4 - BASIC VECTOR PROCESSES 
Introduction 
1. 
Many physical quantities like mass, volume, density, temperature, work and heat, are completely 
specified  by  their  magnitudes.    Such  quantities  are  known  as  scalar  quantities  or  scalars.    Other 
physical quantities possess directional properties as well as magnitudes, so that each magnitude must 
be  associated  with  a  definite  direction  in  space  before  the  physical  quantity  can  be  completely 
described.  It is found that some, though not all, of these directed quantities possess a further common 
property  in  that  they  obey  the  same  triangle  (or  parallelogram)  law  of  addition.    Directed  quantities 
which obey the triangular law of addition are known as vectors. 
2. 
Definition of a Vector.  Any quantity which possesses both magnitude and direction, and which 
obeys the triangle law of addition is a vector. 
Graphical Representation of Vectors 
3. 
A Vector quantity may be represented by a line having: 
a. 
Direction. 
b. 
Magnitude. 
c. 
Sense. 
Fig 1 shows a vector having a direction defined by the angle θ, a magnitude equal to the length OP and 
a sense indicated by the arrow.  The vector OP may be represented by a symbol which may be either 
in  bold  type  or  underlined,  eg  OP  may  be  represented  by  a.    When  a  vector  is  shown  graphically,  a 
scale should be given. 
13-4 Fig 1 Graphical Representation of a Vector 
P
a
θ
O
X
The Resultant Vector 
4. 
The resultant of a system of vectors is that single vector which would have the same effect as the 
system of vectors. 
The Resolution of Vectors into Components 
5. 
It may be convenient to resolve a vector into two components acting at right angles to each other.  
In Fig 2, vector OP is at an angle of 30º to Ox.  The vector may be divided into two components OA 
and OB at right angles to each other.  Resolved graphically, the component OA may be measured as 
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-4 - Basic Vector Processes 
6.9 units and OB as 4 units.  To calculate the magnitudes of OA and OB mathematically, use is made 
of the trigonometrical ratio of OA to OP, thus: 
OA
o
= cos30
OP
∴ OA = OP cos 30º = 6.93 units 
OB
AP
 and 
o
=
= sin 30
OP
OP
∴ OB = OP sin 30º = 4 units 
13-4 Fig 2 Resolution of a Vector into Components 
y
B
P
8 Units
Scale: 1 cm = 1 Unit
o
30
O
x
A
Addition of Vectors 
6. 
Co-linear  Vectors.    The  simplest  case  of  the  addition  of  vectors  occurs  when  the  vectors  are 
parallel.  There are two cases to consider: 
a. 
Parallel Vectors Acting in the Same Direction.  Consider two forces acting on a body, one 
of magnitude 4 units and the other of magnitude 3 units.  The two forces act in the same direction.  
Fig 3 shows the two vectors, a of four units and b of three units.  The sum of the vectors is a + b = 
4 + 3 = 7 units. 
13-4 Fig 3 Addition of Parallel Vectors Acting in the Same Direction 
a = 4 Units
b = 3 Units
a + b = 7 Units
b. 
Parallel  Vectors  Acting  in  Opposite  Directions.    When  two  forces  acting  on  a  body  are 
parallel  and  in  opposite  directions  the  vector  representation  is  as  Fig 4.    The  forces  are  of 
magnitude seven units and three units.  The sum of the vectors is a – b = 7 – 3 = 4 units. 
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-4 - Basic Vector Processes 
13-4 Fig 4 Addition of Parallel Vectors Acting in Opposite Directions 
a = 7 Units
b = 3 Units
a – b
   = 4 Units
7. 
Non-Co-linear  Vectors.    Any  two  vectors  may  be  added  together.    Fig  5  shows  a  triangle  of 
vectors.  A displacement from O to A is represented by vector a, and a further displacement from A to 
B  is  represented  by  vector  b.    The  sum  of  the  displacements  is  equivalent  to  a  displacement  from 
O to B, or a + b. 
8. 
Vector Difference.  The difference of two vectors may be represented as a + (–b), the vector –b 
being b rotated through 180º as shown in Fig 6. 
13-4 Fig 5 Triangle of Vectors 
B
a + b
b
O
A
a
13-4 Fig 6 Vector Difference 
y
– b
a
b
a – b
x
O
The Polygon of Vectors 
9. 
When more than two vectors are to be resolved they can be added or subtracted two at a time as 
shown in Fig 7.  To resolve a + b + c + d, PQ is drawn to represent a, then from the terminal point of 
PQ, QR is drawn to represent b, and so on until all the vectors are represented.  PR = a + b and, in the 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-4 - Basic Vector Processes 
triangle  PRS,  PS = PR  +  RS  =  a  +  b  +  c.    In  the  triangle  PST,  PT = PS +  ST  =  a  +  b  +  c  +  d.    Any 
number of vectors can be summed in this way. 
13-4 Fig 7 The Polygon of Vectors 
T
d
S
c
a + b + c
a + b + c + d
R
a + b
b
P
a
Q
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 - 13-5 - Indices & Logarithms 
CHAPTER 5 - INDICES AND LOGARITHMS 
INDICES 
Introduction 
1. 
When a number is successively multiplied by itself, it is said to be raised to a power.  Thus: 
4 × 4 is four raised to the power of 2 (or 4 squared)  
5 × 5 × 5 is five raised to the power of 3 (or 5 cubed)  
6 × 6 × 6 × 6 × 6 is six raised to the power of 5 
This  is  usually  written  as  the  number  that  is  to  be  multiplied,  known  as  the  base,  together  with  the 
number of times it is to be multiplied as a superscript, known as the index.  Thus: 
   4 × 4 = 42           Index 
 
 
 
 
     Base 
and 6 × 6 × 6 × 6 × 6 = 65. 
The  notation  is  not  confined  to  actual  numbers;  algebraic  symbols  and  expressions  may  be  similarly 
expressed.  Thus: 
m × m × m × m = m4
and, (a + 2) × (a + 2) × (a + 2) = (a + 2)3. 
Multiplication and Division Rules 
2. 
Multiplication.  Suppose it is necessary to multiply 25 by 23.  Now, 25= 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 and 23 = 2 × 2 ×
2. 
∴ 25 × 23 = (2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2) × (2 × 2 × 2) = 28
i.e. the result is obtained by adding the indices, e.g. 216 × 28= 224
3. 
Division.  If it is necessary to divide, say, 25 by 23 then this may be written as: 
2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2
2 × 2 × 2
Cancelling  the  terms  yields  the  result  22  i.e.  the  result  is  obtained  by  subtracting  the  indices, 
e.g. m10 - m6 = m4.  Consider m4 ÷ m4.  Clearly, any number or expression divided by itself = 1.  By the 
subtraction  rule  m4 ÷  m4  =  m0.    Therefore, m0  =  1.    Indeed,  by  the  same  reasoning,  any  number  or 
expression raised to the power zero = 1. 
Negative Indices 
4. 
Consider 25 ÷ 26.  This is equivalent to: 
2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2
1
=
2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 × 2
2
1
By the division rule 25 ÷ 26 = 2–1.  So 2–1 =  , i.e. the negative index indicates a reciprocal.  Similarly, 
2
for example, m–3 =  13
m
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 - 13-5 - Indices & Logarithms 
Fractional Indices 
5. 
Consider the problem: 
“What  number,  when  multiplied  by  itself  =  2?”    Expressing  this  in  index  form,  and  using  the 
multiplication rule: 
2a × 2a = 21
∴ a + a = 1, i.e. 2a = 1 

1
 a =  2
1
1
1
Thus, the fractional power   has the meaning of square root.  Similarly,   = cube root,   = fourth root 
2
3
4
and so on. 
Power of a Power 
6. 
Consider the expression (22)3.  This is equivalent to: 
(2 × 2) × (2 × 2) × (2 × 2) = 26
The result is obtained by multiplying the indices.  In general terms: (am)n = amn
Standard and Engineering Forms 
7. 
In  science  and  engineering  a  very  wide  range  of  numerical  values  are  frequently  encountered.  
For  example,  the  velocity  of  light  is  approximately  300,000,000  metres  per  second  whilst  the 
wavelengths of light are in the approximate range of 0.0000000008 metres to 0.0000000004 metres.  
Such very large and small numbers are clearly cumbersome in use and often difficult to comprehend 
quickly.   In  order to overcome this difficulty,  it  is common practice to  express numbers in a standard 
form or in an 'engineering' form, making use of index notation. 
8. 
The  Standard  Form.    The  standard  form  of  a  number  consists  of  only  one  digit  in  front  of  the 
decimal point which is then multiplied by the appropriate power of 10, i.e. in the form: 
A × 10n
where  A  is  between  1.0000  and  9.9999,  and  the  index,  n,  is  the  required  power  of  10.    Thus,  for 
example: 
67.9 in standard form = 6.79 × 101
679 in standard form = 6.79 × 102
300,000,000 in standard form = 3 × 108
0.00679 in standard form = 6.79 × 10−3
0.0000000008 in standard form = 8.0 × 10−10
9. 
Engineering  Form.    Engineering  notation  is  also  commonly  available  on  calculators.    It  differs 
from the standard form in that the power of 10 is always a multiple of 3.  For example: 
300,000,000 in engineering form = 300 × 106
0.679 in engineering form = 679 × 10–3
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 - 13-5 - Indices & Logarithms 
Summary 
10.  In summary the rules for the handling of numbers or algebraic expressions in index form are as 
follows: 
a0= 1 
am × an = am + n
am ÷ an = am – n
(am)n = amn
a–m =  1m
a
1
m
a  =  m a
LOGARITHMS 
Introduction 
11.  The concept of logarithms is closely associated with the notion of indices.  If a positive number, y, 
is expressed in index form with a base a, i.e. 
y = ax
then the index, x, is known as the logarithm of y to the base a.  Thus: 
If y = ax, then x = loga y 
For example: 
y = 32 = 25, ∴ log2 32 = 5 
If, log10 y = 3, then y = 103
Common Logarithms 
12.  The most commonly used form of logarithms is to the base 10.  The abbreviation ‘log’ is used and 
unless a base is explicitly stated or otherwise implied then 10 may be assumed.  Using index notation 
any positive integer, N, may be written as: 
x
N = 10 , then log10 N = x 
Values  of  the  common  log  of  any  number  may  be  found  either  from  tables  or  from  an  electronic 
calculator.    Prior  to  the  widespread  use  of  electronic  calculators,  logs  were  used  as  an  aid  to 
calculation.    As  logs  are  no  more  than  indices,  they  obey  the  same  rules  as  indices.    Thus  if  it  is 
necessary  to  multiply  two  numbers  this  can  be  achieved  by  finding  the  logs  of  the  numbers,  adding 
these and then finding the number corresponding to this log.  Similarly, division may be accomplished 
by subtracting logs, the power of a number can be found by multiplying its log by the power, and the 
root of a number by dividing its log by the root index. 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 - 13-5 - Indices & Logarithms 
Naperian, Natural or Hyperbolic Logarithms 
13.  In  many  natural  processes,  the  rate  of  growth  or  decay  of  a  substance  is  proportional  to  the 
amount  of  substance  present  at  a  given  time.    It  has  been  found  that  this  relationship  can  be 
expressed in terms of a universal constant known as the exponential constant, e.  The number, e, is 
irrational and is the sum of the infinite series: 
1
1
1
1
1
1 + 1 +
+ +
+ +
+ .....
!
2
!
3
!
4
!
5
!
6
where the symbol ! means factorial, i.e. that number multiplied by all of the positive integers less than 
itself, e.g. 6! = 6 × 5 × 4 × 3 × 2 × 1. 
14.  By taking an appropriate number of terms, e can be calculated to any desired level of accuracy.  
Note  that  as  the  terms  have  factorials  of  ever-increasing  numbers  as  their  denominators  then  each 
successive  term  becomes  smaller  and  the  reduction  in  significance  is  rapid.    As  a  comparison,  the 
third  term  is  0.5,  the  seventh  term  is  0.00139,  and  the  tenth  term  is  0.00000276.    A  value  to  4 
significant figures can be calculated from the first seven terms as 2.718. 
15.  Logarithms  with  e  as  the  base  are  known  as  natural  or  Naperian  (occasionally  hyperbolic) 
logarithms.    They  are  frequently  encountered  in  scientific  texts  and  are  the  only  logarithms  used  in 
calculus.  The abbreviation Ln is generally used.  Whereas natural logarithms follow the same rules as 
common logarithms and can be  used for the same purposes, they are rather more difficult to  extract 
from  tables.    In  any  case,  the  use  of  logarithms  to  carry  out  arithmetic  has  been  superseded  by  the 
electronic calculator. 
Decibels 
16.  An  application  of  logarithms  is  encountered  in  the  field  of  amplification  or  gain,  which  is  often 
expressed in  units of bels  or more normally  decibels.  If P(I)  is the  input power  into an amplifier  and 
P(O) is the output power, the gain is given by: 
P(O)
P(O)
G  = log
bels = 10 log
decibels
P(I)
P(I)
P(O)
The ratio of the powers 
 can be expressed in terms of output and input voltages as: 
P(I)
2
P(O)
V(O)2
 V(O)
=
= 

P(I)
V(I)2
 V(I) 
2
 V(O)
∴G = 10 log 

 V(I) 
V(O)
= 20 log V( ) decibels
I
Similarly, in terms of output and input currents: 
I(O)
G = 20 log I( ) decibels
I
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 - 13-5 - Indices & Logarithms 
17.  Example.  If an amplifier has a gain of 30 decibels, calculate the input voltage required to produce 
an output of 50 volts. 
V(O)
Using G = 20 log V(I)
50
30 = 20 log V(I)
50
1.5 = log V(I)
Taking antilogs: 
50
31.62 = V(I)
50
V(I) = 31.62
=1.581V
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
CHAPTER 6 - GRAPHS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  term  'graph'  is  usually  applied  to  a  pictorial  representation  of  how  one  variable  changes  in 
response  to  changes  in  another.   This chapter will deal with the form of simple graphs, together with 
the extraction of data from them, and from the 'families of graphs' and carpet graphs that are frequently 
encountered  in  aeronautical  publications.    Although  not  strictly  a  'graph',  the  Nomogram  will  also  be 
covered.    The  pictorial  representation  of  data  in  such  forms  as  histograms,  frequency  polygons,  and 
frequency curves will be treated in Volume 13, Chapter 16. 
Coordinate Systems 
2. 
Graphs are often constructed from a table of, say, experimental data which gives the value of one 
variable, x, and the experimentally found value of the corresponding variable, y.  In order to construct a 
graph from this data it is necessary to establish a framework or coordinate system on which to plot the 
information.    Two  such  coordinate  systems  are  commonly  used:  Cartesian  coordinates  and  Polar 
coordinates.  Both systems will be described below, but the remainder of this chapter will be concerned 
only with the Cartesian system. 
3. 
Cartesian Coordinates.  Cartesian coordinates are the most frequently used system.  Two axes 
are  constructed  at  right  angles,  their  intersection  being  known  as  the  origin.    Conventionally  the 
horizontal  'x'  axis  represents  the  independent  variable;  the  vertical  'y'  axis  represents  the  dependent 
variable, i.e. the value that is determined for a given value of x.  Any point on the diagram can now be 
represented uniquely by a pair of coordinate values written as (x,y) provided that the axes are suitably 
scaled.  It is not necessary for the axes to have the same scale.  Thus, in Fig 1, the point P has the 
coordinates (3,4), i.e. it is located by moving 3 units along the x axis and then vertically by 4 'y' units.  It 
is  sometimes  inconvenient  to  show  the  origin  (0,0)  on  the  diagram  when  the  values  of  either  x  or  y 
cover a range which does not include 0. Fig 2 shows such an arrangement where the x-axis is scaled 
from  0  but  the  corresponding  values  of  y  do  not  include  0.    The  intersection  of  the  axes  is  the  point 
(0,200).  It should be noted from Fig 1 that negative values of x or y can be shown to the left and below 
the origin respectively. 
13-6 Fig 1 Cartesian Coordinates
y
8
6
P(3,4)
4
2
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
5
–2
x
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
13-6 Fig 2 Cartesian Coordinates - Displaced Origin
y
400
300
200
1
2
3
4
5
6
x
4. 
Polar  Coordinates.    Polar  coordinates  specify  a  point  as  a  distance  and  direction  from  an  origin.  
Polar coordinates are commonly encountered in aircraft position reporting where the position is given as a 
range  and  bearing  from  a  ground  beacon;  they  are  also  used  in  certain  areas  of  mathematics  and 
physics.  As with Cartesian systems it is necessary to define an origin, but only one axis or reference line 
is required.  Any point is then uniquely described by its distance from the origin and by the angle that the 
line joining the origin to the point makes with the reference line.  The coordinates are written in the form 
(r,θ), with θ in either degree or radian measure.  Conventionally, angles are measured anti-clockwise from 
the  reference  line as positive and clockwise as negative.  Fig 3 illustrates the system.  Point Q has the 
π
1
− 1π
coordinates (3, 30º) or  (3, –330º) in degree measure; (3, 
) or (3, 
) in radian measure. 
6
6
13-6 Fig 3 Polar Coordinates 
Q(3,30º)
30º
0
1
2
3
4
The Straight Line Graph 
5. 
Table  1  shows  a  series  of  values  of  x  and  the  corresponding  values  of  y.    Fig  4  shows  these 
points plotted on a graph. 
Table 1 Values of x and y 

–3 
–2 
–1 





–6 
–4 
–2 




It will be seen that all the points lie on a straight line which passes through the origin.  It is clear from 
the  table  of  values  that  if  the  value  of  x  is,  say,  doubled  then  the  corresponding  value  of  y  is  also 
doubled.  Such a relationship is known as direct proportion and the graphical representation of direct 
proportion is always a straight line passing through the origin.  In general the value of y corresponding 
to a value of x may be derived by multiplying x by some constant factor, m, ie: y = mx.  In the example, 
m has the value 2, i.e. y = 2x.  Because such a relationship produces a straight-line graph, it is known 
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
as  a  linear  relationship  and  y  =  mx  is  known  as  a  linear  equation.    Such  relationships  are  not 
uncommon.    For  example  the  relationship  between distance travelled, (d), speed, (s), and time, (t) is 
given by d = st.  This would be a straight-line graph with d plotted on the y-axis and t on the x-axis. 
13-6 Fig 4 Graph of y = 2x
6
5
4
y
3
2
1
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
–1
x
–2
–3
–4
–5
–6
6. 
It is of course possible for a straight line through the origin to slope down to the right rather than 
up to the right as in the previous example.  In this case positive values of y are generated by negative 
values of x and the equation becomes: y = – mx 
7. 
Consider now the values of x and y in Table 2, and the associated graph, Fig 5. 
Table 2 Values of x and y 

–3 
–2 
–1 





–4 
–2 





13-6 Fig 5 Graph of y = 2x + 2 
8
6
y
4
2
–4
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
–2
x
–4
–6
–8
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
Clearly  the  graph  is  closely  related  to  the  previous  example  of  y  =  2x.   In essence the line has been 
raised up the y-axis parallel to the y = 2x line.  Investigation of the table of values will reveal that the 
relationship  between x and y is governed by the equation: y = 2x + 2, and in general, a graph of this 
type has the equation: y = mx + c, where c is a constant.  It will be apparent that the equation y = mx is 
identical to the equation y = mx + c if a value of 0 is attributed to the constant c.  Thus, y = mx + c is 
the  general  equation  for  a  straight  line,  m  and  c  being  constants  which  can  be  positive,  negative  or 
zero.  A zero value of m generates a line parallel to the x-axis.  The value of c is given by the point at 
which the line crosses the y-axis and is known as the intercept. 
8. 
Gradient.    Consider  Fig  6  which  shows  two  straight-line  graphs:  y  =  2x  and  y  =  4x.    Both  lines 
pass through the origin and the essential difference between them is their relative steepness.  The line 
y = 4x shows y changing faster for any given change in x than is the case for y = 2x.  The line y = 4x is 
said to have a steeper gradient than the line y = 2x.  The gradient is defined as the change in y divided 
by the corresponding change in x, ie  y  .  Rearranging the general equation for a straight line (y = mx), 
x
y
to make m the subject gives m = 
, i.e. the constant m is the gradient of the straight line.  As the line 
x
y = mx + c has been shown to be parallel to y = mx, this clearly has the same gradient, given by the  
value of m.  In the equation: 
distance = speed × time 
'speed'  is  equivalent  to  'm'  in  the  general  equation,  and  it  is  apparent  that  the  gradient,  speed, 
represents a rate of change - in this case the rate of change of distance with time.  This concept of the 
gradient representing a rate of change will become important when dealing with calculus in Volume 13, 
Chapter 13. 
13-6 Fig 6 Graphs of y = 2x and y = 4x 
y = 4x
8
y = 2x
6
y
4
2
–4
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
x
–2
–4
Non-Linear Graphs 
9. 
Not  all  relationships  result  in  straight-line  graphs,  indeed,  they  are  a  minority.    A  body  falling  to earth 
under the influence of gravity alone falls a distance y feet in time t seconds governed by the equation: 
y = 16t2
Table 3 shows a range of values of t with the corresponding values of y, and Fig 7 the associated graph. 
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
Table 3 Values of t and y









16 
64 
144 
256 
400 
Although not relevant in this example, notice that negative values of t produce identical positive values 
of y to their positive counterparts.  The graph is therefore symmetrical about the y-axis and the shape 
is known as a parabola.  The constant in front of the t2 term determines the steepness of the graph. 
13-6 Fig 7 Graph of y = 16t2
400
300
y
200
100
–5
–4
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
5
t (sec)
10.  Consider now the problem "How long will it take to travel 120 km at various speeds?"  This can be 
expressed as the equation: 
120
t = s
where  t  =  time  in  hours  and  s  =  speed  in  km/hr.    This  is  an  example  of  inverse  proportion,  ie an 
increase in s results in a proportional decrease in t.  If values are calculated for s and t, and a graph is 
plotted, it will have the form illustrated in Fig 8 known as a hyperbola. 
13-6 Fig 8 Graph of t =  120  - Inverse Proportion 
s
10
r)
(h 5
t
0
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
s (km/hr)
11.  Graphs of y = sin x and y = cos x will be encountered frequently.  The shapes of the graphs are 
shown below (Fig 9). 
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
13-6 Fig 9 Graphs of sin and cos 
Fig 9a  y = sin x 
Fig 9b  y = cos x  
1
1
0
90
180
270
360
0
π
π


2
2
–1
–1
The sine graph is shown with the x-axis scaled in degrees while the cosine graph has the x-axis scaled 
in radians.  Either is correct; the radian form is frequently encountered in scientific texts.  Sketches of 
these  graphs  are  useful  when  trying  to  determine  the  value  and  sign  of  trigonometric  functions  of 
angles  outside  of  the  normal  0º  to  90º  range.    Notice  that  both  graphs  repeat  themselves  after  360º 
(2π radians). 
12.  Finally, it is worth considering the graph that describes the relationship: 
y = eax
where  a  is  a  positive  or  negative  constant.    This  form  of  equation  is  very  common  in  science  and 
mathematics  and  variants  of  it  can  be  found  in  the  description  of  radioactive  decay,  in  compound 
interest problems, and in the behaviour of capacitors.  The irrational number 'e' equates to 2.718 to 4 
significant  figures.    The  graph  of  y  =  ex  is  shown  in  Fig  10a  and  that  of  y  =  e–x  in  Fig  10b.    The 
significant  point  about  these  graphs,  which  are  known  as  exponential  graphs,  is  that  the  rate  of 
increase (or decrease) of y increases (or decreases) depending upon the value of y. A large value of y 
exhibits a high rate of change.  It is also worth noting that there can be found a fixed interval of x over 
which  the  value  of  y  doubles  (or  halves)  its  original  value  no  matter  what  initial  value  of  y  is  chosen.  
This is the basis of the concept of radioactive decay half-life.  The interval is equivalent to  0.693  where 
a
a is the constant in the equation y = eax.
13-6 Fig 10 Exponential Graphs 
Fig 10a  y = ex
Fig 10b  y = e–x
60
1.0
50
0.8
40
0.6
y
30
y
0.4
20
0.2
10
0
0
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
x
x
13.  Logarithmic  Scales.    Clearly  plotting  and  interpreting  from  exponential  graphs  can  be  difficult.  
The  problem  can  be  eased  by  plotting  on  a graph where the x-axis is scaled linearly while the y-axis 
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
has a logarithmic scale.  This log-linear graph paper reduces the exponential curve to a straight line.  A 
comparison between the linear and log-linear plots of y = ex is shown in Fig 11. 
13-6 Fig 11 Comparison Between Linear and Log-linear Plots 
Fig 11a  y = ex (Linear  Scales) 
Fig 11b  y = ex (Log-linear Scales) 
60
100
50
50
40
y
y
30
10
20
5
10
0
1
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
x
x
The Presentation and Extraction of Data 
14.  So far this chapter has been concerned with the mathematical background to simple graphs.  More 
commonly  graphs  will  be  encountered  and  used  as  a  source  of  data,  especially  in  the  field  of  flight 
planning  and  aircraft  performance.    Whilst  occasionally  these  graphs  will  be  either  the  simple  forms 
already described or variations on these forms, more often rather complex graphs are used as being the 
only  practical  way  of  displaying  complex  relations.    Two  such  types  of  complex  graph  will  be described 
here in order to establish the method of data extraction.  Finally, the nomogram will be discussed. 
15.  Carpet Graphs.  An example of a carpet graph is shown in Fig 12. 
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
13-6 Fig 12 Carpet Graph 
Altimeter Lag Correction
(for altitudes up to 5000 feet)
0
0
-50
5
200
-100
250
10
Example 
-150
(see text)
300
Lag Correction 
to Altimeter 
(feet)
15
-200
350
Dive Angle (degrees)
-250
IAS (knots)
400
20
-300
450
25
-350
500
30
The  aim  of  the  graph  is  to  indicate  the  lag  in  the  altimeter  experienced  in  a  dive.    Unlike  the  graphs 
already  discussed  where  one  input,  'x',  produced  one  output,  'y',  the  carpet  graph  has  two  inputs  for 
one output.  The output is on the conventional 'y' axis but there is no conventional 'x' axis, rather there 
are two input axes.  On the right hand edge of the 'carpet' diagram are figures for dive angle whilst on 
the bottom edge are figures for indicated air speed.  To use the graph it is necessary to enter with one 
parameter, say dive angle, and follow the relevant dive angle line into the diagram until it intersects the 
appropriate  IAS  line.    Intermediate  dive  angle  and  IAS  values  need  to  be  interpolated,  thus  in  the 
example values of 17º and 375 kt have been entered.  From the point of intersection a horizontal line is 
constructed which will give the required lag correction figure where it intersects the 'y' axis, −118 feet in 
the example. 
16.  Families  of  Graphs.    It  is  often  necessary  to  consider  a  number  of  independent  factors  before 
coming  to  an  end  result.    In  this  situation  a  family  of  graphs  is  frequently  used  to  present  the  required 
information.  Fig 13 shows such a family designed for the calculation of the aircraft's take-off ground run.  
Apart from the aircraft configuration which is indicated in the graph title, there are five input parameters.  
There will very often be a series of related graphs with variations in the title, for example in this case there 
will be another family of graphs for an aircraft with wing stores.  It is clearly important that the correct set is 
selected.  The method of using the graph will be described with reference to the example. 
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
13-6 Fig 13 Family of Graphs 
Take-off Ground Run. Clean or Gunpod Only
Mid-flap
RL
RL
RL
4000
3500
Temperature 
3000
Relative to
Example  
ISA(  C)
(see text)
ISA +15
2500
Ground Run 
ISA
(feet)
ISA -20
2000
4000
1500
2000
0
Altitude 
1000
(feet)
  -20
0
20
40
Tailwind
500
4.4
4.6
4.8
5.0
5.2
Headwind
OAT( C)
Aircraft Mass 
Downhill
Uphill
-2
0
2
-20
0
20
40
(tonnes)
Reported Wind Component (knots)
Runway Slope (%)
RL = Reference Line
17.  At  the  left  end  is  a  small  carpet  graph.    Starting  with  the  value  of  outside  air  temperature  (21º) 
proceed  vertically  to  intersect  the  altitude  line  (2,000  feet).    Alternatively  enter  the  'carpet'  at  the 
intersection of the altitude and temperature relative to ISA.  From this intersection proceed horizontally 
into  the  next  graph  to  intersect  the  vertical  reference  line,  marked  RL.    From  this  point  parallel  the 
curves until reaching the point representing the value of runway slope as indicated on the bottom scale 
(1%  uphill).    From  here  construct  a  horizontal  line  to  the  next  graph  reference  line.    Repeat  the 
procedure of paralleling the curves for aircraft mass (4.8 tonnes) and then proceed horizontally into the 
last graph for head/tail wind (20 kt head) which is used in the same manner.  Finally the horizontal line 
is produced to the right hand scale where the figure for ground run can be read (1,900 feet). 
18.  The Nomogram.  The nomogram is not strictly a graph but a diagrammatic way of solving rather 
complex equations.  There are usually two input parameters for which one or two resultant outputs may 
be  derived.    Fig  14  shows  a  nomogram  for  the  determination  of  aircraft  turning  performance.    The 
equations involved are: 
Rate of turn TAS = 
TAS
Radius of Turn
                    = Acceleration × tan Bank Angle  
This nomogram consists of four parallel scaled lines.  Two known values are joined by a straight line, and 
the intersection of this line with the other scales gives the unknown values.  In the example illustrated, an 
input TAS of 180 kts with a Rate 1 turn gives a resultant of 1.1 g, and a radius of turn of 1nm. 
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-6 - Graphs 
13-6 Fig 14 A Nomogram 
40
30
20
10
5
4
3
2
1
0.5
Radius of Turn 'T' 
in Nautical Miles
5
10
20
30 40
50
100
200
300 400
700
Rate of Turn 'W' 
in Degrees Per Minute
Rate 1
Rate 2
Rate 3
2
3 4 5
10
1520
30
40
50 60
70
80
Angle of Bank 'θ' in Degrees 
1.11.2
1.5
2
3
4 5
Resultant Acceleration 'g'
180
200
250
300
350
400
450 500
550 600
True Air Speed 'V' 
in Knots
V
The variables are related by the equation V    =         = g tan θ
w

To use the Nomogram join two known values by a straight line 
and the intersection of this line on its projection with the other  
scales give the unknown values
Example : TAS (V)
= 180 Kt
Rate of Turn (W)
= 1
Angle of Bank ( )
θ
= 25
Using the Nomogram (see dotted line)
Resultant Acceleration  (g)
= 1.1
Radius of Turn (T)
= 1 nm
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-7 - Unit Conversions 
CHAPTER 7 - UNIT CONVERSIONS 
SI Units 
1. 
The Systeme International (SI) d'Unites is a metric system based upon seven fundamental units 
which are: 
Length 
 
 
 
 
 

metre  (m) 
Mass 
 
 
 
 
 

kilogram  (kg) 
Time 
 
 
 
 
 

second  (s) 
Electric current 
 
 
 

ampere  (A) 
Luminous intensity  
 
 

candela  (cd) 
Temperature   
 
 
 

kelvin  (K) 
Amount of substance 
 
 

mole  (mol) 
Other SI units in common usage are: 
Frequency 
 
 
 
 

hertz  (Hz) 
Energy   
 
 
 
 

joule  (J) 
Force 
 
 
 
 
 

newton  (N) 
Power 
 
 
 
 
 

watt  (W) 
Electric charge 
 
 
 

coulomb  (C) 
Potential difference 
 
 

volt  (V) 
Capacitance   
 
 
 

farad  (F) 
Inductance 
 
 
 
 

henry  (H) 
Magnetic field  
 
 
 

tesla  (T) 
Magnitudes 
2. 
Prefixes used with SI Units to indicate magnitudes: 
Factor 
Name of Prefix 
Symbol 
 
10–18
atto 

 
10–15
femto 

 
10–12
pico 

 
10–9
nano 

 
10–6
micro 
μ 
 
10–3
milli 

 
10–2
centi 

 
10–1
deci 

 
10 
deca 
da 
 
102
hecto 

 
103
kilo 

 
106
mega 

 
109
giga 

 
1012
tera 

 
1015
peta 

 
1018
exa 

Page 1 of 4 







AP3456 – 13-7 - Unit Conversions 
Conversion Factors 
3. 
The following conversion factors have been selected as those most likely to be of general use. 
To Convert
To
Multiply By
Length 
4. 
0.0394 
inches (in) 
millimetres (mm) 
25.40 
3.2808 
feet (ft) 
metres (m) 
0.3048 
1.0936 
yards (yd) 
metres (m) 
0.9144 
5.399 × 10–4
nautical miles (nm) 
metres (m) 
1852.0 
0.6214 
miles 
kilometres (km) 
1.6093 
Area 
5. 
0.1550 
square inches (in2) 
square centimetres (cm2) 
6.4516 
10.7639 
square feet (ft2) 
square metres (m2) 
0.0929 
1.1960 
square yards (yd2) 
square metres (m2) 
0.8361 
Volume 
6. 
0.2200 
gallons (UK) 
litres (l) 
4.5460 
0.2643 
gallons (US) 
litres (l) 
3.785 
0.0353 
cubic feet (ft3) 
litres (l) 
28.3161 
35.3147 
cubic feet (ft3) 
cubic metres (m3) 
0.0283 
1.3080 
cubic yards (yd3) 
cubic metres (m3) 
0.7646 
0.0610 
cubic inches (in3) 
cubic centimetres (cm3) 
16.3871 
1 × 10–3
cubic metres (m3) 
litres (l) 
1000.0 
Multiply By
 
To
 
To Convert 
To Convert
To
Multiply By 
Mass 
7. 
0.0353 
ounces (oz) 
grams (g) 
28.3495 
2.2046 
pounds (lb) 
kilograms (kg) 
0.4536 
0.0685 
slugs 
kilograms (kg) 
14.5939 
Velocity 
8. 
3.2808 
feet/second (ft/s) 
metres/second (m/s) 
0.3048 
1.9685 
feet/minute (ft/min) 
centimetres/second (cm/s) 
0.5080 
0.6214 
miles/hour (mph) 
kilometres/hour (km/h) 
1.6093 
2.2369 
miles/hour (mph) 
metres/second (m/s) 
0.4470 
0.5400 
knots (kt) 
kilometres/hour(km/h) 
1.8520 
0.5921 
knots (kt) 
feet/second (fps) 
1.6889 
1.9426 
knots (kt) 
metres/second (m/s) 
0.5148 
Acceleration 
9. 
3.2808 
feet/second2 (ft/s2) 
metres/second2 (m/s2) 
0.3048 
0.1020 
gravitational acceleration (g) 
metres/second2 (m/s2) 
9.8067 
Force 
Page 2 of 4 





AP3456 – 13-7 - Unit Conversions 
10. 
0.2248 
pounds-force (lbf) 
newtons (N) 
4.4482 
2.2046 
pounds-force (lbf) 
kilograms-force (kgf) 
0.4536 
7.2330 
poundals (pdl) 
newtons (N) 
0.1383 
0.1020 
kilograms-force (kgf) 
newtons (N) 
9.8067 
32.174 
poundals (pdl) 
pounds-force (lbf) 
0.0311 
Torque 
11. 
0.7376 
pounds-force feet (lbf ft) 
newton metres (Nm) 
1.3558 
8.8507 
pounds inches (lb in) 
newton metres (Nm) 
0.1130 
0.1020 
kilograms-force metres (kgf m) 
newton metres (Nm) 
9.8067 
Pressure 
12. 
9.869 × 103
atmospheres (atm) 
kilopascals (kPa) 
101.30 
0.0680 
atmospheres (atm) 
pounds-force/inch2 (psi) 
14.6960 
0.1450 
pounds-force/inch2 (psi) 
kilopascals (kPa) 
6.8948 
0.0100 
bars 
kilopascals (kPa) 
100.0 
10.00 
millibars (mbar) 
kilopascals (kPa) 
0.1000 
33.86 
millibars (mbar) 
inches mercury (in Hg) 
0.0295 
1.000 
newtons/metre2 (N/m2) 
pascals (Pa) 
1.000 
25.4 
mm mercury (mm Hg) 
inches mercury (in Hg) 
0.0394 
7.493 
mm mercury (mm Hg) 
kilopascals (kPa) 
0.1334 
Multiply By
 
To
 
To Convert 
To Convert
To
Multiply By 
Density 
13. 
0.0624 
pounds/foot3 (lb/ft3) 
kilograms/metre3 (kg/m3) 
16.0185 
10–3
grams/centimetre3 (g/cm3) 
kilograms/metre3 (kg/m3) 
1000.0 
0.0100 
pounds/gallon 
kilograms/metre3 (kg/m3) 
99.776 
10.0221 
pounds/gallon 
kilograms/litre (kg/l) 
0.0998 
Power 
14. 
1.3410 
horsepower (hp) 
kilowatts (kW) 
0.7457 
1.8182 
horsepower (hp) 
foot 
pounds-force/second 
(ft 
550.0 
lbf/s) 
0.7376 
foot  pounds-force/second  (ft 
watts (W) 
1.3558 
lbf/s) 
0.7376 × 103
foot  pounds-force/second  (ft 
kilowatts (kW) 
1.3558 × 10–3
lbf/s) 
Energy, Work, Heat 
15. 
0.7376 
foot pounds-force (ft lbf)
joules (J) 
1.3558 
0.2388 
calories (cal)
joules (J) 
4.1868 
9.478 × 10–4
British thermal units (Btu)
joules (J) 
1055.1 
3412.1 
British thermal units (Btu)
kilowatt hours (kWh) 
2.931 × 10–4
Page 3 of 4 



AP3456 – 13-7 - Unit Conversions 
0.3725 
horsepower hours (hph)
megajoules (MJ) 
2.6845 
1.3410 
horsepower hours (hph)
kilowatt hours (kWh) 
0.7457 
9.478 × 10–3
therms
megajoules (MJ) 
105.51 
Multiply By
 
To
 
To Convert 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-8 - Principles and Rules 
CHAPTER 8 - PRINCIPLES AND RULES 
Introduction and Notation 
1. 
Algebra  is  that  branch  of  mathematics  dealing  with  the  properties  of,  and  relations  between, 
quantities  expressed  in  terms  of  symbols  rather  than  numbers.    The  use  of  symbols  allows  general 
mathematical  statements  to  be  written  down  rather  than  just  specific  ones.    For  example,  the 
relationship between ºC and ºF can be expressed as: 
9
F =
C + 32
5
5
or C
  =
(F−32)
9
Thus, given a value of temperature in either scale, the corresponding value in the other scale can be 
calculated.  This is a considerably more concise method of relating the two scales than having a table 
showing  the  equivalent  values,  which  in  practice  would  have  to  be  limited  to  a  specified  range  of 
temperatures  and  with  a  specified  level  of  precision.    The  algebraic  relationship  is  in  general  more 
accurate than any representation by graph or nomogram. 
2. 
Normally,  when  an  algebraic  expression  is  written  down  the  conventional  multiplication  sign  is 
omitted, both for brevity and to avoid confusion with the often-used symbol, x.  Sometimes a full stop 
is  used  instead.    The  division  sign  is  usually  replaced  by  the  solidus  (/),  or  by  separating  the 
expression to be divided and the divisor by a horizontal line, thus for example: 
(3x −6)
(3x – 6) ÷ (7x + 3) may be written as (3x – 6)/(7x + 3) or, more commonly, as  (

7x + )
3
The Laws of Algebra 
3. 
There are several laws of algebra which govern how algebraic expressions may be manipulated: 
a. 
Commutative  Law.    This  law  states  that  additions  and  subtractions  within  an  expression 
may be performed in any order.  So may divisions and multiplications, 
e.g.  
 x + y = y + x;   
x + y – z = x – z + y; 
 
xy = yx;   
xyz = zxy = yzx 
b. 
Associative Law.  This law states that terms in an algebraic expression may be grouped in 
any order, 
e.g.  
  x + y + z = (x + y) + z = x + (y + z); 
 
 
xyz = x(yz) = (xy)z 
c. 
Distributive Law.  This law states that the product of a compound expression and a single 
term is the algebraic sum of the products of the single term with all the terms in the expression, 
e.g.  
 x(y + z) = xy + xz;   
4x(2y – 4z) = 8xy – 16xz 
d. 
Laws of Precedence.  These laws dictate the order in which algebraic operations should be 
effected. 
First,  deal  with  terms  in  brackets;  then  work  out  multiplications  and  divisions;  finally,  work  out 
additions and subtractions. 
Operations within brackets are dealt with using the same precedence. 
4. 
Addition  and  Subtraction.    Within  an  algebraic  expression,  like  terms,  e.g.  all  x  terms,  all  y 
terms, all xy terms, all z2 terms etc, may be collected together and combined into a single term; unlike 
terms cannot be so combined, 
e.g.  
 3x2 + 6x – 4y + 2y + 5xy – x2 + 9xy = 2x2 + 6x – 2y + 14xy 
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 13-8 - Principles and Rules 
whereas, 3x2 + 6x – 4y + 5xy cannot be simplified any further by addition or subtraction of terms. 
5. 
Multiplication  and  Division.    If  two  expressions  which  are  to  be  multiplied  together  (or  one 
divided  by  the  other)  have  the  same  sign,  the  result  is  positive;  while  if  their  signs  are  different,  the 
result  is  negative.    The  rules  of  indices  (Volume  13,  Chapter  5)  similarly  apply  to  algebraic 
expressions.  Thus, for example:  4xy2 × 12x-3y4 = 48x-2y6; 
 
25a4b6 ÷ 5a2b = 5a2b5
6. 
When multiplying an expression  within brackets then  all of the terms within the  bracket must be 
multiplied, 
e.g.  
 5(3x2 – 4y + 5) = 15x2 – 20y + 25 
7. 
When two bracketed expressions are to be multiplied together then all of the terms within one set 
of brackets must be multiplied by all the terms within the other set, 
e.g.  
  (3x2+ 6) (2x – 4) = 6x3– 12x2+ 12x – 24 
Factorization 
8. 
A factor is a term by which an expression may be divided without leaving a remainder; a common 
factor  is  a  term  which  is  common  to  all  of  the  terms  of  the  expression.    Thus  for  example  in  the 
expression bx + by, b is a common factor and the expression may be rewritten as b(x + y).  Similarly, 
in the expression:  24a3 + 6a2 – 12a 
6a is common to all the terms and thus it may be rewritten as: 
6a(4a2 + a – 2) 
9. 
Often an expression can be arranged into groups of terms where each group has its own factor, 
e.g.  
 ax + bx + ay + by can be regarded as two pairs of terms, thus: 
(ax + bx) + (ay + by) 
then each pair has its own common factor, x and y respectively, and so can be rewritten as: 
x(a + b) + y(a + b) 
 (a + b) now appears as a common factor and so the expression can be further factorized as: 
(a + b)(x + y) 
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 - 13-9 - Equations 
CHAPTER 9 - EQUATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
An  equation  is  a  mathematical  statement  expressing  an  equality,  i.e.  it  equates  one  algebraic 
expression  with  another.    Equations  may  range  in  complexity  from  simple  linear  equations  which 
contain  only  one  unknown  quantity  and  whose  graphical  representation  is  a  straight  line,  to  complex 
equations containing elements of calculus.  This chapter will deal with simple linear, simultaneous and 
quadratic equations. 
Transposition 
2. 
Perhaps  the  most  common  use  of  an  equation  is  in  the  determination  of  the  value  of  one 
parameter  given  the  values  of  other  terms.    Thus,  for  example,  given  the  equation  for  temperature 
conversion: 
9
F =
C + 32
5
if values for ºC are given then ºF can be determined by substituting the value in the equation, eg for 20 ºC: 
9 x 20
F =
+ 32 
5
=
36 + 32
=
68°F
3. 
However, suppose that it is necessary to find the Celsius equivalent of a Fahrenheit temperature.  
Clearly the equation needs to be rearranged so that C becomes the subject.  In order to achieve this it 
is  important to remember that operations may be carried out on the equation provided that the same 
process  is  applied  to  both  sides  of  the  '='  sign.    The  only  forbidden  operation  is  division  by  zero; 
multiplication by zero is not forbidden but of course gives the trivial result 0 = 0. 
4. 
In the example, the first step is to subtract 32 from both sides of the equation: 
9
F − 32 =
C + 32 − 32
5
Next, both sides of the equation can be multiplied by 5/9, remembering that all terms must be multiplied: 
5 (F − 32) 5 9
=
×
C
9
9
5
5
Thus
C =
(F − 32)
9
5. 
Frequently, equations will be encountered which contain powers and/or roots.  These can be dealt 
with in an analogous fashion provided again that the same operations are carried out on both sides of 
the equation. 
6. 
As an example, the periodic time of a simple pendulum, of length L, is given by the equation: 
L
T = 2 π
seconds
g
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 - 13-9 - Equations 
Suppose  it  is  required  to  make  'L'  the  subject  of  the  equation.    The  first  operation  is  to  square  both 
sides to remove the square root: 
2 = (2π)2 L
T
g
L
= 4π g
Then divide both sides by 4π2: 
T2
L
=
4 π2
g
Finally, multiply both sides by g (and conventionally the subject term is taken to the left side). 
2
g T
Thus L =
2
4 π
7. 
Sometimes the way to proceed is not immediately obvious; the relationship between the distance of 
an object from a lens, (u), the distance of its image, (v), and the focal length of the lens, (f), is given by: 
1
1
1
+
=
u
v
f
Suppose it is necessary to make f the subject of this equation.  One technique is to initially multiply by 
the product of the denominators of the left-hand side, ie by uv. 
uv
uv
uv
+
=
u
v
f
uv
 
ie    v + u = f
Next, taking the 'f'' term to the left and inverting both sides. 
f
1
=
uv
v + u
Finally, multiply again by uv: 
uv
f = v + u
8. 
However, there are often alternative methods.  For example, taking the optical equation again: 
1
1
1
+
=
u
v
f
The left-hand side can be combined into one term by using a common denominator, uv, thus: 
v + u
1
=
uv
f
then inverting both sides 
uv
f = v + u
Click here to open a short quiz to test your understanding of Transposition. 
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 - 13-9 - Equations 
Simple Linear Equations 
9. 
A simple linear equation is one which has only one unknown quantity and in which the unknown 
quantity  has  no  power  other  than  1,  e.g.  4x  +  6  =  30.    The  solution,  ie  finding  the  value  of  x  which 
satisfies the conditions of the equation, is accomplished using the transposition techniques discussed 
above.  Thus, in the example: 
4x + 6 = 30 
Subtract 6 from both sides 
4x = 30 – 6 =24 
Divide both sides by 4 
24
x
=
=
6
4
Notice  that  addition  and  subtraction  is  equivalent  to  transferring  the  term  to  the  other  side  of  the 
equation accompanied by a change of sign, eg 
Taking 
 
4x + 9 = 3x – 6 
The  '3x'  term  can  be  transferred  to the left-hand side if its sign is changed to '–', and similarly the '9' 
may be transferred to the right-hand with a sign change, thus: 
4x – 3x 

– 6 – 9 
ie      x 

– 15 
Click here to open a short quiz to test your understanding of Linear Equations. 
Linear Simultaneous Equations 
10.  Linear simultaneous equations are independent equations, with no powers other than 1, relating to 
more than one unknown.  All of the equations must be true at the same time.  For example: 
x + 3y 
=
20                     (1) 
9x – y 
=
12                     (2) 
In general, to find values of all the unknowns which satisfy the equations then it is necessary to have 
as  many  independent  equations  as  there  are  unknowns,  for  example  if  there are 5 unknowns then 5 
independent  equations  would  be  required.    For  a  pair  of  simultaneous  equations  with  two  unknowns 
there are two methods of solution; elimination and substitution. 
11.  Solution by Elimination.  In this method one or both of the equations are manipulated so that the 
coefficient of one of the unknowns is identical in each equation.  One equation is then subtracted from 
the other to eliminate one unknown resulting in a simple equation in the other unknown which can be 
solved  readily.    This  value  is  then  substituted  back  into  one  of  the  original  equations  to  generate 
another readily soluble simple equation.  Taking the examples from para 10: 
Multiply equation (1) by 9: 
 
9x + 27y 
= 180 
Subtract equation (2) 
9x – y 
=   12 
      28y 
= 168 
Divide by 28 
          y 
=     6 
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 - 13-9 - Equations 
Substitute this value for y in equation (2) 
9x – 6 

12 
       9x  = 
18 
         x  = 
  2 
12.  Solution by Substitution.  In this method one equation is rearranged to express one unknown in 
terms of the other.  This 'value' is then substituted into the other equation, which reduces to a simple 
equation  in  one  unknown.    After  solution  of  this  simple  equation  the  value  is  substituted  into  either 
equation to find the other unknown value.  Taking the same example equations: 
x + 3y 
=
20   
 (1) 
9x – y 
=
12   
 (2) 
Rearrange equation (1) to make 'x' the subject 
x  
=
20 – 3y 
Substitute this into equation (2) and solve for y: 
9(20 –3y) – y  
=
12 
180 – 27y – y 
=
12 
                 28y 
=
168 
                     y 
=
    6 
Substitute this value into equation (1): 
x + 18 
=  20 
       x 
=    2 
Quadratic Equations 
13.  A  quadratic  equation  contains  the  square  of  the  unknown  quantity  but  no  higher  power.    The 
simplest  type  has  the  form  x2=  n  where  n  is  a  positive  number.    The  solution  is  a  simple  matter  of 
finding  the  square  root  of  the  positive  number ie  x  = 
n ,  remembering  that  the  result  can  have  a 
negative or positive value.  More commonly, a quadratic equation has the form: 
ax2 + bx + c = 0, where a, b and c are numbers. 
14.  It  is  instructive  to  examine  the  graphs  representative  of  quadratic  functions;  their  shape  is 
parabolic.  The solutions, or roots, of a quadratic equation are where y = 0 on the graph, i.e. where the 
graph crosses the x-axis.  Four examples are illustrated in Fig 1. 
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 - 13-9 - Equations 
13-9 Fig 1 Graphs of Quadratic Equations 
y
y
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
x
x
–1
1
2
3
4
–1
1
2
3
4
–1
–1
y = x²   
– 4x + 3
y = x² – 4x + 4
–2
–2
a
c
y
y
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
x
x
–1
1
2
3
4
–1
1
2
3
4
–1
–1
–2
–2
y = x² – x – 2
y = x² – 2x + 2
b
d
15.  Fig 1a shows the graph of y = x2 – 4x + 3.  It will be seen that there are two positive roots; where x = 
1 and where x = 3, ie where the graph crosses the x-axis.  If the function had been x2 + 4x + 3 then the 
graph would have crossed the x-axis to the left of the origin, ie giving two negative roots, –1 and –3. 
16.  Fig 1b shows the graph of y = x2 – x – 2.  Here the graph crosses the axis at two points, one to the 
left and one to the right of the origin, thus there is one positive root and one negative root. 
17.  Fig 1c shows the graph of y = x2 – 4x + 4.  Here the graph does not cross the x-axis, rather the x-
axis is a tangent to the curve at the value x = 2.  Here the two roots are said to be coincident or equal. 
18.  Fig 1d shows the graph of y = x2 – 2x + 2.  In this case the graph does not cross the x-axis at all 
therefore there are no real roots. 
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 - 13-9 - Equations 
Solving Quadratic Equations 
19.  Clearly,  a  quadratic  equation  can  be  solved  as  illustrated  above  by  drawing  the  graph  of  the 
function  and  establishing  where  the  curve  crosses  the  x-axis.    However,  this  method  is  tedious  and 
often inaccurate.  There are two other methods of solution in common use: factorization and formula. 
20.  Factorization.    Some  quadratic  equations,  but  not  all,  are  readily  solved  by  the  factorization 
method.  The equation must first be arranged so that all the terms are on the left-hand side with just a 
zero to the right of the '=' sign.  The problem then is to find factors of the expression on the left-hand 
side, remembering that it will not always be possible.  Consider the equation: 
x2 – 4x + 3 = 0 
The left-hand side can be factorized as: 
(x – 1)(x – 3) = 0 
As  the  left-hand  side  is  now  comprised  of  the  product  of  two  factors  equal  to  zero,  then  one  of  the 
factors at least must equal zero, ie either: 
x – 1 = 0, ∴ x = 1 
   r    x – 3 = 0, ∴ x = 3 
21.  Formula.  The formula method can be used to solve all quadratic equations that have a solution 
and,  unless  the  factors  are  readily  apparent,  is  normally  the  preferred  method  of  solution.    The 
equation must first be arranged into the form: 
ax2 + bx + c = 0 
The formula to be used is then: 
− b ± b2 − 4ac
x
=
2a
As an example, take the equation: 
2x2 + 3x – 2 = 0 
In terms of the standard form, a = 2, b = 3, c = –2.  Thus, putting these values into the formula: 
− 3 ± 9 − ( 1
− 6)


4
3
− + 5
1


∴ x  = 
4
2
3
− − 5
or x 

∴ x  =  – 2 
4
22.  The  part  of  the  formula  'b2  –  4ac'  is  known  as  the  discriminant  and  gives  information  about  the 
roots of the equation.  There are three possible cases: 
a. 
b2 > 4ac.  This generates a positive term and so will have two real square roots.  Thus, there 
will be two real roots to the equation.  This is the situation shown by Figs 1a and 1b. 
b. 
b2 = 4ac.  This is the case illustrated by Fig 1c.  b2 – 4ac = 0 and the roots are coincident and 
equal to –b/2a. 
c. 
b2  <  4ac.    This  makes  b2  –  4ac  negative.    There  are  no  real  square  roots  to  a  negative 
number and therefore the equation has no real roots.  This is the case illustrated in Fig 1d where 
the graph does not cross the x-axis.  Although there are no real solutions in this case, this form of 
equation has many applications in, for example, control systems and aerodynamics. 
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
CHAPTER 10 - PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 
Definitions and Axioms 
1. 
Angles.    An  angle  is  formed  by  the intersection of two lines.  In Fig 1 AOB is an angle which is 
formed by a line which starts from the position OA and rotates about O in an anti-clockwise direction to 
the position OB.  In this case O is the 'vertex' of the angle while OB and OA are the 'arms' of the angle.  
With  anti-clockwise  rotation,  the  angle  is  regarded  as  positive;  if  clockwise,  the  angle  is  regarded  as 
negative.  Unless otherwise stated, it is assumed that rotation will be anti-clockwise. 
13-10 Fig 1 An Angle 
B
A
O
2. 
Measurement of Angles.  One complete revolution is divided into 360 degrees (º).  The degree is 
sub-divided  into  60  minutes  (′),  and  the  minute  is  sub-divided  into  60  seconds  (′′).    Ninety  degrees 
constitutes one right-angle. 
3. 
Acute,  Obtuse  and  Reflex  Angles.    An  acute  angle  is  one  which  is  less  than  90º,  an  obtuse 
angle is greater than 90º but less than 180º and a reflex angle is greater than 180º (see Fig 2). 
13-10 Fig 2 Acute, Obtuse, and Reflex Angles 
a  Acute
b  Obtuse
c  Reflex
4. 
Complementary and Supplementary Angles.  If two angles together make up 90º they are said 
to be complementary angles and each is the complement of the other.  If two angles together make up 
180º they are said to be supplementary and each is the supplement of the other. 
5. 
Slope and Gradient.  The slope of the line CA in Fig 3 is the angle ACB.  The gradient of the line 
CA is the ratio AB/CB = 1/5. 
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
13-10 Fig 3 Slope and Gradient 
A
10
C
50
B
6. 
Angles  Formed  by  Two  Intersecting  Straight  Lines.    When  two  straight  lines  intersect,  as  in 
Fig 4, the sum of the adjacent angles is 180º, and the vertically opposite angles are equal. 
13-10 Fig 4 Two Intersecting Straight Lines 
A + B = B + A1 = A1 + B1 = B1 + A = 180°
A = A1
B = B1
A
B
B
1
A1
7. 
Parallel Lines Cut by a Transversal.  When a transversal intersects two parallel straight lines, as 
in Fig 5: 
a. 
The corresponding angles are equal. 
(∠B = ∠D, ∠F = ∠H, ∠A = ∠C, ∠G = ∠E) 
b. 
The alternate angles are equal. 
(∠F = ∠B, ∠C = ∠G) 
c. 
The sum of the interior angles on the same side of the transversal is equal to 180º. 
(∠C + ∠B = 180º, ∠F + ∠G = 180º) 
13-10 Fig 5 Parallel Straight Lines and Transversal 
E
D
F
C
G
B
H
A
8. 
Angle Properties of a Triangle.  The sum of the angles of a triangle is 180º.  When one side of a 
triangle is produced, as in Fig 6, the exterior angle thus formed is equal to the sum of the two interior 
opposite angles. 
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
13-10 Fig 6 Angle Properties of a Triangle 
∠A + ∠
  B + ∠
  C = 1
  80°
∠ABC +  B
∠ AC =  A
∠ CO
A
B
O
C
9. 
Congruency of Triangles.  Two triangles are congruent if one can be superimposed on the other, so 
that  they  exactly  coincide  with  regard  to  their  vertices  and  their  sides.    Their  areas  must  consequently  be 
equal.  Thus the three sides of one triangle must have the same lengths as the three sides of the other and 
the angles opposite to the equal sides must be equal.  Triangles can be proved congruent when: 
a. 
The three sides of one are equal to the corresponding sides of the other. 
b. 
They  have  two  sides  and  the  included  angle  of  one,  equal  to  the  corresponding  sides  and 
included angle of the other. 
c. 
They have two angles and a corresponding side equal. 
10.  The Theorem of Pythagoras.  The conventional notation used for the solution of triangles is to denote 
the three angles by the capital letters A, B, C and the sides opposite these angles by the small letters a, b, c.  
Pythagoras’ theorem states that, in any right-angled triangle, the square on the hypotenuse is equal to the 
sum  of  the  squares  on  the  other  two  sides,  ie  in  Fig  7,  where  the  angle  at  C  = 90º, c2 = b2 + a2.   This 
theorem is of considerable importance and can be used to find one side of a right-angled triangle when the 
other two are known.  For example, if a 12-metre ladder rests against a house so that its foot is 4 metres 
from the wall, it is possible to calculate how far up the side of the house the ladder will reach (see Fig 8). 
13-10 Fig 7 Pythagoras’ Theorem 
A
c =
a² + b²
b
B
a
C
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
13-10 Fig 8 A Practical Application of Pythagoras’ Theorem 
C
12 m
b
a
c
A
4 m
B
From Pythagoras, it is known that 
a 2 = b 2 + c 2
∴ b2 = a 2 − c2
ie
b =
144 − 16
= 128
= 1 .
1 3
thus, the ladder reaches 11.3 metres up the wall. 
11.  Similar Triangles.  If, in two triangles, the three angles of one are equal to the three angles of the 
other,  it  does  not  necessarily  follow  that  they  are  congruent.    Consider  Fig  9  in  which  angle  A  is 
common to the three triangles AFG, ADE and ACB. 
13-10 Fig 9 Similar Triangles 
C
D
F
A
G
E
B
∠AFG = ∠ADE = ∠ACB  (corresponding angles) 
∠AGF = ∠AED = ∠ABC  (corresponding angles) 
Such  triangles  are  said  to  be  similar.    When  triangles  are  equiangular,  the  ratios  of  corresponding 
sides are also equal. 
AF
AD
AC
    Thus, 
=
=
AG
AE
AB
and it follows that  AF
AG
FG
=
=
AD
AE
DE
Note:  A similar relation holds good for two polygons which are equiangular. 
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
12.  The  Relationship  Between  Sides  and  Areas  of  Similar  Triangles.    Triangles  A1B1C1  and 
A2B2C2 are similar triangles with heights h1 and h2 respectively (see Fig 10). 
13-10 Fig 10 Areas of Similar Triangles 
a
b
A
b
c
A
h
 
b
c
h
C
B
C
B
a
a
h
h
a h
Then   1
2
=
∴ h
1 2
=
1
a
a
a
1
2
2
1 a h
1
1
Area of A B C
1
1
1
2
Also,
=
Area of A B C
1
2
2
2
a h
2
2
2
Substituting for h1 
1
a h
1
2
a ×
1
2
Area of A B C
2
a
a
1
1
1
2
1
=
= 2
Area of A B C
1
a
2
2
2
2
a h
2
2
2
Similarly the areas can be proved proportional to the squares of b1, b2 and c1, c2.  Hence the areas of 
similar triangles are proportional to the squares of the corresponding sides. 
Trigonometrical Ratios 
13.  In any right-angled triangle, the side opposite to the right-angle is cal ed the hypotenuse, and the other two 
sides are cal ed the opposite and adjacent according to their position relative to the angle under consideration.  
Fig 11 shows a right-angled triangle ABC in which, relative to angle A, the side BC is opposite and the side AC is 
adjacent.  The reverse is true relative to angle B.  There are six trigonometrical ratios: 
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
13-10 Fig 11 Right-angled Triangle 
B
c
a
A
b
C
opposite
The sine of an angle (sin) 
 
 
=  hypotenuse
adjacent
The cosine of an angle (cos) 
 
=  hypotenuse
opposite
The tangent of an angle (tan) 
 
=  adjacent
1
The cosecant of an angle (cosec) 

sin A
 
The secant of an angle (sec)  
 

1
cos A
The cotangent of an angle (cot)   

1
ta A

14.  The trigonometric ratios, in terms of the triangle in Fig 11 are: 
a
 
 
 
 sin A  =
 
 
 
sin B  = b
c
c
b
 
 
 
cos A  =
 
 
 
cos B  = a
c
c
 
 
 
 tan A  = a  
 
 
tan B  = b
b
a
 
 
    cosec A  = c  
 
    cosec B  = c
a
b
c
 
 
       sec A  =
 
 
 
sec B  = c
b
a
 
 
 
cot A  = b  
 
 
    cot B= a
a
b
and it may be deduced that: 
sin A
cos A
tan A =
cot A =
cos A
sin A
sin A = cos (90 – A); 
cos A = sin (90 – A); 
tan A = cot (90 – A); 
cot A = tan (90 – A) 
15.  The Trigonometric Ratios for Angles of any Magnitude.  So far, only acute angles have been 
considered  but  it  is  also  necessary  to  be  able  to  find  the  trigonometrical  ratios  of  obtuse,  reflex  and 
sometimes negative angles.  Consider a set of rectangular axes OX, OY (see Fig 12).  To determine 
any trigonometrical ratio of any angle, the angle is set up on this system of axes as follows.  A radius 
vector, OP, initially along OX, is considered to turn about O in a counter-clockwise sense through the 
required angle, A.  For a negative angle it turns in the clockwise sense.  From P, drop a perpendicular, 
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
PN,  on  to  the  x-axis.    Any  trigonometrical  ratio  of  A  is  then  referred  to  the  right-angled  triangle  OPN 
and the acute angle α which OP makes with the x-axis.  OP is always taken to be +ve, but ON and PN 
take the signs which would be attached to them when regarded as the coordinates of the point P. 
13-10 Fig 12 The Four Quadrants 
Y
P
A
α
N
O –A
X
1
P
Thus, for the angles A and –A in the figure: 
PN
−P' N
sin A 
 
=
, and is +ve;   
sin (–A)  =
, and is –ve 
OP
OP'
−ON
−ON
cos A 
 
=
, and is –ve; 
cos (–A)  =
, and is –ve 
OP
OP'
PN
−P' N
tan A 
 
=
=

, and is –ve; 
tan (–A) 
, and is +ve 
ON
− ON
The reciprocal ratios, cosec, sec and cot, have the same sign respectively as sin, cos and tan.  These 
more  general  definitions  of  the  trigonometrical  ratios, which apply to all angles of any magnitude and 
sign, are consistent with the former definitions which applied only to acute angles, since, for an acute 
angle, the radius vector, OP would lie in the first quadrant and ON and OP would then both be +ve.  It 
has been shown that, for angles in the second quadrant, sin is +ve while cos and tan are –ve.  Similarly 
it  can  be  shown  that,  for  angles  in  the  third  quadrant,  tan  is  +ve  while  sin  and  cos  are  –ve,  and  for 
angles in the fourth quadrant, cos is +ve while sin and tan are –ve.  Hence the 'all, sin, tan, cos' rule for 
determining the sign of a trigonometrical ratio.  Fig 13 indicates which functions are positive in each of 
the quadrants. 
13-10 Fig 13 Signs of Trig Functions by Quadrant 
Y
Quadrant 2
Quadrant 1
sin
all
O
X
tan
cos
Quadrant 3
Quadrant 4
The Sine Rule 
16.  The three sides and three angles of a triangle are sometimes called its 'elements'.  When given a 
sufficient number of these elements it is possible to find the remainder.  Thus for example if two sides 
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
and one angle or one side and two angles are known, and in each case an angle and the side opposite 
to it are included, the Sine Rule can be used to evaluate the unknown sides and angles. 
17.  In the triangle ABC at Fig 14, draw AD perpendicular to BC and let AD = p. 
13-10 Fig 14 The Sine Rule 
A
c
b
p
B
C
a
D
p =
p
sin B
∴ p = c sin B;  
= sin C
∴ p = b sin C  
c
b

c
b
 c sin B = b sin C or   
=
sin C sin B
In a similar way it can be proved that: 
c
a
=
sin C
sin A
and the Sine Formula is: 
a
b
c
=
=
sin A
sin B
sin C
18.  In  the  triangle  ABC  at  Fig  15,  where  angle  C  is  obtuse,  draw  AD  perpendicular  to  BC  produced 
and let AD = p. 
13-10 Fig 15 Sine Rule - Obtuse Angled Triangle 
A
c
b
p
D
B
a
C
p =
p
sin B
∴ p = c sin B;  and   = sin ACD  ∴ p = b sin ACD 
c
b
but, sin ACD = sin (180–ACD) = sin C 
b
c
∴ p = c sin B = b sin C, as before, or 
=
sin B
sin C
The Cosine Rule 
19.  When the Sine Rule is not applicable, as, for instance, when two sides and an included angle are 
given, the Cosine Rule may be used.  Consider the triangle ABC in Fig 16: 
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
13-10 Fig 16 The Cosine Rule 
A
c
b
p
a - n
n
B
a
C
D
From  A  draw  AD  (=  p)  perpendicular  to  BC.    Let  DC = n  and  BD  =  a–n.    Then,  by  the  principle  of 
Pythagoras, 
p2
=
b2 – n2
and 
p2
=
c2 – (a – n)2

b2 – n2
=
c2 – (a2 – 2an + n2) 

b2 – n2
=
c2 – a2 + 2an – n2

b2
=
c2 – a2 + 2an 
but 

=
b cos C 

b2
=
c2 – a2 + 2ab cos C 
and 
c2
=
a2 + b2 – 2ab cos C 
20.  In the case of triangle ABC, where C is an obtuse angle, as in Fig 17: 
13-10 Fig 17 Cosine Rule - Obtuse Angled Triangle 
A
c
b
p
D
B
a
n
C
p2
=  b2 – n2
and 
p2
=  c2 – (a+n)2

b2 – n2
=  c2 – a2 – 2an – n2

b2
=  c2 – a2 – 2an 
where 

=  b cos ACD 
=  –b cos ACB 
=  –b cos C 

b2
=  c2 – a2 – 2a(–b cos C) 

b2
=  c2 – a2 + 2ab cos C 

c2
=  a2 + b2 – 2ab cos C 
which is identical to the previous formula. 
21.  By the same method, it can be shown that 
b2 = a2 + c2 – 2ac cosB;  
and  a2 = b2 + c2 – 2bc cosA 
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-10 - Plane Trigonometry 
Thus, given any two sides and their included angle, the third side can be found.  It may then be more 
convenient to apply the Sine Rule to find any other unknown elements. 
22.  When three sides a, b, and c are given, the cosine formula may be re-arranged as follows: 
c2 = a2 + b2 – 2ab cos C 
2ab cos C = a2 + b2 – c2
a 2 + b2 − c2
cos C
=
2ab
Similarly cos A and cos B may be found. 
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-11 - The Circle 
CHAPTER 11 - THE CIRCLE 
Definitions 
1. 
Some important definitions relating to the circle are explained with reference to Fig 1. 
13-11 Fig 1 The Properties of a Circle 
D

E
F

O
A
B
I
C
a. 
The  Chord  of  a  circle  is  any  straight  line  which  divides  the  circle  into  two  parts,  and  is 
terminated at each end by the circumference.  AB in Fig 1 is a chord. 
b. 
A Segment of a circle is a figure bounded by a chord and the arc which it cuts off.  In Fig 1 
the chord AB divides the circle into two segments: 
(1)  The minor segment is ABC. 
(2)  The major segment is ADB. 
c. 
An Arc of a circle is a portion of the circumference.  EF in Fig 1 is an arc. 
d. 
A Sector of a circle is a figure which is bounded by two radii and the arc between them.  OEF 
in Fig 1 is a sector. 
e. 
A Tangent to a circle is a straight line which meets the circle in one point called the point of 
contact,  and  does  not  cut  the  circle  when  produced.    A  tangent  is  at  right  angles  to  the  radius 
drawn from the point of contact.  GHI in Fig 1 is a tangent. 
f. 
The  Angle  in  a  Segment  is  the  angle  subtended  at  a  point  on  the  arc  of  a  segment  by  the 
chord  of  the  segment.    In  Fig  1  the  angle  in  the  major  segment  is  ∠ADB  and  the  angle  in  the 
minor segment is ∠ACB. 
g. 
The Angle at the Centre is the angle subtended at the centre of a circle by a chord or by an 
arc.  ∠EOF in Fig 1 is the angle at the centre subtended by EF. 
Theorems 
2. 
The angle at the centre of a circle subtended by an arc is double the angle at the circumference 
subtended  by  the  same  arc.    In  Fig  2  ∠AOB  =  2∠ADB  and  the  reflex  ∠AOB  =  2∠ACB.    Some 
important results follow from this theorem: 
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-11 - The Circle 
13-11 Fig 2 The Angles in a Circle 
D
O
A
B
C
a. 
All angles in the same segment of a circle are equal. 
b. 
The opposite angles of a quadrilateral inscribed in a circle are together equal to 180º; that is, 
they are supplementary. 
c. 
The angle in a semi-circle is a right angle. 
d. 
In  equal  circles,  arcs  which  subtend  equal  angles  either  at  the  centres  or  at  the 
circumference are equal. 
e. 
In equal circles, chords which cut off equal arcs are equal. 
3. 
The angle between a tangent and a chord drawn through the point of contact is equal to the angle 
in the alternate segment.  In Fig 3 ∠DBC = ∠DEB and ∠ABD = ∠DFB. 
13-11 Fig 3 The Angle between Tangent and Chord 
E
D
F
A
C
B
4. 
The  ratio  of  the  circumference  of  a  circle  to  its  diameter  is  denoted  by  π,  so  that  C/d = π or C = πd.  
Since diameter is equal to two times the radius, C = 2πr. 
Circular Measure 
5. 
The magnitude of an angle is commonly expressed in degrees which are obtained by the division 
of  a  right  angle  into  90  parts.    There is another method which is of great practical importance and in 
which  the  unit  employed  is  an  absolute  one.    Consider  Fig  4.    Suppose  the  line  OA  in  Fig  4  rotated 
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-11 - The Circle 
about the point O to the position OB, so that the length of the arc AB is equal to the radius of the circle.  
The angle AOB subtended by the arc AB is called a radian.  The radian is the unit of measurement in 
circular measure.  Hence a radian may be defined as the angle subtended at the centre of a circle by 
an arc equal in length to the radius. 
13-11 Fig 4 The Radian 
B
A
O
r
6. 
The length of an arc, when the angle is given in radians, can be calculated as follows: 
Length of an arc for 1 radian = r 
Length of arc for σ radians = rσ 
Arc = rσ 
7. 
The Relationship Between Radians and Degrees.  Since an arc of r units in length subtends an 
angle of one radian, the number of radians subtended by the circumference of a circle is given by the 
number of times the radius is contained in the circumference, ie C = 2πr.  The number of radians for 
2πr
one revolution  =
= 2π radians.  From this, π radians = 180º and 1 radian = 180/π = 57.3º. 
r
Radians may be converted to degrees by multiplying by π and dividing by 180. 
Examples: 
Convert to radians 45º, 30º taking π as 3.1416 
×
a. 
45 3.1416
3.1416
=
= 0.7854 rad
180
4
×
b. 
30 3.1416
3.1416
=
= 0.5236 rad
180
6
Conversions  are  easily  carried  out  if  an  electronic  calculator  is  available  which  will  enter  an  accurate 
value for π at the touch of a button. 
Angular Rotation 
8. 
A straight strip of tape stuck on the face of a gear wheel from the axis to perimeter, will enable the 
observation that, in one revolution of a gear wheel, an individual tooth is rotated through 360º.  Since 
360º = 2π  radians,  then  one  revolution  is  also  2π  radians.    In  circular  measure,  therefore,  all  even 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-11 - The Circle 
multiples  of  π  correspond  to  complete  revolutions.    For  example,  4π  radians  will  be  2  revolutions,  6π
radians will be 3 revolutions, etc. 
9. 
If a shaft or pulley is rotating at 3 revolutions per second, then the angular rotation must be 3 × 2π
radians per second.  In general terms, a rotation of n revs per second will give an angular velocity of 
2πn radians per second. 
10.  The Relationship Between Angular and Linear Velocity.  Let QMN of Fig 5 represent a flywheel 
which has an angular velocity of ω radians per sec.  This means that any radius OQ rotates through an 
angle of ω radians in 1 sec.  Any point P on OQ wil  also have the same angular velocity.  Since arc = rσ, 
the arc traced out by Q in 1 sec = ω × OQ, and the arc traced out by P in 1 sec = ω × OP.  In general, if 
the point is at a distance r from the centre of rotation, the linear velocity of that point wil  be ωr.  If V is the 
linear velocity of a point, then V = ωr.  Although al  points on the flywheel have the same angular velocity, 
the linear velocity of any point will depend on its distance from the centre of rotation. 
13-11 Fig 5 Angular and Linear Velocity 
M
ω
VQ
VP
N
O
Q
P
Page 4 of 4 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
CHAPTER 12 - SPHERICAL TRIGONOMETRY 
Introduction 
1. 
Many  of  the  problems  encountered  in  navigation  require  the  solution  of  triangles  on  the  Earth’s 
surface.  In all but very small triangles, the effect of curvature must be taken into account. 
GEOMETRY OF THE SPHERE 
2. 
The following properties and definitions apply to the geometrical sphere and, although the shape 
of the Earth is not truly spherical, it is considered to be so for most practical navigational purposes. 
a. 
The section of the surface of a sphere made by any intersecting plane is a circle. 
b. 
The axis of a circle on a sphere is the diameter of the sphere at right angles to the plane of 
the circle (PP′ in Figs 1 and 2). 
c. 
The two points at which the axis of the circle intersects the surface of the sphere are called 
the poles of the circle (P and P′ in Figs 1 and 2). 
d. 
If the plane passes through the centre of the sphere the section is called a great circle.  All 
other sections are called small circles. 
e. 
A quadrant is the great circle arc drawn from any point on a great circle to its pole (Fig 1). 
f. 
Only one great circle passes through two points which are not at opposite ends of a diameter 
of a sphere.  The shorter arc of this great circle is the shortest distance between these two points, 
measured over the surface of the sphere. 
Page 1 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 1 Great Circle 
P
Axis
Quadrant
Great
Circle
P′
13-12 Fig 2 Small Circle 
P
Small
Circle
Axis
P′
Spherical Distance 
3. 
The spherical distance between two points on the surface of a sphere is the length of the shorter 
great circle arc joining them.  It is measured by the angle which that arc subtends at the centre of the 
sphere, expressed in degrees, minutes and seconds, or in radians.  In Fig 3, the spherical distance BC 
is  measured  as  BÔC,  e.g.  BC  =  42º  27'  means  that  the  arc  BC  subtends  an  angle  of  42º  27'  at  the 
centre of the sphere. 
13-12 Fig 3 Spherical Distance 
O
C
B
4. 
Angular measurement of spherical distance is convenient for the following reasons: 
a. 
The  actual  length  of  the  arc  is  readily  obtained,  given  the  radius  of  the  sphere,  since  the 
length of the arc = radius of the sphere × the angle subtended at the centre (in radians).  In the 
Page 2 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
case of the Earth, by definition, an arc of length 1 nautical mile subtends an angle of 1'.  Thus, if B 
and C are two points on the surface of the Earth, the length of BC is given directly by converting 
BÔC to minutes, e.g.: 
BC = 42º 27' = 2,547 nm 
b. 
Angular measurement of spherical distance can be made without reference to the size of the 
sphere; this is of value when dealing with an abstract quantity such as the celestial sphere. 
c. 
The use of angular measurement of the sides simplifies the solution of the various formulae 
used in spherical trigonometry. 
Spherical Angle 
5. 
A  spherical  angle  is  formed  at  a  point  where  two  great  circles  intersect  and  is  measured  by  the 
angle  between  the  great  circles  at  that  point.    This  is the equivalent of measuring the angle between 
the planes of the two great circles in a plane mutually perpendicular to them both. 
6. 
In Fig 4, BÂC is the spherical angle formed by the great circles AB and AC at the point A and is 
measured  by  bÂc  =  BÔC  =  arc  BC.    BOC  is  a  plane  perpendicular  to  the  planes  of  the  great  circles 
ABD  and  ACD,  and  is  contained  in  the  plane  of  the  great  circle  XBCY.    OA  is  perpendicular  to  the 
plane  of  XBCY  and  A  is  a  pole  of that great circle.  By definition, BÔC is a measure of the spherical 
angle at A, from which it follows that the length of arc BC is also a measure of A.  Thus, the spherical 
angle formed at a point may be measured by the arc intercepted between those great circles along the 
great circle to which that point is a pole. 
13-12 Fig 4 Spherical Angle 
A
b
c
O
X
Y
B
C
D
The Spherical Triangle 
7. 
A spherical triangle is formed by the intersection of three great circles on the surface of a sphere.  
Fig  5  shows  such  a  triangle,  ABC.    The  arcs  BC,  CA  and  AB  form  the  sides  of  the  triangle  and  are 
)
)
)
denoted  by  a,  b  and  c  respectively.    The  angles 
C
A
B
,
C
B
A
, and C
B A   form  the  angles  of  the  triangle 
Page 3 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
and  are  denoted  by  A,  B  and  C.    Note  that  by  this  convention,  a  is  the  side  opposite  angle  A,  b  is 
opposite angle B and c is opposite angle C. 
13-12 Fig 5 Spherical Triangle 
A
b
B
C
a
The Polar Triangle 
8. 
Consider the spherical triangle ABC in Fig 6.  Point A′ is a pole of the great circle of which side a 
is a part and is that particular pole which lies on the same side of the great circle as angle A.  Similarly, 
B′ and C′ are the poles appropriate to sides b and c respectively. 
13-12 Fig 6 Polar Triangle 
A
A′
b
b′
c′
B′
E
C′
D
a′
B
C
a
9. 
The  3  points  so  obtained  are  joined  by  arcs  of  great  circles  B′A′, A′C′ and C′B′ giving a second 
spherical triangle A′B′C′.  The original triangle is called the primitive and the second, the polar triangle.  
It should be noted that in many cases the shape of the polar triangle might bear little resemblance to 
that of its primitive. 
10.  From para 2c, if A′ is the pole of arc a then the arc BA′ is a quadrant.  But point A′ lies on the arc 
b′, therefore B is also a pole of arc b′.  Similarly, A and C are poles of arcs a′ and c′ respectively; thus 
triangle ABC is the polar triangle of A′B′C′.  So, if one triangle should be a polar triangle of another, the 
latter will be the polar triangle of the former. 
Page 4 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
Relationship between the Primitive and Polar Triangles 
11.  In Fig 6, let D and E be the points where the arc a′ is intercepted by the arcs c and b respectively.  
Then, from para 6, since A is a pole of a′, the spherical angle A is measured by the arc DE.  But B′E 
and C′D are both quadrants: 
∴           B′E + C′D  
= 180º 
also        B′E + C′D  
= B′C′ + DE 
∴                      DE = 180º – B′C′
 
 
 
 
= 180º – a′
or, angle A is the supplement of the angle subtended by arc a′.  Similarly, it can be proved that: 
      A′ = 180º – a, B′ = 180º – b, C′ = 180º – c 
and a′ = 180º – A, b′ = 180º – B, c′ = 180º – C 
Properties of Spherical Triangles 
12.  The  following  statements  are  rules  of  spherical  trigonometry  and  are  stated  without  the  proof 
which may be found in any basic spherical trigonometry primer.  For a spherical triangle: 
a. 
By convention, each side is less than 180º. 
b. 
From a above it follows that each angle must be less than 180º. 
c. 
Any two sides are together greater than the third side. 
d. 
If  two  sides  are  equal,  the  angles  opposite  those  sides  are  equal;  conversely,  if  two  angles 
are equal, then the sides opposite those angles are equal. 
e. 
The greater side is opposite the greater angle; conversely, the greater angle is opposite the 
greater side. 
f. 
The sum of all the sides is less than 360º. 
g. 
The sum of all the angles lies between 180º and 540º. 
Determination of Spherical Triangles 
13.  The spherical triangle has 6 parts, i.e. 3 sides and 3 angles.  In general, if any 3 parts are known 
the triangle is fixed.  The following combination of 3 parts all determine unique triangles: 
a. 
Two sides and the included angle. 
b. 
Two angles and the included side. 
c. 
Three sides. 
d. 
Three angles. 
Page 5 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
In the following cases, there may be 1 or 2 solutions: 
e. 
Two sides and a non-included angle. 
f. 
Two angles and a non-included side. 
For example, in Fig 7, given c, b and B, there are 2 possible triangles, ABC1 and ABC2.  In Fig 8, given 
B, C and c, there are again 2 possible triangles, ABC1 and ABC2. 
13-12 Fig 7 Two Possible Triangles given Two Sides and a Non-included Angle 
A
c
b
b
a
C
C
B
13-12 Fig 8 Two Possible Triangles given Two Angles and a Non-included Side 
A
c
B
a
C
C
Symmetrical Equality 
14.  The 2 triangles in Fig 9 obey all the normal rules of congruency, i.e. the sides and angles of one 
are  equal  to  the  corresponding  sides  and  angles  of  the  other.    However,  triangle  ABC  cannot  be 
superimposed on AB′C′ since its curvature is in the opposite sense.  Hence, the 2 triangles cannot be 
truly congruent since they fail in this respect.  They are, therefore, said to be symmetrically equal. 
Page 6 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 9 Symmetrically Equal Triangles 
A
C
B′
B
C′
15.  Points to Note.  The following points of difference between plane and spherical triangles should 
be noted: 
a. 
Given  2  angles  of  a  spherical  triangle,  the  third  angle  is  still  undetermined  since,  from 
para 12g,  the  sum  of  the  three  angles  may  be  anywhere  between  180º  and  540º.    This  is  in 
contrast to the plane triangle in which the third angle may be obtained by subtracting the sum of 
the two known angles from 180º. 
b. 
Since  3  angles  determine  a  unique  spherical  triangle  (para  13d),  it  follows  that  similar 
triangles do not occur on the same sphere. 
c. 
In  plane  trigonometry,  the  angles  of  an  equilateral  triangle  are  all  60º.    In  an  equilateral 
spherical triangle, however, whilst the 3 angles are all equal, their value is not restricted to 60º. 
FORMULAE FOR THE SOLUTION OF SPHERICAL TRIANGLES 
16.  Spherical triangles may be solved by various formulae as listed below. 
The Sine Formula 
17.  From  C  (Fig  10)  drop  a  perpendicular  to  the  plane  OAB,  meeting  the  plane  in  H.    Draw  a 
perpendicular  from  C  to  OA,  meeting  that  line  in  J.    Then  JH  will  be  perpendicular  to  OA.    Draw  a 
perpendicular from C to OB, meeting that line in K.  Then KH will be perpendicular to OB. 
13-12 Fig 10 Proof of the Sine Formula 
C
a
b
K
O
B
H
c
J
A
Page 7 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
18.  From Fig 10: 
 CJ = OC sin CÔJ 
 OJ = OC cos CÔJ 
 JH = CJ cos CĴH 
      = OC sin CÔJ cos CĴH 
CH = OC sin CÔJ sin CĴH 
 Let OC = 1 unit 
     CÔJ = b (angle subtended at the centre) 
     CĴH = A (CJ is in the plane of arc b, JH is in the plane of arc c, CĴH is the angle between the planes) 
∴    OJ =  cos b 
and  CJ =  sin b 
       JH = sin b cos A 
       CH = sin b sin A……………………(1) 
Similarly, 
       OK = cos a 
and CK = sin a 
       KH = sin a cos B 
       CH = sin a sin B………………….…(2) 
Equating (1) and (2): 
       sin b sin A = sin a sin B……………(3) 
By repeating this construction in the plane OCB it may be shown that: 
sin b sin C = sin c sin B……..……..(4) 
From (3) and (4) it follows that: 
sin a
sin b
sin c
=
=
………………..(5) 
s  
in A
sin B
sin C
Or,  the  sines  of  the  angles  are  proportional  to  the  sines  of  the  sides  opposite.    This  expression  is 
known as the Sine Formula 
The Cosine Formula 
19.  Fig  11  shows  the  plane  OAB  of  Fig  10.    By  definition  BÔA  =  c  (angle  subtended  at  the  centre).  
Draw JL perpendicular to OB; draw HM perpendicular to JL. 
           Then OK = OJ cos c + JH sin MĴH. 
           But MĴH = 90º – MĴO = BÔA = c. 
∴ OK = OJ cos c + JH sin c………(6) 
Page 8 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 11 The Plane OAB of Fig 10 
L
K
B
O
M
H
c
J
A
Substituting the values for OK, OJ, and JH in (6) 
cos a = cos b cos c + sin b sin c cos A.......(7) 
By repeating the construction in the planes of OCB and OCA, 2 further expressions are obtained, viz: 
cos b = cos a cos c + sin a sin c cos B........(8) 
cos c = cos a cos b + sin a sin b cos C........(9) 
Equations 7, 8 and 9 are of the same form and permit the determination of 1 side knowing the other 2 
sides and the included angle. 
Examples of the Use of the Sine Formula 
20.  The Sine formula can be used in the following cases: 
a. 
To find a non-included angle, given 2 sides and a non-included angle. 
b. 
To find a non-included side, given 2 angles and a non-included side. 
In  accordance  with  para  13,  these  cases  are  ambiguous  and  may  yield  2  possible  results,  as 
demonstrated below. 
21.  Example 1, Sine Formula.  From Fig 12, find C, given A = 38º 42', a = 76º 18', c = 57º 25'. 
13-12 Fig 12 Example 1 - Sine Formula 
A
38°42'
b
'5
°275
76°18'
B
C
 
From the Sine formula 
Page 9 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
sin C
sin A
=
sin c
sin a
sin A  s
  in c
sin C =
sin a
o
o
sin 38 42' sin 57 25'
sin C =
o
sin 76 18'
Using calculator or logarithms, log sin C = 1.73422. 
∴    C = 32º 50' or 147º 10' 
In  this  particular  case,  one  result  may  be  eliminated  by  applying  the  rule  that  the  greater  side  must  be 
opposite  the  greater  angle  (para  12e):  a  is  greater  than  c  hence  A  must  be  greater  than  C;  therefore,  C 
cannot have a value 147º 10'.  The requirements are satisfied by 1 triangle only and, therefore, C = 32º 50'. 
22.  Example 2, Sine Formula.  From Fig 13, find b, given c = 28º 25', B = 62º 07' and C = 33º 42'. 
13-12 Fig 13 Example 2 - Sine Formula 
A
'5°282
62°07'
33°42'
B
C
sin b
sin c
=
sin B
sin C
sin B
sin c
 
 
 sin b = 
sin C
o
o
sin 62 07' sin 28 25'
 
 
 
  = 
o
sin 33 42'
So, using calculator or logarithms, log sin b =  .
1 87973 . 
∴ b = 49º 18' or 130º 42' 
In  this  case,  B  is  greater  than  C,  thus  b  must  be  greater  than  c.    Both  values  of  b  satisfy  this 
requirement, hence the ambiguity is unresolved, and both results must be accepted. 
Examples of the Use of the Cosine Formula 
23.  The Cosine formula may be used as follows: 
a. 
To find the third side, given 2 sides and the included angle. 
Page 10 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
b. 
To  find  the  third  angle,  given  2  angles  and  the  included  side  (by  transposition  to  the  polar 
triangle). 
Both these cases determine unique triangles; hence no ambiguity will arise. 
24.  Example 1, Cosine Formula.  From Fig 14, find c, given a = 47º 15', b = 115º 20' and 
C = 82º 38'.   
13-12 Fig 14 Example 1 - Cosine Formula 
A
115°20'
c
82°38'
C
47°15'
B
From the Cosine formula: 
 
cos c = cos a cos b + sin a sin b cos C 
 
cos c = cos 47º 15' cos 115º 20' + sin 47º 15' sin 115º 20' cos 82º 38' 
Now 115º 20' is in the second quadrant.  It may thus be written that: 
 
cos 115º 20'  = – cos 64º 40' 
 
sin 115º 20' 
= sin 64º 40' 
∴  cos c 
 
= – cos 47º 15' cos 64º 40' + sin 47º 15' sin 64º 40' cos 82º 38' 
 
 
 
 
= – 0.29044 + 0.08510 
∴  cos c 
= – 0.20534 
 
 
 

= 180º – 78º 09' = 101º 51' 
Page 11 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
25.  Example 2, Cosine Formula.  From triangle ABC in Fig 15a, find C, given A = 47º 15', B = 115º 
20', c = 82º 38'.  In this case, two angles and the included side are given and the Cosine formula is not 
directly applicable.  However, the polar triangle may be derived thus; from the rules of para 11: 
13-12 Fig 15 Example 2 - Cosine Formula Indirect Application 
A
47°15'
A′
'8
°3
2
8
b
64°
115°20'
40'
B
B′
132°4
a
5'
97°22'
C
C′
a  Primitive Triangle
b  Polar Triangle
 
a′  = 180º – A = 180º – 47° 15' = 132º 45' 
 
b′  = 180º – B = 180º – 115º 20' = 64º 40' 
 
C′ = 180º – c = 180º – 82º 38' = 97º 22' 
 
c′  = 180º – C′. 
The given quantities are now in terms of 2 sides and an included angle and: 
 
cos c′ 
= cos a′ cos b′+ sin a′ sin b′ cos C′
 
cos c′ 
= cos 132º 45' cos 64º 40' + sin 132º 45' sin 64º 40' cos 97º 22' 
 
cos c′ 
= – cos 47º 15' cos 64º 40' – sin 47º 15' sin 64º 40' cos 82º 38' 
 
 
 
= – 0.29044 – 0.08510 
 
 
 
= – 0.37554 
 
 
c′ 
= 112º 03½' 
∴ C′ 
= 180º – 112º 03½' = 67º 56½' 
The Haversine Formula 
26.  In  the  preceding  examples  it  has  been  necessary  to  consider  the  sign  of  the  various  functions.  
This  is  an  inconvenience  and  calculations  would  be  much  simplified  if  only  positive  values  occurred.  
The Haversine (half-reverse-sine) formula may be used to achieve this object. 
1 − cos A
27.  The expression 
 is known as the haversine of an angle A, written hav A and has special 
2
properties.  Thus: 
When 
A = 0º 
 
cos A =   1 
and  hav A = 0 
 
 
A = 90º   
cos A =   0 
and  hav A = ½ 
 
 
A = 180º   
cos A = –1 
and  hav A = 1 
 
 
A = 270º   
cos A =   0 
and  hav A = ½ 
 
 
A = –90º   
cos A =   0 
and  hav A = ½ 
 
 
A = –180º 
cos A = –1 
and hav A = 1 
 
 
A = –270º 
cos A =   0 
and hav A = ½ 
Page 12 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
 
 
A = –360º 
cos A =   1 
and hav A = 0 
The value of the haversine never exceeds 1 and is always positive irrespective of whether the angle is 
positive or negative and since: 
1 − cos a 
1 − cos A 
hav a =
and hav A =

2

2

cos a = 1 – 2 hav a (and cos A = 1 – 2 hav A) 
Substituting for cos a and cos A in the Cosine formula (para 19): 
             cos a = cos b cos c + sin b sin c cos A 
    1 – 2 hav a = cos b cos c + sin b sin c (1 – 2 hav A) 
or 1 – 2 hav a = cos b cos c + sin b sin c – 2 sin b sin c hav A 
Now:    cos b cos c + sin b sin c = cos (b – c) 
and       cos (b – c) = 1 – 2 hav (b – c) 
∴  1 – 2 hav a = 1 – 2 hav (b – c) – 2 sin b sin c hav A 
From which:  hav a = hav (b – c) + sin b sin c hav A 
28.  Since the haversine is always positive, the value of hav (b – c) is positive no matter what values 
are assigned to b and c and the equation may be simplified by writing (b ~ c), meaning the difference 
between b and c.  So: 
 
hav a = hav (b ~ c) + sin b sin c hav A……...(10) 
Similarly, it may be shown that: 
 
hav b = hav (a ~ c) + sin a sin c hav B 
and  hav c = hav (a ~ b) + sin a sin b hav C 
By  convention,  only  angles  and  sides  up  to  180º  are  considered.    Terms  sin  a,  sin  b  and  sin  c  will, 
therefore, always be positive; hence every term in the Haversine formula is positive. 
Example of the Use of the Haversine Formula 
29.  The Haversine formula is used to: 
a. 
Find the third side, given 2 sides and the included angle. 
b. 
Find  the  third  angle,  given  2  angles  and  the  included  side  (by  transposition  to  the  polar 
triangle). 
Page 13 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
From triangle ABC in Fig 16, find c given a = 47º 15', b = 115º 20' and C = 82º 38'. 
13-12 Fig 16 Application of the Haversine Formula 
A
1
c
15°20’
B
47°
82° 38’
15’
C
 
hav c =  hav (47º 15' ~ 115º 20') + sin 47º 15' sin 115º 20' hav 82º 38' 
 
hav c = hav 68º 05' + sin 47º 15' sin 64º 40' hav 82º 38' 
 
 
 = 0.31337 + 0.28931 
∴   c = 101º 51' 
The Cosecant Formula 
30.  Given  the  3  sides  of  a  spherical  triangle,  the  3  angles  may  be  determined  by  substitution  in  the 
Haversine formula.  This is transposed for convenience to give the Cosecant formula: 
 
hav a = hav (b ~ c) + sin b sin c hav A
 
hav A = hav a − hav (b ~ c)
sin b sin c
  hav A = hav a – hav (b ~ c) cosec b cosec c....(11) 
The other 2 forms are: 
 
hav B = hav b – hav (a ~ c) cosec a cosec c, and 
 
hav C = hav c – hav (a ~ b) cosec a cosec b 
From these equations, all 3 angles may be determined.  Alternatively, given 3 angles, the 3 sides can 
be obtained by transposition to the polar triangle. 
Page 14 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
Example of the Use of the Cosecant Formula 
31.  From the triangle ABC in Fig 17a, find side a given A = 82º 30', B = 60º 52' and C = 45º 02'.  The 
corresponding sides of the polar triangle (Fig 17b) are: 
 
a′  = 180º – 82º 30' = 97º 30' 
 
b′  = 180º – 60º 52' = 119º 08' 
 
c′  = 180º – 45º 02' = 134º 58' 
 
A′ = 180º – a 
13-12 Fig 17 Application of the Cosecant Formula 
A
A ’
82° 30’
134° 58’
1
1
9
°
0
8

60

° 52
02

45°
B’
a
B
C
97° 30’
C ’
a
b
Then: 
 
hav A′ = [hav a′– hav (b′ ~ c′)] cosec b′ cosec c′
 
 
   = [hav 97º 30' – hav (119º 08' ~ 134º 58')] × (cosec 119º 08' cosec 134º 58') 
 
 
   = [hav 97º 30' – hav 15º 50'] × (cosec 60º 52' cosec 45º 02') 
(Q 60º 52' is 180º–119º 08' and 45º 02' is 180º–134º 58') 
 
 
   = [0.56526 – 0.01897] × (cosec 60º 52' cosec 45º 02') 
Using calculator or logarithms, log hav A′ =  94
.
1
642
∴  A′ = 140º 10' 
 
 
and        a = 180º – 140º 10' = 39º 50' 
Sides b and c can be found in a similar manner. 
Page 15 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
The Half-log Haversine Formula 
1 − cos a
1 − cos (b ~ c)
32.  By rewriting equation (11), substituting 
 for hav a and 
 for hav (b ~ c), the 
2
2
following expression is obtained: 
hav A
1
= 1
[ − cos a − 1
( − cos (b ~ c))](cosec b cosec c)
2
1
= cos[(b ~ )
c − cosa](cosec b cosec )
c
2
(b ~ )
c + a 
 b
( ~ )
c − a 
Now:    co (
s b ~ )
c −cosa = − 2sin
 sin 


2


2

a + (b ~ c) 
a − (b ~ c) 
= 2 sin 
 sin 


2


2

θ
2 sin 2
1 − cos θ
θ
2
But:         hav θ =
=
= sin2
2
2
2
θ
So:           sin
=
hav θ
2
Therefore: 
a + (b ~ c) 
sin
= hav [a + (b ~ c)]



2

a − (b ~ c)
and  sin
= hav [a − (b ~ c)]



2

Therefore: 
hav A =
hav[a+(b ~ c)] ×
hav[a−(b ~ c)] ×(cosec b cosec c)
Similarly: 
hav B =
hav [b+ a
( ~ c)] ×
hav[b−(a ~ c)] ×(cosec a cosec c)
hav C =
hav [c+ a
( ~ b)] ×
hav [c − a
( ~ b)] ×(cosec a cosec )
b
This  equation  is  easier  to  manipulate  than  the  Cosecant  formula  since  a  straight  multiplication  is  the 
only operation required.  A calculator or logarithms will produce the relevant results.  It should be noted 
that: 
1
log
hav[a + (b ~ c)] =
log hav [a + (b ~ c)]
2
Page 16 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
An alternative to this formula is called the All Natural Haversine formula where: 
hav a − hav (b ~ c)
hav A = hav (b + c) − hav (b ~ c)
Example of the Use of the Half-log Haversine Formula 
33.  Using triangle ABC in Fig 17 again, find side a given A = 82º 30', B = 60º 52' and C = 45º 02'.  The 
corresponding sides of the polar triangle are: 
 
a′  = 180º – 82º 30' = 97º 30' 
 
b′  = 180º – 60º 52' = 11º 08' 
 
c′  = 180º – 45º 02' = 134º 58' 
 
b′ ~ c′ = 15º 50' 
havA′ = ha (
v 97o 30'+15o 50')× ha (
v 97o
'
30 15o

50 )
' ×(cose 11
c
9o 08'cosec134o 58 )
'
= hav(113o 20') × hav(81o 40') ×(cosec 60o 52' cosec 45o 02')
(Q 60º 52' is 180º–119º 08' and 45º 02' is 180º–134º 58') 
Using calculator or logarithms, log hav A′ =  94
.
1
642
∴  A′ = 140º 10' 
 
and           a = 180º – 140º 10' 
 
 
 
     = 39º 50' 
sides b and c can be found in similar manner. 
The Four Parts Formula 
34.  A case that arises frequently in practice is that in which, given 3 consecutive parts of a spherical 
triangle  (say  2  sides  and  an  included  angle),  it  is  required  to  know  a  further  angle.    This  could  be 
solved by using the Haversine and Cosecant formulae in succession, but such a method is laborious. 
35.  Consider any spherical triangle ABC in which a, c and B are known. 
Then: cos a = cos b cos c + sin b sin c cos A….....(12)
 
  cos b = cos a cos c + sin a sin c cos B 
sin a
 
  sin b = 
sin B
sin A
Page 17 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
Substituting for sin b and cos b in equation (12): 
sin a
 
cos a = cos c (cos a cos c + sin a sin c cos B) + sin c cos A 
sin B
sin A
 
          = cos a cos2 c + cos c sin a sin c cos B + sin a sin c sin B cot A 
 
cos a (1 – cos2 c) = sin a sin c (cos c cos B + sin B cot A) 
Now:  1– cos2 c = sin2 c 
So:  cos a sin2 c 
= sin a sin c (cos c cos B + sin B cot A) 

cot a sin c 
= cos c cos B + sin B cot……...(13) 
Likewise:  
cot a sin b = cos b cos C + sin C cot A 
 
 
 
cot b sin c = cos c cos A + sin A cot B 
 
 
 
cot c sin a = cos a cos B + sin B cot C 
 
 
 
cot b sin a = cos a cos C + sin C cot B 
 
 
 
cot c sin b = cos b cos A + sin A cot C 
36.  The following rules, using Fig 18 as an example, may assist in memorizing these formulae: 
a. 
The four parts follow consecutively around the spherical triangle, eg A, c, B, a in the example. 
b. 
c and B are known as inner parts. 
c. 
A (to be found) and a are known as outer parts. 
d. 
The equations always follow the form cot sin cos, cos sin cot. 
e. 
The sides always appear in the first 3 terms, the angles always appear in the last 3 terms. 
f. 
Each inner part appears twice in the equation. 
g. 
Each outer part appears only once. 
h. 
The outer parts appear at each end of the equation. 
Applying these rules to Fig 18: 
The sequence is:  cot sin = cos cos + sin cot 
B  and  c  must  both  appear twice, a appears only once and at the left-hand end since it is a side 
and must be in the first 3 terms; Therefore, A must be at the right-hand end.  Thus, cot a sin c = 
cos c cos B + sin B cot A which matches equation (13) and is correct. 
Page 18 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 18 Illustration of Four Parts Formula 
A
?
c
b
C
a
B
Example of the Use of the Four Parts Formula 
37.  The Four Parts formula can be used as follows: 
a. 
To find an angle, given 2 sides and the included angle. 
b. 
To find a side, given 2 angles and the included side. 
38.  In the spherical triangle ABC at Fig 19, find B given that A = 18º 55', b = 123º 59', c = 36º 58'. 
13-12 Fig 19 The Four Parts Formula – Example 
A
18° 55'
123° 5
'
9
8
'
° 5
36
?
B
C
B and b are the outer parts. 
∴ cot b sin c = cos c cos A + sin A cot B 
cot b sin c − cos c cos A
cot 56o 01'sin 36o 58' − cos36o58' cos18o55'
cot B = 
 = 
sin A
sin18o 55'
Page 19 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
Using calculator or logarithms 
− 0.40536 − 0.75584
−1.16120
cot B = 
 = 
 = – 0.55411 
sin 18o 55 '
sin 18o 55 '
∴ B = – 15º 36'  
∴ B = 180º – 15º 36' = 164º 24' 
Tangent Formula or Napier’s Analogies 
39.  Although the lengthy working is omitted, from the Sine and Cosine formulae it can be proven that 
for any spherical triangle ABC: 
sin 1 (a − b)
tan 1 (A − B) cot 1 C
2
………(14) 
2
2
sin 1 (a b)
2
Also 
cos 1 (a − b)
tan 1 (A B) cot 1 C
2
……....(15) 
2
2
cos 1 (a b)
2
40.  From any polar triangle A′B′C′: 
 
 
           C = (180º – c′) 
∴  cot ½C = cot (90º – ½c′) = tan ½c′
 
          (A – B) = (180º – a′) – (180º – b′) = – (a′ – b′) 
      tan [½(A – B)] = tan [–½(a′ – b′)] = – tan ½ (a′ – b′) 
Similarly, (a – b)    = – (A′ – B′) 
         sin [½(a – b)] = sin [–½(A′ – B′)] = – sin ½(A′ – B′) 
 
         ½(a + b) = ½(180º – A′ + 180º – B′) = 180º – ½(A′ + B′) 
 
 sin [½(a + b)] = sin [180º –½(A′ + B′)] = sin ½(A′ + B′) 
Substituting these values in equation (14): 
sin 1 (A′ − B )

− tan 1 a
( ′ − b )
′ = tan 1 c
2
′ −
2
2
sin 1 A
( ′ + B )

2
sin 1 (A′ − B )


tan 1 a
( ′ − b )
′ = tan 1 c
2

2
2
sin 1 A
( ′ + B )

2
Page 20 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
Thus, in any spherical triangle ABC: 
sin 1 (A − B)
tan 1 (a − b) tan 1 c
2
……...(16) 
2
2
sin 1 (A B)
2
Similarly, from equation (15): 
cos 1 (A − B)
tan 1 (a b) tan 1 c
2
…...…(17) 
2
2
cos 1 (A B)
2
Examples of the Use of the Tangent Formulae 
41.  The tangent formulae are used: 
a. 
Given 2 sides and the included angle, to find the other 2 angles. 
b. 
Given 2 angles and the included side, to find the other 2 sides. 
c. 
Given 2 sides and the angles opposite, to find the other unknowns. 
42.  Example 1, Tangent Formula.  In Fig 20 (a repeat of Fig 16), find A and B, given a = 47º 15', b = 
115º 20' and C = 82º 38'. 
13-12 Fig 20 Example 1 of the Tangent Formulae 
A
1
c
15°20'
B
47°
82° 38'
15'
C
o
o
o
82 38' sin 1(47 15' −115 20')
tan 1 (A −B) = cot
2
2
2
o
o
sin 1(47 15' 1
+ 15 20')
2
A  useful  feature  of  the  tangent  formulae  emerges  here.    Since  b  >  a,  sin 1 (a − b)   is  negative.  
2
However, with b > a, it follows that B > A and tan (A – B) is also negative.  The negative sign appears 
on both sides of the equation and may, thus, be disregarded.  It is therefore permissible to write: 
sin 1 (b − a)
tan 1 (B − A) = cot 1 C
2
2
2
sin 1 (b + a)
2
Page 21 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
That is to say, in the application of the tangent formulae to any example the order may be changed so 
that the smaller quantity is subtracted from the larger and negative angles do not occur.  This operation 
must be performed throughout all terms in the equation.  Then: 
1
o
o

1
tan (B − A) = cot 41 1 ′ sin 34 02 2
9
2
o
1
sin 81 17 ′
2
1
o

1
o
tan (B + A) = cot 41 19′ cos 34 02 2
2
o
1′
cos 81 17 2
Using a calculator or logarithms: 
1
o
(B − A) =
1
32 47 ′
2
2
1
o
(B + A) =
1
80 52 ′
2
2
B
1
= (B − A) 1
+ (B + A)
2
2
A
1
= (B + A) 1
− (B − A)
2
2
∴         A = 113° 40' and B = 48° 05' 
43.  Example  2,  Tangent  Formula.    In  Fig  21,  find  B,  given  A  =  38°  42',  a  =  76°  18',  C =  32°  50' 
and c = 57° 25'. 
13-12 Fig 21 Example 2 of the Tangent Formulae 
A
 38° 42'
'52°7
b
5
50'
32°
 76° 18'
B
C
sin 1 (a − c)
tan 1 (A − C) = cot B
2
2
sin 1 (a + c)
2
o
o
o
o
tan 1 (A − C) sin 1 (a + )
c
tan 1 3
( 8 42′ − 32
0
5 )
′ sin 1 (76 8
1 ′ + 57
5
2 ′)
cot 1 B
2
2
=
2
2
=
2
o
o
sin 1 (a − )
c
sin 1 (76 18′ − 57 25′)
2
2
Page 22 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
o
o
tan 2 5 ′
1 ′
6
sin 66 51
=
2
o
o
sin 1 (76 1 ′
8 − 57 2 ′
5 )
2
From which, using a calculator or logarithms: 
 
 
 
B = 147º 57' 
Right-angled Spherical Triangles 
44.  Consider a triangle ABC in Fig 22 in which the spherical angle A = 90º. 
13-12 Fig 22 Right-angled Spherical Triangle 
A
b
c
a
Then, by the Four Parts formula: 
 
cot a sin c 
= cos c cos B + sin B cot A 
 
but:  cot A 
= cot 90º = 0 
∴  cot a sin c 
= cos c cos B 
and:  
cos B 
= cot a tan c 
Now: 
cos B 
= sin (90º – B) 
and:  
cot a 
= tan (90º – a) 

sin (90° – B)  = tan (90° – a) tan c………(18) 
From the Cosine formula: 
 
 
cos a  
= cos b cos c + sin b sin c cos A 
 
but:  cos A  
= 0 
 
so:  cos a 
= cos b cos c 

sin (90º – a)  = cos b cos c………………(19) 
Page 23 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
By  taking  each  form  of  the  Cosine  and  Four  Parts  formulae  in  turn  a  series  of  expressions  can  be 
obtained as follows: 
 
Sin (90º – C)  = tan (90º – a) tan b 
 
Sin (90º – C)  = cos (90º – B) cos c 
 
Sin (90° – B)  = cos (90º – C) cos b 
 
Sin (90º – A)  = tan (90º – B) tan (90º – C) 
 
Sin c  
 
= tan (90º – B) tan b 
 
Sin c 
 
 
= cos (90º – a) cos (90º – C) 
 
Sin b 
 
 
= tan (90º – C) tan c 
 
Sin b 
 
 
= cos (90º – B) cos (90º – a) 
Napier’s Rules of Circular Parts 
46.  The foregoing rules are difficult to memorize and are conveniently summarized in Napier’s Rules 
of  Circular  Parts.    Fig  23  shows  a  right-angled  spherical  triangle  with  the  appropriate  circular  parts 
written alongside.  Note that: 
a. 
The parts are written down in the order in which they appear in the triangle. 
b. 
The  right  angle  is  not  counted  as  a  circular  part  and  is  represented  in  the  diagram  by  the 
double line. 
c. 
The circular parts corresponding to the other 2 angles are the complements of those angles. 
d. 
The circular part corresponding to the side opposite the right angle is the complement of that 
side. 
13-12 Fig 23 Diagram for Napier’s Rules of Circular Parts for a Right-angled Spherical Triangle 
A
A
c
b
b
c
90° – B
90° – C
a
90° – a
47.  Provided that the circular parts are written down in accordance with the above principles, any one 
of the formulae in para 45 may be derived on sight from the following 2 rules: 
a. 
The sine of the middle part is equal to the product of the tangents of the adjacent parts. 
b. 
The sine of the middle part is equal to the product of the cosines of the opposite parts. 
Page 24 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
For example, select any part as the middle part.  Let this be c in Fig 23. 
Then: 
b and (90º – B) are the adjacent parts 
∴   
sin c = tan b tan (90º – B) 
 
(90º – a) and (90º – C) are the opposite parts 
∴   
sin c = cos (90º – a) cos (90º – C) 
Examples of the Use of Napier’s Rules. 
48  Napier’s Rules are especially useful when it is required to solve the spherical triangle for any other 
part, given: 
a. 
Two sides and a non-included angle. 
b. 
Two angles and a non-included side.  
This is done by dividing the triangle into 2 right-angled triangles and applying the preceding rules.  In 
para  22,  an  attempt  was  made  to  solve  such  a  case  by  use of the Sine formula and it was apparent 
that ambiguity could arise.  This, unfortunately, is also possible using Napier’s Rules. 
49.  Example  Using  Napier’s  Rules.   In the spherical triangle ABC in Fig 24, find side b, given that 
B = 62º 07', C = 33º 42' and c = 28º 25'.  To simplify the calculation, first construct AD, a perpendicular 
drawn from A to arc BC.  Let this be designated d.  In order to obtain b, side d is required. 
13-12 Fig 24 Example of Napier’s Rules 

'52 c 


°82
 62° 07' 


42'
33°

From Napier’s Rules, using the circular parts diagram for triangle ABD at Fig 25: 
Page 25 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 25 Circular Parts for Triangle ABD 
D
d
BD
90° – BÂD
90° – B
 
90° – c
 
 
 
sin d = cos (90º – B) cos (90º – c) 
 = cos 27º 53' cos 61º 35' 
Using a calculator or logarithms 
 
 

 = 24º 52½' or 155º 07½' 
But c is opposite the right-angle, so d cannot possibly be larger than c. 
Hence:  d 
 = 24º 52½' 
Continuing, from Napier’s Rules using the circular parts diagram for triangle ADC at Fig 26: 
 
 
sin d = cos (90º – C) 
 cos (90º – b) 
 
 
 
 = sin C sin b 
 
 
sin b = sin d cosec C 
 
 
 
 = sin 24º 52½' cosec 33º 42' 
Using a calculator or logarithms: 
 
 

 = 49º 18' or 130º 42', both of which are valid. 
Page 26 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 26 Circular Parts for Triangle ADC 
D
CD
d
90° – C
90° – DÂ
 
C
90° – b
 
Right-sided Spherical Triangles 
50.  A  spherical  triangle  (Fig  27)  in  which  1  side  has  a  value  of  90º  (sometimes  called  a  'quadrantal 
triangle')  may  be solved by Napier’s Rules because, if a triangle is right-sided, it follows that its polar 
triangle is right-angled.  To save the labour of conversion to the polar form in such cases, the following 
rules for the circular parts of right-sided triangles are stated without proof: 
a. 
The parts are written down in the order in which they appear in the spherical triangle. 
b. 
The right side is not counted as a circular part. 
c. 
The circular parts corresponding to the other 2 sides are the complements of those sides. 
d. 
The circular part corresponding to the angle opposite the right side is the complement of that 
angle. 
13-12 Fig 27 Right-sided Spherical Triangle 
A
a
b
B
C
a = 90°
Fig 28 shows the circular parts diagram in this case. 
Page 27 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
13-12 Fig 28 Circular Parts Diagram for Right-sided Triangle 
a
C
B
90° – b
90° – c
90° – A
51.  Napier’s Rules for right-sided spherical triangles are the same as those given in para 47, viz: 
a. 
The sine of the middle part is equal to the product of the tangents of the adjacent parts. 
b. 
The sine of the middle part is equal to the product of the cosines of the opposite parts. 
The  exception  is  that  when  the  adjacent  or  opposite  parts  are  both  sides  or  both  angles,  a  negative 
sign is added to the equation. 
     e.g. sin (90º – A) = – tan (90º – b) tan (90º – c), but sin (90º – b) = + cos (90º – c) cos B 
52.  Example  of  a  Right-sided  Spherical  Triangle.    In  Fig  29,  find  A,  given  a  =  90º,  c  =  73º  19' 
and b = 54º 32'. 
13-12 Fig 29 Right-sided Triangle Example 
A
?
54°32'
'9
°1
C
37
90°
=
a
B
By Napier’s Rules: 
 
sin (90° – A) = – tan (90º – b) tan (90º – c) 
∴        cos A = – tan 35º 28' tan 16º 41' 
Using a calculator or logarithms: 
 
 
 
  A = 102º 19.7' 
Page 28 of 29 

AP 3456 – 13-12 - Spherical Trigonometry 
Summary of Formulae 
53.  Table 1 summarizes the use of the various formulae covered in this chapter. 
Table 1 Summary of Formulae 
Case
Formulae to Use
Giving
Haversine
Third side
Four Parts
Either angle
Tangent
Both angles
Four Parts
Either side
Tangent
Both sides
Convert to polar form 
Third angle
and use Haversine
Half-log Haversine
Any angle
Cosecant
Any angle
All Natural Haversine
Any angle
Convert to polar form and 
use Half-log Haversine
Any side
All Natural Haversine
Any side
Cosecant
Any side
Third angle
Tangent
{Third side
Divide into right-angle
Third angle
triangles and apply
{Third side
Napier's Rules
Sine
Opposite angle
Divide into right-angle
Either angle
triangles and apply
{
Napier's Rules
Third side
Sine
Opposite angle
Divide into right-angle
triangles and apply
Either side
{
Napier's Rules
Third angle
Page 29 of 29 

AP3456 – 13-13 - Functions and Limits 
CHAPTER 13 - FUNCTIONS AND LIMITS 
Functions 
1. 
In Volume 13, Chapter 6, it was shown that the relationship between two variables, x and y say, 
can  be  expressed  in  an  equation  such  as  y  =  mx  +  c.    The  principle  is  not  confined  to  the  linear 
relationship but may also be extended to such equations as: 
y = sin x, y = ex, etc. 
Since values are attributed to x it is known as the independent variable; the corresponding values of y 
may then be determined, and y is therefore known as the dependent variable. 
2. 
The dependence of y upon x is expressed mathematically in the phrase ‘y is a function of x’ and is 
usually written as y = f(x), in which f(x) is a shorthand way of indicating some expression in terms of x.  
Thus, in the expression y = x2 – 4x + 3, f(x) is x2 – 4x + 3; similarly, in y = sin 2x, f(x) is sin 2x; and in 
y = e2x,  f(x)  is  e2x.    In  each  case  by  plotting  the  graphs  of  these  functions  a  smooth  curve  is  obtained 
whose shape depends upon the nature of f(x). 
3. 
In  each  of  the  above  examples  an  explicit  statement  has  been  made,  i.e.  y  is  equal  to  some 
function of x.  Such functions are known as explicit functions. 
4. 
It is however possible to write a function, such as 9x + 6xy + 4y2 = 1, in which, although there is no 
direct  statement  of  y  in  terms  of  x,  it  is  evident  nevertheless  that  corresponding  values of y could be 
determined by giving values to x.  Such a function is known as an implicit function. 
Gradients 
5. 
Suppose that an object is moving in a straight line in such a way that its distance, s metres, from a 
fixed point on the line at any time, t seconds after it started moving, is governed by the equation: 
s = 12 + 10t – t2,   i.e.    s = f(t) 
By  giving  a  series  of  values  to  t  and  calculating  the  corresponding  values  of  s  then  a  graph  of  the 
function can be plotted showing how s changes as t changes.  Such a graph is shown in Fig 1. 
6. 
Information  about  the  speed  at  which  the  object  is  moving  can  be  obtained  from  this  graph  by 
constructing chords.  For example, over the period of 5 seconds, the increase in s is indicated by PF = 25 
metres and the object’s average speed over the period is therefore 25/5 m/sec = 5 m/sec.  Letting ∠FAP be 
called  θ,  then  tan θ  =  PF/AP  =  25/5.    So,  the  average  speed  during  the  5 secs  is  given  by  the  slope,  or 
gradient, of the chord AF.  Similarly the object’s average speed over the first 4 secs is given by the gradient 
of the chord AE = 24/4 = 6 m/sec.  Thus, it can be inferred that the average speed over any selected period 
of time will be given by the gradient of the chord spanning that part of the curve.  For example, the average 
speed of the object during the third second of its movement is given by the gradient of the chord CD, i.e. 5 
m/sec. 
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-13 - Functions and Limits 
13-13 Fig 1 Distance/Time Graph s = 12 + 10t – t2
t
0
1
2
3
4
5
s
12
21
28
33
36
37
40
R S
E
F
D
30
C
)
(m
s
B
20
θ
A
P
10
0
0
1
2
3
4
K L 5
t (sec)
7. 
Whereas, for reasonably long intervals of time, it is possible to measure the gradient of the chord 
directly from the graph, if it becomes necessary to determine the gradient over a short period, such as 
KL, then this method will be difficult and inaccurate.  However, it is possible to obtain the desired result 
by using the actual function: 
s = 12 + 10t – t2
As an example, suppose that it is required to find the average speed of the object over the period of 
time from t = 3 secs to t = 3.1 secs. 
After 3.1 secs,      s = 12 + 10(3.1) – (3.1)2 m 
 
 
 
 
 = (43 – 9.61) m = 33.39 m 
After 3 secs,         s = 12 + 30 – 9 m = 33 m 
Therefore, in 0.1 secs the object covered 0.39 m at an average speed of 3.9 m/sec. 
8. 
By  shortening  the  interval  of  time  to  0.01  secs,  i.e.  from  3  to  3.01  secs,  and  substituting  these 
figures in the function, the average speed becomes 3.99 m/sec.  Taking an even shorter interval from 
3  secs  to  3.001 secs  yields  an  average  speed  of  3.999  m/sec.    If  the  same  exercise  is  repeated  for 
time intervals just prior to 3 secs, the following results are obtained: 
a. 
From 2.9 to 3 secs: 4.1 m/sec 
b. 
From 2.99 to 3 secs: 4.01 m/sec 
c. 
From 2.999 to 3 secs: 4.001 m/sec 
From the figures, it can be inferred that at the precise time of 3 secs the actual or instantaneous speed 
was 4 m/sec. 
9. 
Fig 2 shows a magnified section of the graph with just two of the chords drawn.  The gradient of 
the chord PD represents the average speed between 2.9 and 3.0 secs; the gradient of DQ represents 
the average speed between 3.0 and 3.1 secs.  The chord PD has been extended to M and the chord 
QD projected back to L.  Between 2.9 and 3.1 secs, the chord PM rotates about an axis through D until 
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-13 - Functions and Limits 
it  is  aligned  with  LQ.    At  some  instant  during  this  rotation,  the  chord  will  take  up  the  position  of  the 
tangent to the curve at D.  It can be inferred that this will occur at the time t = 3 secs; thus the gradient 
of  the  tangent  at  a  point  on  a  distance/time  graph  measures  the  actual  speed  at  that  instant,  i.e. the 
rate of change of s compared with the rate of change of t at that instant. 
13-13 Fig 2 Two Chords on Magnified Section of s = 12 + 10t – t2
M
Q
D
33
L
P
)
(m
s
32
2.9
3.0
3.1
t (sec)
Infinitesimals and Limits 
10.  A  shorter  method  of  arriving  at  this  conclusion  without  using  specified  intervals  was  devised  by 
Newton.    He  suggested  that  a  small  increase  in  any  quantity  like  s  might  be  indicated  by  a  special 
symbol δs (delta s) which has no specified size but represents a minutely small change in s.  A similar 
small change in t would be denoted by δt, and in x by δx, etc. 
11.  Fig 3 shows a section of the curve  
s = 12 + 10t – t2
PM represents the distance covered, s, at time OM (t).  QN represents the distance (s + δs) covered in 
time ON (t + δt).  In both cases, δs and δt are very small.  Thus, the graph shown is a greatly magnified 
portion of a very small arc of the curve.  The gradient of the chord PQ represents the average speed 
between time t and (t + δt) and can be measured as QR/PR = δs/δt. 
13-13 Fig 3 Section of the Curve s = 12 + 10t – t2
Q
s = f(t)
P
δs
δt
R
s + δs
s
O
M
N
t
t
t + δt
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-13 - Functions and Limits 
12.  Since Q is on the curve: 
s + δs = 12 + 10(t + δt) – (t + δt)2
   = 12 + 10t + 10δt – t2 – 2tδt – (δt)2.....(1) 
and for P 
        s = 12 + 10t – t2..……….………...........(2) 
Subtracting (2) from (1) 
δs = 10δt – 2tδt – (δt)2
Dividing by δt 
δs/δt = 10 – 2t – δt 
Thus, a formula has been derived for calculating the average speed over any period of time however 
small. 
For example, between t = 3 and t = 3.0001 secs, ie δt = 0.0001 secs: 
δs/δt =10 – 6 – 0.0001 = 3.9999 m/sec 
If a value of 0.000001 secs had been used in the formula, then δs/δt would have been 3.999999. 
13.  Thus, it will be seen that in the expression: 
δs/δt = 10 – 2t – δt 
if  the  value  of  δt is allowed to grow smaller and smaller, i.e. approaches zero, then δs/δt approaches 
the value 10 - 2t.  This is written as: 
δs
Lim
δt 0

 = 10 – 2t 
δt
This is read as ‘The limit of delta s by delta t, as delta t tends to zero, equals 10 – 2t’. 
14.  If the value of 3 secs is now substituted into this expression, then 10 – 2t = 4, which is the value 
for the gradient that was deduced earlier, i.e. the actual speed at the instant of t = 3 secs.  To indicate 
that this is the actual gradient at an instant then: 
δs
Lim
ds
δt 0

 is replaced by 
δt
dt
Thus, in summary, if an object is moving so that the distance s metres covered in time t seconds is a 
function of the time, (i.e. s = f(t) and f(t) = 12 + 10t – t2), then its speed at any time, t, is equal to the 
gradient  of  the  tangent  to  the  distance/time  graph  at  time  t  and  is  defined  by  ds/dt  which  may  be 
calculated from the expression ds/dt = 10 – 2t.  The notation ds/dt is, therefore, a measure of the rate 
at which s is changing compared with the rate at which t is changing at an instant of time 't'. 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
CHAPTER 14 - DIFFERENTIATION 
Gradients 
1. 
In  Volume  13,  Chapter  13  it  was  shown  that  given  the  relationship  between  distance  gone  and 
time it was possible to find the rate of change of distance with time, i.e. speed, either over a specified 
interval or at a particular instant, by determining the gradient of the appropriate chord or tangent.  The 
technique  is  not  restricted  to  the  distance/time  problem  but  has  a  general  applicability  whenever  one 
parameter is changing in response to changes in another. 
2. 
For example, when we say that a train passes us at 60 mph, we do not mean that it has travelled 
60 miles in the last hour nor that it will travel 60 miles in the next hour.  We mean that it will travel about 
1  mile  in  the  next  minute  or,  better  still,  about  half  a mile in the next 30 seconds or, with still greater 
probability,  about  88  feet  in  the  next  second.    To  find  the  speed  of  the  train  at  the  instant  at  which it 
passes us, we must measure the distance it goes in as small an interval of time as possible and then 
work out the average speed for this short interval.  The shorter the interval, the closer will our answer 
be  to  the  train’s  actual  speed  at  that  instant.    In  practice,  there  will  always  be  an  error  in  the 
measurement  of  instantaneous  speed  but  we  can  calculate  instantaneous  speed  with  complete 
accuracy by means of differentiation provided we know enough about the motion. 
3. 
In  moving  along  the  straight  line  AB  (Fig  1),  starting  at  P(x,y),  an  increase  NM  (=  PR)  in 
x produces an increase RQ in y.  The ratio of the increase in y to the increase in x (ie RQ/PR) is called 
the gradient of the slope of the line AB.  Clearly, the gradient is equal to tan θ. 
13-14 Fig 1 Gradient of a Straight Line 
B
y
Q
P
(x,y)
δy
R
y
δ
θ
x
x
A
O
N
M
x
4. 
A small interval in the x-axis, like NM, is usually denoted by δx, pronounced delta–x and must be 
thought of as a single symbol, the x never being separated from the variable.  If y is given in terms of, 
or as a function of, x, i.e. y = f(x), then any change in the value of x produces a change in the value of 
y.    The  symbol  δy  is  used  to  denote  the  increment  in  y  caused  by  the  increment  δx.    Notice  the 
difference in the definitions of δx and δy because x is the independent and y the dependent variable.  In 
Fig 1, δx = NM = PR, δy = RQ and the gradient of AB is δy/δx. 
5. 
In Fig 2, δx = NM = PR and δy, the corresponding increase in y, is –RQ.  δy is negative because 
an increase in x causes a decrease in y.  The resulting gradient δy/δx is, therefore, negative. 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
13-14 Fig 2 Negative Gradient 
A
P (x,y)
R
δy(negative)
y
Q
y
δx
θ
x
O
N
M
x
B
6. 
Gradient of a Curve.  The gradient of a curve at any point is defined as the gradient of the tangent to 
the curve at that point.  In Fig 3, let P(x,y) be any point on the curve.  Let NM = δx, then the corresponding 
increase in y is RQ and so δy = RQ.  Then δy/δx = the gradient of the chord PQ and represents the average 
gradient  of  the  curve  between  the  points  P and Q.  As δx→0 (meaning δx tends towards 0, i.e. becomes 
closer to 0), the value of δy/δx changes and, at the same time, the chord PQ approaches its limiting position, 
namely the tangent to the curve at P.  Hence the gradient of the curve at P is described as: 
y
δ
P = lim
x
δ →0 x
δ
dy
and this limit can be denoted as 
, pronounced "dee-y by dee-x".  The value is, of course, given also 
dx
by tan θ, where θ is the angle between the tangent and OX in Fig 3. 
13-14 Fig 3 Gradient of a Curve 
Q (x+ x
δ ,y+ y
δ )
y
δy
P
(x,y)
R
δx
y
y
θ
O
x
N
M
δx
x
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
7. 
The Gradient of y = x3.  As an example, Fig 4 shows the graph representing y = x3.  Let P(x,y,) 
be  any  point  on  the  curve.    NM  represents  a  small  change  δx,  in  x,  and  RQ  represents  the 
consequential  change  δy,  in  y.    Thus,  Q  is  the  point (x+  δx,  y  +  δy).  As both P and Q lie on the line 
then: 
for P, 
 
 
y = x3 
 
 
 
 
 
(1) 
and for Q, 
y + δy = (x + δx)3
 
 
 
 
 
   = x3+ 3x2δx + 3x(δx)2+ δx3   
(2) 
Subtracting 
(2) – (1) 
δy = 3x2δx + 3x(δx)2+ δx3 
Dividing by 
δx 
y
δ
2
2
= x
3
+ 3x x
δ + x
δ
x
δ
Then by definition (para 6) the gradient of the tangent to the curve: 
dy
y
δ
= lim
dx
x
δ →0 x
δ
dy
i.e. 
 = 3x2 as the 3xδx and δx2 terms are eliminated (because δx becomes 0). 
dx
13-14 Fig 4 Fig 1 y = f(x) = x3
Q
y
δy
P (x,y)
R
N δ M
x
x
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
Clearly, the gradient varies from point to point, as can be seen from the graph.  The way in which the 
dy
gradient  varies  is  given  by 
  i.e.  by  the  function  3x2.    Thus  the  value  of  the  gradient  can  be 
dx
determined by substituting the appropriate value of x into the expression 3x2. 
e.g.  gradient at x = 0, is 0 
 
gradient at x = 1, is 3 
 
gradient at x = 2, is 12 
8.
The Gradient of y = x2.  Fig 5 shows the graph representing y = x2. 
13-14 Fig 5 Fig 2 y = f(x) = x2
100
90
80
70
y
60
50
δy
40
(x,y)
30
20
y
10
δx
x
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
x
If (x,y) is any point on the curve then: 
y = x2 
 
 
 
 
(3) 
If x increases by δx so that y increases by δy then 
y + δy = (x + δx)2
   = x2 + 2xδx + (δx)2 
 
(4) 
Subtracting (4) – (3) gives 
δy = 2xδx + (δx)2
y
δ
  and 
   
 = 2x + δx 
x
δ
dy
from which the gradient of y = x2 at (x, y), ie 
, is 2x. 
dx
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
The Differential Coefficient (Derivative) 
dy
9. 
 is called the differential coefficient of y with respect to x, or the derivative of y with respect to x.  
dx
dy
dy
d
The process of obtaining 
 is called differentiating y with respect to x.  Sometimes 
 is written 
 (y) 
dx
dx
dx
d
in  which 
  is  an  operator,  like  the  symbol  √,  and  means  simply  "the  derivative  of".    Thus,  the 
dx
expressions: 
d (x2 + 5x)
dx
d(x2 + 5x)
or
dx
dy
or
where y = x2 + 5x,
dx
all mean the same thing, namely: 
y
δ
lim
when y = x2 + 5x
x
δ →0 x
δ
Differentials 
y
δ
dy
y
δ
10.  Although 
 is a quotient (i.e. it stands for δy ÷ δx), 
 is not.  Once the quotient 
has been 
x
δ
dx
x
δ
dy
dy
obtained, 
  can  be  found  as  the  limiting  value  of  this  quotient.  Strictly  speaking 
  ought  to  be 
dx
dx
dy
regarded as a single symbol like δy or δx.  However, although it is important to remember that 
 is 
dx
obtained as a limit and is not strictly a quotient, it is often convenient to treat it as if it is.  For example 
dy
having found that when y = x2, 
 = 2x, this result could be written as dy = 2xdx or d(x2) = 2xdx.  In 
dx
this  notation,  dy,  dx  and  d(x2)  are  best  regarded  as  infinitesimal  increments  in  y,  x,  and  x2  and  are 
called the differentials of those quantities. 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
The General Case 
11.  The arguments in paras 7 and 8 to obtain the gradient or differential coefficients of y = x3 and y = 
x2, can be generalized for the case of y = f(x).  Remembering that if y is given as a function of x, i.e. y = 
f(x), then any change in the value of x produces a change in the value of y.  So, if (x, y) is any point on 
a curve then: 
y = f(x)   
 
(5) 
and an increase in x, i.e. δx causes an increase in y, i.e. δy, such that: 
y + δy = f(x + δx) 
 
(6) 
Subtracting 
(6) – (5): 
δy = f(x + δx) – f(x) 
y
δ
f (x + x
δ )− f (x)
Hence,       
=
x
δ
x
δ
dy
f (x − x
δ )− f (x)
and so        
= lim
dx
x
δ →0
x
δ
Successive Differentiation 
12.  When y = f(x) = x3 was differentiated the result was 
dy
 d

( 3x)
 = or
  = 3x2
dx
dx

which is itself a function of x, sometimes expressed as f ′(x).  This can itself be differentiated and can 
be shown to be: 
d  dy 

 = 6x
dx  dx 
d  dy 
2
d y
The  expression 

   is  usually  written  as 
  or  as  f  ′′(x).    Similarly  the  result  of  further 
dx  dx 
2
dx
3
d y
4
d y
differentiation of 6x would be written as f ′′′(x) or
 = 6, and f ′′′′(x) or 
 = 0. 
3
dx
4
dx
Standard Derivatives 
13.  Examination of the successive differentiation above, known as differentiation from first principles, 
reveals  a  pattern  from  which  a  general  rule  can be derived.  In practice, there are a number of rules 
which  allow  the  derivatives  of  certain  functions  to  be  determined  without  recourse  to  formal  working.  
For example, the results in para 12 show that: 
d
n
n 1

ax
= nax
dx
where  a  and  n  are  constants  which  may  be  positive  or  negative,  fractions  or  integers.    This  formula 
may be applied to each level of differentiation to reach the result.  For example, using the formula: 
dy
d
Where y = x2, 
 = 2x (i.e. 2 × 1 × x1) and 
(2x) = 2 (i.e. 1 × 2 × x0) 
dx
dx
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
14.  Sum of Terms.  Where f(x) is the sum of a number of terms eg: 
y = ax3+ bx2+ cx + d 
where  a,  b,  c,  and  d  are  constants,  then  f  ′(x)  is  the  sum  of  the  derivatives  of  each  individual  term.  
Thus, in this case: 
f ′(x) = 3ax 2 + 2bx + c 
Note that the derivative of a constant = 0. 
15.  Product  Rule.    It  may  be  that  it  becomes  necessary  to  differentiate  an  expression  which  is  the 
product of two functions of the same variable, e.g.: 
y = (x + 1)(x2– 3) 
In  this  case  it  would  be  possible  to  multiply  out  the  expression  without  much  difficulty  and  then 
differentiate  the  sum  of  the  terms  as  outlined  in  para  14.    However  this  may  not  be  convenient, 
especially  if  there  are  several  functions  rather  than just two.  In this situation the product rule can be 
used.  Let one function be u and the other v, so y = uv.  Then, by the product rule: 
dy
udv
vdu
=
+
dx
dx
dx
i.e.  the  result  is  the  first  function  multiplied  by  the  derivative  of  the  second  function,  plus  the  second 
function multiplied by the derivative of the first function.  Thus in the example: 
y = (x + 1)(x2– 3) 
Let, (x + 1) = u and (x2 – 3) = v 
dy
udv
vdu
Then: 
=
+
dx
dx
dx
dy
Thus: 
= (x + )
1 × 2x + (x2 − )
3 ×1
dx
 
 
      = 2x2 + 2x + x2 – 3 
 
 
      = 3x2 + 2x – 3 
This method can be extended to cover more than two factors. 
d(uvw)
dw
dv
du
Thus, 
 =  uv
+ wu
+ wv

dx
dx
dx
dx
For example: 
d (x + )1(x + )
2 (x + )
3  = (x + 1)(x + 2) + (x + 1)(x + 3) + (x + 2)(x + 3) 
dx
     = x2 + 3x + 2 + x2 + 4x + 3 + x2 + 5x + 6 
     = 3x2 + 12x + 11 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
16.  Function of a Function - The Chain Rule.  Consider an expression such as: 
y = (3x2+ 2)2 
Here, y is a function of (3x2+ 2) and (3x2 + 2) is a function of x.  As with the product rule, in some cases 
the  function  may  be  simplified  into  the  sum  of  several  functions  which  may  then  be  differentiated 
individually.    However  this  will  be  tedious  if  the  power  is  greater  than,  say,  2.    The chain rule can be 
used to solve this problem as follows: 
Let, 3x2 + 2 = u 
Then, y = u2
dy

 = 2u 
du
and as 
 
 u = 3x2 + 2  
du  = 6x 
dx
dy
du
dy
×
=
= 2u × 6x
du
dx
dx
Then substituting back for u: 
dy  = 2(3x2+ 2) × 6x 
dx
 
 
 
    = (6x2+ 4) × 6x 
 
 
 
    = 36x3+ 24x 
17.  Quotient of 2 Functions.  If y = u/v where u and v are functions in x then: 
du
dv
v
− u
dy
dx
dx
=
2
dx
v
As an example consider the function: 
(x2 + )1
y = (3x + 2)
du
Then,  u = (x2+ 1)  ∴
 = 2x 
dx
dv
And,    v = (3x + 2) ∴
 = 3 
dx
dy
(3x + 2) × 2x − ( 2
x + )
1 × 3
Thus,  
=
dx
( x
3 + 2)2
2
2
6x + 4x − 3x − 3
 
  

(3x + 2)2
2
3x + 4x − 3
 
 

(3x + 2)2
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 13-14  Differentiation 
Summary 
18.  A summary of the results derived above together with other standard derivatives is shown in Table 
1. 
Table 1 Standard Differential Coefficients 
Standard Differential 
Type of Function 
Standard Type 
Comments 
Coefficient 
dy
Standard 
y = f(x) 
dx
Reduce the power by 1 
Algebraic  
y = axn
naxn-1
and multiply by the 
original power. 
y = sin x 
cos x 
Trigonometric 
y = cos x 
–sin x 
y = tan x 
sec2 x 
Logarithmic  
1
y = logex 
x
Multiply the original 
function by the 
Exponential 
y = ekx
kekx
differential coefficient 
of its index. 
The differential 
Sum of two or more 
du
dv
coefficient of a sum is 
u + v 
+
functions 
dx
dx
the sum of the 
differential coefficients. 
Multiply each function 
Product of two 
dv
du
by the differential 
uv 
u
+ v
functions 
dx
dx
coefficient of the other 
and add the results. 
du
dv
Quotient of two 
u
v
− u
dx
dx
functions 
v
2
v
df
df (x)
×
Function of a function 
F[f(x)] 
Use the chain rule. 
d[f (x)]
dx
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
CHAPTER 15 - INTEGRATION 
PRINCIPLES OF INTEGRATION 
Introduction 
1. 
Differentiating means solving the problem: 
dy
Given y = f(x), find 

dx
The reverse problem is: 
dy
Given 
 = f(x), find y. 
dx
This reverse process is called integration. 
Indefinite Integrals 
2. 
Consider the following: 
dy  = axn  
 
 
 
(1) 
dx
From  the  discussion  on  differentiation  in  Volume  13,  Chapter  14,  it  will  be  apparent  that  the  function 
whose derivative with respect to x is axn is of the form: 
y = bxn+1   
 
 
 
(2) 
If (2) is differentiated with respect to x the result is: 
dy  = ( n + 1 )bxn   
 
(3) 
dx
a
Comparing (1) and (3), they will be the same if (n + 1)b = a, ie if b =  n + .  Substituting this value of b in (2): 
1
axn 1
+
y =
 
 
 
 
(4) 
n +1
Although (4) is certainly one solution to the problem, it is not a unique solution.  Since the derivative of 
any  constant  is  zero,  the  derivative  of  (4)  will  be  unchanged  if  any  constant,  c,  is  added  to  the  right-
hand side of the equation.  Therefore, the general solution is: 
ax n 1
+
y =
+ c   
 
 
(5) 
n +1
Because of the presence of the arbitrary constant, c, (5) is known as the indefinite integral of (1). 
3. 
Integration  Symbol.    It  is  convenient  to  have  a  symbol  to  denote  the  indefinite  integral  of  a 
function, thus (5) may be rewritten as: 
+
n
axn 1
ax dx =
+ c

   
(6) 
n +1
In this notation the ∫ and the dx are used as brackets to denote that everything between them is to be 
integrated  with  respect  to  x.    The  quantity  so  bracketed  is  known  as  the  integrand.    Thus  axn  is  the 
integrand of ∫axn dx, while the right-hand side of (6) is the integral.  Formula (6) holds for  all values 
of n, integral and fractional, positive and negative, with the single exception of n = –1.  This case will be 
dealt with later. 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
4. 
The  Constant  of  Integration.    When  a  function  is  differentiated,  the  result  represents  the 
gradient  of  the  graph  of  that  function.    Consequently  as  the  integration  process  is  the  reverse  of 
differentiation, an integral represents a function with the given gradient.  Recalling that the equation of 
a  straight  line  is  y  =  mx  +  c  it  will  be  remembered  that  the  coefficient  of  x,  i.e.  m,  equates  to  the 
gradient of the line.  There is, however, an infinite family of parallel lines, all with the same gradient, m, 
varying  in  the  value  of  the  constant  c.    Thus  the  knowledge  of  the  gradient  is  insufficient  to  describe 
uniquely  a  particular  straight  line.    So  when  a  function  is  integrated  an  arbitrary  constant  must  be 
included  to  take  account  of  the  infinite  number  of  'parallel'  functions.    As  an  example  consider  the 
following function: 
y = ∫2x dx 
To perform the integration the power of x has to be increased by 1, and then the integrand has to be 
divided by the new power.  Finally the arbitrary constant must be added.  Thus: 
y = x2 + c 
Fig 1 shows the graphs of y = x2 + c for a variety of values of c. 
13-15 Fig 1 Graphs of y = x2 + c 
2
y = x  + 3
8
7
y 6
5
y = x2
4
C = 3
3
2
2
1
C = 0
y = x  – 2
0
–2
–1
1
2
–1
x
C = – 2 
–2
For any given value of x al  of the curves have the same gradient, ie they al  satisfy the condition dy/dx = 2x.  In 
order to determine which graph is the solution to the particular problem then more information is required.  For 
example, it may be known that y = 3 when x = 0, hence 3 = 0 + c, thus c = 3.  Therefore, the required solution is 
y = x2 + 3. 
5. 
As  a  practical  example  suppose  that  a  body  moves  with  an  acceleration  of  3ms-2  and  it  is 
necessary to find an expression for its velocity after t seconds: 
dv = 3, ie 
v = ∫3dt =3t + c 
dt
The  reason  that  this  is  an  inadequate  description  of  the  velocity  is  that,  although  acceleration 
information  was  provided,  no  information  was  given  concerning  the  initial  velocity  of  the  body.  
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
Therefore, no definite value for the velocity at any given time can be deduced.  If the initial velocity was, 
say, 2 ms-1 then the velocity at any time, t, becomes 3t + 2 ms-1 (i.e. c = 2). 
Standard Integrals 
6. 
Just as with differentiation, there are a number of standard integrals which are used.  In general 
an  unfamiliar  expression  must  be  converted  into  a  standard  form,  or  a  variation  or  a  combination  of 
standard  forms,  before  the  integration  can  be  accomplished.    Similar  rules  to  those  used  in 
differentiating apply in integrating; thus the integral of a sum of a set of functions becomes the sum of 
the  integrals  of  each  individual  function.    If  an  integrand  has  a  constant  then  this  is  taken  out  before 
integration is performed, thus: 
∫3x2 dx = 3∫x2 dx 
Usually,  products  or  quotients  must  be  simplified  into  simple  functions  before  integration  can  take 
place.  Thus, for example: 
   ∫(x + 2)(x – 3) dx 
= ∫(x2 – x – 6) dx 
x3
x2
=

− 6x + c
3
2
and 
x(x −1)dx

1
x 2
x2 − x
=
dx
∫ 1
x 2
3
1


= ∫ x2 − x2 d
 x


5
3
2x 2
2x 2
=

+ c
5
3
7. 
In paragraph 3 it was shown that the integral of a simple function in x, axn is given by: 
axn 1
+
n +1
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
However, it was stated that this formula did not apply when n = –1.  This is because the denominator of 
the expression would become –1 + 1 = 0, and dividing by zero has no real meaning.  The paradox can 
be resolved by recalling that differentiating log
1
ex yields 
, therefore the converse means: 
x
1 dx = log x
∫ x
e
8. 
A list of the more common standard integrals is shown in Table 1. 
Table 1 Some Standard Integrals 
dy
dy
=
dx

Comments 
dx
dx
xn+1
xn
Increase the index by 1, and divide by the new index. 
n + 1
cos x 
sin x 
Inverse of differentiation. 
sin x 
–cos x 
Inverse of differentiation. 
2x
sec
tan x 
ekx
Write  down  the  function  ekx  and  divide  it  by  the  differential 
ekx
k
coefficient of the index of e. 
1
log
x
e x 
Definite Integrals 
9. 
Fig 2 shows an arc, ZB, of the curve y = f(x).  P is the point (x, y) and Q the point [(x + δx), (y δy)], 
where δx and δy are very small quantities. 
13-15 Fig 2 Area under the Curve of f(x) 

Q
y = f (x)
P
y
Z
Y
δA
(y + δ y)
L
δ x
M
x
(x + δ x)
x
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
10.  The elemental strip LPQM is part of the area (A) between the curve and the axes of x and y. Let 
the  area,  LPQM,  be  denoted  as  δA.    The  mean  height  of  the  arc  PQ  lies  between  y  and  y  +  δy.  
Suppose it equals y + Kδy, where K < 1, then the area LPQM = δA = δx(y + Kδy) 
∴ (δA/δx) = y + Kδy 
In the limit as δx → 0 then (δA/δx) → (dA/dx) and δy → 0 
∴ dA = y,
∫ dA
and
dx = ∫ ydx
dx
dx
i.e. A = ∫y dx = ∫f(x) dx 
Suppose, ∫f(x) dx = F(x) + c, then, A = F(x) + C 
11.  If it is required to find the area between the curve, the x axis, and the ordinates at x = a and x = b, 
i.e. the area DCBA in Fig 3 then: 
For the ordinate at x = b, 
A1 = F(b) + C 
and at x = a, 
A2 = F(a) + C  
Subtracting these, DCBA = A1 – A2 = F(b) – F(a) 
13-15 Fig 3 Area under the Curve - The Definite Integral 
B
y = f (x)
C
A1
A2
y
D
A
a
b
x
This is written as: 
b
∫f(x)dx = F(b)−F(a)
a
or, in words, “the integral f(x)dx between the limits x = a and x = b”.  'a' and 'b' are called, respectively, 
the lower and upper limits of the value of x.  Notice that the constant of integration has disappeared; 
this  is  because  it  would  appear  in  both  F(b)  and  in  F(a)  and  is  thus  cancelled  in  the  subtraction.  
Because such integrals are evaluated between defined limits, they are called definite integrals. 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
12.  In summary, the method is as follows: 
a. 
Integrate the function, omitting the constant of integration. 
b. 
Substitute the value of the upper limit for x; repeat for the value of the lower limit.  Subtract 
the results to give F(b) – F(a). 
Example: 
2
2
4
 

  
3
24
14
x
=
=

= .
3 75

x
dx
 

  
4
4
4
 

  
2
1
APPROXIMATE NUMERICAL INTEGRATION 
Introduction 
13.  The  integration  process  is  often  complex,  but,  provided  that  the  requirement  is  for  a  numerical 
answer to definite integration, then there are a number of methods available which yield approximate 
results, most of which are suitable for computer implementation if necessary.  Two such methods, the 
trapezoidal rule and Simpson’s rule, will be described. 
Trapezoidal Rule 
14.  In the trapezoidal rule, the x axis is divided into equal intervals, h, and the top of each arc section 
is approximated by the chord, as in Fig 4.  Thus, a series of trapezia are formed whose top coordinates 
have the values y1, y2, etc. 
13-15 Fig 4 The Trapezoidal Rule 
y = f (x)
y
y
y
y
y
y
1
2
3
4
n
h
h
h
0
x
x
x
x
x
1
2
3
4
n
x
15.  The area of the first trapezium is: ½h(y1+ y2), and so: 
x n
1
1
1
y d
  x =
h(y +y ) +
h(y + y ) + ...... h(y
+ y )


2
1
2
2
2
3
2
n 1
n
x1
   = h(½y1 + y2 + y3…… yn-1 +½yn) 
In general, a small value of h will give a better solution than a large one, but the best procedure is to 
repeat the computation with successively smaller values of h until two results agree within the required 
level of precision. 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
1
1
2
16.  Example.  Compute  ∫ x dx  using the trapezoidal rule. 
0.5
First compute with h = 0.1, say: 
X1 = 0.5;   
½y1 = 0.3535 
X2 = 0.6;   
   y2 = 0.7746 
X3 = 0.7;   
   y3 = 0.8367 
X4 = 0.8;   
   y4 = 0.8944 
X5 = 0.9;   
   y5 = 0.9487 
X6 = 1.0;   
½y6 = 0.5000 
              Sum = 4.3079 
1
1
∫ 2
x dx  = 0.1 × 4.3079 = 0.43079 
0.5
Repeat with h = 0.05 
X1 = 0.5;   
½y1 = 0.3535 
X2 = 0.55; 
   y2 = 0.7416 
X3 = 0.6;   
   y3 = 0.7746 
X4 = 0.65; 
   y4 = 0.8062 
X5 = 0.7;   
   y5 = 0.8367 
X6 = 0.75; 
   y6 = 0.8660 
X7= 0.80;  
   y7 = 0.8944 
X8 = 0.85; 
   y8 = 0.9220 
X9 = 0.9;   
   y9 = 0.9487 
X10 = 0.95; 
  y10 = 0.9747 
X11 = 1.0;  
½y11 = 0.5000 
               Sum = 8.6184 
1
1
∫ 2
x dx  = 0.05 × 8.6184 = 0.43092 
0.5
To three decimal places, the result is 0.431 which compares very well with the correct value of 0.43096. 
Simpson’s Rule 
17.  In  the  trapezoidal  rule  the  curve  y  =  f(x)  is  approximated  by  a  series  of  straight  lines.    It  can, 
however, be approximated by any suitable curve and in the case of Simpson’s rule, a parabola is used.  
Rather than joining pairs of points, a parabola is traced through three points on the line as shown in Fig 
5. 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
13-15 Fig 5 Simpson’s Rule - Fitting a Parabola through Three Points 
y = f (x)
Parabola
y
y
y
y
1
2
3
h
h
x
0
1
x2
x3
x
18.  The result for an integration interval divided into 2 parts with 3 ordinates is: 
x3
∫ y  = 1
dx
h(y + 4y + y )
1
2
3
3
x1
1
1
19.  Example.  Compute  ∫ 2
x dx  using Simpson’s rule with h = 0.25. 
0.5
x1 = 0.5;   
y1 = 0.7071 
x2 = 0.75; 
y2 = 0.8660 
x3 = 1.00; 
y3= 1.0000 
and the integral is given by: 
⅓ × 0.25(0.7071 + 4 × 0.8660 + 1.0000)= 0.4309 
which is a better result than that given by the trapezoidal rule with h = 0.10. 
20.  Simpson’s  rule  will  usually  give  a  more  accurate  result  than  the  trapezoidal  rule  for  the  same 
interval, h, but it is often necessary to sub-divide the curve into more than one set of three ordinates.  A 
different  parabola  is  fitted  over  each  section.    For  example,  in  Fig 6,  seven  ordinates  are  used,  the 
parabolas are P1, P2, P3 and the integral is given by: 
⅓h(y1 + 4y2 + y3) + ⅓h(y3 + 4y4 + y5) + ⅓h(y5 + 4y6 + y7) = ⅓h(y1 + 4y2 + 2y3 + 4y4 + 2y5 + 4y6 + y7) 
The principle is capable of extension to any ODD number of ordinates. 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 -13-15 - Integration 
13-15 Fig 6 Simpon’s Rule - Seven Ordinates 
P2
P
P
3
1
y = f(x)
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
y
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
h
h
h
h
h
h
0
x
x
x
x
x
x
x
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
x
Page 9 of 9 

AP 3456 – 13-16 - The Scope of Statistical Method 
CHAPTER 16 - THE SCOPE OF STATISTICAL METHOD 
Introduction 
1. 
The word statistics is used in two distinct ways.  It is used to mean either sets of figures, usually 
tabulated, in which sense it is short for statistical data, or to mean the methods whereby the significant 
details may be extracted from such sets of figures.  In this sense, it is short for statistical method, and 
it is with this meaning that this section is concerned. 
2. 
A  good  definition  of  the  subject  is:  a  body  of  methods  for  making  wise  decisions  in  the  face  of 
uncertainty.  Defined in this way the subject may be regarded as an extension of the idea of common 
sense, which is the name each person gives to his own method of making wise decisions in everyday 
matters.    The  fact  that  the  answers  provided  by  common  sense  on  the  one  hand  and  by  statistical 
method  on  the  other  often  seem  to  be  poles  apart,  is  attributable  either  to  the  inadequacies  of 
common sense or to an incorrect use of statistical method. 
3. 
As a broad generalization, it may be stated that statistics takes over from common sense where 
the complexity of the problem warrants it, and where the quantities involved can be expressed in the 
form  of  numbers.    If  these  conditions  are  fulfilled  then  the  use  of  statistical  method  will  give  an 
economy of effort and a precision which is unobtainable in any other way. 
4. 
There are very few aspects of human activity in which uncertainty does not play a part, so that the 
potential  uses  of  statistical  method  are  very  large  in  number.    In  general,  practical  problems  have 
solutions  which  are  more  or  less  probable,  and  probability  theory  forms  the  basis  of  statistics.    An 
understanding  of  at  least  the  elementary  ideas  of  probability  is,  therefore,  a  prerequisite  for  the 
understanding of statistical method. 
5. 
It  is  important  to  notice  that  the  word,  "wise"  appears  in  the  definition  of  statistics,  and  not  the 
word "right".  That the latter word is inadmissible follows, of course, from the fact that we are accepting 
uncertainty as a basic ingredient of the problem.  The wise decision that is made will be based on the 
most  probable  occurrence,  but  the  most  probable  occurrence  is  not  bound  to  occur.    Our  decisions, 
therefore,  will  sometimes  turn  out  to  be  wrong,  no  matter  how  elegant  the  mathematics  used  in  the 
solution of the problem, and this fact must be accepted. 
6. 
Quite frequently, decisions will prove to be wrong because they were based on inadequate data, 
and the point must be made that statistical analysis does not bring anything out of the data that is not 
already  there.  Statistics provides an objective  way of testing the data and of obtaining answers free 
from  personal  prejudice  and  preconceived  notions.    The  use  of  statistical  method,  in  other  words, 
makes it possible to interpret correctly the influence of chance in the evidence available. 
7. 
It  is  clearly  important  that  any  experiment  or  series  of  trials  should  be  designed  to  provide 
relevant evidence in sufficient quantity to do what is required.  The only safe way to ensure this is to 
bring the statistician into the enquiry from the very beginning, so that he will not only analyse the data 
but in fact will  also state  what data should  be collected.  Far too often the statistician  is called in too 
late, so that the investigator is faced with the invidious choice of either giving incomplete answers or of 
repeating all or part of the investigation in order to obtain adequate data.  This procedure is likely to be 
far more costly  in  the  long  run than a  properly  planned attack on the problem in the first place.  The 
best results are invariably obtained by the statistician and subject specialist working together from the 
beginning of the enquiry. 
Page 1 of 4 

AP 3456 – 13-16 - The Scope of Statistical Method 
The General Method of Statistics 
8. 
Although there are many distinct statistical techniques, they all have certain features in common.  
The following remarks are of general application. 
9. 
The  Presentation  of  Data.    The  raw  data  of  statistics  consists  of  a  more  or  less  haphazard 
collection of numerical data.  An important first step before any statistical analysis can be started is to 
tabulate  the  data  in  some  way  which  is  meaningful  for  the  investigation  in  hand.    Suitable  tabulation 
will, in fact, probably suggest the profitable line of attack, a process which may be aided by a graphical 
presentation of the data. 
10.  Population.  Any collection of data which is to be analysed by a statistical process represents a 
finite  selection  of  values  from  a  practically  if  not  theoretically,  infinite  population.    In  this  context,  the 
word  population  is  part  of  statistical  jargon,  and  refers  to  the  totality  of  values  which  it  is  possible  to 
conceive within the restrictions laid down for the data.  It is important to note that the population may 
be  one  of  people,  of  measurements,  of  bombs  dropped  on  a  target  under  specified  conditions,  or  of 
any data whatsoever that may be given numerical values. 
11.  Sample.  The concept of population is always to some extent an abstraction, since it is not possible to 
obtain access to all members of it (if it were, statistical analysis would be unnecessary).  The data that is 
available is a sample taken from the population being studied.  A problem will always be posed in terms of 
populations and not of samples.  The solution to the problem, however, must proceed through an analysis 
of  samples.    For  this  to  be  a  valid  procedure  it  is  clearly  necessary  that  the  sample  should  be  a  fair 
representation of the population that is being studied.  It may then be assumed that parameters calculated 
from  the  sample  are  reliable  estimates  of  the  corresponding  parameters  of  the  population,  and  that 
conclusions based on the sample will be valid for the population also. 
12.  Sampling.  It will be clear from para 11 that the technique of sampling, whereby the sample to be 
used in the investigation is to be chosen, plays a vital part in statistical work.  Every collection of data 
is a fair sample from some population, but the important thing is to ensure that the collection selected 
is a fair sample of a specified population.  This is by no means an easy thing to ensure.  Broadly, two 
different  sampling  techniques  are  used,  the  choice  in  a  particular  case  being  dependent  upon  the 
extent of one’s knowledge of the system studied.  If a great deal is known about the population it may 
be possible to select a sample which conforms to the same pattern as the population; this technique is 
used extensively in public opinion polls.  If it is not possible to do this, or if one is uncertain about the 
completeness  of  one’s  knowledge,  then  a  technique  of  random  selection,  in  which  every  member  of 
the  population  has  an  equal  chance  of  being  selected  for  the  sample,  will  be  used.    This  has  the 
extreme  merit,  if  done  correctly,  of  removing  unsuspected  bias,  which  may  arise  in  any  subjective 
method of sampling.  A common method of ensuring randomness in the sample is through the use of 
special tables of random numbers, which have been thoroughly tested and found free from bias. 
13.  Statistical Significance.  It is not unusual in statistical work to find that when a random sample is 
taken with the aim of providing a hypothesis it turns out that the sample data does not wholly support 
that hypothesis.  The difference could be due to: 
a. 
The hypothesis being wrong, or 
b. 
The sample being biased. 
Clearly,  tests  are  needed  to  determine  which  is  the  more  likely  possibility.    Tests  of  significance  are 
very important to statisticians but are outside the scope of the chapter. 
Page 2 of 4 

AP 3456 – 13-16 - The Scope of Statistical Method 
14.  Proof  and  Disproof.    It  is  perhaps  clear  already  from  the  foregoing  discussion  that  statistical 
method never provides a definite proof of any hypothesis, though it may provide very strong evidence 
indeed  in  favour  of  it.    Any  process  which  involves  extrapolation  from  sample  to  population,  and 
usually  from  past  to  future  time,  must  involve  uncertainty,  and  no  matter  how  improbable  an  event 
there is always the possibility that it will happen.  The gibe that "you can prove anything by statistics" 
shows  a  complete  misunderstanding  of  the  methods  of  statistical  inference.    Nothing  is  "proved"  or 
"disproved" by statistics. 
Some Uses of Statistics 
15.  The  point  has  been  made  that  the  opportunities  for  the  application  of  statistical  method  are 
virtually  unlimited,  so  that  any  list  of  uses  will  necessarily  be  incomplete.    The  following  selection  of 
topics, however, gives a good idea of the great scope of statistical method. 
16.  The Measurement of the Inexplicable.  Many problems are concerned with quantities which do 
not  take  unique  values  under  the  conditions  which  it  is  possible  to  specify.    In  such  cases,  residual 
uncertainties  may  be  very  important,  and  it  is  necessary  to  be  able  to  assess  their  likely  magnitude.  
Probability theory provides a way of doing this.  We may distinguish two important types of problem: 
a. 
Those in which the uncertainties give rise to a random departure from a true value or from a 
desired result.  We are here concerned with the determination of errors. 
b. 
Other cases, in which there is no true or desired value, but in which random variability is an 
essential feature of the system.  Measurements of biological quantities and of human attainment 
come into this category. 
The emphasis here is on the use of statistics to calculate meaningful parameters which may be used 
to  describe  the  population.    Some  distribution  of  values  is  obtained,  and,  in  practice,  the  essential 
features of this distribution are established by comparison with a similar theoretical distribution. 
17.  The Identification of Important Factors.  The problem here is to determine which of several factors 
that  might  be  expected  to  affect  performance  do  in  fact  have  a  significant  effect.    In  some  cases,  the 
important factors may be seen without the aid of statistical analysis.  In other cases, because of interactions 
between  factors,  the  issue  may  be  by  no  means  clear,  and  statistical  techniques  then  provide  a  way  of 
separating the effects of individual factors and thus establishing their relative importance. 
Some Misuses of Statistics 
18.  No discussion of the uses of statistics would be complete unless accompanied by a discussion of 
misuses, for  abuse  of statistical  method  occurs  all  too  frequently.    It  is  because  of  this  that  statistics 
are viewed with such suspicion by so many people. 
19.  In  general  we  may  lay  down  the  principle  that  from  a  given  set  of  data  one  set  of  conclusions 
relative  to  a  particular  issue  will  be  more  likely  than  any  other  set.    But  the  fact  is  that  other 
conclusions, incompatible with the first, will frequently be drawn, often because a certain conclusion is 
desired and sometimes, as in misleading advertising, because no other conclusion is acceptable.  It is 
often  difficult  or  impossible  for  a  person  not  intimately  engaged  in  an  investigation  to  trace  invalid 
reasoning,  and  hence  the  belief  arises  that  a  judicious  use  of  statistics  will  enable  conflicting 
conclusions  to  be  drawn  from  the  same  set  of  data.    Again,  the  possibilities  are  legion,  but  the 
following examples illustrate some of them. 
Page 3 of 4 

AP 3456 – 13-16 - The Scope of Statistical Method 
20.  Deceptive  Presentation.   Cases of presentation  with intent to deceive are common features of 
everyday life, and very often take the form of the omission of relevant data.  Thus, a poster supporting 
an  anti-immunization  campaign  announced  boldly  that  in  a  certain  period  of  time  5,000  cases  of 
diphtheria  occurred  among  immunized  children.    The  public  was  expected  to  infer  that  immunization 
failed,  but  the  poster  did  not  disclose  the  highly  relevant  information  that  in  the  same  period  75,000 
cases  occurred  among  non-immunized  children,  nor  that  non-immunized  children  were  6  times  as 
likely to get diphtheria and 30 times as likely to die from it. 
21.  Sampling  Errors.    The  importance  of  sampling  has  already  been  emphasized,  and  it  must  be 
obvious that bad sampling will lead to invalid conclusions.  For example, taking the announcement of 
births from the columns of the "Times" gave a sex ratio of 1,089 males per 1,000 females.  However, 
the  Registrar  General  found  during  the  same  period  a  ratio  of  1,050  females  per  1,000  males.    The 
reason for the discrepancy is no doubt that the sample from the "Times" was not a fair sample of the 
whole population, perhaps because parents are more inclined to announce the births of their sons and 
heirs than of their daughters. 
22.  False  Correlations.    The  technique  of  correlation  is  very  easily  misapplied,  and  correlation 
between  two  variables  should  not  be  sought  unless  there  are  reasons,  stemming  from knowledge  of 
the  system  studied,  to  expect  it.    It  is  easy  to  think  of  variables  which,  though  unrelated,  will  show 
strong correlation, often because both happen to vary in a certain way with the passage of time.  Such 
correlations are called nonsense correlations. 
23.  Statistics  versus  Experience.    It  is  the  subject  expert  who  will  make  the  decision,  making  full 
use  both  of  his  own  specialist  knowledge  and  of  the  results  of  the  statistical  analysis.    If  a  statistical 
inference runs counter to what the specialist expects, then he should query it.  The inference may be 
correct, but a little probing will be most worthwhile. 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
CHAPTER 17 - DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS 
Introduction 
1. 
Statistics is concerned with the mathematical analysis of numerical data.  The numerical data is in 
the  form  of  a  set  of  observations  of  the  variable  (or  variables)  under  consideration.    A  variable  (or 
variate)  is  a  quantity  which  assumes  different  measurable  values,  e.g. height,  weight,  examination 
marks,  temperature,  intelligence,  length  of  life,  etc.    Any  set  of  observations  of  the  variable  is 
considered,  for  statistical  purpose,  as  a  sample  drawn  from  some  infinitely  large  population.    When 
each  and  every  member  of  a  population  has  an  equal  chance  of  being  selected  for  a  sample,  the 
sample is called a random sample.  The principle task of statistical analysis is to deduce the properties 
of  the  population  from  those  of  a  random  sample.    In  this  chapter,  we  discuss  how  samples  and 
populations can be described; in particular, we will look at averages and the bunching of the samples 
and population about these averages. 
AVERAGES 
Types of Average 
2. 
The Arithmetic Mean.  The arithmetic mean is commonly referred to as 'the average'.  The mean 
is  the  sum  of  all  the  values  of  a  variable  divided  by  the  number  of  variables.    The  algebraic  form  of 
expression is: 
X + X + X
Σ X
X
1
2
N
=
=
N
N
where:   X  
= the mean 
X1….XN  = the values of the different variables in a distribution 

 
= the number of variables 
Σ 
 
= the symbol instructing the addition of al  of the values 
Example: 
A sample consists of the data 5, 8, 9, 6, 12, 14. 
5 + 8 + 9 + 6 +12 +14
54
The mean is  X =
=
= 9
6
6
3. 
The  Median.    If  the  sample  observations are arranged in order from the smallest to the largest, 
the median is the middle observation.  If there are two middle observations, as in the case of an even 
number of observations, the median is halfway between them. 
Examples: 
a. 
Given sample 1, 14, 9, 6, 12.  Arranged in order 1, 6, 9, 12, 14, the median is 9. 
b. 
Given sample 20, 7, 11, 10, 13, 17.  Arranged in order 7, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, the median is 12. 
4. 
The Mode.  The mode is the observation which occurs most frequently in a distribution.  If each 
observation  occurs  the  same  number  of  times,  there  is  no  mode.    If  two or more observations occur 
the same number of times, and more frequently than any other observations, then the sample is said to 
be multi-modal. 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
Examples: 
a. 
Given sample 16, 13, 18, 16, 17, 16, the mode is 16. 
b. 
Given sample 4, 7, 4, 9, 3, 7, then the modes are 4 and 7. 
c. 
Given sample 3, 7, 12, 11, 16, 20 there is no mode. 
The mode is seldom used but has been included for completeness. 
MEASURES OF DISPERSION 
Introduction 
5. 
Knowledge  of  the  average  of  a  distribution  provides  no  information  about  whether  figures  in  a 
distribution are clustered together or well spread out.  For example, two groups of students have examination 
marks of 64%, 66%, 70%, and 80%, for the first group and 37%, 61%, 88% and 94% for the second group.  
Both groups have a mean mark of 70% but the marks of the second group have a much greater dispersion 
than those of the first group.  Clearly, it would be useful to have a way of measuring dispersion (or variance) 
and expressing it as a simple figure.  The most commonly used measures are: 
a. 
Range. 
b. 
Quartile Deviation. 
c. 
Standard Deviation. 
d. 
CEP (used in particular applications). 
Range 
6. 
Range is the difference between the highest and lowest values.  Unfortunately, range is too much 
influenced  by  extreme  values  so  that  one  value  differing  widely  from  the  remainder  in  a  group  could 
give  a  distorted  picture  of  the  distribution.    Range  also  fails  to  indicate  the  clustering  of  values  into 
particular groups or areas. 
Quartile Deviation 
7. 
Quartiles  are  the  values  of  the  items  one  quarter  and  three  quarters  of  the  way  through  a 
distribution.    If  the  top  and  bottom  quarters  are  cut  off,  extreme  values  are  discarded  and  a  major 
disadvantage of range as a measure of dispersion is avoided. 
Quartile Deviation =  Third Quartile - First Q
  uartile
2
As with Range, this method fails to indicate clustering. 
Standard Deviation 
8. 
Standard  deviation  is  the  most  important  of  the  measures  of  dispersion.    The  standard 
deviation (σ) is found by adding the square of the deviations of the individual values from the mean of 
the distribution, dividing the sum by the number of items in the distribution, and then finding the square 
root  of  the  quotient.    (Scientific  calculators  include  a  facility  for  finding  σ  and  other  statistical 
parameters from sets of data.) 
Σ(x x)2

σ =
N
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
The more that values of individual items differ from the mean, the greater will be the square of these 
differences,  giving  rise  to  a  large  measure  of  dispersion.    The  main  disadvantage  of  using  standard 
deviation  as  a  measure  of  dispersion  therefore  is  that  it  can  give  disproportionate  weight  to  extreme 
values because it squares the deviations eg a value twice as far from the mean as another is weighted 
by  a  factor  of  4,  (22).    Nevertheless,  standard  deviation  is  the  best  and  most  useful  measure  of 
dispersion within a set of observations. 
Circular Error Probable (CEP) 
9. 
A term commonly encountered in weapon effects planning is Circular Error Probable (CEP).  The 
CEP is the radius of the circle, centered on the mean impact point, within which 50% of weapons fall.  
Strictly,  CEP  should  only  be  used  when  the  distribution  of  impacts  is  known  to  be  circular,  but  this 
restriction  is  often  ignored  in  practice.    As  a  rough  guide,  the  CEP  is  approximately  1.18  times  the 
standard deviation of the linear errors in weapon impacts, although this convention is only justifiable if 
the errors in range and deflection are normally distributed (see paras 25-27). 
FREQUENCY DISTRIBUTIONS 
Introduction 
10.  It is very difficult to learn anything by examining unordered and unclassified data.  Table 1 displays 
such raw data. 
Table 1 Weekly Mileages Recorded by 60 Salesmen 
504 
592 
671 
498 
601 
532 
623 
548 
467 
487 
399 
482 
507 
477 
501 
562 
555 
642 
477 
522 
627 
556 
622 
521 
429 
491 
497 
510 
603 
547 
535 
517 
612 
491 
432 
508 
577 
444 
556 
639 
444 
723 
562 
685 
432 
642 
562 
662 
688 
492 
486 
467 
474 
433 
417 
512 
563 
612 
375 
578 
Raw data is simply a list of data as received, in this case from sixty individual salesmen.  Little of use 
can be learned from data presented in this form. 
Ungrouped Frequency Distribution 
11.  The first step in making the raw data more meaningful is to list the figures in order from the lowest 
mileage  to  the  highest.    At  the  same  time,  it  may  be  convenient  to  annotate  those  figures  that  occur 
more than once with the frequency of occurrence.  The result is the distribution shown in Table 2.  The 
symbol  for  frequency  is  'f'.    The  sum  of  the  frequencies  (∑f  )  must  equal  the  total  number  of  items 
making up the raw data. 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
Table 2 Ungrouped Frequency Distribution 
Mileage 

Mileage 

Mileage 

Mileage 

Mileage 

375 

482 

508 

555 

622 

399 

486 

510 

556 

623 

417 

487 

512 

562 

627 

429 

491 

517 

563 

639 

432 

492 

521 

577 

642 

433 

497 

522 

578 

662 

444 

498 

532 

592 

671 

467 

501 

535 

601 

685 

474 

504 

547 

603 

688 

477 

507 

548 

612 

723 

Grouped Frequency Distribution 
12.  Though the ungrouped frequency distribution is an improvement in the presentation, there are still 
too many figures for the mind to grasp the information effectively.  More simplification is necessary in 
order to compress the data.  This can be done by grouping the figures and showing the frequency of 
the group occurrence.  The result is shown in Table 3. 
Table 3 Grouped Frequency Distribution 
Mileage 

375 – under 425 

425 - under 475 

475 - under 525 
18 
525 - under 575 
12 
575 - under 625 

625 - under 675 

675 - under 725 

Total Records 
60 
13.  Effect  of  Grouping.    As  a  result  of  grouping,  it  is  possible  to  see  from  Table  3  that  mileages 
cluster  around  475-525.    Although  grouping  highlights  the  pattern  of  a  distribution  it  does  lead  to  the 
loss of information about where in the group the 18 occurrences lie.  The increased significance of the 
table has therefore been paid for but the cost is worthwhile.  The loss of information also means that 
calculations made from grouped frequency distribution cannot be exact. 
Class Limits 
14.  The  boundaries  of  a  class  are  called the class limits.  Care must be taken in deciding class limits to 
ensure that there is no overlapping of classes or gaps between them.  For example if the class limits in table 
3 had been 375-425 and 425-450 which group would a mileage of 425 have gone into?  Likewise, if the class 
limits had been 375-424 and 425-449 a mileage of 424½ would have no group to fit into. 
15.  Discrete and Continuous Data In defining class limits, it should be remembered that discrete data 
increases  in jumps.  For instance, data relating to the number of children in families will be in whole units 
because 1½ and 2¼ children are not possible.  Continuous data, however, may include fractions. 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
16.  Class Intervals.  Class intervals define the width of a class.  If the class intervals are equal, the 
distribution is said to be an equal class interval distribution. 
17.  Unequal Class Intervals.  Some data is such that if equal class intervals were used a very few 
classes  would  contain  all  the  occurrences  whilst  the  majority  would  be  empty.    An  example  of  this  is 
the distribution of salaries using a class interval of £1000.  In this situation, the class intervals should 
be arranged so that over-full classes are subdivided and near empty ones grouped together. 
18.  Choice  of  Classes.    The  construction  of  a  grouped  frequency  distribution  always  involves  a 
decision as to what classes to use.  The following suggestions should be borne in mind: 
a. 
Class intervals should be equal wherever possible. 
b. 
Class intervals of 5, 10, or multiples of 10 are more convenient than, say, 7 or 11. 
c. 
Classes should be chosen so that occurrences within the classes tend to balance around the 
mid point. 
Construction of a Grouped Frequency Distribution 
19.  To construct a grouped frequency distribution directly from raw data the following steps should be 
taken: 
a. 
Pick out the highest and lowest figures (375 and 723) and on the basis of these decide upon 
the list and the classes. 
b. 
Take each figure in the raw data and insert a check mark (1) against the class into which it falls. 
c. 
Total the check marks to find the frequency of each class (see Table 4). 
Table 4 Direct Construction of Grouped Frequency Distribution 
Class 
Check Marks 

375 - under 425 
111 

425 - under 475 
1111 1111

475 - under 525 
1111 1111 1111 111
18 
525 - under 575 
1111 1111 11
12 
575 - under 625 
1111 1111

625 - under 675 
1111 1

675 - under 725 
111 

Total Records 
60 
GRAPHS OF OBSERVATIONS 
The Histogram 
20.  A  Histogram  is  a  graph  of  a  frequency  distribution.    It  is  shown  in  Fig  1  and  is  constructed  as 
follows: 
a. 
The horizontal axis is a continuous scale running from one end of the distribution to the other.  
The axis should be labelled with the name of the variable and the unit of the measurement. 
b. 
For each class in the distribution a vertical column is constructed with its base extending from 
one class limit to the other and its area proportional to the frequency of the class. 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
13-17 Fig 1 Histogram of Data from Table 3 
20
15
ƒ 10
5
375
425
475
525
575
625
675
725
Weekly Mileages
The Frequency Polygon 
21.  If the mid points of the tops of the blocks of a frequency histogram are joined by straight lines, the 
resulting figure is a frequency polygon as illustrated in Fig 2.  The area enclosed by the horizontal axis, 
the  polygon,  and  any  two  ordinates  represents  approximately  the  number  of  observations  in  the 
corresponding  range.    The  total  area  enclosed  by  the  polygon  represents  the  total  number  of 
observations if the frequency scale is used, and unity if the probability scale is used. 
13-17 Fig 2 Frequency Polygon 
20
15
ƒ 10
5
375
425
475
525
575
625
675
725
Weekly Mileages
The Frequency Curve 
22.  If  the  number  of  observations  is  greatly  increased  and  the  size  of  the  class  interval  is 
correspondingly  reduced,  then  the  frequency  histogram  and  the  frequency  polygon  will  tend  to  a 
smooth curve as in Fig 3.  By increasing the number of observations indefinitely, the whole population 
instead  of  just  a  sample  will  have  been  analysed.    Thus,  the  smooth  curve  obtained  by  this  process 
represents the distribution of the complete population in the same way as the histogram or frequency 
polygon represents the distribution of the sample. 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
13-17 Fig 3 Frequency Curve 
20
15
ƒ 10
5
375
425
475
525
575
625
675
725
Weekly Mileages
23.  If the original sample is random, and large enough, then it is unlikely that the smooth curve will be 
very  different  from  drawing  a  smooth  curve  through  the  mid  points  of  the  histogram  blocks.    Such  a 
smooth curve is known as a frequency curve if the frequency scale is used or a probability curve if the 
probability  scale  is  used.    The  area  under  the  curve  between  any  two  ordinates  represents,  as 
accurately as any estimate can, the number of observations within the corresponding range, while the 
same area for a probability curve represents the probability that a single observation, taken at random 
from  the  complete  population,  will  lie  within  the  corresponding  range.    The  latter  idea  is  more  useful 
since it applies to the whole population and is no longer confined to the sample. 
24.  Histograms  frequently  display  a  pattern  in  which  there  is  a  high  column  in  the  centre  with 
decreasing  columns  spread  symmetrically  either  side.    If  the  class  interval  is  small  enough,  the 
frequency curve looks like the cross section of a bell.  This pattern occurs frequently in statistical work. 
The Normal Curve of Distribution 
25.  The  task  of  handling  statistical  data  can  be  simplified  if  a  mathematical  curve  can  be  found 
approximating to that which would be produced by plotting the actual data on a graph.  By substituting 
the  mathematical  graph  for  the  real  one,  it  is  possible  to  make  calculations  to  reveal  facts  about  the 
distribution of the raw data which would otherwise have been difficult to determine.  The normal curve 
of distribution satisfies this requirement.  It has the following features: 
a. 
It is symmetrical 
b. 
It is bell shaped 
c. 
Its mean lies at the peak of the curve 
d. 
The two tails continuously approach, but never cross, the horizontal axis (x) (see Fig 4). 
The formula for the curve can be ignored because any mathematical data relating to it can be found in 
mathematical tables. 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-17 - Descriptive Statistics 
13-17 Fig 4 Normal Curve of Distribution 
y
x


26.  Areas Below the Normal Curve of Distribution.  The 'y' axis in Fig 4 is at the peak of the curve 
and  passes  through  the  mean  value  of  the  distribution.    The  total  area  beneath  the  curve  is  unity, 
representing the fact that a random variable is certain to lie between +∞ and –∞.  If 1 σ lengths are now 
marked off on the x-axis from the mean value of the curve, the area enclosed by the curve and the 1 σ 
boundaries  is  68.26%  of  the  total  area.    Tables  are  available  to  give  the  areas  lying  under  the  curve 
between any two lines on the x-axis designated in terms of σ. 
27.  Areas  and  Frequencies.    Areas  under  the  normal  distribution  curve  are  proportional  to  frequencies.  
An  area  of  95%  of  the  total  area  is  equivalent  to  a  frequency  figure  which  indicates  that  95%  of  all 
occurrences lie between the two 2 σ values.  Similarly, 99.75% of al  occurrences fal  within the 3 σ values 
(see Fig 5).  The height of the curve at a particular point has no practical relevance - areas under the curve 
must always be used to give the frequency of occurrence in a specified range of values. 
13-17 Fig 5 Approximate Areas Beneath the Normal Curve 
95 %
99.75%
68.26%






Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
CHAPTER 18 - ELEMENTARY THEORY OF PROBABILITY 
Mathematical Definition of Probability 
1. 
Suppose that a certain experiment can have just n possible results, all of them equally likely (e.g.
in drawing a card from a pack there are just 52 possible results and all of them are equally likely) and 
suppose that a certain event can occur as m of these n possible results (e.g. picking an ace can occur 
as 4 of the 52 possible results).  Then the probability of the event occurring in any one experiment is 
defined as m/n.
2. 
Thus the probability of drawing an ace is 4/52 or 1/13.  We may also say that the chances are 1 in 
13 or that the odds are 12 to 1 against. 
3. 
If  the  probability  that  an  event  will  occur  is  m/n,  then  the  probability  that  it  will  fail  to  occur  is 
(n-m)/n = 1 − m/n.  Thus if p is the probability of success and q the probability of failure, we have 
q =1 – p   or   p = 1 – q   or   p + q = 1 
4. 
It is certain that an event will either occur or fail to occur.  The probability of either a success or a 
failure  is  n/n  =  1.    Hence  probability  =  1  denotes  certainty  and,  similarly,  probability  =  0  denotes 
impossibility. 
Interdependence of Events 
5. 
a. 
Mutually  Exclusive  Events.    Two  events  are  mutually  exclusive  if  the  occurrence  of  one 
prevents  the  occurrence  of  the  other.    If  a  die  is  thrown,  the  occurrence  of  a  6  prevents  the 
occurrence of a 5. 
b
Independent  Events.    Two  events  are  independent  if  the occurrence or non-occurrence of 
one  has  no  effect  on  the  probability  of  the  occurrence  of  the  other.    If  two  dice  are  thrown,  the 
result of one throw has no effect on the result of the other. 
c
Dependent Events.  Two events are dependent when the occurrence or non-occurrence of 
one event has some effect on the probability of occurrence of the other.  If two cards are drawn 
from a pack, the probability that the second card is an ace is 3/51 or 4/51 depending on whether 
the first card was or was not an ace. 
Notice  that  mutually  exclusive  events  occur  as  alternative  results  of  the  same  experiment  whereas 
independent  and  dependent  events  occur  as  the  simultaneous  or  consecutive  results  of  different 
experiments. 
Calculation of Probabilities 
6. 
Theorem I - Addition of Probabilities.  If two events are mutually exclusive, then the probability 
of either one or the other event occurring is the sum of the probabilities of the individual events. 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
Proof.    Let  the  probability  of  E1  be  m1/n  and  let  the probability of E2 be m2/n.  Then out of n equally 
likely  events,  m1  are  E1  and  m2  are  E2,  ie  m1  +  m2  events  out  of  n  are  either  E1  or  E2.    Hence  the 
probability of either E1 or E2 occurring is: 
m + m
m
m
1
2
1
2
=
+
n
n
n
7. 
Theorem II - Multiplication of Probabilities.
a
Independent Events.  If two events are independent, then the probability of both one and the 
other happening is the product of the probabilities of the individual events. 
b
Dependent Events.  If two events are dependent, then the probability of both the first event 
and  the  second  event  happening  is  the  product  of  the  probability  of  the  first  event  and  the 
conditional probability of the second event on the assumption that the first event has happened. 
Proof.    Let  the  probability  of  E1  be  m1/n1  and  let  the  probability  of  E2  be  m2/n2.    If  E1  and  E2  are 
independent,  then  the  probability  of  E2  is  independent  of  the  success  or  failure  of  E1,  but  if  they  are 
dependent  then  the  probability  m2/n2  is  to  be  regarded  as  the  conditional  probability  of  E2  on  the 
assumption that E1 has happened.  Then the total number of possible results of the two experiments 
together  is  n1n2.    Of  these  possible  results,  E1  and  E2  can  occur  together  in  m1m2  ways.    Hence 
probability of both E1 and E2 occurring is: 
m m
m
m
1
2
1
2
=
×
n n
n
n
1
2
1
2
8. 
Conclusion both Theorem I and Theorem II extend to any number of events. 
Example 1.  A card is drawn from a pack.  What is the probability of it being either an ace, the king of 
clubs or a red queen? 
4
The probability of drawing an ace is  52
1
The probability of drawing the king of clubs is  52
2
The probability of drawing a red queen is  52
Hence the required probability is: 
4
1
2
7
+
+
=
52
52
52
52
Example 2.  Two dice are thrown and a card is drawn from a pack.  What is the probability that both 
dice will show sixes and that the card will be the ace of spades? 
The probability of a six in one throw is  1  and the probability of drawing the ace of spades is  1
6
52
Hence, the required probability is: 
1
1
1
1
× ×
=
6
6
52
1872
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
Example 3.  Two dice are thrown.  What is the probability of the total throw being 10?  The possible 
successes are (4, 6), (5, 5), (6,4).  The result of one die is independent of the result of the other. 
1
1
1
Probability of (4,  6)  is     ×
=
6
6
36
1
1
1
Probability of (5,  5) is      ×
=
6
6
36
1
1
1
Probability of (6,  4)  is     × =
6
6
36
Any combination of the pair excludes every other combination.  Hence the required probability is: 
1
1
1
1
+
+
=
36
36
36
12
Example 4.  Two cards are drawn from a pack.  What is the probability that they will both be aces? 
4
The  probability  that  the  first  card  is  an  ace  is 
  and  the  conditional  probability  that  the  second 
52
3
card shall also be an ace is 
.  Hence, the required probability is:  
51
1
1
1
×
=
13 17
221
Example 5.  Five balls are drawn from a bag containing 6 white balls and 4 black balls.  What is the 
probability that 3 white balls and 2 black balls are drawn? 
Although the rules for combining probabilities are important, it sometimes pays to work from first 
principles, i.e. direct from the mathematical definition of probability as in this example. 
10
5 balls can be selected from 10 in    ways, that is in
 5 
10.9.8.7.6
2.9.7.2
=
= 2.9.7.  
2 ways
1.2.3.4.5
1
This is the total number of possible selections. 
6
Three white balls can be selected from 6 in     ways, i.e. 
3
6.5.4 = 5.  4ways
1.2.3
4
2 black balls can be selected from 4 in     ways, ie 
2
4.3 = 2.  3ways
1.2
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
Hence,  the  number  of  ways  in  which  3  white  balls  and  2  black  balls  can  be  selected  is  5.4.2.3, 
from which the required probability is: 
5.4.2.3
10
=
2.9.7.2
21
Limitations of Mathematical Definition 
9. 
It  is  not  always  possible  to  use  the  mathematical  definition  of  probability  because  the  definition 
requires that the experiment should have a finite number of possible different results.  In practice, there 
are  often  an  infinite  number  of  possible results (e.g. in dropping a bomb on a target).  Moreover, the 
definition  depends  on  the  results  being  equally  likely,  which  to  a  certain  extent  begs  the  question 
unless we can satisfy ourselves intuitively that the results are equally likely.  Thus, when the number of 
possible results is infinite or when we cannot be sure that they are all equally likely, we cannot use the 
mathematical definition, and instead we use the following one. 
Statistical Definition of Probability 
10.  Suppose that a certain experiment is carried out n times and that a certain event occurs as m of 
the n results.  Then the probability of the event occurring as the result of any one experiment is defined 
as: 
m
p = lim
n→∞
n
In practice, we cannot let n      ∞, but instead we take n to be as large as we conveniently can.  The 
resulting  value  obtained  for  the  probability  is  then  the  best  available  estimate  in  cases  where  the 
mathematical definition cannot be used. 
11.  It  can  be  shown  that  there  is  little  theoretical  difference  between  the  two  definitions  and  that 
therefore,  the  theorems  proved  on  the  basis  of  the  mathematical  definition  still  hold  for  probabilities 
obtained statistically. 
Example 6.  The operational requirement for a guided weapon demands that the weapon should have 
a  reliability  of  90%.    If  the  weapon  can  be  broken  down  into  120  functionally-tested  components  of 
equal complexity and reliability, determine the reliability demanded from each component. 
The  reliability  of  a  weapon  or  a  component  is  the  probability  that  the  weapon  or  component  will  be 
completely serviceable.  In this case, the statistical definition of probability clearly applies.  Now if RC is 
the  reliability  of  a  component,  then  the  probability  that  120  such  components  will  all  be  serviceable 
together may be obtained using the Multiplication Theorem for independent events. 
0.90 = R120 , or R
  
120
=
0.90 = 0.9991
C
C
Thus, each component must have a reliability of 99.91 %. 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
Probability of At Least One Success 
12.  It is important to distinguish between: 
a. 
The probability of at least one success. 
b. 
The probability of one success only. 
Suppose  it  is  required  to  get  a  minimum  of  one  hit  on  a  target.    It  is  not  sufficient  to  calculate  the 
probability  of  one  hit  only  because  this  would  exclude  the  possibility  of  2, 3, or more hits which must 
also count as successes.  The criterion of success is at least one hit. 
Example 7.  Three ballistic missiles are launched at a certain target.  From the statistical analysis of 
performance  trials  of  the  missile,  it  is  estimated  that  the  probability  of  hitting  the  target  with  a  single 
1
missile is  .  Calculate the chance of scoring: a. One hit only; b. At least one hit. 
6
For a:  The chance of a hit with the first missile but not with the other two is: 
1
5
5
25
× × =
6
6
6
216
The chance of a hit with the second missile but not with the other two is: 
5
1
5
25
× × =
6
6
6
216
The chance of a hit with the third missile but not with the other two is: 
5
5
1
25
× × =
6
6
6
216
Hence the chance of one hit only is: 
25
25
25
75
+
+
=
216
216
216
216
For b:  In the same way, the chance of two hits only is: 
1
1
5
15
× × ×3 =
6
6
6
216
and the chance of three hits is: 
1
1
1
1
× × =
6
6
6
216
Hence the chance of at least one hit is: 
75
15
1
91
+
+
=
216
216
216
216
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
1
Alternatively,  since  the  chance  of  a  hit  with  one  missile  is 
,  the  chance  of  missing  with  one 
6
1
5
3
missile is 1 – 
 = 
  Thus, the chance of missing with all three missiles is   5 
125
  =
, and the 
6
6
 6 
216
chance of failing to miss with all three missiles, that is the chance of at least one hit, is: 
125
91
1 −
=
216
216
To  generalize,  let  the  chance  of  success  in  one  attempt  be  p,  then  the  chance  of  failure  in  one 
attempt  is  (1  –  p),  ie  the  chance  of  failure  in  n  attempts  =  (1  –  p)n,  and  finally,  the  chance  of  at 
least one success in n attempts is 1 – (1 – p)n. 
Example 8.    If  the  probability  of  obtaining  a  hit  with  a  single  missile  is  assessed  as  1 ,  how  many 
20
missiles must be launched to give a 75% chance of at least one hit? 
If n is the number of missiles which must be launched we require that: 
n

1 
1− 1
 −
 = 0.75

20 
n
 19 
ie 
 = 0.25
 20 
or  0
  .95n = 0.25
Taking logarithms, 
n log 0.95 = log 0.25 
log 0.25
∴ n =
= 27
log 0.95
Example  9.    The  data  given  below  refers  to  an  interceptor  fighter  armed  with  2  air-to-air  guided 
weapons.  Determine the overall effectiveness of the weapon system. 
Aircraft serviceability 
 
 
0.90 
Aircraft reliability in flight 
 
0.80 
Missile reliability 
 
 
 
0.70 
Missile lethality 
 
 
 
0.50 
The probability that the aircraft will be both serviceable and reliable in flight, and therefore able to 
deliver the weapon is: 
0.90 × 0.80  = 0.72 
The probability that a single weapon will inflict the required damage on the target is: 
0.70 × 0.50  = 0.35 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
Thus, the probability that at least one weapon will inflict the required damage is: 
1 – (1 – 0.35)2 = 0.58 
i.e. the overall effectiveness is: 0.72 × 0.58 = 0.42 or 42% 
Reliability 
13.  The accurate assessment of the reliability of complex and expensive systems or equipment can be a 
vitally important factor in planning the purchase or deployment of resources.  In order to quantify reliability for 
analysis, it is necessary to be able to attach a numerical value to it.  Reliability is defined as the probability 
that an item will not fail during a given period of time.  The probability of an item not failing is denoted by p.  
The probability of an item failing is denoted by q.  It follows that p+q = 1.  It is important that when a figure for 
reliability is quoted the time period to which it relates should also be quoted.  It should be noted that reliability 
is a probability and is therefore expressed as a fraction of 1 or a percentage. 
14.  Combination.    The  overall  reliability  (R)  of  a  combination  of  components  may  be  calculated  on 
the  assumption  that  the  quantities  p  and  q  are  independent  of  the  other  components  in  the  system.  
This  being  so,  probabilities  must  be  combined  by the multiplication rule to give the probability that all 
will occur together. 
a. 
Components in Series.
--- (1) --- (2) --- ..... --- (n) --- 
The system will survive only if all the components survive. 
∴  R = p1 × p2 ×………pn 
b. 
Components in Parallel.
(1)
(2)
(n)
The system will fail only if all the components fail. 
∴      1 – R = q1 × q2 ×………qn
or   R = 1 – (q1 × q2 ×………qn) 
or   R = 1 – (1 – p1)(1 – p2)……(1-pn) 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-18 - Elementary Theory of Probability 
A parallel system may be referred to as a redundant system. 
c. 
Components may be combined partly in series and partly in parallel
(2)
(1)
(4)
(3)
These systems may be reduced to a system of units in series by obtaining the overall reliability of 
each  parallel  branch.    Thus  in  the  above  example,  if  R23  is  the  overall  reliability  of  the  parallel 
components 2 and 3 
R23 = 1 – q2 × q3
and the system reduces to: 
--- (l) --- (R23) --- (4) 
whence, R = p1 × R23 × p4
  = p1 × p4 × [1 – (1 – p2)(1 – p3)] 
15.  Where redundant components are used on a mutually exclusive basis either one is used or another, 
and in this case the addition rule for combining the probabilities must be used.  For example, a navigation 
system consists of mode 1 (reliability p1) and mode 2 (p2) which will only be switched in by a switch, of 
reliability  p3,  if  mode  1  fails.    The  system  will  survive  only  if  mode  1  survives  or  if mode 1 fails and the 
switch operates and mode 2 survives.  In terms of reliabilities, the switch and mode 2 are only called upon 
to survive if mode 1 fails. 
(1)
(2)
(3)
∴  R = p + (11- p )(p )(p
1
1
3
2 )
The term (1 – p1)(p3)(p2) is the reliability contribution of the standby equipment.  The overall reliability of 
the system can be worked out by the series/parallel calculation, giving: 
R = 1 – (1 – p1)(1 – p3p2) = p1 + p2p3 – p1p2p3. 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-19 - The Nature of Heat 
CHAPTER 19 - THE NATURE OF HEAT 
Temperature and Heat 
1. 
Heat  is  a  form  of  energy  possessed  by  a  body  by  virtue  of  its  molecular  agitation.    The  heat 
content of an object is not measured simply by its temperature; heat content is also a function of mass.  
One unit of heat is the kilocalorie (kcal), and may be defined as the quantity of heat required to raise 
the  temperature  of  1 kilogram  of  pure  water  from  14.5  ºC  to  15.5  ºC  at  a  pressure  of  1  atmosphere.  
The temperature range needs to be specified, as the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature 
by 1 ºC depends slightly on which ºC is chosen. 
2. 
Because heat is a form of energy, it may equally, and perhaps more properly, be expressed in the 
SI  unit  of  energy,  the  joule  (J).    Indeed,  by  international  agreement  the  kilocalorie  is  now  defined  as 
4186.8 joules. 
Specific Heat 
3. 
Materials other than water require different quantities of heat to change their temperature by 1 ºC.  
All  materials  may  thus  be  attributed  a  value,  known  as  the  specific  heat,  which  reflects  this  variation 
and is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of the substance 
by 1 ºC.  This may be expressed in the equation: 
 
 


mct joules 
where 


quantity of heat 
 
 


mass of substance (kg) 
 
 


specific heat (J  kg-1 ºC-1) 
 
 


change in temperature (ºC) 
4. 
The value of specific heat depends upon the external conditions under which the heat is applied.  
Two  variables  are  normally  taken  into  consideration,  leading  to  two  values,  one  at  constant  pressure 
and one at constant volume.  In the case of solids and liquids which are generally heated at constant 
pressure,  then  only  the  constant  pressure  value  is  normally  quoted,  and  in  any  case  the  difference 
between the two values is negligible for all normal purposes.  However, in the case of gases the two 
specific heats are quite different. 
Change of State 
5. 
When a material changes state from a solid to a liquid or from a liquid to a gas, or vice versa, then 
energy  must  either  be  added  to  the  substance  or  be  released  from  the  substance.    For  example,  in 
order to change 1 kg of ice into water, approximately 335 × 103 J of heat needs to be added.  During 
the change of state the temperature does not rise, i.e. 1 kg of ice at 0 ºC changes to 1 kg of water at 0 
ºC.  Conversely, to freeze 1 kg of water then approximately 335 × 103 J of heat needs to be removed.  
The  heat  which  is  required  to  change  the  state  of  a  substance,  without  any  temperature  change,  is 
known as latent heat.  Where the change is between solid and liquid it is known as the latent heat of 
fusion; where the change is between liquid and gas it is known as latent heat of vaporization.  In both 
cases, the values quoted refer to 1 kg of the substance at the normal melting and boiling points.  (Heat 
energy  which  causes  a  change  of  temperature  without  giving  rise  to  a  change  of  state  is  defined  as 
sensible heat.) 
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 13-19 - The Nature of Heat 
6. 
Supercooling.  If a liquid is cooled slowly and is kept motionless, its temperature can be reduced 
to well below its normal freezing point.  This is known as supercooling.  A supercooled liquid is in an 
unstable  state  and  any  disturbance  will  cause  some  of  the  liquid  to  solidify,  thereby  releasing  latent 
heat.    The  temperature  of  the  supercooled  liquid  is  raised  to  its  freezing  point  by  the  release  of  this 
latent heat and the normal process of solidification takes place. 
Heat Transfer 
7. 
Heat may be transferred from one place to another by three mechanisms: 
a. 
Conduction.  If one end of, say, a metal rod is heated, then the atoms and electrons at that 
end will acquire higher kinetic and potential energy than those in other parts of the rod.  In random 
collisions,  these  energetic  atoms  and  electrons  will  transfer  energy  to  their  neighbours  which  in 
turn will become more energetic, collide with their neighbours, and transfer some of their energy.  
Thus  in  this  way  the  thermal  energy  which  was  applied  at  one  end  of  the rod will be transferred 
along the rod.  This process is known as conduction. 
b. 
Convection.  Convection is the transfer of heat from one place to another occasioned by the 
movement of the heated substance.  Convection only occurs in liquids and gases. 
c. 
Radiation.    In  radiation,  the  heat  is  transferred  in  the  form  of  electromagnetic  waves.    The 
intervening medium plays no part in the process and indeed radiation can take place in a vacuum.  
Heat is radiated more efficiently by dull surfaces and dark colours than by polished ones and light 
colours;  thus,  the  most  efficient  radiating  surface  is  matt  black.    Correspondingly,  radiated  heat 
energy is most efficiently absorbed by matt black surfaces, and most efficiently reflected by light 
shiny ones. 
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 13-20 - Temperature and Expansion 
CHAPTER 20 - TEMPERATURE AND EXPANSION 
The Concept of Temperature 
1. 
Temperature  may  be  defined  as  the  degree  of  hotness  of  a  body  measured  according  to  some 
fixed scale.  The sense of touch readily distinguishes between hot and cold bodies and thus between 
higher and lower temperatures.  Temperature may also be regarded in another way; if two bodies are 
placed  in  thermal  contact,  then  heat  will  flow  from  the  body  at  higher  temperature  to  that  at  a  lower 
temperature. 
2. 
The direction in which the heat flows does not depend on the quantity of heat in either body.  For 
example, the water in a tank may be at a lower temperature than a hot soldering iron, but owing to its 
greater volume it may contain a greater quantity of heat.  If the soldering iron is immersed in the water, 
heat  will  pass  from  the  iron  to  the  water.    Once  the  temperatures  are  equal  no  more  heat  will  be 
transferred. 
Temperature Scales 
3. 
The temperature of an object is measured by a thermometer which makes use of those properties 
of liquids, gases and other substances, which vary continuously with temperature and are independent 
of previous treatment.  Common methods involve the measurement of the expansion of solids, liquids 
or gases as they are heated, (liquid-in-glass thermometers and bi-metallic strips), the measurement of 
gas pressure as a gas is heated under constant volume (constant volume gas thermometer), and the 
change in colour of emitted light as an object is heated (optical pyrometer). 
4. 
All  of  these  thermometers  require  to be calibrated according to a defined scale.  Historically two 
fixed  temperature  points  have  been  defined;  zero  degrees  Celsius  (originally  centigrade),  and  100 
degrees Celsius, or their Fahrenheit equivalents of 32 ºF and 212 ºF. 
5. 
The  lower  point  was  defined  by  the  temperature  at  which  pure  water  and  ice  exist  in  thermal 
equilibrium;  the  upper  point  at  which  pure  water  and  steam  exist  in  thermal  equilibrium.    Both  points 
were defined at a pressure of 1 atmosphere (1.01325 × 105 Nm–2). 
6. 
Temperature  scales  are  now  defined  relative  to  the  Kelvin  scale.    The  temperature  at  which  all 
molecular  agitation  due  to  heat  energy  ceases  is  defined  as  Absolute  Zero.    This  corresponds  to  a 
temperature of approximately –273º on the Celsius scale and it is assigned a value of 0 K.  The size of 
the degree Kelvin is identical to that of the degree Celsius, thus the conventional fixed points of 0 ºC 
and  100  ºC  are  273  K  and  373  K  respectively.    Conventionally,  the  degrees  sign  is  omitted  when 
referring to Kelvin temperatures. 
7. 
Temperature  Conversion.    Conversion  of  temperature  values  between  Celsius  and  Fahrenheit 
scales may be accomplished using the following two equations: 
9
(X ºC ×
) + 32 = Y ºF 
5
5 × (Y ºF – 32) = X ºC 
9
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-20 - Temperature and Expansion 
Temperature Measurement 
8. 
Temperature  is  measured  using  a  thermometer  (or  a  pyrometer  for  high  temperatures),  various 
types of which are described in the following paragraphs. 
9. 
Liquid-in-glass  Thermometers.    The  liquid-in-glass  thermometer  is  the  simplest  instrument  for 
the measurement of temperature.  It depends on the fact that as the temperature of a liquid changes, 
so the volume of that liquid expands or contracts.  For most purposes, mercury is used as the liquid.  
However, as mercury solidifies at –39 ºC, there is a limit to the lower end of its useful range.  Alcohol 
may be used for lower temperature measurement, but it is limited at the higher temperatures as it has 
a boiling point of 78 ºC. 
10.  Bi-metallic  Strip.    The  bi-metallic  strip  thermometer  consists  of  two  strips  of  dissimilar  metals 
welded together, and usually formed into a helix.  One end of the helix is fixed while the other is free to 
rotate.    As  the  two  metals  have  different  coefficients  of  expansion,  they  will  expand  or  contract  at 
different  rates  as  temperature  changes.    This  will  be  manifested  in  the  helix  coiling  and  uncoiling  in 
response  to  temperature  changes.    A  pointer  is  attached  to  the  free  end  of  the  helix  and  this  moves 
over  a  graduated  scale.    This  type  of  thermometer  is  frequently  used  for  outside  air  temperature 
measurement.    A  non-coiled  version  is  often  used  as  the sensing element in thermostatic controls in 
which the bending of the bi-metallic strip makes or breaks an electrical circuit. 
11.  Pyrometers.    Conventional  thermometers  are  not  suitable  for  the  measurement  of  very  high 
temperatures,  such  as  those  found  in  jet  pipes.    The  instrument  used  for  high  temperature 
measurement is called a pyrometer and three types are described below: 
a. 
Thermocouple.  The principle of operation of the thermocouple is illustrated in Fig 1.  A and B are 
junctions of dissimilar metals, G is a sensitive galvanometer.  If the temperature of the two junctions is 
different, a current will flow from the iron to the copper at the colder junction and from the copper to the 
iron at the hotter junction.  The size of the current is measured by the galvanometer; a higher current 
indicates a greater temperature difference between the two junctions.  The advantage of this system is 
that the cold junction and the galvanometer can be remote from the hot, sensing, junction.  The main 
disadvantage of the system is that it has to be calibrated, both to relate the current to the temperature 
difference  and  to  determine  the  cold  junction  temperature,  so  that  actual,  rather  than  relative, 
temperatures  can  be  determined.    The  two  metals  used  in  the  junctions  can  be  varied  to  suit  the 
temperature range to be measured.  Thermocouples are typically used in the measurement of jet pipe 
temperatures (see also Volume 5, Chapter 26). 
13-20 Fig 1 Thermocouple 
G
A
B
Copper
Iron
Iron
Copper
Cold Junction
Hot Junction
b. 
Optical Radiation Pyrometer.  The radiation pyrometer relies on the principle that materials 
change colour and brightness as they are heated.  A simple type of optical pyrometer is used to 
measure  the  temperature  of  kilns  and  furnaces.    The  instrument  has  an  electrically  heated 
filament  which  is  placed  between  the  eye  of  the  observer  and  the  bright  interior  of  the  furnace.  
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-20 - Temperature and Expansion 
The current flowing through the filament is adjusted until the filament brightness matches that of 
the  furnace  interior.    As  with  the  thermocouple,  calibration  against  known  temperature  sources 
enables the measured current to be related to temperature.  For automatic use, in a more hostile 
environment  such  as  an  aero-engine,  more  sophisticated  instruments  are  available.    These  use 
photo-voltaic  cells  and  amplifiers  to  measure  the  emitted  radiation  which  is  then  converted  to  a 
measured temperature. 
c. 
Resistance  Wire.    The  electrical  resistance  pyrometer  relies  on  the  fact  that  the  electrical 
resistance  of  materials  varies  with  temperature.    The  resistance  of  metals  increases  with 
temperature increases while the resistance of non-metals decreases with temperature increases.  
Over moderate temperature ranges the resistance change is proportional to temperature change. 
The Behaviour of Gases 
12.  It can be shown that, for a given amount of gas (say n moles), the pressure (p), the volume (V), 
and the temperature (T), of the gas are related by the ideal gas equation: 
pV = nRT, where R is the universal gas constant. 
13.  This equation incorporates two laws as follows: 
a. 
Boyle's  Law.    This  law  asserts  that  if  the  temperature  of  a  gas  is  kept  constant  then  the 
product  of  the  pressure  and  the  volume  remains  constant  as  a  given  amount  of  gas  is 
compressed or expanded: 
i.e. pV = constant. 
b. 
Charles' Law.  This law asserts that if the pressure of a gas is kept constant then the ratio of 
the volume to the temperature remains constant as a given amount of gas is heated or cooled: 
V
i.e. 
 = constant 
T
This  behaviour  of  gases  is  used  as  the  basis  for  the  two  types  of  gas  thermometer:  the  constant 
volume and the constant pressure thermometers. 
14.  Isothermal  and  Adiabatic  Changes.    Fig  2  illustrates  the  two  ways  in  which  the  pressure  of  a  gas 
changes  as  the  volume  is  changed.    The  difference  depends  upon  whether  the  temperature  changes 
concurrently.    If  a  gas  is  compressed  slowly  such  that  there  is  time  for  the  energy  transferred  to  it  to  be 
dissipated  through the container, then the temperature of the gas will remain constant, and the change of 
state is said to be isothermal.  On the other hand if no energy transfer between the gas and the surroundings 
is permitted, then its temperature will rise and the change in state is termed adiabatic. 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-20 - Temperature and Expansion 
13-20 Fig 2 Isothermal and Adiabatic Changes 
Adiabatic
Isothermal
re
u
s
s
re
P
Volume
Expansion of Solids and Liquids 
15.  Solids expand as they are heated.  The thermal expansion of a solid is usually best described by 
the increase in linear dimension.  The increment is directly proportional to the temperature change and 
to the original length.  Thus: 
ΔL = αLΔT 
where 
   L = original length 
 
 
 ΔL = change of length 
 
 
 ΔT = change in temperature 
The constant, α, is cal ed the coefficient of linear expansion.  Its value for any material varies slightly 
with the initial temperature. 
16.  The volumetric expansion of a solid can be expressed in an analogous equation: 
ΔV = βVΔT 
where 
  V = original volume 
 
 
ΔV = change in volume 
 
 
ΔT = change in temperature 
and the constant, β, is the coefficient of volume expansion (β = 3α). 
17.  Most  liquids  expand  when  they  are  heated,  so  that  their  density  reduces  with  increasing 
temperature.  However, water exhibits a somewhat unusual variation.  From 0 ºC to 4 ºC the volume 
decreases,  non-linearly,  as  temperature  increases.    Above  4  ºC,  the  volume  increases  with 
temperature.  Thus, water has its maximum density at 4 ºC. 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
CHAPTER 21 - THE NATURE OF LIGHT 
Introduction 
1. 
The  true  nature  of  light  is  a  question  which  has  taxed  scientists  for  many  generations.    Most 
theories  treat  light  as  the  transport  of  energy,  either  as  a  wave  motion  or  as  a  stream  of  particles.  
Each  of  these  ideas  can  be  used  to  explain  certain  phenomena  associated  with  light  but  neither  can 
satisfactorily explain them all.  For example, the wave theory can explain why crossed light beams do 
not  scatter  each  other,  whereas  the  particle  concept  would  not  allow  this  to  happen.    Conversely  the 
wave theory cannot be used to explain the photoelectric effect - only the particle theory is satisfactory.  
Neither idea really defines what light actually is; rather each is a model which can be used to describe 
and  predict  the  behaviour  of  light  under  a  particular  set  of  circumstances.    Thus,  it  is  necessary  to 
choose the appropriate model for the task in hand.  In general, where the behaviour of light in motion is 
being studied, the wave model is more useful, while the particle model is to be preferred when studying 
the interaction of light with other matter, eg absorption and emission. 
The Wave Model 
2. 
When a pebble is tossed into a pond it sets into motion the water particles with which it comes into 
contact.  These particles set neighbouring particles in motion and so on until the disturbance reaches 
the edge of the pond.  In fact, any particular particle only oscillates vertically about a mean position.  It 
does not itself move to the edge of the pond; only the disturbance moves through the water.  This is a 
typical characteristic of wave motion.  The oscillations are at right angles to the direction of propagation 
of the wave, and such a wave motion is known as a transverse wave.  Light waves are also transverse 
waves,  but  rather  than  representing  the  motion  of  particles  in  a  medium,  the  wave  represents  the 
variations in electric and magnetic field strength.  Neither of these fields can exist without the other and 
they  are  interdependent.    The  fields  are  mutually  perpendicular,  and  both  are  at  right  angles  to  the 
direction  of  wave  motion.    This  arrangement  is  illustrated  in  Fig  1.    Unlike  water  waves,  which  are 
constrained  to  move  along  the  water  surface,  light  waves  can propagate in any direction and are not 
dependent upon the medium; indeed, they can move through a vacuum. 
13-21 Fig 1 Light Wave 
Electrical Field
Magnetic Field
Direction of
Wave Motion
3. 
The waves generated by tossing a pebble into a pond are small compared with, for example, sea 
waves.    Also,  whereas  the  distance  between  the  crests  of  the  pond  waves  may  be  only  a  few 
centimetres,  with  sea  waves  the  separation  may  be  several  metres.    Similar  variations  occur  in  light 
waves and these parameters are summarized in Fig. 2, where it will be seen that light waves have a 
sinusoidal  form.    The  distance  between  the  subsequent  crests  of  a  wave  (or  between  any  other 
Page 1 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
corresponding points) is known as the wavelength and is usual y given the symbol λ.  The vertical size 
of  the  wave  is  measured  from  the  mean  level  and  is  known  as  the  amplitude.    The  time  taken  for 
corresponding  points  on  a  wave  to  pass  a  fixed  point  is  known  as  the  period,  and  the  number  of 
corresponding points passing in unit time is the frequency (f).  The wave travels at a speed (C), which 
depends  upon  the  medium  through  which  it  is  passing.    In  free  space  the  speed  of  light  is 
approximately 3 × 108 metres per second (m/s or ms–1) or 186,000 miles per second.  From this, it will 
be seen that speed, frequency, and wavelength are related by the equation: C = fλ.
13-21 Fig 2 Wave Parameters 
Wavelength   
λ
Amplitude
Polarization 
4. 
In general, the electric and magnetic fields of a light wave are free to vibrate in any of the infinite planes 
at right angles to the direction of propagation.  Any ordinary light source consists of the superposition of a 
number of plane waves each with a random plane of vibration.  Such a light beam is said to be unpolarized.  
If, however, the electric field is constrained to lie in a particular plane then the light is said to be polarized.  
Polarization can be achieved by passing the light through a suitable filter. 
The Electromagnetic Spectrum 
5. 
Light  waves  can  be  shown  to  have  essentially  the  same  characteristics  as  many  other  types  of 
radiation  such  as  radio  waves,  microwaves  and  X-rays.    Indeed,  all  of  these  are  examples  of 
electomagnetic  radiation,  differing  primarily  in  their  frequencies.    The  electromagnetic  spectrum 
describes  a  large  range  of  such waves, illustrated in Fig 3, in which visible light occupies only a very 
small  band.    White  light  consists  of  a  graded  spectrum  containing  the  colours  Red,  Orange,  Yellow, 
Green, Blue, Indigo and Violet. 
13-21 Fig 3 The Electromagnetic Spectrum 
Wavelength(  )
λ  m
6
–3
–6
–9
–12
–15
103
10
1
10
10
10
10
10
Microwaves
X-rays
Cosmic Rays
Radio Waves
Infra-red
Ultra Violet
Gamma Rays
3
6
9
12
15
21
24
10
10
10
10
10
1018
10
10
Frequency( f ) Hz
–6
–6
0.7 x 10 m
Red
Orange Y
  e
  ll
  o
   w
     G
    r
  e
   e
  n            B
  lue          I  
n   
d  
i   
g  
o      V
   i o
   l e
   t        
0  .  
4     
x    
1   
0    m
14
14
4.3 x 10 Hz
7.5 x 10
Page 2 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
Wave-fronts and Rays 
6. 
From  a  point  source,  light  is  propagated  in  all  directions.    Travelling  out  from  the  source,  wave 
maxima  will  be  encountered  at  regular  intervals,  corresponding  to  the  wavelength.    Similarly,  at 
different  positions,  but  still  with  the  same  spacing,  minima  will  occur  and  the  same  will  apply  for  any 
intermediate  value  of  amplitude.    Lines  can  be  drawn joining points of equal amplitude, analogous to 
contour lines, and these are known as wave-fronts.  As the radiation occurs in three dimensions these 
wave-fronts are in fact spherical surfaces, but it is often satisfactory to treat the radiation as if it were 
planar in which case the wave-fronts reduce to circles.  As a further practical simplification, if the wave-
front  is at a large distance from the source, and if only a small sector is investigated, then the wave-
front may be approximated by a straight line. 
7. 
The  direction  of  propagation  of  light  is  at  90º  to  the  wave-fronts  and  a  line  representing  this 
direction is known as a ray.  Rays are often used in diagrams where only the direction of propagation is 
of concern.  Wave-fronts and rays are illustrated in Fig 4. 
13-21 Fig 4 Wave-fronts and Rays 
Mi
M n
i  
Ma
M x 
ax
Mi
M n
i
Ma
M x 
ax
Point
Ray 
Source
Wavefronts 
Superposition and Interference 
8. 
When two or more sinusoidal waves act at the same place then the result can be found by adding 
algebraically the individual amplitudes.  Four examples of this principle of superposition are shown in 
Figs 5, 6, 7 and 8.  In Fig 5, the two waves have the same amplitude and frequency and are in phase, 
ie  the  maxima  and  minima  of  each  wave  occur  at  the  same  time  and  place.    In  this  case  the  waves 
reinforce  each  other,  thus  resulting  in  a  doubling  of  the  amplitude.    This  is  known  as  constructive 
interference.  In Fig 6, the same two waves are completely out of phase.  At every point the amplitudes 
have  the  same  magnitude  but  the  opposite  sign,  and  so  cancel  each  other  -  a  situation  known  as 
destructive interference.  In Fig 7, three waves having the same frequency but different phases add to 
produce  another  sinusoid  with  the  same  frequency.    Fig 8  shows  the  general  case  where  two  waves 
have different amplitudes and frequencies. 
Page 3 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
13-21 Fig 5 Two Sinusoidal Waves, Same Amplitude, Frequency and Phase 
e
d
time
litu
p
m
A
13-21 Fig 6 Two Sinusoidal Waves, Same Amplitude and Frequency, 180º Out of Phase 
e
d
time
litu
p
m
A
13-21 Fig 7 Three Sinusoidal Waves, Same Amplitude, and Frequency, Different Phases 
e
d
litu
p
m
A
Time
13-21 Fig 8 Two Sinusoidal Waves, Different Amplitude and Frequency 
e
d
litu
p
time
m
A
9. 
If  two  close  sources  radiate  light  of  the  same  frequency  and  if  the  two  radiations  are  in  phase 
then, as shown in Fig 9, at some points there will be constructive interference whilst at others there will 
be destructive interference.  The result is a radially symmetrical interference pattern. 
Page 4 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
13-21 Fig 9 Constructive and Destructive Interference 
Constructive
Destructive
Peak
Trough
Source A
Source B
Diffraction 
10.  It is a characteristic feature of waves that they will deflect around the edges of obstacles placed in 
their path and spread into the shadow zone behind the obstacle.  This effect can often be seen where 
for  example  water  waves  pass  through  a  narrow  harbour  entrance  or  impinge  upon  a  breakwater.  
There is no complete 'shadow' behind the wall, rather the waves appear to bend around the obstacle.  
This  phenomenon  is  known  as  diffraction.    In  general,  the  amount  of  diffraction  is  related  to  the 
wavelength and the size of the gap through which the waves must pass.  The deviations of the wave 
are  quite  large  when  the  size  of  the  obstacle  or  gap  is  of  the  same  order  as  the  wavelength.    Light, 
behaving as a wave form, will also experience diffraction but as the wavelength of light is very small the 
effect is only pronounced when the obstacle or gap is very small. 
11.  The  effect  of  diffraction  is  closely  associated  with  the  ideas  of  constructive  and  destructive 
interference developed in paragraphs 7 to 9.  An insight into the effect can be gained by studying the 
passage of light through a pair of closely spaced narrow slits. 
12.  Fig  10  shows  plane  waves  arriving  at  a  screen  in  which  there  are  two  narrow  slits  which  are 
perpendicular to the page.  The two slits act as sources of light and therefore two series of circular wave-
fronts can be constructed, one set from each slit.  In the diagram the wave-fronts represent the crests of the 
waves.    As  the  slits  were  illuminated  by  the  same  incident  light  the  light  leaving  each  slit  has  the  same 
wavelength, amplitude and phase.  The principle of superposition can be used to predict the effects which 
will be observed.  At point P crests of waves from each slit arrive simultaneously and therefore constructive 
interference takes place and a reinforcement of amplitude will be seen.  The same argument can be applied 
to any point where crests intersect.  Such points have been joined by bold lines in the diagram and strong 
waves would be expected to be seen radiating along these lines.  If the distance between point P and each 
slit is measured it will be seen to be different by one wavelength (1λ).  The same is true for any point along 
the bold line through P.  Other lines of constructive interference will each demonstrate a different value for 
the difference in distance and these values have been indicated in the diagram.  In each case, the value is 
an integral multiple of a wavelength (nλ). 
Page 5 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
13-21 Fig 10 Diffraction by Two Slits 
0
1 λ
1 λ
1½ λ
1½ λ
Q
2 λ
2 λ
P
Screen
Slits
Wave-fronts
13.  Point Q corresponds to the point of intersection of a crest from one slit and a trough from the other 
and  therefore  destructive  interference  will  occur.    The  dashed  lines  represent  the  lines  along  which 
destructive interference occurs.  In this case, the difference in distance from any point on a dashed line 
to each slit is an integral multiple of half a wavelength (nλ/2). 
14.  Points  like  P  and  Q  represent  the  extremes  of  complete  constructive  interference  and  complete 
destructive  interference.    In  between  these  points  will  be  points  where  the  interference  is  partially 
constructive, ie the resultant amplitude is greater then zero but less than twice the amplitude of each wave. 
15.  Consider now Fig 11a, in which point R is a large distance from an opaque screen in which there 
are two slits S1 and S2.  There is a small angle between the lines joining the slits to point R, however, if 
the point is sufficiently far away then this angle becomes so small that it may be safely ignored, and the 
lines can be considered to be parallel.  This situation is reflected in Fig 11b which is a magnification of 
the area close to the screen in which the lines joining the slits to R are drawn parallel.  The lines are 
inclined at an angle θ to lines normal to the screen. 
13-21 Fig 11 Determination of Angles for Constructive and Destructive Interference 


S1
θ
S
M
1
I
S
1
R
2
d
β
α
I 2
R
S2
θ
R
16.  A line S2M is drawn which is perpendicular to the lines from each slit to R.  Point M and the slit S2
are  the  same  distance  from  R  and  the  difference  between  distances  I1and I2 is equal to the distance 
between slit S1 and M. 
Page 6 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
17.  It  has  been  shown  in  paragraphs  11  and  12  that  the  factor  determining  whether  constructive  or 
destructive interference occurs at R is the difference between the distances I1 and I2.  Thus, it is now 
necessary to relate the distance S1M to the angle θ. 
 
angle θ + angle α = 90º 
and
 
angle β + angle α  = 90º 
Thus,
 
angle β = angle θ
Now,
 
sin β = S1M/d 
Thus,
 
sin θ = S1M/d 
So,
 
S1M = d sin θ
For constructive interference to occur the difference between the distances I1 and I2 must be equal to 
an integral number of wavelengths so: 
I1 – I2 = S1M = d sin θ = nλ 
    or, sin θ = nλ/d, where n is any integer. 
This equation determines the angles at which constructive interference occurs in terms of wavelength 
and slit spacing.  It can be shown that the equivalent equation for destructive interference is: 
sin θ = (n + ½)λ/d. 
18.  As the number of equally spaced slits in the screen (and hence interference sources) is increased, 
the  destructive  interference  regions  widen,  as  shown  in  Fig  12.    A  screen  with  many  equally  spaced 
slits is known as a diffraction grating. 
13-21 Fig 12 Diffraction Patterns 
a Double Slit 
b 10 Slits
Intensity 
Intensity 
Angle 0
Angle 0
c 100 Slits
Intensity 
Angle 0
Page 7 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
Huygens’ Principle 
19.  A knowledge of the manner in which a wave-front propagates is necessary in order to explain the 
phenomena of reflection and refraction.  In 1690 the Dutch physicist Huygens proposed the following 
method: 
To  find  the  change  of position of a wave-front in a small interval, t, draw many small spheres of 
radius [wave speed] × t with centres on the old wave-front.  The new wave-front is the surface of 
tangency to those spheres. 
It  should  be  remembered  that  this  is  only  a  model  which  enables  predictions  to  be  made,  it  is  not 
meant  to  be  a  description  of  reality.    The  small  spheres  employed  in  this  construction  are  known  as 
wavelets.    Clearly  most  diagrams  are  constrained  to  showing  phenomena  in  two  dimensions  only  in 
which case the spherical wavelets reduce to circles.  Fig 13 shows how Huygens’ principle is used to 
predict the new position of a planar wave-front after a short interval. 
13-21 Fig 13 Huygens’ Principle of Wave-front Propagation 
vt
Reflection 
20.  The case of a plane wave incident on a plane mirror is shown in Fig 14.  Fig 14a shows the wave-
fronts  approaching  a  reflecting  surface.    One  edge  of  the  leading  wave-front  is  just  touching  the 
surface at point P.  The situation a short time later is shown in Fig 14b where some Huygens’ wavelets 
have been constructed (the portion of the wavelets below the surface have been omitted as irrelevant).  
The new wave-front touches the surface at point P′.  To the right of P′ the new wave-front is parallel to 
the old wave-front as it has not yet been reflected.  In order to find the position of the new wave-front to 
the  left  of  P′,  a  straight  line  is  drawn  starting  from  P′,  and  tangential  to  the  wavelet  centred  on  P 
(Huygens’  Principle).    This straight line represents the part of the wave that has been reflected.  The 
two  right-angled  triangles  are  congruent  as  they  have  a  common  side,  PP′,  and  the  short  sides,  PQ 
and  P′Q′  are  equal  (being  radii  of  the  wavelets).    Thus,  the  angles  θ  and  θ′  are  equal.    In  studying 
reflection, it is usually more convenient to deal with rays rather than with wave-fronts, since they more 
readily show the direction of propagation. 
Page 8 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
13-21 Fig 14 Reflection Using Huygens’ Principle 
P

Q
Q'
P'
P

Q
Q'
P'
P
θ
θ'

Fig 15 shows the reflection of the rays corresponding to the wave-fronts of Fig 14c. 
13-21 Fig 15 Reflection of a Ray 
Normal
Incident Ray
Reflected Ray
θ
θ'
Reflecting Surface
In summary there are two Laws of Reflection as follows: 
a. 
The angle of incidence equals the angle of reflection. 
b. 
The incident and reflected rays and the normal to the reflecting surface lie in the same plane. 
Page 9 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
Refraction 
21.  Huygens’  Principle  can  also  be  used  to  predict  the  behaviour  of  light  when  it  is  transmitted  at  a 
boundary between two mediums rather than being reflected.  Consider Fig 16.  AB represents a wave-
front arriving at such an interface at an angle θi, the point A arriving before point B.  To find the position 
of  the  wave-front  after  a  short  time  interval,  t,  Huygens’  wavelets  are  constructed  emanating  from 
points A and B.  From point B, which can be assumed to be in air, the light travels at velocity v1, and a 
wavelet can be drawn representing the time taken for the light to travel from B to B′.  In the same time 
interval,  the  light  from  A  is  travelling  in  the  transparent  medium  (glass  say)  at  a  slower  velocity  (v2).  
Thus, the same time interval will correspond to a smaller wavelet.  The new wave-front is now drawn 
from point B′ to be tangential to the wavelet centred on A.  Thus, the light wave has been deviated as it 
changes  from  one  medium  to  another  in  which  the  velocity  of  light  is  different.    This  phenomenon  is 
known as refraction. 
13-21 Fig 16 Refraction Using Huygens’ Principle 
B
i
Medium 1
(Velocity = V1)
θi
Interface Boundary
A
θ
B'
r
Medium 2
(Velocity = V2)
A'
r
Page 10 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
22.  From Fig 16: 
BB′

v1t 
and 
AA′

v2t 
BB′
v1
Thus, 

………………………..(1) 
B
A ′
v2
BB′
sin θi 

B
A ′
A
A ′
and 
sin θr 

B
A ′
sin θ
BB′
i
Hence, 
sin θ


r
A
A
Noting that θi = i and θr = r and comparing with equation (1): 
sin i
v1

……….………………..(2) 
sin r
v2
23.  It is normal to express the velocities of light in the two media as fractions of c, the velocity of light 
in  a  vacuum.    Hence,  v1  =  c/n1,  and,  v2  =  c/n2.    The  numbers  n1  and  n2  are  known  as  the  refractive 
indices of medium 1 and medium 2 respectively, and equation (2) may be rewritten as: 
sin i
n2
=
……………………………………….(3) 
sin r
n1
If the incident wave is travelling in a vacuum, (or, for nearly all practical purposes, in air), then n1 = 1 
and equation (3) reduces to: 
sin i = n
sin r
where n is the refractive index of the second medium.  This relationship between the angle of incidence, 
angle of refraction and the refractive indices of the media is known as Snell′s Law of refraction.  When a 
wave  passes  from  a  medium  of  high  velocity  to  one  of  lower  velocity  then  it  is  refracted  towards  the 
normal  and  conversely  when  passing  from  a  'slower'  medium  to  a  'faster'  medium  it  is  refracted  away 
from the normal.  As with reflection the two rays and the normal to the interface all lie in the same plane.  
It is also evident that there is a corresponding change in wavelength. 
Total Internal Reflection 
24.  Consider  rays  of  light  travelling  from  a  slower  velocity  medium,  such  as  water  to  a  faster  velocity 
medium (say air) as illustrated in Fig 17.  Ray 1 emitted normal to the surface of the water continues into the 
air normal to the surface whereas ray 2, at an angle of incidence i, is refracted through the angle r. 
Page 11 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
13-21 Fig 17 Internal Reflection 
l
a
1
2
rm
o
r
N
3
i
Total 
4
Internal
Reflection
Critical
Angle
As i is increased, r eventually becomes 90º (ray 3).  The value of the angle of incidence obtained in this case 
is called the critical angle.  The change from refraction to reflection is not sudden, for some reflection always 
takes  place  at  the  surface  of  separation  when  i  is  less  than  critical.    However,  when  i  is  greater  than  the 
critical angle all of the incident light is reflected at the boundary.  This behaviour is known as total internal 
reflection.  The phenomenon has a number of practical applications, perhaps the most important of which 
has been the development of the optical fibre in which the light is transmitted along the fibre experiencing 
total internal reflection when it impinges upon the fibre walls.  Since a refracted ray cannot be deviated more 
than 90° from the normal to the interface, when r = 90º, sin i has its maximum possible value and, as sin r = 
1: 
v1
sin i = v2
Dispersion 
25.  Unlike  reflection,  refraction  is  frequency  dependent.    This  is  because  the velocity of a wave in a 
medium changes as the frequency of the wave changes.  Thus the 'bending power' of a given material 
is  dependent  upon  the  frequency;  an  effect  known  as  dispersion.    Thus,  for  example  if  a  ray  of  light 
containing a mix of frequencies is refracted by a medium then each of the component frequencies, or 
colours, will emerge at a different angle.  Traditionally a prism has been used to demonstrate this effect 
and to analyse the component frequencies of a light source.  Fig 18 illustrates the arrangement.  The 
incident  light  ray  experiences  refraction  at  each  glass/air  interface  with  those  components  at  the  red 
end of the spectrum experiencing less refraction than those at the violet end. 
13-21 Fig 18 Dispersion of Light by a Prism 
Beam of
Prism
white light
Page 12 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
The Particle Model - The Photoelectric Effect 
26.  Although  the  wave  model  has  provided  a  good  description  of  many  of  the  ways  in  which  light 
behaves, it fails to explain the photoelectric effect. 
27.  The  photoelectric  effect  involves  the  conversion  of  light  into  electricity  and  is  used  in  solar  cells 
and photographic light meters for example.  A simple device to illustrate the effect is shown in Fig 19.  
Light from a lamp illuminates a metal electrode enclosed in an evacuated tube.  Electrons are ejected 
from  this  electrode,  travel  to  the  collecting  electrode  (A)  and  then  flow  around  the  circuit  in  which  an 
ammeter can measure the current.  The kinetic energy of the ejected electrons can be determined by 
applying  a  potential  difference  between  the  emitting  and  collecting  electrodes  using  an  adjustable 
source.  With the polarity as shown the collector exerts a repulsive force on the electrons.  A potential 
can therefore be applied which will just stop the flow of electrons from the emitter to the collector.  This 
potential is known as the stopping voltage. 
13-21 Fig 19 Apparatus for the Investigation of the Photoelectric Effect 
Lamp
Emitter
Collector
A
+
-–
Ammeter
V
28.  It can be shown experimentally that the kinetic energy of the electrons increases linearly with the 
frequency of the incident light as shown in Fig 20.  Below a certain frequency, the light is incapable of 
ejecting electrons; this frequency, f1, in Fig 20 is called the threshold frequency. 
13-21 Fig 20 Variation of Kinetic Energy with Frequency 
y
rg
e
n
E
tic
e
in
K
f1
Frequency
29.  The  energy  of  waves  depends  upon  intensity  and  not  frequency  and,  therefore,  the  wave  model 
would predict that the kinetic energy of the ejected electrons would increase with increasing intensity.  
Thus, the wave model is at variance with the experimental result. 
Page 13 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
30.  The particle model assumes that monochromatic light of frequency f comprises identical particles 
each  carrying  energy  hf  where  h  is  a  constant  known  as  Planck’s  constant.    The  particles  of  light 
(known  as  photons)  collide  with  electrons  in  the  metal  and  the  energy  hf  carried  by  a  photon  is 
transferred  to  an  electron.    When  the  frequency  of  the  light  is  below  the  threshold  frequency,  the 
energy  carried  by  the  photon  is  insufficient  to  free  even  the  weakest  bound  electrons  from  the  metal 
and  all  of  the  photon’s  energy  is  converted  into  heat.    Once  the  frequency  exceeds  the  threshold 
frequency then the energy is sufficient to free electrons from the metal and also to give the electrons 
some kinetic energy.  The higher the frequency, the higher the photon energy, and thus the higher will 
be the ejected electron’s kinetic energy. 
The Measurement of Light 
31.  Visible light is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, just like radar and X-rays (see Fig 3).  As with all 
electromagnetic radiation, it can be measured in terms of both frequency (4.3 × 1014 Hz to 7.5 × 1014 Hz) and 
wavelength  (0.4  ×  10-6  Hz  to  0.7  ×  10-6  Hz).    However,  valid  though  these  measurements  are,  they  do  not 
convey information about how light is perceived by the human eye.  The concepts of power, brightness, and 
illumination need to be considered. 
32.  It is beyond the scope of AP 3456 to discuss photometrics (the study and measurement of visible 
light) in great detail.  The definitions given in the following paragraphs represent a simplified approach 
to light which should suffice for aircrew purposes. 
33.  The  'power'  of  traditional  electric  filament  light  bulbs  was  usually  stated  in  watts,  the  most 
common types being 60 watts and 100 watts.  However, the watt rating only refers to how much power 
the bulbs consume, not how much light they give out.  Over 80% of the energy consumed is used to 
heat the filament to make it glow and emit light.  Modern compact fluorescent (CF) bulbs generate light 
by 'gas discharge' and are much more energy efficient.  For the same light output, CF bulbs consume 
about a quarter of the energy of filament bulbs.  Typical light output for a conventional 100-watt bulb is 
about 1750 lumens.  This same output can be generated by a CF bulb rated at 27 watts. 
34.  The 'lumen' is the SI unit of light flow or 'luminous flux' and is the most common measurement of 
light output.  The relationship between lumens, lux and candela is shown in Fig 21.  The candela is the 
SI unit of luminous intensity and, in very simple terms, is the amount of light generated by a 'standard' 
candle.    A  typical  100-watt  incandescent  filament  light  bulb  has  a  luminous  intensity  of  about  120 
candelas.    Light  level,  illumination  or  illuminance  is  measured  in  lux  (or  millilux,  where  1  lux  =  1000 
millilux).    In  simple  terms,  1  lux  is  the  light  level  obtained  when  a  candle  is  held  one  meter  from  a 
subject  in  a  darkened  room.    If  the  candle  is  held  one  foot  away  from  the  subject,  the  light  level 
obtained  is  obviously  higher  (this  is  the  old  imperial  measure  of  illuminance,  known  as  one  'foot-
candle', which is approximately equal to 10 lux).  To light a surface of one square meter evenly at 1 lux 
requires 1 lumen of total light, i.e. 1 lux = 1 lumen/m2. 
Page 14 of 15 


AP3456 – 13-21 - The Nature of Light 
13-21 Fig 21 Illustration of Common Lighting Measurements 
Power of
Luminous Intensity
Light Source
(candela)
Flow of
Luminous Flux
Light Energy
(lumen)
Illumination
Illumination
on Surface
(lux)
35.  Outside on a clear summer day, in the UK, the light level is about 10,000 lux.  Outdoor light levels 
for different conditions are shown in Table 1. 
Table 1 Typical Outdoor Light Levels 
Condition 
Illumination (lux) 
Full daylight 
10,000 
Overcast day 
1,000 
Very dark day 
100 
Twilight 
10 
Full Moon 
0.1 
Starlight 
0.001 (1 millilux) 
Overcast night 
0.0001 
36.  In buildings, light levels are considerably reduced, and artificial lighting may be required depending on 
the tasks being undertaken.  Table 2 shows recommended light levels for various indoor situations. 
Table 2 Recommended Indoor Light Levels 
Location/Activity 
Illumination (lux) 
Warehouses, Homes, Theatres 
150 
Normal Office Work, Library, Showrooms, Laboratories 
500 
Supermarkets, Mechanical Workshops 
750 
Operating Theatres, Normal Drawing Work 
1,000 
Detailed Drawing Work, Very Detailed Mechanical Work 
1500 - 2000 
Page 15 of 15 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
CHAPTER 22 - MIRRORS AND LENSES 
Introduction 
1. 
This chapter will deal with the formation of images by mirrors and lenses.  Images will be described as 
upright  or  inverted,  magnified  or  diminished,  real  or  virtual,  and  sometimes  reversed.    Whereas  most  of 
these terms are straightforward, the terms 'real' and 'virtual' need some explanation. 
2. 
If rays of light coming from a point (the object) are caused to converge to a second point, the second 
point  is  called  the  image  and  is  a  real  image.    If,  however,  rays  of  light  coming  from a point are made to 
appear to diverge from a second point, the second point is a virtual image.  It will become apparent that an 
image formed by a mirror will be real if object and image are on the same side of the mirror, whereas with a 
lens the image is real if it occurs on the opposite side of the lens to the object.  Further differences are that a 
real image can be projected on to a screen whereas a virtual image cannot, and real images are inverted 
whilst virtual images are upright. 
MIRRORS 
Plane Mirrors 
3. 
Fig 1 shows a straight-line object, AB, being reflected in a plane mirror MM′.  The image of AB can be 
determined  by  considering  its  end  points.    Two  incident  rays  are  drawn from each point to the mirror and 
produced according to the laws of reflection.  Both pairs of reflected rays are then extended behind themirror.  
Thus,  the  reflected  pair  of  rays  coming  from  A  converge  at  A′  and  the  pair  from B converge at B′.  If the 
points A′ and B′ are joined by a straight line then the complete image of AB is produced. 
13-22 Fig 1 Reflection of an Object in a Plane Mirror 
M'
A
A'
Object
Image
B
B'
M
4. 
Fig  2  shows  the  paths  of  the  rays  of  light  required  for  an  eye  to  see  the  image  in  a  mirror.  
Measurement will show that the image is as far behind the mirror as the object is in front and that the 
size  of  the  image  is  the  same  as  that  of  the  object.    The  image  is  reversed  and  virtual.    Everyday 
experience in the use of plane mirrors will confirm that the image is upright. 
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
13-22 Fig 2 Viewing an Image in a Plane Mirror 
M'
A
A'
Image
Object
B
B'
Eye
M
Curved Mirrors 
5. 
The  commonest  types  of  curved  mirrors  are  those  consisting  of  a  portion  of  the  surface  of  a 
sphere; they may be either concave or convex.  The centre of the sphere, of which the curved mirror is 
a part, is called the centre of curvature, and its radius is called the radius of curvature.  A line drawn 
from the centre of curvature to the centre of the mirror surface is called the principal axis.  These terms 
are illustrated in Fig 3. 
13-22 Fig 3 Features of a Spherical Mirror 
Radius of  
Curvature
Principal Axis
CC
Centre of  
Curvature
6. 
Consider Fig 4.  If the rays of light falling on a curved mirror are parallel to the principal axis, they 
are reflected from a concave mirror so that they converge at one point, and from a convex mirror such 
that they appear to diverge from one point.  This point is called the principal focus (F).  The distance 
from the principal focus to the centre of the mirror is called the focal length and is approximately equal 
to half the radius of curvature. 
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
13-22 Fig 4 Spherical Mirror - Reflection of Rays Parallel to the Principal Axis 
CC
F
F
Principal 
Axis
7. 
If  a  source  of  light  is  at  or  near  the  principal  focus  of  a  spherical  concave  mirror,  the  light  rays 
striking the mirror near its centre are reflected parallel to the principal axis.  The rays striking the edge 
of the mirror are reflected so that they diverge.  Parallel rays could be produced from all points on the 
mirror by altering the shape to a parabola, as shown in Fig 5. 
13-22 Fig 5 Comparison of Spherical and Parabolic Curved Mirrors 
Source
Source
Sypherical Curve
Parabolic Curve
Images in Curved Mirrors 
8. 
The  position  and  size  of  an  image  produced  by  a  curved  mirror  can  be  determined  by  the 
technique  of  ray  tracing.  The behaviour of certain rays from an object can be easily determined and 
drawn as follows: 
a. 
Rays  parallel  to  the  principal  axis  will  be  reflected  through,  or  appear  to  diverge  from,  the 
principal focus. 
b. 
Rays passing through the centre of curvature will be reflected along the same line. 
9. 
Fig 6 illustrates the principle applied to an object reflected in a convex mirror.  F is the principal focus 
and C is the centre of curvature.  Rays from points A and B on the object, parallel to the principal axis, are 
reflected as if they diverged from F.  Rays from A and B, which would pass through C if extended behind the 
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
mirror, are reflected back along the same path.  The image is virtual, upright and smaller than the object.  
These characteristics are true regardless of the object’s distance from the mirror. 
13-22 Fig 6 Formation of Image in a Convex Mirror 
A
A'
F
CC
B'
B
10.  Images in concave mirrors are real unless the object is placed between the principal focus and the 
mirror.  The image increases in size as the object is brought from infinity towards the mirror, attaining 
the same size as the object when the object reaches the centre of curvature and being magnified when 
the object is inside the centre of curvature. 
11.  Fig 7 shows how ray tracing can be used to determine the position and size of an image produced 
by  a  concave  mirror.    In  Fig  7a  the  object  is  outside  the  centre  of  curvature;  in  Fig  7b  the  object  is 
inside the principal focus. 
13-22 Fig 7 Formation of Images in Concave Mirrors 
a
b
A
A'
Virtual 
A
Image
CC
CC
F
B'
B
F'
B'
A'
B
12.  The  position  of  the  image  produced  by  a  spherical  curved  mirror  can  be  determined  from  the 
equation: 
1
1
1
+ =
v
u
f
where u = object distance, v = image distance and f = focal length. 
13.  In  order  for  the  equation  to  differentiate  between  real  and  virtual  images  a  sign  convention  is 
necessary.  The 'real is positive' convention is normally used, and the following rules apply: 
a. 
A concave mirror has a positive focal length. 
b. 
A convex mirror has a negative focal length. 
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
c. 
Real objects are assigned a positive u value. 
d. 
Real images have positive v values. 
e. 
Virtual images have negative v values. 
The formula will automatically generate the correct sign for any derived distance. 
14.  Magnification.  The linear magnification due to a mirror is the ratio of the height of the image to the 
height of the object.  In Fig 8, where A′B′ is the image of AB and the triangles ABP and A′B′P are similar: 
A' B'
PB'
v
m =
=
=
AB
PB
u
Thus when the image is further from the mirror than the object is, the magnification will be greater than 
one, and vice versa.  When a real object produces a real image the magnification is positive whilst if a 
virtual image is produced the magnification is negative.  By rearranging the formula in para 12, it can 
be shown that magnification can be expressed in terms of v and f, or u and f as follows: 
v − f
f
m =
, or  m =
f
u - f
13-22 Fig 8 Magnification in a Concave Mirror 
A
B'
F
P
B
A'
LENSES 
Description 
15.  A  lens  is  a  portion  of  a  transparent  medium  bounded  by  two  curved  surfaces.    Most  lenses  are 
made of glass or plastic, and their surfaces are portions of spheres or cylinders.  Only spherical lenses 
(of which there are two basic types), will be described here: 
a. 
Convex  Lenses.    These  are  thicker  at  the  centre  than  at  the  edges  and  are  known  as 
converging lenses (Fig 9a). 
b. 
Concave  Lenses.    These  are  thinner  at  the  centre  than  at  the  edges  and  are  known  as 
diverging lenses (Fig 9b). 
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
13-22 Fig 9 Convex and Concave Lenses 
a Convex Lenses 
b Concave Lenses 
16.  Lenses  have  two  surfaces,  each  of  which  may  be  considered  to  be  part  of  a  spherical  surface,  and 
therefore have a centre of curvature.  A straight line joining the two centres of curvature is called the principal 
axis and is perpendicular to the surfaces where it passes through them as, shown in Fig 10. 
13-22 Fig 10 Principal Axis of Convex Lens 
Radii of 
Curvature
Principal 
CC
CC
Axis
Lens
17.  The  principal  focus  is  the  point  on  the  principal  axis  to  which  all  rays  which  are  close  to  and 
parallel to the axis converge, or from which they appear to diverge, after refraction.  The optical centre 
is  a  fixed  point  for  any  particular  lens  and  coincides  with  the  geometric  centre  of  a  symmetrical  lens 
(see para 20).  The distance from the principal focus to the optical centre of a lens is called the focal 
length.  These terms are illustrated in Fig 11. 
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
13-22 Fig 11 Lens Terminology 
Optical 
Centre
Principal 
Focus
Focal 
Length
Optical 
Centre
Principal
Focus
Focal 
Length
18.  Refraction by Convex Lenses.  A convex lens is approximately the same as two prisms placed 
base  to  base.    Fig  12  shows  parallel  rays  of  light  falling  on  a  pair  of  prisms.    At  O  the  ray  AO  is 
refracted towards the normal NF.  As it leaves the prism at B it is refracted away from the normal BE 
along the line BC.  The feature to be noted is that light is bent towards the base or thicker part of the 
prism.    Similarly,  when  light  rays  parallel  to the principal axis fall on a convex lens they are refracted 
towards the thick part of the lens as shown in Fig 13. 
13-22 Fig 12 Refraction by Two Prisms 
N
E
A
O F
B
C
13-22 Fig 13 Refraction by Convex Lens 
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
19.  Refraction  by  Concave  Lenses.    A  concave  lens  is  approximately  the  same  as  the  prism 
arrangement shown in Fig 14.  The parallel rays of light are refracted towards the base of each prism 
and  therefore  diverge.    Similarly,  the  lens  in  Fig  15  causes  light  rays  parallel  to  the  principal  axis  to 
diverge, apparently from a point F which is called the virtual focus. 
13-22 Fig 14 Refraction by Two Prisms 
13-22 Fig 15 Refraction by a Concave Lens 
F
Images Formed by Lenses 
20.  The ray tracing technique can equally be applied to the formation of images by lenses.  The rays 
of  use  are  similar  to  those  employed  in  the  case  of  mirrors.    A  ray  parallel  to  the  principal  axis  will 
emerge  to  pass  through  the  principal  focus  in  the  case  of  a  converging  lens  or  will  appear  to  have 
passed through the principal focus in the case of a diverging lens.  As light paths are reversible, a ray 
which passes through the principal focus before entering a convex lens, or which would have passed 
through  the  principal  focus  had  it  not  been  intercepted  by  a  concave  lens,  will  emerge  parallel  to  the 
principal  axis.    Finally  a  ray  coincident  with  the  principal  axis  will  be  undeviated;  in  practice  provided 
that the thickness and diameter of the lens are small compared with its focal length, and provided that 
the location of the object or image point is not too far from the axis, then this non deviation rule can be 
generalized to include all rays passing through the optical centre. 
21.  Fig 16 shows the formation of an image by a concave lens.  The image is always virtual, upright 
and  smaller  than  the  object.    Fig  17  illustrates  the  formation  of  a  real  image  by  a  convex  lens  and 
Fig 18 shows the formation of a virtual image by a convex lens. 
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
13-22 Fig 16 Formation of Virtual Image of Concave Lens 
A
A'
F
B'
B
13-22 Fig 17 Formation of Real Image by Convex Lens 
A
B'
F
F
B
A'
13-22 Fig 18 Formation of Virtual Image by Convex Lens 
A'
A
F
F
B
B'
1
1
1
22.  The  formula: 
+ =   is  equally  applicable  to  lenses  as  it  is  to mirrors, using the same sign 
v
u
f
convention; convex lenses having positive focal lengths, concave lenses having negative focal lengths.  
The magnification formula is also the same as for mirrors. 
Lens Power 
23.  A thick lens with sharply curved surfaces bends light rays more than a thin flat lens does; it has a 
shorter focal length.  The ability of a lens to refract light rays is a measure of its power.  The power is 
measured in dioptres (symbol D) and if the focal length (f) is measured in metres then: 
1
D = f
The power of a convex lens is positive and that of a concave lens is negative. 
24.  If  two  lenses  are  placed  in  contact  then  the  resultant  power  can  be  obtained  by  summing  the 
powers of the individual components lenses. 
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-22 - Mirrors and Lenses 
Lens Defects 
25.  Spherical Aberration.  Particularly if a lens has a wide aperture, rays parallel to the principal axis 
and passing through the periphery of the lens converge to a point which is nearer to the lens than the 
point to which a narrow central beam of parallel rays converge.  At P in Fig 19, the central parts of the 
object are blurred whilst the peripheral portions are distinct.  At F the situation will be the reverse.  The 
distance PF is called the longitudinal spherical aberration.  Spherical aberration is more pronounced in 
thick lenses with short focal lengths than in thin lenses with long focal lengths. 
13-22 Fig 19 Spherical Aberration 
P
F
26.  Chromatic Aberration.  Since the refractive index of a prism or lens is greater for violet light than for 
red light, the lens may be considered as having a different focal length for each colour as shown in Fig 20. 
13-22 Fig 20 Chromatic Aberration 
Violet
Green
Orange
Red
Yellow
Blue
27.  Correcting  Aberrations.    Spherical  aberration  can  be  prevented  by  placing  an  adjustable 
diaphragm in front of the lens thus eliminating peripheral light rays.  Alternatively a compound lens can 
be used to correct for both spherical and chromatic aberration. 
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 13-23 - Infra-red Radiation 
CHAPTER 23 - INFRA-RED RADIATION 
Characteristics of Infra-red Radiation 
1. 
Infra-red (IR) radiation is electro-magnetic radiation and occupies that part of the electro-magnetic 
spectrum between visible light and microwaves.  The IR part of the spectrum is sub-divided into Near 
IR,  Middle  IR,  Far  IR  and  Extreme  IR.    The  position  and  division  of  the  IR  band,  together  with  the 
appropriate wavelengths and frequencies, is shown in Fig 1. 
13-23 Fig 1 Infra-red in the Electromagnetic Spectrum
Frequency (Hz)
4
6
8
10
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Ultra
Radio Waves
Microwaves
Infra-red
X-rays
Gamma Rays
Cosmic Rays
Violet
4
2
–2
–4
–6
–8
–10
–12
–14
10
10
1
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Wavelength(  ) m
Microwaves
Extreme IR
Far IR
Middle IR
Near IR
Visible
Ultra Violet
3
10
15
6
3
0.7
0.4
Wavelength (microns)
Note: One  micron ( ) = 10–6 metres and is now known as one micro-metre in the SI system.
2. 
All  bodies  with  a  temperature  greater  than  absolute  zero  (0  K,  –273  °C)  emit  IR  radiation  and  it 
may  be  propagated  both  in  a  vacuum  and  in  a  physical  medium.    As  a  part  of  the  electro-magnetic 
spectrum  it  shares  many  of  the  attributes  of,  for  example,  light  and  radio  waves;  thus  it  can  be 
reflected,  refracted,  diffracted  and  polarized,  and  it  can  be  transmitted through many materials which 
are opaque to visible light. 
Absorption and Emission 
3. 
Black Body.  The radiation incident upon a body can be absorbed, reflected or transmitted by that 
body.    If  a body absorbs all of the incident radiation then it is termed a 'black body'.  A black body is 
also an ideal emitter in that the radiation from a black body is greater than that from any other similar 
body at the same temperature. 
4. 
Emissivity  (ε).    In  IR,  the  black  body  is  used  as  a  standard  and  its  absorbing  and  emitting 
efficiency is said to be unity; i.e. ε = 1.  Objects which are less efficient radiators, (ε < 1), are termed 
'grey bodies'.  Emissivity is a function of the type of material and its surface finish, and it can vary with 
wavelength and temperature.  When ε varies with wavelength the body is termed a selective radiator.  
The ε for metals is low, typical y 0.1, and increases with increasing temperature; the ε for non-metals is 
high, typically 0.9, and decreases with increasing temperature. 
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-23 - Infra-red Radiation 
Spectral Emittance 
5. 
Planck’s Law.  A black body whose temperature is above absolute zero emits IR radiation over a 
range of wavelengths with different amounts of energy radiated at each wavelength.  A description of 
this energy distribution is provided by the spectral emittance, Wλ, which is the power emitted by unit 
area  of  the  radiating  surface,  per  unit  interval  of  wavelength.    Max  Planck  determined  that  the 
distribution of energy is governed by the equation: 
2
1
hc


c h 

Wλ  =  
kTλ
e
−1
5
λ


where 
λ 

Wavelength 


Planck’s constant 


Absolute temperature 


Velocity of light 


Boltzmann’s constant 
6. 
Temperature/Emittance  Relationship.    This  rather  complex  relationship  is  best  shown 
graphically,  as  in  Fig  2  in  which  the  spectral  emittance  is  plotted  against  wavelength  for  a  variety  of 
temperatures.    It  will  be  seen  that  the  total  emittance,  which  is  given  by  the  area  under  the  curve, 
increases  rapidly  with  increasing  temperature  and  that  the  wavelength  of  maximum  emittance  shifts 
towards the shorter wavelengths as the temperature is increased. 
13-23 Fig 2 Distribution of IR Energy with Temperature 
0.8
900 K
0.7
)
Wavelength of Max Emittance
1

µ2 0.6

m
c
0.5
(W
e
c
n
800 K
0.4
itta
m
E
0.3
t
n
ia
d
700 K
0.2
a
R
l
600 K
tra
0.1
c
e
500 K
p
S
0 0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
Wavelength (microns)
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-23 - Infra-red Radiation 
7. 
Stefan-Boltzmann Law.  The total emittance of a black body is obtained by integrating the Max 
Planck equation which gives the result: 
W = σT4
where 
W  = 
Total emittance  
 
 
σ 

Stefan Boltzmann constant  
 
 


Absolute temperature 
For a grey body, the total radiant emittance is modified by the emissivity, thus: 
W = εσT4
8. 
Wien’s Displacement Law.  The wavelength corresponding to the peak of radiation is governed 
by Wien’s displacement law which states that the wavelength of peak radiation (λm), multiplied by the 
absolute temperature is a constant.  Thus: 
λmT = 2900 μK 
By substituting λm = 2900/T into Planck’s expression it is found that: 
Wλm = 1.3 × 10-15 T5 expressed in Watts cm-2μ-1 
ie the maximum spectral radiant emittance depends upon the fifth power of the temperature. 
Geometric Spreading 
9. 
The laws so far discussed relate to the radiation intensity at the surface of the radiating object.  In 
general,  radiation  is  detected  at  some  distance  from  the  object  and  the  radiation  intensity  decreases 
with  distance  from  the  source  as  it  spreads  into  an  ever-increasing  volume  of  space.    Two  types  of 
source are of interest; the point source and the plane extended source. 
10.  Point  Source.    A  point  source  radiates  uniformly  into  a  spherical  volume.    In  this  case  the 
intensity of radiation varies as the inverse square of the distance between source and detector. 
11.  Plane Extended Source.  When the radiating surface is a plane of finite dimensions radiating uniformly 
from all parts of the surface then the radiant intensity received by a detector varies with the angle between 
the line of sight and the normal to the surface.  For a source of area A the total radiant emittance is WA.  The 
radiant emittance received at a distance d and at an angle θ from the normal is given by: 
WA cosθ
2πd2
IR Sources 
12.  It  is  convenient  to  classify  IR  sources  by  the  part  they  play  in  IR  systems;  ie  as  targets,  as 
background,  or  as  controlled  sources.    A  target  is  an  object  which  is  to  be  detected,  located  or 
identified  by  means  of  IR  techniques,  while  a  background  is  any  distribution  or  pattern  of  radiation, 
external  to  the  observing  equipment,  which  is  capable  of  interfering  with  the  desired  observations.  
Clearly what might be considered a target in one situation could be regarded as background in another.  
As  an  example  terrain  features  would  be  regarded  as  targets  in  a  reconnaissance  application  but 
would be background in a low-level air intercept situation.  Controlled sources are those which supply 
the power required for active IR systems (e.g. communications), or provide the standard for calibrating 
IR devices. 
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-23 - Infra-red Radiation 
Targets 
13.  Aircraft Target.  A supersonic aircraft generates three principle sources of detectable and usable IR 
energy.  The typical jet pipe temperature of 773 K produces a peak of radiation, (from Wien’s law), at 3.75μ.  
The exhaust plume produces two peaks generated by the gas constituents; one at 2.5 to 3.2μ due to carbon 
dioxide, the other at 4.2 tο 4.5μ due to water vapour.  The third source is due to leading edge kinetic heating 
giving a typical temperature of 338 K with a corresponding radiation peak at about 7μ. 
14.  Reconnaissance.  Terrestrial IR reconnaissance and imaging relies on the IR radiation from the 
Earth  which  has  a  typical  temperature  of  300  K.    The  peak  of  radiation  corresponding  to  this 
temperature is about 10μ and so systems must be designed to work at this wavelength. 
Background Sources 
15.  Regardless of the nature of the target source, a certain amount of background or interfering radiation 
will  be  present,  appearing  in  the  detection  system  as  noise.    The  natural  sources  which  produce  this 
background radiation may be broadly classified as terrestrial or atmospheric and celestial. 
16.  Terrestrial  Sources.    Whenever  an  IR  system  is  looking  below  the  horizon  it  encounters  the 
terrestrial background radiation.  As all terrestrial constituents are above absolute zero they will radiate 
in  the  infra-red,  and  in  addition  IR  radiation  from  the  sun  will  be  reflected.    Green  vegetation  is  a 
particularly strong reflector which accounts for its bright image in IR photographs or imaging systems.  
Conversely, water, which is a good reflector in the visible part of the spectrum, is a good absorber of 
IR, and therefore appears dark in IR images. 
17.  Atmospheric and Celestial Sources.  Whenever an IR device looks above the horizon the sky 
provides  the  background  radiation.    The  radiation  characteristics  of  celestial  sources  depend  on  the 
source temperature together with modifications by the atmosphere. 
a. 
The  Sun.    The  sun  approximates  to  a black body radiator at a temperature of 6,000 K and 
thus  has  a  peak  of  radiation  at  0.5μ,  which  corresponds  to  yel ow-green  light.    The 
distribution  of  energy  is  shown  in  Fig  3  from  which  it  will  be  seen  that  half  of  the  radiant 
power occurs in the infra-red.  The Earth’s atmosphere changes the spectrum by absorption, 
scattering and some re-radiation such that although the distribution curve has essentially the 
same  shape,  the  intensity  is  decreased and the shorter, ultraviolet, wavelengths are filtered 
out.    The  proportion  of  IR  energy  remains  the  same  or  perhaps  may  be  slightly  higher.  
Sunlight reflected from clouds, terrain and sea shows a similar energy distribution. 
b. 
 
13-23 Fig 3 Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation 
IR Spectral Region
y
rg
e
n
E
Above Atmosphere
d
te
ia
d
Through Atmosphere 
a
R
at Earth's Surface
e
tiv
la
e
R
0.1
0.3 0.5 0.7 1.0
5.0
Wavelength ( )
µ
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-23 - Infra-red Radiation 
b. 
The  Moon.    The  bulk  of  the  energy  received  from  the  moon  is  re-radiated  solar  radiation, 
modified  by  reflection  from  the  lunar  surface,  slight  absorption  by  any  lunar  atmosphere  and  by 
the Earth’s atmosphere.  The moon is also a natural radiating source with a lunar daytime surface 
temperature up to 373 K and lunar night time temperature of about 120 K.  The near sub-surface 
temperature remains constant at 230 K, corresponding to peak radiation at 12.6μ. 
c. 
Sky.    Fig  4  shows  a  comparison  of  the  spectral  distribution  due  to  a  clear  day  and  a  clear 
night  sky.    At  night,  the  short  wavelength  background  radiation  caused  by  the  scattering  of 
sunlight by air molecules, dust and other particles, disappears.  At night there is a tendency 
for the Earth’s surface and the atmosphere to blend with a loss of horizon since both are at 
the same temperature and have similar emissivities. 
d. 
 
13-23 Fig 4 Spectral Energy Distribution of Background Radiation from the Sky 
y
Clear Day Sky
rg
e
Clear Night Sky
e
n
tiv
E
la
d
e
te
R
ia
d
a
R
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
Wavelength (µ)
d. 
Clouds.  Clouds produce considerable variation in sky background, both by day and by night, 
with the greatest effect occurring at wavelengths shorter than 3μ due to solar radiation reflected 
from cloud surfaces.  At wavelengths longer than 3μ, the background radiation intensity caused by 
clouds  is  higher  than  that  of  the  clear  sky.    Low  bright  clouds  produce  a  larger  increase  in 
background  radiation  intensity  at  this  wavelength  than  do  darker  or  higher  clouds.    As  the  cloud 
formation changes the sky background changes and the IR observer is presented with a varying 
background both in time and space.  The most serious cloud effect on IR detection systems is that 
of the bright cloud edge.  A small local area of IR radiation is produced which may be comparable 
in area to that of the target, and also brighter.  Early IR homing missiles showed a greater affinity 
for  cumulus  cloud  types  than  the  target  aircraft.    Discrimination  from  this  background  effect 
requires the use of spectral and spatial filtering. 
IR Transmission in the Atmosphere 
18.  Atmospheric  Absorption.    The  periodic  motions  of  the  electrons  in  the  atoms  of  a  substance, 
vibrating and rotating at certain frequencies, give rise to the radiation of electro-magnetic waves at the 
same frequencies.  However, the constituents of the Earth’s atmosphere also contain electrons which 
have  certain  natural  frequencies.    When  these  natural  frequencies  are  matched  by  those  of  the 
radiation  which  strikes  them,  resonance  absorption  occurs  and  the  energy  is  re-radiated  in  all 
directions.    The  effect  of  this  phenomenon  is  to  attenuate  certain  IR  frequencies.   Water vapour and 
carbon  dioxide  are  the  principle  attenuators  of  IR  radiation  in  the  atmosphere.    Figs  5a,  5b  and  5c 
show the transmission characteristics of the atmosphere at sea-level, at 30,000 ft and at 40,000 ft. 
19.  Scattering.    The amount of scattering depends upon particle size and particles in the atmosphere 
are rarely bigger than 0.5μ, and thus they have little effect on wavelengths of 3μ or greater.  However, 
once moisture condenses on to the particles to form fog or clouds, the droplet size can range between 0.5 
and  80μ,  with  the  peak  of  the  size  distribution  between  5  and  15μ.    Thus  fog  and  cloud  particles  are 
comparable  in  size  to  IR  wavelengths  and  transmittance  becomes  poor.    Raindrops  are  considerably 
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-23 - Infra-red Radiation 
larger than IR wavelengths and consequently scattering is not so pronounced.  Rain, however, tends to 
even out the temperature difference between a target and its surroundings. 
13-23 Fig 5 Atmospheric Transmittance vs. Altitude 
  Transmittance at Sea Level 
) 100
(%
80
n
tic
io
60
s
ris
is
te
m
c
40
s
n
ra
a
20
ra
h
T
C
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wavelength (Microns)
b   Transmittance at 30,000 ft 
) 100
(%
80
n
tic
io
60
s
ris
is
te
m
c
40
s
n
ra
a
20
ra
h
T
C
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wavelength (Microns)
c   Transmittance at 40,000 ft 
) 100
(%
80
n
tic
io
60
s
ris
is
te
c
40
m
s
n
ra
a
20
ra
h
T
C
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wavelength (Microns)
20.  Scintillation.  Where a beam of IR passes through regions of temperature variation it is refracted 
from  its  original  direction.    Since  such  regions  of  air  are  unstable,  the  deviation  of  the  beam  is  a 
random, time varying quantity.  The effect is most pronounced when the line of sight passes close to 
the earth and gives rise to unwanted modulations of the signal, and incorrect direction information for 
distant targets. 
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-24 - Lasers 
CHAPTER 24 - LASERS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  laser  is  a  device  that  emits  an  extremely  intense  beam  of  energy  in  the  form  of  electro-
magnetic  radiation  in  the  near  ultra-violet,  visible,  or  infra-red  part  of  the  electromagnetic  spectrum.  
The  word  LASER  is  an  acronym  derived  from  the  definition  of  its  function,  Light  Amplification  by 
Stimulated Emission of Radiation.  The word has been so integrated into the English language that it is 
no  longer  written  in  capital  letters,  as  are  most  acronyms.    Indeed,  in  technical  circles,  its  use  has 
spawned a verb, to lase, which describes the action of using a laser.  Unlike the radiation from other 
sources,  laser  light  is  monochromatic  (single  wavelength),  coherent  (all  waves  in  phase),  and  highly 
collimated  (near  parallel  beam).    Since  the  first  laser  was  constructed  in  1960  in  California,  the 
development has been rapid and uses have been found in a wide variety of civil and military spheres, 
including  surgery,  communications,  holography  and  target  marking  and  range-finding.    In  order  to 
understand  the  principle  of  operation  of  a  laser  it  is  first  necessary  to  appreciate  some  aspects  of 
atomic structure and energy levels. 
Atomic Energy Levels 
2. 
The  atom  consists  of  a  central  nucleus  containing  positively  charged  protons  and  neutral 
neutrons.    Surrounding  the  nucleus  are  negatively  charged  electrons.    The  number  of  protons  and 
electrons are equal thus resulting in a net zero charge on the atom as a whole.  The electrons have a 
certain energy level due to the sum of their kinetic energy and electrostatic potential energy.  However 
electrons within an atom are constrained to exist in one of a series of discrete energy levels.  In normal 
circumstances the electrons will adopt the minimum energy levels permitted and the atom is then said 
to  be  in  its  ground  state.    In  order  for  electrons to enter a higher energy level, energy in one form or 
another has to be supplied.  If such a transition to a higher energy level occurs the atom is said to be in 
an excited state. 
3. 
Conventionally, the energy states of an atom can be shown on an energy level diagram as shown 
in Fig 1.  The horizontal lines represent the permitted energy levels, increasing upwards, separated by 
varying energy differences, ΔE.  The horizontal extent of the lines has no significance.  The base line is 
the  ground  state  i.e.  the  lowest  energy  level  in  which  atoms  will  normally  be  found  (A  in  Fig  1).    By 
supplying  energy,  it  may  be  possible  to  excite  an  atom  (B  in  Fig  1)  into  a  higher  energy  level.    This 
process is known as absorption. 
13-24 Fig 1 Atomic Energy Levels 
5
4
E3-4
3
B
2
E1-2
Energy
A
Ground State 1
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-24 - Lasers 
Emissions 
4. 
Spontaneous  Emission.    An  atom  in  an  excited  state  is  unstable  and  will  have  a  tendency  to 
revert  to  the  ground  state.    In  doing  so, it will emit the excess energy as a single quantum of energy 
known  as  a  photon,  a  process  known  as  spontaneous  emission.    If  a  large  population  of  atoms  are 
excited  into  higher  states,  as  for  example  in  a  fluorescent  lighting  tube,  then  they  will  occupy  a  wide 
band  of  energy  levels.    On  undergoing  spontaneous  emissions,  some  will  revert  to  the  ground  state 
directly whilst others will drop via intermediate levels.  In either case photons will be emitted with a wide 
range  of  energy  levels  corresponding  to  the  various  energy  level  differences.    The  frequency  of  the 
emitted energy is determined by the Planck-Einstein equation: 
E = hf 
where E is the photon energy, f is the frequency and h is Planck’s constant. 
Thus in a fluorescent tube, as there are a wide variety of energy level transitions, there will be a wide 
variety of frequencies in the emitted light giving the impression of white light.  It should be noted that 
what  transitions  occur  and  when  they  occur  is  a  random  process.    Equally  the  direction  in  which  the 
emitted photon is radiated is also random.  Thus the radiation generated by spontaneous emission is 
isotropic (i.e. radiating in all directions), non-coherent and covers a wide frequency band. 
5. 
Stimulated  Emission.    As  early  as  1917  Einstein  predicted  on  theoretical  grounds  that  the 
downward transition of an atom could be stimulated to occur by an incident photon of exactly the same 
energy  as  the  difference  between  the  energy  levels.    It  is  this  type  of  emission  that  is  exploited  in 
lasers.  This process is shown in Fig 2.  It should be noted that the incident photon is not absorbed and 
so  for  each  incident  photon,  two  photons  are  emitted,  each  of  which  can  stimulate  further  emissions 
providing that there are atoms in the higher energy level.  Furthermore, these emitted photons have the 
same energy, and therefore frequency, the same phase and are emitted in the same direction as the 
incident photons.  These are, of course, the characteristics of laser radiation. 
13-24 Fig 2 Stimulated Emission 
Incident Photon
f = E
E
f = E
h
h
Stimulated Emission
Ground State
6. 
Population Inversion.  In the normal course of events, however, most atoms are in the ground state 
and so incident photons are more likely to excite a ground state atom than to induce stimulated emission.  It 
is therefore necessary to ensure that there are more atoms in the appropriate higher energy level than in the 
ground  state,  a  situation  known  as  a  population  inversion.    The  process  by  which  this  is  achieved  will  be 
described with reference to the ruby laser which was the first lasing medium to be used. 
7. 
Optical Pumping.  Fig 3a illustrates the normal configuration with respect to the chromium atoms 
within a ruby crystal.  The diagram shows a number of atoms in the ground state and a number of as 
yet  unoccupied  higher  energy  levels.    It  should  be  noted  that  the  energy  levels  in  Fig  3  refer  to  the 
energy of the atom as a whole and not to the energy levels of the constituent electrons.  At the start of 
the  process  the  ruby  is  subjected  to  a  burst  of  intense white light generated by a system similar to a 
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-24 - Lasers 
photographic  electronic  flash  gun.    As  the  white  light  comprises  a  wide  range  of  frequencies  then  a 
whole  range  of  energies  will  be  imparted  to  the  ground  state  atoms.    Some  of  these  atoms  will 
therefore be excited to a range of higher energy levels (Fig 3b); a process known as optical pumping. 
13-24 Fig 3 The Stages of Operation in a Ruby Laser 
Optical Pumping
Atomic  Excitation
White  
Light
Population Inversion
Stimulated Emission
8. 
The  Metastable  State.    From  these  higher  energy  levels  spontaneous  emissions  will  occur  but 
whereas some will be due to transitions to the ground state, in the case of chromium the majority will 
decay to an intermediate level known as a metastable state as shown in Fig 3c from which atoms may 
emit  photons  at  random.    Nevertheless,  this  state,  apart  from  being  a  preferential  level,  has  the 
additional feature that atoms tend to remain there for a longer time (by a factor of some 1000s) than 
they do in any other level other than the ground state.  In this way a population inversion is achieved 
i.e. there are more atoms in the metastable state than in the ground state. 
9. 
Lasing Action.  Inevitably at some time an atom in the metastable state will make a spontaneous 
transition to the ground state with the emission of a photon.  This photon can now do one of two things; 
it  can  either  excite  a  ground  state  atom  into  a  higher  level  or  it  can  stimulate  an  excited  atom  in  the 
metastable  state  to  make  a  transition  to  the  ground  state.    Since  a  population  inversion  has  been 
achieved, then on balance it is more likely to stimulate emission than to be absorbed by a ground state 
atom (Fig 3d).  Thus lasing will be initiated.  At the end of this process all of the atoms will be back in 
the ground state ready for further optical pumping to start the cycle again. 
10.  Other  Techniques.    Optical  pumping  is  not  the  only means of achieving a population inversion.  
The helium-neon laser, for example, uses a different method.  The medium in this case is a mixture of 
helium  and  neon  gases  of  which  the  neon is responsible for lasing.  Energy is input to the helium by 
means of an electrical discharge and the energized helium atoms transmit their excess energy not by 
radiation  but  in  collisions  with  neon  atoms.    The  neon  atoms  are  excited  to  a  high  energy  level  such 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-24 - Lasers 
that there is a population inversion between this level and an intermediate level rather than with respect 
to  the  ground  state.    Stimulated  emission  therefore  occurs  between  these  two  higher  levels.    This 
process is illustrated in Fig 4.  Atoms in the bottom lasing level eventually decay spontaneously back to 
the ground state. 
13-24 Fig 4 The Processes in a Helium-Neon Laser 
Helium
Neon
Laser
Collisional Pump
Pump
Drain
Non-radiative 
Decay
11.  The  system  so  far  described  produces  monochromatic  and  coherent  radiation,  however  it  is  not 
very intense and is not emitted as a beam.  This is because the stimulating photons are incident upon 
the atoms from random directions and so the emitted photons follow, likewise, random directions.  In 
addition  there  will  of  course  be  a  proportion  of  random  spontaneous  emissions.    It  is  therefore 
necessary to ensure that as many photons as possible are travelling in the required direction.  This is 
achieved by having the lasing medium within an optical resonant cavity. 
The Laser 
12.  The features of the working laser are shown in Fig 5.  The optical resonant cavity is achieved by 
placing mirrors at each end of the lasing medium.  These mirrors are separated by an integral number 
of ½-wavelengths of the laser radiation and are accurately aligned perpendicular to the laser axis.  One 
of the mirrors is semi-transparent.  Photons travelling normal to the mirrors will be reflected backwards 
and forwards through the cavity and in the process will stimulate further emissions which will radiate in 
the  same  direction.  The n × ½-wavelength nature of the mirror separation ensures that the radiation 
stays  in  phase.    Off  axis  radiation  will  soon  be  lost  to  the  system  through  the  side  walls  allowing  the 
axial radiation to increase rapidly in relation to the non-axial radiation.  The semi-silvered mirror allows 
the highly directional beam to leave the cavity. 
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-24 - Lasers 
13-24 Fig 5 Laser Schematic 
Resonant Cavity
Fully-silvered
Semi-silvered
Mirror
Mirror
λ
L = n 2
Lasing Medium
L
13.  Q-switching.   A typical ruby laser as described will have a nominal output power of several kW 
and  a  pulse  length  in  the  order  of  a  millisecond.    For  many  applications  it  would  be  beneficial  to 
increase the power by reducing the pulse length.  The technique used to achieve this is known as Q-
switching.  Between the lasing medium and the fully silvered mirror is a glass cell containing a green 
dye.  Although the lasing action starts once the pumping commences, the green dye absorbs the red 
laser light preventing the build up of energy in the resonant cavity.  In doing so the molecules in the dye 
are raised to an excited state.  The concentration of the dye is arranged so that the dye molecules are 
all excited coincidently with the maximum number of atoms of chromium being in the metastable level.  
At this point the dye becomes transparent to the laser wavelength and there is then a very rapid build 
up of lasing action.  The pulse of laser radiation is delivered in about 10 nanoseconds, before the dye 
molecules return to the ground state and shut off the laser.  The output power can be increased to the 
order of hundreds of mW by this technique. 
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 – 13-25 - Nature of Sound 
CHAPTER 25 - THE NATURE OF SOUND 
Introduction 
1. 
A Definition of Sound.  Sound is the name given to the sensation perceived by the human ear.  
Every sound is produced by the vibration of the object from which it originates; thus, any explanation of 
the  nature  of  sound  must  include  a  discussion  of  vibratory  motion.    The  audible  sound  spectrum  is 
generally acknowledged to cover the frequency range from 15 to 20,000 hertz. 
2. 
Simple  Harmonic  Motion.    The  simplest  form  of  vibratory  motion  can  be  represented  by  the 
oscillation  of  a  pendulum  bob  swinging  through  a  small  angle.    If  the  displacement  of  the bob from the 
central position is plotted on a graph against time, the variation of the displacement with time gives rise to 
a sine curve as shown in Fig 1.  This motion is called simple harmonic motion, and could equally describe 
the vibration of a tuning fork.  The displacement of the bob can be described by the equation: 
2 t
π
d = a sin
……………………………..(1) 
T
where a and T are constants as shown in Fig 1. 
13-25 Fig 1 Simple Harmonic Motion 
d+
a
)
(d
e
c
n
ta
Time (t)
is
D
a
d–
T
(One Cycle)
3. 
Frequency,  Amplitude  and  Period.    In  Fig  1,  the  cycle  represents  one  complete  swing  of  the 
pendulum.  The frequency of the oscillation is defined as the number of cycles per second (1 cycle per 
second = 1 hertz (Hz)).  During one cycle, the bob twice attains maximum deflection from the central 
position.  The maximum distance displaced is called the amplitude, and in Fig 1 this is shown by the 
constant a.  The period of a vibration is the time it takes to complete one cycle.  The frequency can be 
expressed as: 
1
f =
…………………………………….(2) 
T
where f is the frequency and T is the period in seconds. 
4. 
Fourier’s  Theorem.    The  vibration  of  a  tuning  fork  is  the  nearest  audible  equivalent  to  the 
oscillation of a pendulum.  It can be shown that any vibratory motion which repeats itself regularly can 
be  represented  as  the  resultant  or  combination  of  simple  harmonic  frequencies  of  suitably  chosen 
amplitudes.  These frequencies must also be integral multiples of the frequency with which the motion 
repeats itself (Fourier’s Theorem).  Hence, equation (1) is the basis for describing the vibrations of all 
sounding objects. 
5. 
Medium  of  Transmission.    If  a  sound  source  is  placed  in  an  airtight  chamber  which  is  slowly 
evacuated of air, the sound will gradually die away as the vacuum increases.  Eventually the sound will 
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-25 - Nature of Sound 
cease,  although  it  can  be  seen  that  the  source  is  still  vibrating.    Such  an  experiment  can be used to 
demonstrate that a material medium such as air, water, wood, glass, or metal is required for the sound 
to be transmitted. 
The Propagation of Sound 
6. 
Transverse Waves and Longitudinal Waves.  The wave motion observed when the surface of a 
pond  is  disturbed  is  called  transverse  wave  motion,  because  the  particles  of  water  oscillate  at  right 
angles  to  the  direction  of  propagation  of  the  waves.    Sound  waves,  however,  are  propagated  as 
longitudinal waves.  In this kind of wave motion the particles oscillate, each about a fixed point, in the 
direction of propagation of the waves.  In Fig 2, the undisturbed particles of a medium are represented 
by equally spaced dots.  A similar set of particles is shown in Fig 3 being disturbed by the passage of a 
sound  wave  through  the  medium.    Each  particle  is  displaced  to  the  right  and  left  of  its  undisturbed 
position as the wave passes through the medium.  If the displacement of a single particle is plotted on 
the vertical axis of a time graph the familiar sine wave form of simple harmonic motion is produced as 
shown in Fig 4. 
13-25 Fig 2 Undisturbed Particles in a Medium 
13-25 Fig 3 Passage of a Sound Wave Through a Medium 
13-25 Fig 4 Longitudinal Wave Plotted in Graphical Form 
Wave Length (λ)
Left
Amplitude
Time
Right
7. 
Pressure Variations.  When the particles of a medium are displaced by the passage of a sound wave, 
there is a consequent local variation in pressure.  It is these small changes in pressure which actuate the 
human  ear  and  mechanical  devices  such  as  microphones.    Fig  5  shows  the  pressure  variations  that 
accompany the passage of a sound wave; they consist of alternate compressions and rarefactions. 
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-25 - Nature of Sound 
13-25 Fig 5 Pressure Variation in a Medium 
Compression
So
S un
u d 
d
So
S ur
u c
r e
c
Rarefaction
The Properties of Sound Waves 
8. 
Reflection.  Like light waves, sound waves are reflected from a plane surface such that the angle 
of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence.  It can also be shown that sound waves come to a focus 
when they are incident on a concave reflector. 
9. 
Reverberation.  If sound is generated within a large enclosed space it can be heard directly from the 
source and indirectly from reflected and diffused (multiple reflection) sound waves.  The indirect sounds are 
called reverberations and continue for a finite time after the sound source has been silenced. 
10.  Refraction.    Sound  waves  travel  faster  in  warm  air  than  in  cold  air  and  are  therefore  refracted 
when  there  is  a  temperature  gradient.    Refraction  also  occurs  in  water  and  other  media  because  of 
changes in the velocity of sound. 
11.  Interference.    If  two  sound  sources  are  of  the  same  frequency  and  intensity,  and  are  initially  in 
phase  (i.e.  coherent)  they  will  interfere  with  each  other  and  will  cancel  or  reinforce  according  to  the 
path difference.  If the path difference is an odd number of half wavelengths, cancellation occurs and 
no sound is heard.  If it is an even number of half wavelengths, the sounds will reinforce and a louder 
sound is heard. 
12.  The Wave-front.  If a single pulse of noise, such as an explosion, occurs in a medium, the paths 
followed  by  the  sound  waves  can  be  traced  by  placing  a  number  of  recording  microphones  in  the 
vicinity  and  noting  the  time  taken  for  the  sound  to  reach  each  microphone.    If  the  microphones  are 
located at specified ranges from the source, the points in space reached simultaneously by the sound 
can  be  plotted.    These  points  are  considered  to  lie  on  a  surface  called  the  wave-front,  and,  in  a 
homogeneous  medium,  the  direction  of  propagation  is  perpendicular  to  this  surface.    It  can  also  be 
observed that the sound is propagated outwards at a constant velocity. 
13.  Diffraction.  It is a common experience that it is possible to hear sound even when the source is 
behind an obstruction.  This 'bending' of sound waves (or indeed any other type of wave) around such 
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-25 - Nature of Sound 
an  obstacle  is  known  as  diffraction.    Although  the  mathematical  treatment  is  rather  complex,  a 
satisfactory explanation of the phenomenon can be made using Huygens’ principle.  Huygens’ principle 
states  that  all  points  on  a  wave  front  can  be  considered  as  point  sources  from  which  secondary 
wavelets are generated.  After a time interval, a new position of the wave-front will be established as 
the  surface  of  tangency  to  these  secondary  wavelets.    The  way  that  this  principle  accounts  for  the 
'bending' of sound around an obstacle is shown in Fig 6. 
13-25 Fig 6 Huygens’ Principle – 'Bending' Sound around an Obstacle 
Object
Wave-fronts
Source
The Velocity of Sound 
14.  Since the pressure variations produced by a sound wave are so rapid that no transfer of heat can occur, 
the process is considered to be adiabatic.  The velocity of sound (c) in a gas is found to be given by: 
p
γ
c =
………………………………….(3) 
ρ
where  γ is  the  ratio  of  the  specific  heat  at  constant  temperature to that at constant volume, p is the 
pressure, and ρ is the density. 
p
15.  Since 
= RT  in an ideal gas, where R is the specific gas constant and T is the temperature in K, 
ρ
equation (3) can be rewritten as: 
c =
γ RT ………………………………..(4) 
Therefore in a given gas, since γ and R are constants, c ∝ R T  within the range in which the gas obeys the 
ideal gas equation.  A working expression for the speed of sound in air at a temperature of t °C is given by 
the equation: 
−1
c = 3
( 30 + 0.6 t
1 )ms
t
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-25 - Nature of Sound 
p
In  equation  (3)  both  γ  and 
  are  constant  for  a  given  gas  at  a  specific  temperature, and from this it 
ρ
can be deduced that the velocity of sound in air is independent of pressure. 
16.  The velocity of sound in water is covered in Volume 13, Chapter 28. 
The Intensity of Sound 
17.  The  intensity  of  sound  at  any  place  is  defined  as  the  rate  of  flow  of  energy  across  unit  area 
perpendicular  to  the  direction  of  propagation.    If  a  sound  source  is  emitting  J  joules  of  energy  per 
second  uniformly  in  all  directions  it  can  be  calculated  that  the  energy  passing  through  unit  area  is 
proportional  to  the  inverse  square  of  the  distance  from  the  source.    The  intensity  of  sound  is  further 
attenuated by the absorption of energy by the medium through which it is propagated. 
The Doppler Effect 
18.  The  Doppler  effect  occurs  when  there  is  a  relative  velocity  between  the  sound  source  and  the 
observer. 
13-25 Fig 7 The Doppler Effect 
A
Obs X  
Obs Y  
B

c
b
a
Motion of 
Sound Source
Fig 7  shows  how  the  change  of  wavelength  and  hence  frequency  occurs  when  a  source  of  sound  is 
moving either towards or away from the observer.  The circles represented by A, B, C etc correspond 
to successive wave-fronts generated at a, b, c etc by the moving source.  It is clear that to the observer 
at X, passage of the wave-fronts will be more frequent (ie the observer will hear a higher pitched sound 
than was generated), while to the observer at Y, passage of the wave fronts will be less frequent (i.e. 
the observer will hear a lower pitched sound). 
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-25 - Nature of Sound 
19.  The  velocity  of  sound  in air of uniform temperature is constant, irrespective of any movement of 
the source or the observer.  However, any movement of the source will alter the wavelength of a sound 
in air and hence change the pitch of the sound heard by the observer.  If the component of velocity of 
the  source  towards  the  observer  is  Vs,  then  the  frequency,  f  ′,  of  the  note  heard  by  the  observer  is 
given by: 
c
f ′ = f0. c − Vs
where f0 = frequency of the note if heard from a stationary source, and c = velocity of sound in air.  Any 
movement of the observer alters the velocity of the sound relative to the observer, and this also results 
in  a  change  of  pitch.    If V0 is the component of velocity of the observer towards the source, then the 
frequency, f ′, of the note heard by the observer is given by: 
c + V
f ′ = f .
0
0
c
If  both  the  source  and  the  observer  are  moving  then  the  frequency,  f ′′,  of  the  note  heard  by  the 
observer is given by: 
c + 0
V
f ′ = f0. c − Vs
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-26 - Acoustic Measurement 
CHAPTER 26 - ACOUSTIC MEASUREMENT 
Introduction 
1. 
Sound consists of small variations in pressure above and below the ambient pressure with respect 
to  time.    It  may  be  depicted  diagrammatically  as  a  sine  curve  reflecting  the  gradual  increase  in 
pressure  to  a  maximum  and  its  subsequent  decrease  to  a  minimum.    The  maximum  excursion  of 
pressure difference from the ambient level is called the amplitude, but for practical purposes some kind 
of  average  value  over  time  is  required  that  gives  equal  weighting  to  both  the  rarefaction  and 
compression  phases.    This  'average'  value  is  known  as  the  root-mean-square  (RMS)  value,  and  its 
derivation is described below. 
2. 
Root-mean-square Value.  Fig la shows a graph of the sinusoidal sound pattern with amplitude 
on the y-axis.  The first stage, (Fig lb), is to square all the values of amplitude which has the effect of 
making  the  negative  values  positive.    The  squared  values  are  then  averaged,  (Fig  lc),  to  produce  a 
level value.  Finally, the square root of the average is taken (Fig 1d).  As with all other pressures, the 
units are newtons per square metre (Nm–2) or Pascals (Pa). 
13-26 Fig 1 Root-mean-square Derivation Sound Intensity 


2
(Pressure Difference)
Ambient Pressure
re
u
s
s
re
u
re
s
P
s
re
P


2
Average (Pressure Difference)
rms value
re
re
u
u
s
s
s
s
re
re
P
P
Sound Intensity 
3. 
Sound intensity is a measure of the power transmitted per unit area, the area being at right angles 
to the direction in which the sound is propagating.  For unhindered sound, away from the source, the 
intensity is proportional to the square of the pressure i.e.: 
I = kp2
where k is a constant determined by the medium through which the sound is travelling (e.g. for air at 
atmospheric  pressure  and  20  °C,  k = 1/410).    The  term  'sound  intensity'  is  used  in  some  reference 
books, but it is not used as a measure in underwater acoustics. 
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 13-26 - Acoustic Measurement 
Sound Pressure Level 
4. 
In  underwater  acoustics,  measurements  are  always  in  terms  of  sound  pressure  level  (SPL).  
Sound pressure levels cover a very wide range of values, for example the range from the threshold of 
hearing to the onset of pain is from 2 × 10–5 Pa to 20 Pa.  Using a linear scale over this range would 
be cumbersome, and so a logarithmic (decibel) scale is used relative to a datum pressure level.  The 
datum pressure that is chosen for sound in air is 2 × 10–5 Pa, which is equivalent to the lowest sound 
pressure  at  1,000  Hz,  detectable  on  average  by  people  with  normal  hearing.    In  underwater 
measurement, the datum pressure level is the micropascal, (1 × 10–6 Pa). 
5. 
As the energy contained in a wave is proportional to the amplitude squared, and if p is the sound 
pressure to be measured, then if the transmission was to take place in water: 
p2
SPL = 10 log
dB

1
( ×10 6 )2
p
=  20 log
dB

1×10 6
6. 
Note  that  a  significant  change  in  sound  pressure  level  is  represented  by  only  a  small  change  in 
decibel notation.  If the pressure from a noise source is doubled, this equates to 10 log 2 in dB, ie 3 dB.  
Thus, if the noise level from, say, a jet aircraft with four engines running was 140 dB, the same aircraft 
running  on  two  engines  would  generate  a  level  of  137  dB.    A  one  or  two  dB  difference  in  the 
measurement of acoustic pressure may therefore be significant in target detection. 
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
CHAPTER 27 - OCEANOGRAPHY 
Introduction 
1. 
Maritime  Patrol  Aircraft  are  tasked  with  the  location  of  submarines  using  acoustic  sensor 
equipment.  The aim of this chapter is to outline those aspects of the oceanic environment which have 
a  bearing  on  the  transmission  of  sound.    Details  of  how  acoustic  systems  are  affected  by  this 
environment are covered in Volume 13, Chapter 28. 
GEOLOGY AND STRUCTURE 
General 
2. 
The oceans are not simply depressions in the Earth’s surface filled with water, rather they have a 
fairly  complex  structure.    Fig  1  shows  a  cross  section  of  the  Earth’s  crust  between  Africa  and  South 
America and just into the eastern Pacific Ocean. 
13-27 Fig 1 Cross-section of the Earth’s Crust between Africa and South America 
75°W
15°E
Pacific Ocean
South America
South Atlantic Ocean
Africa
Continental Slope
Continental Shelf
Abyssal Plain Continental Slope
Continental Shelf
5 km
5 km
Trench
Continental Rise
Continental Rise
Ocean Ridge
0 km
Axial Rift
0 km
2.5 km
2.5 km
5 km
5 km
10 km
10 km
Vertical Exaggeration x 100
0
1000
2000
kms
3. 
In the centre of the Atlantic Ocean is what amounts to a mountain chain - the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.  This 
is part of a ridge system which extends from North of Iceland southwards into the South Atlantic, eastwards 
into  the  Indian  Ocean,  then  northwards  again  in  the  East  Pacific  before  disappearing  under  the  North 
American continent.  Its total length is over 50,000 km and its width between 1,000 and 4,000 km.  The ridge 
generally rises to about 2 km, occasionally 5 km, above the flanking plain, and the crest is normally about 2½ 
km below sea level.  The Mid-Atlantic Ridge has an axial rift and it is here that new ocean crust is created.  
This crust formation leads to the Atlantic widening at a rate of 2 to 4 cm/year. 
4. 
Adjacent to, and either side of, the ridge lie the abyssal plains which are in general relatively flat areas.  
This flatness is primarily due to a thick layer of sediment overlaying the rough topography which has been 
generated at the ridge.  In places this flatness is punctuated by abyssal hills and seamounts.  The majority of 
these  are  ocean  floor  volcanoes  and  most  do  not  rise above sea level; where they do, they form oceanic 
islands.    The  Pacific  Ocean  is  particularly  well  endowed  with  seamounts  some  of  which  are  very  large.  
Mauna Loa for example is about 100 km across at its base and rises to about 9 km above the plain, ie about 
as high as Mt.  Everest.  Many of these seamounts have flat tops and are known as guyots.  It is believed 
that  this  flat-topped  effect  was  caused  by  wave  erosion  at  a  time  when  the  volcano  was  at  or  above  sea 
level; with the passage of time, they have subsided below the surface. 
5. 
The  margins  of  the  Atlantic  and  Pacific  Oceans  are  rather  different.    The  Pacific  margin  is 
characterized  by  seismic  and  volcanic  activity  whereas  the  Atlantic  margin  is  aseismic.    This  is 
because  the  Pacific  margin  coincides  with  the  edge  of  a  crustal  plate,  whereas  in  the  case  of  the 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
Atlantic  the  ocean  and  the  adjacent  continents  are  on  the  same  plate.    This  difference  gives  rise  to 
characteristically different ocean floor topography. 
Atlantic Margin 
6. 
Fig  2  shows  the  typical  shape  of  an  Atlantic  style  ocean  margin.    The  continental  shelf  is 
geologically part of the continent rather than the ocean; the underlying rock type is not oceanic.  The 
shelf  is  normally  coated  with  sediments  derived  from  the  adjacent  land.    The  width  of  the  shelf  can 
extend to as much as 1,500 km although for the most part, it is less than this, typically a few hundred 
kilometres.  The surface is generally flat with an average gradient of only 0.1°.  At the shelf break the 
water depth varies between 20 and 500 m with an average of around 130 m. 
13-27 Fig 2 Typical Topography of an Atlantic Style Ocean Margin 
Continental Slope
0
) 1
Shelf Break
m
(k
th 2
p
e
D
3
4
5
Continental Shelf
Continental Rise
Abyssal Plain
6
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
1100
Vertical Exaggeration x 50
Distance From Shore (km)
7. 
Continental  Slope.    The  continental  slope  marks  a  sharp  increase  in  gradient  to  about  4°  on 
average.  The width of the slope is between 20 and 100 km and the base of the slope lies at a depth of 
between 1.5 and 3.5 km.  Frequently the slope is cut by submarine canyons along which sediment is 
transported to the deep ocean.  These canyons, which are somewhat similar to V-shaped river valleys 
on  land,  often  start  on  the  continental  shelf  and  commonly  coincide  with  the  mouths  of  major  rivers.  
The  end  of  the  continental  slope  marks  the  end  of  the  continental  crust  and  the  beginning  of  the 
oceanic crust. 
8. 
Continental Rise.  The continental rise has a much gentler gradient than the slope, about 1°, and 
is built up of the sediments which have flowed down the slope.  Typically, the continental rise extends 
for about 500 km and reaches a depth of some 4 km before merging into the abyssal plain. 
Pacific Margin 
9. 
The most significant difference between an Atlantic and a Pacific type margin is the presence of a 
very  deep  trench  in  the  latter  at  the  outer  edge  of  the  continental  slope.    In  general,  the  shelf  is 
narrower in the Pacific, about 50 km.  The shelf break tends to be more abrupt and the slope often has 
a  steeper  gradient,  up  to  about  10°  in  places.    The  continental  rise  is  missing  and  is  replaced  by  a 
trench which marks the site where the oceanic crust is being subducted beneath the continental crust.  
It is this subduction which gives rise to seismic and volcanic activity.  The trenches can reach depths of 
over 11 km, and a depth of 8 km would not be untypical.  In places the trench may be partly filled with 
land derived sediments. 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
SEAWATER 
Physical Properties 
10.  Salinity.    Salinity  is  a  measure  of  the  dissolved  solids  in  seawater.    It  is  usually  expressed  in 
values  of  parts  per  thousand  by  weight  (i.e.  gm  kg–1)  and  the  symbol  o/oo  is  used.    Surface  salinity 
represents  a  balance  between  an  increase  due  to  evaporation  and  freezing  on  the  one  hand,  and  a 
decrease  due  to  precipitation,  ice  melting,  and  river  influx  on  the  other  hand.    Despite  these  effects, 
salinity values do not vary greatly; between 30 and 40 o/oo at the extremes.  Minimum values occur in 
coastal regions with large river discharges and the maximum values occur in the Red Sea and Persian 
Gulf.  In the open ocean surface salinity values are even more conservative, varying between about 33 
and 37 o/oo.  The maximum values tend to occur around the tropics, where the effect of evaporation is 
at  its  highest.    In  low  and  middle  latitudes  salinity  decreases  with  depth  in  the  first  600  to  1000  m,  a 
zone known as a halocline, below which it becomes virtually constant at 34.5 to 35 o/oo. 
11.  Pressure.  Assuming constant density and a constant value for g (the acceleration due to gravity), then 
pressure varies virtually linearly with depth.  For 99% of the oceans, density remains within +2% of its mean 
value, and variations in g are very much smaller than this so the linear relationship is a reasonable model.  
The change is approximately 105 Nm–2 (1 bar or 1 atmosphere) per 10 m (33 ft). 
12.  Temperature.  The only agent for heating the oceans is incoming solar energy and the majority of 
this is absorbed within metres of the ocean surface.  All of the infra-red radiation is absorbed within one 
metre and only about 2% of the incident energy reaches 100 m.  A small amount of heat is transmitted 
to depth by conduction but mixing caused by wind and waves is the main mechanism for the transfer of 
heat.    This  turbulence  generates  a  mixed  surface-layer  which  may  be  up  to  200  m  thick  depending 
upon surface conditions, and therefore upon the season. 
13.  Permanent Thermocline.  Below this mixed layer, and down to about 1,000 m, the temperature 
falls rapidly.  This region is known as the permanent thermocline.  Underneath this, seasonal variations 
are virtually non-existent and there is a much shallower temperature gradient with temperature falling 
to between 0.5 ºC and 1.5 ºC.  This 3-layer model of the ocean temperature structure is illustrated in 
Fig 3 showing the variations with latitude. 
14.  Season  and  Latitude  Effects.    In  high  latitudes  (above  60º  N)  the  permanent  thermocline  is 
missing.  In mid-latitudes the 'classic' profile may be amended by a seasonal thermocline when surface 
waters are heated in spring and summer (Fig 3). 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
13-27 Fig 3 Depth/Temperature Profiles for Different Latitudes 
a   High Latitudes
b  Low Latitudes
c   Mid Latitudes
Temperature (°C)
Temperature (°C)
Temperature (°C)
–5
0
5
0
5
10
15
20
25
0
5
10
15
20
Surface Mixed Layer
500
Seasonal
Permanent Thermocline
Thermocline
1000
1500
2000
Deep Layer
2500
3000
15.  Diurnal Effects.  Diurnal variations in temperature are insignificantly small, usually less than 0.3 ºC in 
the open oceans although perhaps up to 3 ºC in shallow coastal waters. 
Waves 
16.  Formation.  Waves are another manifestation of the transfer of wind energy to the surface water.  
The  precise  mechanism  of  this  transfer  is  complex  and,  as  yet,  poorly  understood.    In  the  area  of 
formation,  waves  that  are  generated  will  consist  of  a  superimposition  of  waveforms  of  varying 
frequency  and  amplitude  depending  upon  the  wind  speed  and  the  fetch  (the  length  of  sea  area 
affected).    Higher  wind  speeds  lead  to  higher  waves,  but  eventually  a  state  of  equilibrium  will  be 
reached  with  the  excess  energy  being  dissipated  in,  for  example,  white  capping.    The  influence  of 
waves  is  only  felt  close  to  the  surface  and  waves  generated  by  a  severe  storm  would  be  virtually 
unnoticeable below about 100 m.  The characteristics of waves are illustrated in Fig 4. 
13-27 Fig 4 Characteristics of an Ocean Wave 
Wavelength
Crest
Wave
Height
Trough
Wave height - the linear distance between crest and trough
Wave length - the linear horizontal distance between corresponding points on consecutive waves
Wave period - the length of time for one complete cycle to pass a fixed point
17.  Swell.  Moving away from the area of generation the short period waves are dissipated, and only 
the  long  period  waves  remain.    These  are  known  as  swell  and  can  travel  large  distances  from  the 
generating area, typically thousands of kilometres. 
18.  Sea  Bed  Effects.    When  waves  enter  shallow  water,  they  are  affected  by  the  seabed  once  the 
depth is less than ½ the wavelength.  The front of the wave becomes steeper and eventually breaks. 
19.  Beaufort Scale.  The relationship between wind speed and sea state is expressed in the Beaufort 
Scale  which  may  be  used  for  estimating  wind  speed  on  land  and  at  sea.    It  should  be  noted  that,  at 
sea, the scale is valid only for waves generated locally, and providing adequate time has elapsed and 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
there  has  been  an  adequate  fetch  for  a  fully  developed  sea  to  become  established.    The  Beaufort 
Scale is explained in Table 1 at the end of the Chapter. 
Currents 
20.  Deep  Currents.    As  has  been  seen,  sea  water  is  not  homogenous  -  its  temperature  may  vary 
considerably,  and  there  may  be  minor  variations  in  salinity.    In  the  Antarctic  and  around  Greenland 
large masses of water are generated which are cold due to the interaction with the atmosphere, saline 
due  to  the  freezing-out  of  a  proportion  of  the  fresh  water,  and  therefore  somewhat  denser  than 
average.  This cold, dense water sinks and moves towards and across the Equator at depth.  Clearly 
there  will  be  boundaries  between  this  water  and  the  other  water  masses  that  it  encounters  with 
different  temperature  and  salinity  characteristics.    Similar  boundaries  exist  between  other  water 
masses  with  different  properties.    Examples  are  to  be  found  where  water  from  the  Baltic  enters  the 
North Sea and where Mediterranean water enters the Atlantic Ocean.  These boundaries are known as 
fronts and are analogous to meteorological fronts where different air masses meet. 
21.  Surface Currents.  Sea currents are generated by winds when some of the energy of air movement is 
transferred by friction to the ocean surface.  This leads to generalized zonal currents similar to the idealized 
coriolis-induced global patterns of surface winds illustrated in meteorological texts, and although this simple 
model  is  considerably  modified  by  the  presence  of  land  masses,  the  influence  of  these  winds  is  clearly 
discernable  in  Fig  5.    As  at  depth  there  will  be  fronts  between  water  masses  of  differing  characteristics, 
reflecting their different origins and histories.  Whereas some of these fronts will be more or less permanent, 
others will be of a temporary nature primarily due to seasonal effects. 
13-27 Fig 5 Generalized Surface Currents 
The Biological Environment 
22.  Life  Forms.    Ninety-eight  percent  of  marine  species  belong  to  the  benthic,  or  seabed-living  system.  
But, it is the remaining 2% of species, the pelagic or free-swimming system, which is of concern here.  The 
life forms can be divided into two main groups: the plankton and the nekton (there is a third small group, the 
pleuston, which includes the jellyfish, which live at the sea surface, but they are of no relevance here). 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
23.  The Plankton.  The plankton are the group of organisms, both plant and animal, whose powers of 
locomotion are insufficient to prevent them being transported by currents.  They range in size from less 
than  2  μm  up  to  just  over  2  cms.    As  a  large  proportion  of  the  plankton  (the  phytoplankton)  is 
responsible  for  photosynthesis  they  must  exist  in  that  part  of  the  ocean  to  which  light  can  penetrate, 
typically the top 100 m or so.  Virtually all plankton exhibit a diurnal variation of depth, rising near the 
surface at night and descending again just before sunrise. 
24.  The Nekton.  The nekton are those creatures which can swim with sufficient power to be more or 
less independent of water movement.  This group includes fish, cephalopods, and whales in the open 
ocean.  Often, they exhibit the same diurnal variation in depth as the plankton on which they feed. 
25.  The  Deep  Scattering  Layer.    The  diurnal  depth  variation  of  most  plankton  and  nekton  has 
already been described and this event occurs within the top 100 m or so of the ocean.  However, it is 
worth noting that there are some mainly carnivorous plankton and nekton which migrate between much 
greater depths.  Typically, they will spend the day at between 400 and 1000 m and the night at about 
200 to 300 m.  The significance of this group of organisms is that they can affect echo sounders and 
SONAR  equipment.    It  is  thought  that  the  reflection  of  sound  waves  is caused primarily by small fish 
possessing  air  bladders  and  by  prawn-like  creatures.    This  phenomenon  is  known  as  the  deep 
scattering layer and can be observed in all oceans. 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
Table 1 Sea State and Beaufort Wind Scale 
Wind Speed 
Wave 
Sea 
Beaufort 
Wind 
Name 
Characteristics 
Height 
State 
No 
Gusts 
knots 
ms-1
(m) 
Sea like mirror.  Complete calm.  Smoke 

Calm 

0.0-0.2 


rises vertically. 

Ripples  with  appearance  of  scales,  no 

Light Air 
1-3 
0.3-1.5 
foam  crests.    Wind  direction  shown  by 
0.1-0.2 

smoke drifts but not by wind vanes. 
Small  wavelets,  crests  have  glassy 
Light 
appearance  but  do  not  break.    Wind  felt 


4-6 
1.6-3.3 
0.3-0.5 

Breeze 
in  face,  leaves  rustle,  ordinary  vanes 
moved by wind. 
Large  wavelets,  crests  begin  to  form, 
Gentle 
scattered  white  horses.    Leaves  and 


7-10 
3.4-5.4 
0.6-1.0 

Breeze 
small  twigs  in  constant  motion,  wind 
extends light flag. 
Small  waves  becoming  longer,  fairly 
Moderate 
frequent  white  horses.   Wind raises dust 


11-16 
5.5-7.9 
1.5 

Breeze 
and  loose  paper;  small  branches  are 
moved. 
At  sea,  moderate  waves  assume  longer 
Fresh 
form,  many  white  horses  and  chance  of 


17-21 
8.0-10.7 
2.0 

Breeze 
spray,  crested  wavelets  on  inland  lakes.  
Small trees in leaf begin to sway. 
Large  waves,  extensive  white  foam 
Strong 
crests,  spray  probable.    Large  branches 


22-27 
10.8-13.8 
3.5 

Breeze 
in  motion,  umbrellas  used  with  difficulty, 
whistling in telegraph wires. 
Sea  heaps  up,  white  foam  begins  to  be 
Near 
blown  in  streaks.    All  trees  in  motion, 


28-33 
13.9-17.1 
5.0 

Gale 
inconvenience  felt  when  walking  against 
wind. 
Moderately high waves of greater length, 
crests  break  into  spindrift,  foam  well 


Gale 
34-40 
17.2-20.7 
7.5 
43-51 
blown  in  streaks.    Twigs  break  off,  wind 
impedes progress. 
High  waves,  dense  streaks  of  foam, 
Strong or 
spray  may  affect  visibility,  sea  begins  to 


Severe 
41-47 
20.8-24.4 
9.5 
52-60 
roll.    Slight  structural  damage  occurs 
Gale 
(chimney pots and slates removed). 
Very  high  waves,  overhanging  crests, 
sea  surface  white,  heavy  rolling  and 

10 
Storm 
48-55 
24.5-28.4 
12.0 
61-68 
visibility  reduced.    Trees  uprooted, 
considerable structural damage occurs. 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-27 - Oceanography 
Exceptionally  high  waves,  small  and 
Violent 
medium  sized  ships  lost  to  view  in 
11 
56-64 
28.5-32.7 
15.0 
69-77 
Storm 
troughs.    Widespread  wind  damage  on 
land. 
Air  filled  with  foam  and  spray,  sea 
completely  white  with  driving  spray.  
12 
Hurricane 
64+ 
32.7+ 
15+ 
78+ 
Visibility  greatly  reduced.    Structural 
damage to disaster level. 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
CHAPTER 28 - SOUND IN THE SEA 
Introduction 
1. 
Due to the rapid attenuation of other energy forms in the sea, e.g. light, the use of sound is one of 
the  few  methods  available  for  underwater  detection.    A  study  of  the  behaviour of sound in the sea is 
therefore important for operators of maritime patrol aircraft. 
2. 
Unlike light, which is a form of electromagnetic energy, sound involves the vibration of the medium 
through which it is transmitted.  So, whereas light can pass through a vacuum, sound cannot, generally 
travelling best through solids and liquids and somewhat less well through gases. 
3. 
The  wavelengths  of  sound  which  are  relevant  in  the  ocean  range  from  about  50  metres  to 
1 millimetre.  Assuming a velocity of sound in sea water of 1,500 ms-1, this corresponds to frequencies 
between  30  Hz  and  1.5  MHz.    Variations  in  the  velocity  of  sound  in  sea  water  and  their  effect  on 
propagation are in fact very important and will be examined in some detail. 
The Velocity of Sound in the Sea 
4. 
In Volume 13, Chapter 25 a simple equation relating the velocity of sound in air to specific heat, 
pressure  and  density  was  given.    Unfortunately,  this  simple relationship does not apply in liquids and 
although a mathematical treatment can be derived, it is rather complex.  However, it is possible to deal 
empirically with the variation of sound velocity with salinity, pressure and temperature.  An increase in 
any one factor will increase the sound velocity if all other factors remain constant.  In line with current 
practice,  changes  are  shown  in  units  of  feet,  pounds  per  square  inch  (psi)  and  ºF  rather  than  in  SI 
units.  The velocity of sound in sea water varies between 4,700 fts-1 and 5,100 fts-1. 
5. 
Salinity.    A  1  o/oo  increase  in  salinity  increases  the  sound  velocity  by  4.27  fts-1.    Unfortunately, 
there  is  no  method  of  readily  determining  salinity  from  a  maritime  patrol  aircraft  but  assuming  a 
constant  value  of  35  o/oo  is  normally  sufficient.    However,  caution  is  needed  in  those  areas  where 
salinity values are liable to be markedly different from the average, e.g. in coastal and ice melt areas. 
6. 
Pressure.  An increase in pressure of 44 psi, corresponding to a depth change of about 100 ft, will 
increase  the  sound  velocity  by  about  1.7  to  1.8  fts-1.    Fortunately,  pressure  increases with depth in a 
linear fashion and so velocity changes are easily predicted with fair accuracy. 
7. 
Temperature.    Of  the  3  factors  being  considered,  changes  in  temperature  have  the  greatest 
effect  on  sound  velocity.    A  0.5  ºC  (≡  1  ºF)  increase  in  water  temperature  will  cause  an  increase  in 
sound velocity of between 4 and 8 fts-1. 
8. 
Sound  Velocity  Profile.    Fig  1  shows  how  sound  velocity  varies  with  depth  in  a  typical  'Three-
layer  Ocean'.    This  variation  with  depth  is  known  as  a  sound  velocity  profile  (SVP).    The  following 
points can be deduced: 
a. 
There  is  an  increasing  velocity  down  through  the  surface  mixed  layer  due  to  the  effect  of 
increasing pressure (Temperature constant). 
b. 
There  is  decreasing  velocity  with  depth  in  the  thermocline  due  to  decreasing  temperature 
having a greater effect than increasing pressure. 
Page 1 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
c. 
There  is  increasing  velocity  down  through  the  deep  water  due  to  increasing  pressure 
(temperature constant). 
13-28 Fig 1 Sound Velocity Profile for a Typical 'Three-layer Ocean' 
Temperature
Velocity
A.
Surface Sound Velocity
A
is the velocity of sound,
usually in feet/sec or
Isothermal
metres/sec measured at the
Mixed Layer
ocean surface.
B
B.
Sonic Layer Depth is defined
as the depth of maximum
Thermocline
sound velocity in the upper
1,000 ft of the water column.
C
C.
Deep Sound Channel Axis is
defined as the depth of
minimum sound velocity, usually
found at the base of the
permanent thermocline.
Deep Water
D.
Bottom Sound Velocity is the
velocity of sound at the ocean
D
floor.
9. 
Temperature Gradient and Sound Velocity.  Temperature/depth profiles are readily obtained by 
MPA  crews  and  the  following  relationship  between  temperature  profile  and  sound  velocity  can  be 
expected: 
a. 
If temperature decreases with depth at a rate of 0.1 to 0.2 ºC/100 ft (0.2 to 0.4 ºF/100 ft) its 
effect  will  be  offset  almost  exactly  by  the  effect  of  the  increasing  pressure  with  depth.    This  will 
result in an ISOVELOCITY condition (i.e. no change in velocity with depth). 
b. 
If temperature decreases with depth at a rate of less than 0.1 to 0.2 ºC/100 ft (0.2 to 0.4 ºF/100 ft) 
then sound velocity will increase with depth and a POSITIVE velocity gradient will exist. 
c. 
If temperature decreases with depth at a rate greater than 0.1 to 0.2 ºC/100 ft (0.2 to 0.4 ºF/100 ft) 
then sound velocity will decrease with depth and a NEGATIVE velocity gradient will exist. 
d. 
If  temperature  remains  constant  with  depth,  this  is  termed  ISOTHERMAL  and  there  will  be 
velocity gradient of +2 (i.e. an increase in velocity of 2 fts-1 per 100 ft increase in depth). 
Refraction 
10.  When  sound  leaves  a  source,  it  can  be  considered  to  move  along  paths  known  as  rays  - 
analogous  to  light  rays.    As  with  light  (see  Volume  13,  Chapter  21,  Para  21),  if  the  medium  of 
transmission  is  homogenous,  then  these  rays  will  be  straight  lines  but  if  the  ray  moves  into  an  area 
where the velocity of sound is different then the ray will be bent, a phenomenon known as refraction. 
11.  The  effect  of  refraction  on  a  ray  passing through layers of different velocity is illustrated in Fig 2 
where the total ray path will be seen to be made up of a series of straight-line segments. 
Page 2 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
13-28 Fig 2 Refraction in a Layered Medium 
Velocity 
Profile
Layer 1
C1
1
2
Layer 2
C2
2
3
Layer 3
C3
3
12.  A useful mnemonic is the 'HALT' rule which states that rays will be refracted away from depths of 
relatively high velocity and towards depths of relatively low velocity: 
High Away, Low Towards 
Thus, in Fig 2 the ray moving from layer 1 to layer 2 (relatively low velocity) will be refracted towards 
layer  2  i.e.  θ2  >  θ1.    On  reaching  layer  3  (relatively  high  velocity)  the  ray  will  be  refracted  away  from 
layer 3 i.e. θ3 < θ2. 
13.  Applying this rule to the typical SVP in Fig 1, it will be seen that sound rays in the mixed surface 
layer will be refracted upwards away from the Sonic Layer Depth and sound rays in the thermocline will 
be refracted downwards until they pass the depth of the Deep Sound Channel Axis when they will be 
refracted upwards again.  The direction of propagation of a sound ray will therefore be determined by 
the ambient SVP. 
14.  Snell’s  Law.    The  degree  to  which  a  ray  is  bent  when  moving  from  an  area  of  one  velocity  to 
another is determined by Snell’s Law which states that: 
In a medium comprising discrete layers each of different sound velocity, the angles θ1, θ2, θ3 etc 
of a ray incident on and leaving a boundary between layers are related to the sound velocities, C1, 
C2, C3 etc of these respective layers such that: 
cos θ
cos θ
cos θ
1
2
3
=
=
 = a constant, for any given ray. 
C
C
C
1
2
3
15.  Limiting Ray.  When sound rays are refracted within a sea layer, one ray will eventually just graze or 
be  tangential  to  the  boundary  with  an  adjacent  layer,  or  to  the  sea  surface  or  ocean  bottom.    This  ray, 
which will continue to be refracted within the layer, is known as the limiting ray.  Rays which approach the 
layer boundary at a more perpendicular angle, will pass through it (or be reflected or absorbed). 
Shadow Zones 
16.  The HALT rule predicts that rays will be refracted away from depths of sound velocity maxima.  As a 
result, there often exists at these depths a region into which very little acoustic energy can penetrate; such 
Page 3 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
regions  are  termed  'Shadow  Zones'.    The  existence  of  such  a  zone,  and  its  relative  position,  depends 
upon  the  SVP.    Minor  amounts  of  energy  will  enter  the  shadow  zone  due  to  diffractive  and  scattering 
effects.  The nature of shadow zones in a variety of SVPs is shown in Fig 3 a-d. 
a. 
Isovelocity  Conditions  (Fig  3a).    In  isovelocity  conditions,  the  increase  in  sound  velocity 
due to increasing pressure with depth is offset by the effect of decreasing temperature with depth.  
Since there is no variation in velocity there is no refraction and sound rays travel in straight lines 
from the source. 
b. 
Negative Velocity Gradient (Fig 3b).  In this situation, the temperature decreases at a rate 
sufficient to overcome the pressure effect and so velocity decreases with depth.  Sound rays are 
refracted  downwards  away  from  the  higher  velocity  area.    A  shadow  zone  exists  above  and 
beyond the limiting ray. 
c. 
Positive  Velocity  Gradient  (Fig  3c).    In  the  situation  where  temperature  is  constant  or 
increasing  with  depth,  or  at  least  does  not  fall  at  a  rate  to  override  the  pressure  effect,  then  a 
positive velocity gradient will be established.  Sound rays will be refracted upwards away from the 
higher velocity area and a shadow zone exists below and beyond the limiting ray. 
d. 
Positive over Negative Velocity Gradient (Fig 3d).  The combination of a positive velocity 
gradient  above  a  negative  velocity  gradient  produces  a  split  beam  effect  at  the  depth  of  the 
velocity gradient change.  The limiting ray and all rays above it are refracted upwards away from 
the  higher  velocity  area.    All  rays  below  the  limiting  ray  are  similarly  refracted  downwards.    A 
shadow zone will exist beyond the limiting ray(s). 
Sound Transmission Modes (Paths) 
17.  Clearly sound energy can travel directly underwater from the source to the detector, affected only 
by  'bending'  due  to  refraction.    In  general,  however,  direct  rays  achieve  only  relatively  short  ranges.  
The  range  is  normally  determined  by  the  limiting  ray  and  will  depend  primarily  on  the  Sonic  Layer 
Depth, the SVP below the surface mixed layer, and the source/receiver depth combination: 
a. 
Effect  of  Sonic  Layer  Depth.    The  deeper  the  Sonic  Layer  Depth,  the  greater  will  be  the 
Direct Path range.  This is because the limiting ray has a greater vertical distance to travel before 
being refracted upwards and those rays at a greater angle than the critical angle ray will also have 
a greater vertical distance to travel before passing through the layer. 
b. 
Effect of SVP Below the Surface Mixed Layer.  The greater the negative velocity gradient 
below  the  surface  mixed  layer,  the  more  pronounced  will  be  the  refraction  and  so  the  more 
reduced will be the direct path range. 
c. 
Effect of Receiver/Source Depth Combination.  If the receiver and source are in different 
layers then this will curtail the direct path range to an extent, particularly if the receiver is shallower 
than  the  source.    The  greatest  direct  path  range  is  normally  achieved  when  both  source  and 
receiver  are  in  an  isothermal  layer.    In  general,  the  direct  path  range  depends  upon  the  velocity 
gradient. 
Page 4 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
13-28 Fig 3 Velocity Gradients 
a    Isovelocity Conditions
Temp
Velocity
Range
Source
Depth
b   Negative Velocity Gradient
Temp
Velocity
Range
Source
Shadow
Limiting
Zone
Ray
Depth
c   Positive Velocity Gradient
Temp
Velocity
Range
Source
Depth
Limiting Ray
Shadow
Zone
d   Positive over Negative Velocity Gradient
Temp
Velocity
Range
Source
Depth
Limiting Ray
Sonic
Layer
Depth
Shadow
Zone
Limiting Ray
Page 5 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
18.  Phenomena.  The variations in sound velocity with depth in the ocean lead to a number of effects 
which allow much greater sound detection ranges to be achieved than would be possible if the direct 
path  only  was  available.    The  infinite  variety  of  sound  velocity  profiles  implies  an  infinite  variety  of 
transmission  modes.    However,  it  is  possible  to  group  them  all  into  four  basic  phenomena;  other 
modes  tend  to  be  just  variations  on  these  four.    It  should  be  remembered  though,  that  unless 
transmitter  and  receiver  are  very  close  together,  then  the  received  sound  has  very  probably  been 
transmitted by a combination of more than one mode. 
19.  Surface  Duct  (Surface  Sound  Channel).    This  transmission  mode,  sometimes  known  as  'The 
Mixed  Layer  Sound  Channel', concerns only acoustic energy contained within the surface layer.  The 
prime  requisite  for  the  existence  of  a  surface  duct  is  a  layer  with  a  positive  velocity  gradient.    Sound 
rays in the layer are refracted up towards the surface (away from the higher velocity), reflected off the 
sea surface downwards and are then refracted upwards again and so on.  This trapping of the sound 
energy within the duct can result in extended ranges.  The quality of sound transmission via this mode 
is  dependent  upon  the  Sonic  Layer  depth,  the  sea  state,  and  the  source  depth.    Whether  this  mode 
can be used depends primarily upon whether the sensor can be placed in the layer and also upon the 
signal frequency.  Surface Duct propagation is illustrated in Fig 4, and its usefulness may be affected 
by the following factors: 
a. 
Sonic Layer Depth.  An effective Surface Duct cannot exist unless the Sonic Layer depth is 
greater than 50 feet.  The deeper the Sonic Layer depth the greater the range in the duct as the 
sound rays have further to travel before being reflected off the surface.  Each time a sound ray is 
reflected  off  the  surface  some  energy  is  lost  by  scattering  so  for  any  given  range  the  reflection 
losses are less for a deep layer. 
b. 
Sea  State.    Wind,  waves  and  swell  all  increase  absorption,  reflection  and  scattering  losses 
as well as increasing the ambient noise by inducing air bubbles into the water.  These factors will 
all reduce the range achieved and the effectiveness of the duct. 
c. 
Velocity  Gradient  in  the  Surface  Layer.    In  order  to  have an effective surface duct the sound 
velocity  gradient  within  the  surface  layer  must  be  positive.    The  more  positive  the  gradient  the  less 
sound energy that can escape and the better the detection ranges.  Isovelocity conditions represent the 
limit of a positive gradient and result in straight-line propagation, the limiting type of Surface Duct. 
13-28 Fig 4 Surface Duct 
Velocity
Range
Source
Sonic
Depth
Layer
Limiting Ray
Depth
Escaping Rays
Page 6 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
20.  Sound  Channels.    The  pre-requisite  for  a  Sound  Channel  is  a  region  of  decreasing  sound 
velocity overlaying a region of increasing sound velocity.  Applying the HALT rule will show that sound 
rays will tend to be refracted towards the depth of minimum sound velocity.  This depth is known as the 
Sound  Channel  Axis.    A  Sound  Channel  is  illustrated  in  Fig  5.    The  following  two  types  of  sound 
channel are recognized: 
a. 
Deep  Sound  Channel.    This  is  also  known  as  the  SOFAR  Channel  (SOund  Fixing  and 
Ranging), and is the most common type of Sound Channel.  It results from the negative velocity 
gradient  of  the  thermocline  overlaying  the  positive  velocity  gradient  established  by  the  pressure 
effect  in  deep  water.    The  axis  of  the  Deep  Sound  Channel  is  found  at  the  depth  of  minimum 
sound velocity, usually at the base of the permanent thermocline.  The SOFAR axis depth varies 
geographically.    In  the  Atlantic  Ocean,  it  varies  between  1,300  ft  in  high  latitudes  (above  60º  N) 
and  6,600  ft  in  low  latitudes  (about  35º  N).    The  depth  also  decreases  uniformly  with  longitude 
away from the Greenwich Meridian in the North Atlantic. 
b. 
Shallow  Sound  Channel.    This  is  sometimes  known  as  a  Depressed  Sound  Channel  or 
Sub-Surface  Duct.    This  type  of  sound  channel  occurs  in  the  upper  layers  of  water  above  the 
permanent  thermocline  but  is  somewhat  transient  in  nature.    In  order  to  be  effective,  the  axis 
depth  of  a  Shallow  Sound  Channel  must  be  between  150  and  600  feet  below  the  surface.    The 
channel  must  be  at  least  50  feet  thick  and  the  limiting  rays  must  be  at  an  angle  of  at  least  2º 
above and below the channel axis.  Shallow Sound Channels exist in the Mediterranean and the 
North-East Atlantic at certain times of the year and are present in the lower latitudes of the Atlantic 
all year.  In the North Atlantic, they are only established during the summer months, with an axis 
depth of about 450 feet. 
The usability of both types of sound channel is determined by the proximity of the receiver to the axis 
depth and by the signal frequency. 
13-28 Fig 5 Sound Channel 
Velocity
Range
Depth
Source
Channel
Axis
Limiting Rays
21.  Convergence  Zone.    Sound  rays  leaving  a  source  near  the  surface  which  penetrate  below  the 
surface  layer,  will  be  refracted  downwards  until  they  pass  the  depth  of  the  deep  sound  channel  axis 
whence they begin to be refracted upwards towards the surface.  Provided that the water depth is great 
enough a sufficient number of rays will eventually reach the near surface depths as a ring of focused 
energy  around  the  source  known  as  the  annulus.    This  is  illustrated  in  Fig  6.    The  likelihood  of 
Convergence  Zone  propagation  can  be  determined  from  a  sound  velocity  profile  using  the  following 
parameters which are shown graphically in Fig 7: 
a. 
Velocity at Source (Vs).  This is the sound velocity at the source depth. 
Page 7 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
b. 
Velocity at Bottom (Vb).  This is the sound velocity at the ocean bottom depth and is used 
to  determine  whether  or  not  sound  rays  will  be  refracted  back  upwards  towards  the  surface.  
Before any rays will be refracted upwards, the velocity at the bottom (Vb) must exceed the sound 
velocity at the source depth (Vs). 
c. 
Velocity Excess (Vx).  If Vb is greater than Vs, then the difference is known as the 'Velocity 
Excess'.  For a reliable Convergence Zone, this velocity excess must be approximately 33 fts-1. 
Convergence  Zone  range  in  the  UK  MPA’s  normal  operating  areas  is  between  20  and  32  nautical 
miles.    It  is  unusual  for  Convergence  Zone  propagation  to  take  place  in  warm  or  moderately  warm 
water in depths of less than 1,200 fathoms.  However, Convergence Zone can exist in water depths of 
less  than  300  fathoms  in  certain  conditions.    Convergence  zone  width  is  directly  proportional  to  the 
depth  excess  and  can  be  roughly  estimated  at  10%  of  the  range  interval.    It  is  possible  to  have  a 
number of Convergence Zones around a single source.  The first zone will be the strongest in terms of 
intensity.    The  second  and  third  zones  occur,  respectively,  at  twice  and  three  times  the  range  of  the 
first, providing that the source is strong enough. 
13-28 Fig 6 Convergence Zone Propagation 
20-32 nm
Source
Surface
Limiting
Rays
Depth
Excess
Bottom
13-28 Fig 7 Convergence Zone Velocity Profile 
Sound Velocity
Depth
Vs
Vs - Velocity at Source
Dr - Depth Required
Dr
Vx
Vx - Velocity Excess
Dx
Dx - Depth Excess
Vb Vb - Velocity at Bottom
22. Bottom  Bounce  Mode.    Sound  rays  which  leave  a  source  at  angles  greater  than  that  of  the 
Limiting  Ray  will  eventually  strike  either  the  ocean  bottom  or  the  sea  surface.    The  'Bottom  Bounce 
Mode' refers to those rays which are reflected back and forth between these two boundaries.  Whereas 
Page 8 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
some  energy  will  be  reflected  off  the  boundary  surface  (either  ocean  bottom  or  sea  surface),  a 
proportion  will  be  lost  to  sensors  due  to  scattering  and  absorption.    The  quality  of  this  transmission 
mode  is  primarily  dependent  on  factors  such  as  boundary  surface  roughness,  bottom  type,  water 
depth, and signal frequency.  Bottom Bounce Mode is particularly important in shallow water or where 
the Sonic Layer depth is less than 50 feet.  In fact, sound propagation for frequencies between 50 Hz 
and 1,500 Hz in shallow water is dominated by the 'Bottom Bounce' transmission mode. 
Leakage Paths 
23.  In general sound channels or ducts are low loss propagation paths.  At low frequencies, however, 
it is found that losses increase suddenly and the duct 'breaks down'.  The frequency at which this effect 
occurs is known as the cut-off frequency.  In simple terms the wavelength becomes too big to fit into 
the  duct.    The  leakage  path  is  in  the  direction  of  propagation  and  the  main  cause  of  the  leakage  is 
diffraction together with some scattering losses.  In Volume 13, Chapter 25, when diffraction was being 
considered, it was shown that according to Huygens’ principle secondary wavelets are produced from 
each  point  on  a  wave-front.    Although  the  vast  majority  of  the  sound  energy  is  propagated  in  the 
forward  direction,  these  wavelets  have  a  component  of  their  energy  to  the  side  and  this  energy  can 
'leak'  into  shadow  zones  or  out  of  a  sound  channel.    Leakage  paths  tend  to  complicate the relatively 
simple propagation paths that have been outlined.  Two examples are: 
a. 
Leakage  Effect  on  Convergence  Zone.    Fig  8a  illustrates  the  effect  of  leakage  on 
convergence  zone  propagation.    Whereas  some  energy  will  enter  the  convergence  zone  path 
immediately, some may remain trapped in the surface duct for some range before leaking into a 
different  convergence  zone  path.    This  anomalous  propagation  can  lead  to  confusion  in 
recognizing the convergence zone and the width of the annulus. 
b. 
Leakage  Effect  on  Bottom  Bounce.    Fig  8b  illustrates  the  effect  of  leakage  on  bottom 
bounce  propagation.    Again,  some  energy  is  transmitted  directly  to  the  bottom  while  some 
remains trapped in the surface duct for a while before entering a bottom bounce path. 
13-28 Fig 8 Leakage Effects 
a    Leakage Effect on Convergence Zone
Surface Duct
CZ
Leakage Path
b    Leakage Effect on Bottom Bounce
Surface Duct
Bottom
Bounce
Leakage Path
Page 9 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
Coherency Effect (Lloyd’s Mirror) 
24.  Clearly, it is possible for sound from one source to arrive at a receiver having followed a variety of 
paths.    In  general,  any  two  sound  paths  will  be  of  different  lengths  and  so  it  is  highly  likely  that  the 
phase of the sound arriving by one path will be different to that of the sound arriving by another.  If the 
received sound waves are in phase, then there will be an enhancement of the signal.  If, however, the 
phases are different then there will be a reduction in the received signal with complete cancellation if 
the  waves  are  180º  out  of  phase.    Commonly  this  effect  is  a  result  of  interference  between  a  direct 
wave and a surface reflected wave or, in shallow water, between a direct wave and a bottom-reflected 
wave.    A  similar  effect  can  occur  if  some  sound  is  reflected  by  an  object  in  the  water  and  therefore 
arrives  out  of  phase  with  the  direct  wave  (secondary  source  polarisation).    Lloyd’s  mirror  effect  is 
illustrated in Fig 9. 
13-28 Fig 9 Lloyd’s Mirror Effect 
Surface
Reflected Path
Source
Direct Path
Sensor
Diurnal (Afternoon) Effect 
25.  Solar  heating  near  the  surface  water  can  cause  short-term  variations  in  the  vertical  temperature 
structure which can, in turn, bring about changes in sound propagation paths.  These diurnal variations can 
lead  to  shortening  of  detection  ranges.    As  the  surface  water  is  heated  during  the  day,  a  negative 
temperature profile builds up causing refraction of the sound energy and the establishment of new shadow 
zones.  As the surface water cools again, the temperature gradient and its associated effects disappear. 
Noise 
26.  Ambient  Noise.    Ambient  noise  is  that  unwanted  sound  which  is  inherent in the sea independent of 
either the target or the aircraft.  It can, of course, mask the noise generated by a target which the sensors are 
attempting  to  detect.    Ambient  noise  can  be  predicted  by  graphical  or  computer  methods  (both  of  which 
depend upon a mix of theoretical and empirical data), or it can be measured using an ambient noise meter.  
There are three main sources of ambient noise in the areas where the UK MPA normally operate: 
a. 
Shipping  Traffic.    Shipping  tends  to  generate  the  main  component  of  ambient  noise  in 
deep-water areas, especially at lower frequencies (below 500 Hz).  It is most intense in the vicinity 
of  major  shipping  lanes  and  results  from  the  sound  of  machinery, electrical systems, hydraulics, 
hydrodynamic flow, and propeller cavitation. 
b. 
Sea State.  This noise source is the result of sea surface agitation causing the entrapment and 
subsequent  escape  of  air  bubbles.    This  noise  is  dominant  at  higher  frequencies  (above  500  Hz).  
Sea state noise is increased by strong surface winds especially in shallow water. 
Page 10 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
c. 
Biological.    Some  crustaceans,  fish  and  marine  mammals  contribute  to  ambient  noise  by 
producing sounds associated with their normal life activities.  Biological sounds are present over a 
large  frequency  spectrum  and  are  extremely  difficult  to  predict  with  any  accuracy  due  to  such 
factors  as  changing  biological  cycles  and  movement  of  the  source  organisms;  there  are  often 
seasonal and diurnal cycles.  In general, biological noise is greatest in shallow water, particularly 
in tropical and sub-tropical seas. 
27.  Self-noise.    Self-noise  is  a  noise  generated  by  a  maritime  patrol  aircraft’s  own  mechanical, 
avionic, and electrical system. 
Sound Transmission Losses 
28.  Not  all  of  the  sound  generated  by  a  source  reaches  a  sensor.    There  are  two  general  ways  in 
which acoustic energy may be dissipated during propagation: spreading and attenuation. 
29.  Spreading Losses.  Spreading is a geometrical phenomenon whereby a fixed amount of energy 
is distributed over an ever-increasing area as it moves away from the source.  There are two types of 
spreading loss which may be encountered. 
a. 
Spherical  Spreading.    If  the  sound  velocity  in  the  ocean  is  constant  in  both  the  horizontal 
and vertical directions, then the sound energy will radiate equally in all directions from the source.  
At  any  given  distance,  r,  from  the  source,  the  power  of  the  source,  W,  will  be  spread  over  the 
surface  of  a  sphere  of radius r.  This surface area is 4πr2.  The sound intensity, I, which is the 
sound power per unit area, will be given by: 
W
I = 
 Wm–2
2
4π r
This  is  an  inverse  square  law,  i.e.  intensity  is  inversely  proportional  to  the  square  of  the  range.  
Notice  that  it  is  frequency  independent.    Working  in Sound Pressure Levels (SPLs) in dBs, then 
the spreading loss (spherical) = 20 log r.  If the range is doubled from r to 2r then: 
Change in SPL = 20 log r – 20 log 2r 
 
 
 
 
   = 20 log [r ÷ 2r] 
 
 
 
 
   = 20 log 0.5 = 20 × –0.3 
 
 
 
 
   = –6 dB 
i.e. a doubling of distance results in a 6dB loss. 
Page 11 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
b. 
Cylindrical  Spreading.    Cylindrical  spreading  occurs  when  the  acoustic  energy  is  trapped 
between two parallel boundaries such as the upper and lower bounds of a sound channel, surface 
duct  or  a  convergence  zone.    The  energy  is  constrained  to  spread  in  only  two  dimensions  in  a 
cylindrical manner.  In this case, at any given distance from the source, r, the power of the source, 
W, wil  be spread over the surface of a cylinder of radius r.  The area in this case wil  be 2πr and 
the variation of sound intensity with range is given by: 
W
I = 
 Wm–2
2πr
The  spreading  loss  (cylindrical)  in  dBs  =  10  log  r,  so  looking  again  at  the  loss  involved  in  a 
doubling of range: 
Change in SPL= 10 log r – 10 log 2r 
 
 
 
 
  = 10 log [r ÷ 2r] 
 
 
 
 
  = 10 log 0.5 = 10 × –0.3 
 
 
 
 
  = –3 dB 
i.e. doubling of distance results in a 3dB loss. 
30.  Spreading Loss Comparisons.  Fig 10 shows a comparison between the different types of spreading 
loss.  Since cylindrical loss is less severe than spherical loss, ducted modes of sound propagation often yield 
the  highest  probabilities  of  signal  detection.    However,  most  of  the  time  the  received  signal  has  suffered 
some combination of the spreading losses.  For example, since direct path makes up the initial portion of 
ALL transmission modes, they all exhibit some degree of spherical spreading. 
13-28 Fig 10 Spreading Loss Graph 
Spreading Loss (dB)
0
20
Cylindrical
40
Spherical
60
80
1
10
100
1000
10000
Range (Yards)
31.  Attenuation  Losses.    Attenuation  is  the  term  applied  to  the  linear  decrease  in  acoustic  energy 
per unit area of a wave-front as the distance from the source increases.  Attenuation loss includes the 
effects of absorption, scattering and diffractive leakage. 
a. 
Absorption  Loss.    Absorption  loss  involves  the  conversion  of  acoustic  energy  into  heat  by 
molecular action.  Absorption loss is directly proportional to the range from the source.  Increases 
in  salinity  and  decreases  in  temperature  increase  absorption  losses.    Unlike  spreading  losses, 
absorption depends upon the frequency, varying approximately as the square of the frequency. 
Page 12 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-28 - Sound in the Sea 
b. 
Scattering  Loss.    Scattering  is  the  random  reflection  of  acoustic  energy  from  the  ocean 
surface, the ocean bottom, or from suspended particles (volume scattering).  Factors influencing 
the degree of each type of scattering are: 
(1)  Surface  Scattering.    The  severity  of  surface  scattering  loss  is  dependent  upon  wave 
height, signal frequency, and angle of incidence of the sound energy. 
(2)  Bottom  Scattering.    The  severity  of  bottom  scattering  is  dependent  upon  the  bottom 
roughness,  sediment  particle  size,  signal  frequency,  and  angle  of  incidence  of  the  sound 
energy. 
(3)  Volume Scattering.  The severity of the scattering loss due to volume scattering is the most 
difficult to predict.  It is dependent upon the ratio of the particle size responsible for the reflection to 
the signal wavelength.  It is also dependent on the type of particle (i.e. solid or fluid).  The most 
important contributor to volume scattering is biological in nature.  Apart from the effect of the Deep 
Scattering Layer, volume scattering strength tends to decrease with depth. 
The  prediction  of  actual  losses  due  to  scattering  is  problematical,  but  there  are  some  general 
observations  that  can  be  made:  higher  scattering  losses  are  associated  with  higher  frequencies, 
rougher scattering surfaces and larger scattering particles.  Fluids such as bubbles are generally more 
effective volume scatterers than solid particles. 
Page 13 of 13 

AP3456 – 13-29 - Statics 
CHAPTER 29 - STATICS 
Introduction 
1. 
Statics is the study of forces in equilibrium.  A particle is in equilibrium when all the forces acting 
upon it are balanced; it may be stationary, or it may be in a state of unchanging motion.  The term force 
and some associated terms are discussed below. 
Forces, Moments and Couples 
2. 
Force.  A force is that quantity which when acting on a body which is free to move, produces an 
acceleration  in  the  motion  of  that  body.    For  example,  if  a  stationary  football  is  kicked, it moves, ie it 
experiences  an  acceleration;  the  kick  is  the  applied  force.    If  a  moving  football  is  kicked,  it  changes 
speed, or direction, or both, so again it experiences an acceleration.  However, just because a body is 
not accelerating does not mean that there are no forces acting upon it.  Although that may be the case, 
it may equally be the situation that there are several forces acting such that their resultant is zero.  For 
example,  an  aircraft  which  is  flying  at  constant  altitude,  speed,  and  direction  has  many  forces  acting 
upon it, principally lift, thrust, weight, and drag. 
3. 
Weight.  Any body on or near the Earth is subject to the attraction of Earth’s gravity, and if a body 
is  released  in  this  situation  it  will  accelerate  towards  the  centre  of  the  Earth.    The  value  of  the 
acceleration,  which  is  usually  given  the  symbol  g,  is  approximately  9.8  ms–2  but  varies  slightly  both 
geographically and with altitude.  Since gravity imposes an acceleration on a body, it must be a force, 
and it is this force which is known as weight. 
4. 
Vector  Representation  of  a  Force.    Force  is  a  vector  quantity,  ie  it  has  both  magnitude  and 
direction.    A  vector  may  be  represented  by  a  straight  line  drawn  to  scale  and  marked  with  an  arrow.  
The direction of the line represents the direction of the vector and its length represents the magnitude.  
Vectors  may  be  added  together  by  means  of  the  triangle,  parallelogram,  and  polygon  laws  to  give  a 
single resultant and a single vector may be resolved into two or more components.  A more complete 
treatment of vectors is to be found in Volume 13, Chapter 4. 
5. 
Moment or Torque.  The moment of a force about a point, or torque, is the tendency of the force 
to turn the body to which it is applied about that point.  The magnitude of the moment or torque is the 
product of the force and the perpendicular distance from the point to the line of the force.  The moment 
of a force about an axis is the product of the force and the length of the perpendicular common to the 
line of the force and the axis. 
6. 
Couple.    A  system  of  two  equal  and  parallel  forces,  acting  in  opposite  directions  but  not  in  the 
same line, is known as a couple.  The moment of a couple about any point in the plane of the forces is 
constant  and  equal  to  the  product  of  one  of  the  forces  and  the  perpendicular  distance  between  their 
lines of action. 
Centre of Gravity 
7. 
In any rigid extended body there is a unique point at which the total gravitational force, the weight, 
appears to act.  This point is known as the centre of gravity. 
8. 
The position of the centre of gravity of a flat body can be determined by suspending it at any point, 
P  and  marking  the  vertical,  then  suspending  it  at  a  second  point,  Q,  and  again  marking  the  vertical.  
The centre of gravity is at the intersection of the two lines (Fig 1). 
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-29 - Statics 
13-29 Fig 1 Determining the Centre of Gravity of a Flat Plate 
Q
P
Vertical
CG
Vertical
9. 
The  position  of  the  centre  of  gravity  of  a  composite  body,  which  can  be  treated  as  a  number  of 
symmetrical  parts,  can  be  found  as  shown  in  the  following example.  A body consists of two uniform 
spheres mounted on a uniform cylindrical bar as shown in Fig 2. 
13-29 Fig 2 Determining the Centre of Gravity of a Symmetrical Body 
1m
4m
11m
17m
19m
x
CG
0
10
10
200
200
50
25
Taking  0  as  the  reference  point,  the  parts  can  be  treated  as  three  cylinders  with  centres  of  gravity 
distances 1, 11, and 19, metres respectively from the datum, and weights 10, 50, and 10 units; and two 
spheres  of  weights  200  and  25  units,  with  centres  of  gravity  4  and  17  metres  respectively  from  the 
datum.    Let  the  centre  of  gravity,  through  which  the  total  weight  (295  units)  of  the  body  acts,  be  x 
metres from 0.  Taking moments about 0: 
(10 × 1) + (200 × 4) + (50 × 11) + (25 × 17) + (10 × 19) = 295x 
∴ 295x = 10 + 800 + 550 + 425 + 190 = 1975 
∴x = 6.69 metres. 
Equilibrium 
10.  Two  types  of  equilibrium  condition  may  be  recognized,  translational  equilibrium  and  rotational 
equilibrium. 
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-29 - Statics 
11.  Translational Equilibrium.  An object is said to be in translational equilibrium if it has constant velocity 
(including velocity equal to zero).  In order to achieve this condition, the vector sum of all of the forces acting 
upon  the  object  must  be  zero.    It  is  usually  convenient  to  consider  the  components  of  the  forces  in  three 
orthogonal directions (x, y, and z axes).  In this case the algebraic sum of the x, y and z components must 
each equal zero.  As an example, consider Fig 3a which shows a uniform rectangular body being supported 
by two ropes.  Three forces are acting on the body; the tension in the ropes, F1, and F2, and the weight, F3.  
All three forces may be regarded as coplanar and as acting through the centre of gravity and this simplified 
situation is shown in the vector diagram, Fig 3b.  For translational equilibrium the x component of F1 must be 
equal  and  opposite  to  the  x  component  of  F2;  F3  has  no  x  component.    This  equality  can  be  shown  by 
constructing verticals from the ends of the vectors to the x-axis.  Also, the sum of the y components of F1 and 
F2  must  be  equal  and  opposite  to  F3.    The  y  components  may  be  determined  by  constructing  horizontals 
from the ends of the vectors to the y-axis. 
13-29 Fig 3 Translational Equilibrium 
y
yF2
Rope F
Rope F
2
1
yF
F
1
2
F1
x
xF
xF
2
1
F3
xF = –xF
1
2
yF  +  yF = –
  yF
1
2
3
Weight F3
a
b
12. Rotational  Equilibrium.    An  object  is  in  rotational  equilibrium  when  it  rotates  about  an  axis  of 
constant  direction  at  a  constant  angular  speed,  including  zero  angular  speed.    The  condition  of 
rotational equilibrium is achieved if the vector sum of all the torques about the axis is zero, i.e. the sum 
of the clockwise moments has the same magnitude as the sum of the anticlockwise moments. 
13.  As  an  example,  consider  the  uniform  bar  shown  in  Fig  4,  which  is  free  to  rotate  about  the  axle.  
Three forces, F1 F2, and F3, are shown acting on the bar at distances L1, L2, and L3 respectively from 
the axle.  For rotational equilibrium, the relationship: F1L1 + F2L2 – F3L3 = 0 must be satisfied. 
13-29 Fig 4 Rotational Equilibrium 
F3
L3
L1
F1
F
L
2
2
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-29 - Statics 
Stability 
14.  Three conditions of stability with respect to equilibrium may be recognized as follows: 
a. 
Stable Equilibrium.  An object is in stable equilibrium if any small displacement caused by 
external  forces  or  torques  tends  to  be  self-correcting.    An  example  would  be  a  marble  in  the 
bottom  of  a  round-bottomed  cup.    If  an  external  force  disturbs  its  equilibrium  it  will,  after  a  few 
oscillations, settle back to its original position. 
b. 
Unstable Equilibrium.  An object is in unstable equilibrium if any small displacement tends 
to  be  escalating.    A  marble  balanced  on  the  end  of  a  finger  would  be  an  example.    Any  small 
displacement would cause the marble to move to a totally different position. 
c. 
Neutral  Equilibrium.    Neutral  equilibrium  is  an  intermediate  state  between  stable  and 
unstable equilibrium.  Consider a marble at rest on a flat horizontal surface.  A small displacement 
will cause the marble to move but the resulting position is unchanged from an equilibrium point of 
view from the original position.  It will have no tendency either to be displaced further, or to return 
to its original position. 
Friction 
15.  When  two  solid  surfaces  which  are  in  contact  move,  or  tend  to  move,  relative  to  each  other,  a 
force  acts  in  the  plane  of  contact  of  the  surfaces  in  a  direction  opposing  the  motion.    This  force  is 
known as friction and is a result of interactions between the molecules of the two surfaces. 
16.  Dynamic Friction.  If an object is sliding over a surface at a constant velocity, then the friction is an 
example of dynamic friction and there will be some conversion of the kinetic energy of the object into heat.  
The force of dynamic friction, fd, depends upon the material of the two surfaces, on their smoothness and 
on the component of the force, F, that presses the two surfaces together.  The frictional force is practically 
independent of the relative velocity of the two surfaces.  It has been found that: 
fd = ud F 
where ud is a constant for a given pair of surfaces and is known as the coefficient of dynamic friction.  
The  value  of  ud  varies  from  about  0.06  for  a  smooth  steel  surface  sliding  on  ice,  to  0.7  for  rubber 
sliding over dry concrete. 
17.  Static Friction.  If an object is placed on a plane whose angle of inclination can be increased, it is 
found  that  the  object  remains  stationary  until  a  certain  angle  of  inclination  is  reached  whereupon  the 
object starts to move.  The force preventing the object from moving is known as static friction.  As the 
plane’s  inclination  is  increased  then  the  value  of  the  component  of  the  weight  parallel  to  the  plane 
increases.  As the friction force is equal and opposite to this force (otherwise the object would move), 
then  it  too  must  increase  as  the  inclination  is  increased  until  it  reaches  a  critical  angle.    As  with 
dynamic  friction  the  maximum  force  of  static  friction,  fs  max  depends  upon  the  materials,  the 
smoothness of the surfaces in contact and on the component of the force, F, pressing the two surfaces 
together.  For any pair of surfaces, it is found that: 
fs max = us F 
where us is constant for any two materials of specified smoothness and is called the coefficient of static 
friction.  It varies from about 0.1 for steel on ice to about 1 for rubber on dry concrete.  The coefficient 
of static friction is always higher than that of dynamic friction, which is why objects tend to start moving 
with a jerk. 
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-29 - Statics 
18.  Applicability.    It  should  be  noted  that  the  relationships  described  above  are  derived  from 
observations  rather  than  from  any  theoretical  understanding of the mechanisms causing friction.  Thus, 
the equations do not have universal applicability; deviations occur, for example, at extreme speeds, when 
the surfaces in contact are very small and when the force pressing the surfaces together is very large. 
Machines 
19.  A machine is any device which enables energy to be used in a convenient way to perform work.  
Typical  examples  of  simple  machines  are  levers,  winches,  inclined  planes,  pulleys  and  screws.  
Machines do not save work; in general, they allow a smaller force to be applied in order to achieve a 
result, but the smaller force must be applied over a greater distance.  As examples of machines, the 
lever and a pulley system will be reviewed. 
20.  The Lever.  A lever can be described as a rigid beam supported at a point or fulcrum that is fixed, 
and  about  which  the  beam  can  turn.    The  arrangement  is  shown  in  Fig  5  where  the  purpose  of  the 
lever  is  to  lift  a  load,  of  weight  W.    A  force  F  is  applied  at  the  opposite  end  such  that  the  lever  is 
maintained in a horizontal position.  In this situation, the system is in rotational equilibrium and so the 
moments  about  the  pivot  must  be  equal  and  opposite.    The  anticlockwise  moment  is  WL1  whilst  the 
clockwise moment is FL2.  Therefore, if L2 is greater than L1 the force required to balance the load is 
less  than  the  load.    However,  as  shown  in  Fig  6,  in  order  to  raise  the  load  over  a  distance,  h,  the 
smaller force must be applied over a greater distance, h1. 
13-29 Fig 5 Lever in Rotational Equilibrium 
L
L
1
2
F
W
Lever
W L
F L
1
2
13-29 Fig 6 Lever - Smaller Force over Greater Distance 
h1
h
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-29 - Statics 
21.  A  Two-pulley  System.    A  two-pulley  system  is  shown  in  Fig  7  in  which  a  force,  F,  is  applied 
through a distance, a, in order to raise a weight, W, through a distance, b.  From the principle of the 
conservation of energy (see Volume 13, Chapter 31, Para 16), the potential energy gained by the load 
will equal the work done by the effort, ignoring incidental energy losses (eg friction).  Therefore: 
W
a
Wb = Fa, or 
=
F
b
As with the lever, a load can be lifted with a smaller force, but that force must be applied over a greater 
distance. 
22.  Mechanical  Advantage.    The  ratio  W   is  known  as  the  mechanical  advantage.    For  the  pulley 
F
system shown, if a = 2b, the mechanical advantage is 2. 
23.  Efficiency.  Efficiency is related to the work done in moving an object.  Work is described fully in 
Volume 13, Chapter 31, Para 10 and is the product of a force and the distance moved in the direction 
of that force.  In the example: 
Work done on load
Wb
Efficiency =
=
Work done by effort
Fa
Efficiency is usually expressed as a percentage.  Since friction has to be overcome, the efficiency of a 
machine is always less than 100%. 
13-29 Fig 7 A Two-pulley System 
F
W
a
b
W
F
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-30 - Kinematics 
CHAPTER 30 - KINEMATICS 
Introduction 
1. 
Kinematics is the study of motion without reference to the forces involved.  In this chapter, linear 
and angular motion will be examined. 
LINEAR MOTION 
Speed and Velocity 
2. 
Speed is the ratio of the distance covered by a moving body, in a straight line or in a continuous 
curve, to the time taken.  The velocity of a body is defined as its rate of change of position with respect 
to time, the direction of motion being specified.  If the body is travelling in a straight line, it is in linear 
motion, and if it covers equal distances in equal successive time intervals it is in uniform linear motion. 
3. 
For uniform velocity, where s is the distance covered in time t, the velocity v is given by: 
s
v = t
4. 
In the more general case, the instantaneous velocity vi is given by: 
v
ds
i = 
dt
Acceleration 
5. 
The acceleration of a body is its rate of change of velocity with respect to time.  Any change of either 
speed or direction of motion involves an acceleration; a retardation is merely a negative acceleration. 
6. 
When the velocity of a body changes by equal amounts in equal intervals of time it is said to have 
a uniform acceleration, measured by the change in velocity in unit time. 
7. 
If  the  initial  velocity  u  of  a  body  in  linear  motion  changes  uniformly  in  time  t  to  velocity  v,  its 
acceleration a is given by: 
(v − u)
a = 
t
Vector Representation 
8. 
Velocity  and  acceleration  are  vector  quantities  and  the  laws  of  vector  addition  may  be  applied.  
Thus, the resultant velocity of a body having two separate velocities (e.g. an aircraft flying in wind) may 
be  found  by  the  parallelogram  law.    In  addition,  a  single  velocity  may  be  resolved  into  two  or  more 
components. 
Relationship between Distance, Velocity, Acceleration, and Time 
9. 
Some  useful  formulae  can  be  derived  relating  distance,  velocity,  acceleration,  and  time.    When 
dealing  only  with  motion  in  a  straight  line,  the  directional  aspects  of  velocity  and  acceleration  can  be 
ignored, apart from the use of positive and negative signs to indicate forward and backward motion. 
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-30 - Kinematics 
10.  Consider a body with initial velocity, u, which in time t attains, under uniform acceleration a, a final 
velocity v.  Suppose that the distance covered during this time is s.  It has been stated that: 
(v − u)
a = 
t
∴ at = v – u, or 
v = u + at……………………………(1) 
The mean or average velocity of the body is (u + v)/2.  Therefore, the distance covered in time t will be 
given by: 
(u + v)
s = 
t
. ………………………..(2) 
2
Substituting for v from equation (1), 
s = ½ (u + u + at).t, or 
s = ut + ½ at2……………………….(3) 
From equation (1), t = (v – u)/a.  Substituting for t in equation (2), 
1 (u + v)(v − u)
s = 
, or 
1
a
v2 = u2 + 2as……………………….(4) 
11.  Note  that  if  the  distance  travelled  in  time  t  is  denoted  by  s,  velocity  can  be  obtained  by 
differentiation: 
v =  ds
dt
Similarly, the acceleration a is given by: 
2
dv
d s
a =
=
2
dt
dt
Conversely,  given  an  expression  for  acceleration,  integration  will  give  an  expression  for  velocity,  and 
further integration an expression for displacement. 
12.  Velocity-Time  Graphs.    The  linear  motion  of  a  body  can  be  illustrated  by  means  of  velocity-time 
graphs,  examples  of  which  are  shown  in  Fig  1.    In  each  case  the  distance  travelled  by  the  body 
between times t1 and t2 is represented by the area under the corresponding part of the graph (shaded 
in Fig 1).  The instantaneous acceleration at any time is given by the slope of the curve at that point. 
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-30 - Kinematics 
13-30 Fig 1 Velocity - Time Graph 
a Uniform Velocity
ity
c
lo
e
V
u
s= ut
0
t
Time
t
t
1
2
b Uniform Acceleration
ity
c
lo
e
V
at
v
s = ut+ - 
1 at 2
u
2
0
Time
t
t
t
1
2
c Changing Acceleration
ity
c
lo
dv
e
The slope of the graph, 
,
V
dt
at any point represents 
the instantaneous 
acceleration
Time
Relative Velocity 
13.  It  is  sometimes  necessary  to  determine  the  velocity  with  which  one  moving  body  appears  to  be 
moving with respect to another.  This is known as the relative velocity.  For linear motion this type of 
problem  may  be  solved  graphically,  as  in  Fig  2,  by  drawing  from  an  origin  a  vector  representing  the 
velocity  of  body  A,  and  from  the  end  of  this  vector  drawing  a  vector  to  represent  the  velocity  of  B 
reversed.  In Fig 2 the third side of the triangle, ob, represents the velocity of A relative to B. 
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-30 - Kinematics 
13-30 Fig 2 Relative Velocity 
Velocity Va
A
Velocity Vb
B
a
Vb Reversed
Va
b
O
ROTARY MOTION 
Angular Velocity 
14.  So far, only motion in a straight line has been examined.  Consider now a point P which moves in 
a circle of radius r at constant speed v.  Its angular velocity ω is given by dθ/dt where θ is the angular 
displacement in radians (Fig 3a).  The speed v is given by: 

v = r .
= ω
r
dt
15.  Although  the  velocity  of  the  point  is  constant  in  magnitude,  it  is  constantly  changing  in  direction, 
and  therefore,  by  definition,  P  is  subject  to  an acceleration.  Consider the point P at a certain instant 
(position P1in Fig 3a), and also after a small interval of time δt (position P2).  It is clear that the vectors 
representing motion at these two instants are of the same length, but are in different directions.  They 
are  represented  by  AB  and  AC  in  Fig 3b, BC representing the change in velocity in the time δt.  The 
acceleration is given by BC/δt. 
13-30 Fig 3 The Acceleration Experienced in Uniform Circular Motion 
a  Angular Velocity
b  Acceleration Towards the Centre
ω
P1
v
P2
v
r
δθ
v
A
B
δθ
O
v
C
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-30 - Kinematics 
16.  Since  δt  is  small,  the  angular  displacement,  δθ,  is  also  small,  and  BC  may  be  considered  to  be 
almost perpendicular to both AB and AC, that is, directed towards the centre of the circle. 
BC = v.δθ
P P
  but, δθ =  1 2
r
If the time interval δt is very small, the straight line P1P2 is very nearly equal to the distance P1P2 along 
the arc, which is v.δt. 
δ
∴ δθ
v. t
 = 
radians 
r
δ

v2 t
 BC = 
r
BC
 Acceleration = 
t
δ
v2
      = 
 or vω, or ω2r 
r
all towards the centre. 
17.  To  summarize,  a  body  moving  at  constant  speed  v  in  a  circle  of  radius  r  has  a  constant 
acceleration of v2/r, directed towards the centre of the circle. 
18.  The following formulae for circular motion, similar to those for linear motion, may be derived: 
For uniform angular velocity, θ = ωt. 
For uniform angular acceleration, 
ω2 = ω1 + αt   
 
 
(cf,   v = u + at) 
(ω + ω
1
2 )
θ
t
 = 
2
and   
  θ = ω1t + ½αt2 
 
 
(cf,   s  = ut + ½at2) 
and         ω2 = ω 2
1  + 2αω 
 
 
(cf,   v2 = u2 + 2as) 
where 
ω1 = initial velocity in radians per sec 
ω2 = velocity in radians per sec after t sec 
α = angular acceleration in radians per sec2
θ = angle through which turned, in radians 
Relationship between Angular and Linear Velocity 
19.  Consider  again  the  point  P,  rotating  with  uniform  angular  velocity  ω  and  radius  r  (Fig  3a).   The 
length of the arc P1P2 is the radius multiplied by the angle in radians, i.e. arc P1P2 = rθ.  But, for uniform 
angular velocity, θ = ωt, hence arc P1P2 = rωt and the linear velocity of P is rωt/t, or ωr.  Similarly, the 
linear  acceleration  of  P  is  equal  to  the  angular  acceleration  times  the  radius;  its  direction  is  radially 
towards  the  centre  of  rotation.    Summarizing,  if  v  =  linear  velocity,  ω  =  angular  velocity,  a  =  linear 
acceleration, and α = angular acceleration, then: 
v = ωr, or ω =  v
a
  and  a = αr, or α  

r
r
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-30 - Kinematics 
Vector Representation of Angular Quantities 
20.  Angular  velocity  and  acceleration  are  vector  quantities.    By  convention,  they  are  represented  by 
vectors; the vector length represents the magnitude of the quantity and its direction is perpendicular to 
the  plane  of  rotation,  i.e.  parallel  to  the  axis  of  rotation.    The  direction  of  the  arrow  is  such  that,  on 
looking in its direction, the rotation is clockwise (Fig 4).  This convention is known as the right-handed 
screw law.  Such vectors can be combined and resolved according to the normal principles of vectors. 
13-30 Fig 4 Vector Representation of Angular Quantities 
Direction 
of Rotation
Vector Representing
Angular Velocity
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
CHAPTER 31 - DYNAMICS 
Introduction 
1. 
Dynamics is the study of motion related to force.  In Volume 13, Chapter 30, it was shown how a 
body moves; in this chapter it will be shown why the body moves in that way. 
QUANTITIES 
Mass 
2. 
When an object is at rest, a force is necessary to make it move; similarly, a body in motion needs 
a force to be applied in order to change its motion.  This reluctance to any change in motion is called 
inertia  and  the  property  that  gives  rise  to  inertia  is  mass.    It  can  be  shown  that  inertia  is  directly 
proportional to mass. 
3. 
The mass of a body may be defined as the quantity of matter in the body.  The unit of mass is the 
kilogram  (kg)  and  the  standard  kilogram  is  a  cylinder  of  platinum-iridium  alloy  kept  at  the  Bureau 
International des Poids et Mésures. 
Density 
4. 
The density of a substance is the mass per unit volume of that substance.  The unit of density is 
the kilogram per cubic metre (kg m–3).  Relative density (or specific gravity) is the ratio of the density of 
a substance at a stated temperature to the density of water at 4 ºC. 
Momentum 
5. 
The  momentum  of  a  body  is  defined  as  the  product  of  its  mass  and  its  velocity.    As  the  definition 
includes  the  velocity  term,  momentum  is  a  vector  quantity  and  a  change  in  either  speed  or  direction 
constitutes a change in momentum.  The unit of momentum is the kilogram metre per second (kg ms–1). 
Force 
6. 
Newton’s laws of motion
a. 
First  Law.    A  body  remains  in  a  state  of  rest  or  uniform  motion  (i.e.  no  acceleration)  in  a 
straight line unless acted upon by an external force. 
b. 
Second Law.  The rate of change of momentum is proportional to the applied force, and the 
change of momentum takes place in the direction of the applied force. 
c. 
Third Law.  Every action is opposed by an equal and opposite reaction. 
7. 
By selecting a unit of force as that force which gives unit acceleration to unit mass the second law 
may be written as: 
F = ma 
The unit of force is the newton (N) which is the force necessary to induce an acceleration of 1ms–2 in a 
mass of 1 kilogram. 
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
Conservation of Momentum 
8. 
Consider  two  bodies,  A  and  B,  travelling  in  the same direction, which collide, the duration of the 
collision  being  the  short  time  t.    Throughout  the  collision,  each  will  experience  a  force  equal  and 
opposite to that experienced by the other (Newton's third law).  The impulse of the force is Ft, and is 
the  same  for  each  body.    Thus,  the  change  of  momentum  will  be  the  same  for  each  body.    If  at  the 
time  of  collision  body  A  was  overtaking  body  B,  it  is  apparent  that  the  effect  of  the  impact  will  be  to 
decrease  the  momentum  of  A  and  increase  that  of  B,  and  the  total  momentum  of  the  system  of  two 
bodies will be unchanged. 
9. 
The Law of Conservation of Momentum.  The effects of the interaction of parts of a closed system 
are  summarized  in  the  Law  of  Conservation  of  Momentum,  which  states  that  the  total  momentum  in 
any given direction before impact is equal to the total momentum in that direction after impact. 
Work 
10.  A force is said to do work when its point of application moves, and the amount of work done is the 
product of the force and the distance moved in the direction of the force. 
11.  The unit of work is the joule (J) which is the work done when a force of 1 newton moves 1 metre 
in the direction of the force. 
12.  The  gravitational  force  acting  on  a  body  is  the  product  of  its  mass  (m)  and  the  acceleration  of 
gravity  (g),  i.e.  mg.    Therefore,  the  work  done  against  gravity  in  raising  the  body  through  a  vertical 
distance, h, is mgh. 
Energy 
13.  The energy possessed by a body is its capacity to do work; the unit of energy is the joule.  A body 
may possess this capacity by virtue of: 
a. 
Its position, when the energy is called potential energy (PE). 
b. 
Its motion, when the energy is called kinetic energy (KE). 
14.  Consider  a  mass,  m,  projected  vertically  upwards  from  the  ground  with  initial  velocity,  u.    It  is 
acted upon (downwards) by gravity, and will attain a height, h, which can be determined by substitution 
in the formula v2 = u2 + 2as, thus: 
0 = u2 + 2(–g)h 
the velocity being zero at the highest point 
∴ h = u2/2g 
The work done reaching a height h is mgh.  Substituting for h, 
work done = mgu2/2g = ½mu2
 
 
 = work done in coming to rest from velocity u 
 
 
 = KE. 
15.  At the highest point, where the velocity is zero, the kinetic energy is zero.  If, however, the mass is 
allowed to fall, it will, at the moment of striking the ground, have regained its original velocity, and thus 
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
its original kinetic energy.  The energy which it possessed at the highest point is potential energy and 
equals its original kinetic energy. 
16.  Consider also a body acted upon by a constant force F. 
 v2 − u2 
Then F = ma  = m 




s
2

where u, v, and s have the conventional significance. 
Thus: Fs = ½m(v2– u2) 
The  left-hand  side  is  the  work  done  by  the  force,  while  the  right-hand  side  is  the  resulting  change  in 
kinetic energy.  The general expression for the kinetic energy of a body moving with velocity v is: 
 KE = ½mv2
This  illustrates  the  principal  of  the  conservation  of  energy  -  energy  can  be  neither  created  nor 
destroyed, though it may be converted from one form to another.  It should be noted that kinetic and 
potential  energies  are  examples  of  one  form  of  energy,  namely  mechanical  energy;  a  change  may 
involve other forms of energy such as chemical, heat, light, sound, magnetic or electrical energy. 
Power 
17.  Power is the rate of doing work and has the unit, watt (W), equal to 1 joule per second. 
CIRCULAR MOTION 
Centripetal Force 
18.  It was shown in Volume 13, Chapter 30 that a body travelling with uniform speed in a circle has an 
acceleration  of  v2/r  towards  the  centre  of  the  circle.    The  force  producing  this  acceleration  is  termed 
centripetal  force,  and  for  a  body  of  mass  m  the  centripetal  force  is  mv2/r  towards  the  centre  of  the 
circle.  It should be noted that in the case of a body travelling in a circular path at the end of a string, 
while  the  mass  is  experiencing  centripetal  force  towards  the  hand,  there  is  an  equal  and  opposite 
reaction on the hand holding the string, known as centrifugal force.  Centrifugal force exists only as an 
equal and opposite reaction to centripetal force. 
Moment of Inertia 
19.  Consider now a rigid body, such as a flywheel, free to rotate about an axis through its centre, at 
angular  velocity  ω.    When  the  wheel  is  rotating  all  the  particles  of  the  wheel  have  the  same  angular 
velocity, but their linear velocities will depend on their individual distances from the axis, those on the 
rim moving much faster than those near the axis. 
20.  A  particle  of  mass  m,  distance  r  from  the  centre,  and  with  linear  velocity  v,  has  kinetic  energy 
½mv2 or ½ mr2ω2.  The total kinetic energy of all the particles is ½ω2 Σmr2. 
21.  The sum (expressed as Σ) of the products mr2 for all the particles in a rigid body rotating about a 
given axis is called the Moment of Inertia (I). 
I = Σmr2
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
22.  Moment  of  inertia  can  be  considered  as  the  rotational  equivalent  of  mass  and,  just  as  in  linear 
motion, if a force is applied to a body, force = mass × acceleration, so in circular motion, if a torque is 
applied to a wheel, 
torque = moment of inertia × angular acceleration. 
23.  Radius of Gyration.  The radius of gyration is a useful concept whereby the mass M (=Σm) of the 
wheel is considered to be concentrated in a ring of radius k from the axis, such that Σmr2 = Mk2.  'k' is 
then known as the radius of gyration, and I = Mk2. 
SIMPLE HARMONIC MOTION 
General 
24.  A  type  of  motion  which  is frequently encountered is simple harmonic motion.  This is defined as 
the motion of a body which moves in a straight line so that its acceleration is directly proportional to the 
distance from a fixed point in the line, and always directed towards that point.  A mass suspended from 
a  spiral  spring  which  is  given  a  small  vertical  displacement  from  its  equilibrium  position  and  then 
released will oscillate with simple harmonic motion. 
25.  Simple  harmonic  motion  can  be  illustrated  by  considering  the  projection  of  a  point  moving  at 
uniform speed in a circular path on to a diameter of that circle (Fig 1). 
13-31 Fig 1 Simple Harmonic Motion 
P
r
ω
B
ωt
A
N
O
x
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
Let the point P start at position A, and move with constant angular velocity ω, in a circle of radius r.  Let 
PN be the perpendicular from the point to the diameter AOB.  Then while the point P moves round the 
circle from A through B back to A, N moves through O to B and back to A.  The time for one complete 
cycle of oscillation is 2π/ω and this is called the periodic time or simply the period of the oscillation.  The 
frequency of oscillation is the number of complete cycles in unit time, and frequency = 1/periodic time = 
ω/2π  The distance ON at any time, t, is given by x = r cos ω t.  The instantaneous velocity of N is given 
by: 
dx  = – rω sin ω t and the acceleration by: 
dt
2
d x  = – rω2 cos ω t = – ω2x 
2
dt
Since  the  angular  velocity  ω  is  constant,  the  acceleration is proportional to the distance ON, thus the 
movement  of  N  accords  with  the  definition  of  simple  harmonic  motion.    Note  that  the  expression  is 
negative, since the acceleration is measured in the opposite direction to that of the displacement ON 
(i.e. towards O). 
The Simple Pendulum 
26.  The simple pendulum provides an example of simple harmonic motion, provided that its amplitude 
of  oscillation  is  small.    Consider  a  mass,  m,  suspended  from  a  light  inextensible  cord  of  length  L, 
displaced through a small angle θ (in radians) from the vertical (Fig 2). 
13-31 Fig 2 The Simple Pendulum 
O
θ
L
T
x
mmg cos   θ
A
– mg sin   
θ
θ
mg
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
27.  The forces acting on the mass are its weight, mg, acting vertically downwards, and the tension, T, 
in the cord.  The weight can be resolved into two components, mg cos θ equal and opposite to T, and 
the restoring force, – mg sin θ acting in the opposite direction to the direction of displacement of the 
mass from its central position.  Using the equation: 
force = mass × acceleration, 
–mg sin θ = ma 
∴   a = – g sin θ, or, for small angles, a = – gθ (approximately) 
x
      but, θ =  L

gx
    a = – L
28.  As  g  and  L  are  constant  for  a  particular  location  and  a  particular  pendulum,  the  acceleration  is 
proportional to the displacement x, and acts in the direction of the force towards the mid point A, thus 
(for small displacements) satisfying the conditions for simple harmonic motion. 
29.  By  comparing  the  results  of  paras  25  and  27  it  can  be  seen  that  the  period  of  oscillation  of  a 
simple pendulum, for small displacements, is given by: 
L
period = 2 π
sec , 
g
and the frequency by: 
1
g
frequency = 
 hertz. 

L
It  will  be  noted  that,  for  small  angles  of  swing,  the  period  of  oscillation  of  a  simple  pendulum  is 
independent of the mass, and of the amplitude of swing. 
The Compound Pendulum 
30.  For a compound, or rigid, pendulum, the period is given by: 
I
period =  2π mgh
where  I  is  the  moment  of  inertia  about  the  axis  of  rotation,  and  h  is  the  distance  from  the  centre  of 
gravity to the pivot. 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-31 - Dynamics 
A Mass Supported by a Spring 
31.  The  comparable  equation  for  the  period  of  oscillation  of  a  mass  m  kilograms  suspended  from a 
spring of stiffness e kilograms per metre is: 
m
period =  2π
sec. 
e
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 13-32 - Hydraulics 
CHAPTER 32 - HYDRAULICS 
Introduction 
1. 
Hydraulic  systems  provide  a  means  of  transmitting  a  force  by  the  use  of  fluids.    They  are 
concerned  with  the  generation,  modulation  and  control  of  pressure  and  flow  of  the  fluid  to  provide  a 
convenient means of transmitting power for the operation of a wide range of aircraft services.  A typical 
aircraft hydraulic system will be used for operating flying controls, flaps, retractable undercarriages and 
wheelbrakes.    Hydraulic  systems  can  transmit  high  forces  with  rapid,  accurate  response  to  control 
demands. 
Definition of Terms 
2. 
The following definitions need to be understood: 
a. 
Pressure.  Pressure is the force per unit area exerted by a fluid on the surface of a container.  
Pressure is measured in bars, pascals (Pa), or newtons per square metre (N/m2). 
1 bar = 100,000 Pa = 100,000 N/m2
b. 
Force.    The  force  exerted  on  a  particular  surface  by  a  pressure  is  calculated  from  the 
formula: 
Force = Pressure × Surface Area. 
c. 
Fluid.    A  fluid  is  a  liquid  or  gas  which  changes  its  shape  to  conform  to  the  vessel  that 
contains it. 
d. 
Hydraulic  Fluid.    Hydraulic  fluid  is  an  incompressible  oil.    In  aircraft  systems,  low 
flammability  oils  are  used,  the  boiling  and  freezing  points  of  which  fall  outside  operating 
parameters. 
Transmission of Force and Motion by Fluids 
3. 
When  a  force  is  applied  to  one  end  of  a  column  of  confined  fluid  a  pressure  is  generated  which  is 
transmitted through the column equally in every direction.  Fig 1 illustrates a simple hydraulic system.  Two 
cylinders  are  connected  by  a  tube.    The  cylinders  contain  pistons  of  surface  areas  0.0l  m2  and  0.000l  m2
giving a piston area ratio of 100:1.  The system is filled with hydraulic fluid and fitted with a pressure gauge. A 
force of 1,000 newtons (N) is applied to the small piston.  The force will produce a pressure (P) in the fluid so: 
Force ( )
F
1000
P =
   i.e.      P = 
 = 10,000,000 Pa or 10 MPa, which is 100 bar. 
Piston Area (A)
0.0001
The system pressure will appear on the gauge and will be felt on every surface within the system.  Thus at 
the large piston a force (F) will be exerted where F = P × A = 10 × 106 × 0.01 = 100,000 N.  The force applied 
at the small piston is therefore increased on delivery by the large piston by a factor of 100, i.e. in the same 
ratio as that of piston area.  This is sometimes referred to as force multiplication. 
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 – 13-32 - Hydraulics 
13-32 Fig 1 A Simple Hydraulic System 
1,000 N
100,000 N
0.01 m2
0.0001 m2
100150
50
0
BAR
4. 
If the small piston is now moved down in its cylinder through a distance of 100 mm, as illustrated 
in Fig 2, the large piston will move upwards through a distance inversely proportional to the piston area 
ratio,  ie  through  l  mm.    The  work  done  by  the  small  force  is  transmitted  hydraulically  and  equals  the 
work expended in moving the greater force through a smaller distance, 
i.e. 
force 1 × distance 1 = force 2 × distance 2 
or 
1000 N × 100 mm = 100,000 N × 1 mm 
This is the principle of the hydraulic lever and is the operating principle of any hydraulic system. 
13-32 Fig 2 Relative Movement in a Simple Hydraulic System 
1,000 N
100,000 N
1mm
100mm
0.01 m2
100150
50
0
BAR
0.0001 m2
Components of a Typical Hydraulic System 
5. 
In a simple hydraulic system, force applied by hand or foot to a small 'master' piston is transmitted 
to a larger 'slave' piston to operate the required service.  In more complex, high performance systems, 
the  master  piston  is  replaced  by  hydraulic  pumps  and  the  slave  by  actuators  driving  each  of  the 
powered services.  A typical system illustrated in Fig 3 will operate at between 200 and 300 bar, and it 
will include the following components: 
a. 
Hydraulic  Pump.    The  pump  generates  hydraulic  pressure  and  delivers  it  to  the  pressure 
lines in the system.  It will usually be either engine driven or electrically powered. 
b. 
Valves.  Non-return valves control the direction of fluid flow, pressure relief valves the level of 
power produced, and selector valves the amount of fluid flow to related actuators. 
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 – 13-32 - Hydraulics 
c. 
Actuators.  Actuators convert the hydraulic power into usable mechanical power at the point 
required. 
d. 
Hydraulic Fluid.  The fluid provides the means of energy transmission as well as lubrication, 
and cooling of the system. 
e. 
Connectors.    The  connectors  link  the  various  system  components.    They  are  usually  rigid 
pipes, but flexible hoses are also used. 
f. 
Reservoir.    Fluid  is  stored  in  a  system  reservoir  in  sufficient  quantity  and  quality  to  satisfy 
system  requirements.    The  fluid  becomes  heated  by  operation  of  the  system,  and  the  reservoir 
performs the secondary functions of cooling the fluid and of allowing any air absorbed in the fluid 
to separate out. 
g. 
Filters.  Hydraulic system components are readily damaged by solid particles carried in the 
fluid, and several stages of filtration are included in a system to prevent debris passing from one 
component to the next.  The filters perform as useful tell-tales of fluid contamination.  In addition, 
samples are taken periodically from the fluid and analysed to detect trends in acid and other trace 
element levels. 
h. 
Accumulator.  An accumulator is a cylinder containing a floating piston.  On one side of the 
piston  is  nitrogen  at  system  pressure,  and  on  the  other  hydraulic  fluid  from  the  pressure  line.  
When the hydraulic pressure is increased, the nitrogen is compressed.  The compressed nitrogen 
then acts as a spring and can damp out system pressure ripples.  It also acts as a reserve of fluid 
and an emergency power source. 
13-32 Fig 3 Typical Practical Hydraulic System 
Supply
Return
LP Filter
Selector
Reservoir
Valve
Filter
Nitrogen
Output
Power
Pump
Input
Accumulator
Power
Actuator
Filter
Pressure
Direction
Flow
Control
Control
Control
Valves
Valves
Valves
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
CHAPTER 33 - INTRODUCTION TO GYROSCOPES 
Introduction 
1. 
Modern technology  has brought about many changes  to the gyroscope.  The conventional spinning 
gyroscope  is  still  in  current  use  for  flight  instruments  in  smaller  and  simpler  aircraft.    More  sophisticated 
aircraft  however,  make  use  of  devices  which  are  termed  'gyros',  but  this  is  because  of  the  tasks  they 
perform rather than their manner of operation.  Gyroscopes can therefore be categorised as: 
a. 
Spinning Gyroscopes. 
b. 
Optical Gyroscopes. 
c. 
Vibrating Gyroscopes. 
This chapter will concentrate for the most part on the spinning gyroscope. 
2. 
A conventional gyroscope consists of a symmetrical rotor spinning rapidly about its axis and free 
to  rotate  about  one  or  more  perpendicular  axis.    Freedom  of  movement  about  one  axis  is  usually 
achieved by mounting the rotor in a gimbal, as in Fig 1 where the gyro is free to rotate about the YY1
axis.  Complete freedom can be approached by using two gimbals, as illustrated in Fig 2. 
13-33 Fig 1 One-degree-of-freedom Gyroscope 

Rotor

X
Gimbal
Spin Axis

Y
Z
Page 1 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 2 Two-degrees-of-freedom Gyroscope 

Gimbals
Rotor
Y
Spin Axis

X
Frame

Z
3. 
The physical laws which govern the behaviour of a conventional gyroscope are identical to those 
which account for the behaviour of the Earth itself.  The two principal properties of a gyro are rigidity in 
inertial  space  and  precession.    These  properties,  which  are  explained  later,  are  exploited  in  some 
heading  reference  and  inertial  navigation  systems  (INS)  and  other  aircraft  instruments  which  are 
described in Volume 5, Chapter 10. 
Definition of Terms 
4. 
The following fundamental mechanical definitions provide the basis of the laws of gyrodynamics: 
a. 
Momentum.  Momentum is the product of mass and velocity (mv). 
b. 
Angular  Velocity.    Angular  velocity  (ω)  is  the  tangential  velocity  (v)  at  the  periphery  of  a 
v
circle, divided by the radius of the circle (r), so  ω =
.  Angular velocity is normally measured in 
r
radians per second. 
c. 
Moment of Inertia.  Since a rotating rigid body consists of mass in motion, it possesses kinetic 
energy.  This kinetic energy can be expressed in terms of the body’s angular velocity and a quantity 
called 'Moment of Inertia'.  Imagine the body as being made up of an infinite number of particles, with 
masses m1, m2, etc, at distances r1, r2, etc from the axis of rotation.  In general, the mass of a typical 
particle is mx and its distance from the axis of rotation is rx.  Since the particles do not necessarily lie in 
the same plane, rx is specified as the perpendicular distance from the particle to the axis.  The total 
kinetic energy of the body is the sum of the kinetic energy of all its particles: 
K = ½ m


1 r1 ω2 + ½ m2 r2 ω2 + … 
   = Σ
2
x ½ mx rx ω2 
Page 2 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
Taking the common factor ½ω2 out of the expression gives: 
K = ½ ω2 (m
2
2
1 r1  + m2 r2  + …) 
   = ½ ω2 (Σ
2
x mx rx ) 
The quantity in parenthesis, obtained by multiplying the mass of each particle by the square of the 
distance from the axis of rotation and adding these products, is called the Moment of Inertia of the 
body, denoted by I: 
I = m
2
2
2
1 r1  + m2 r2  + … = Σx mx rx
In terms of the moment of inertia (I), the rotational kinetic energy (K) of a rigid body is 
K = ½ Ι ω2    
d.
Angular Momentum.  Angular Momentum (L) is defined as the product of Moment of Inertia 
and Angular Velocity, ie L = Iω. 
e
Gyro  Axes.  In gyrodynamics it is convenient to refer to the axis about  which the torque is 
applied as the input axis and that axis about which the precession takes place as the output axis.  
The third axis, the spin axis, is self-evident.  The XX1, YY1 and ZZ1 axes shown in the diagrams 
are not intended to represent the x, y and z axes of an aircraft in manoeuvre.  However, if the XX1
(rotational) axis of the gyro is aligned with the direction of flight, the effects of flight manoeuvre on 
the  gyro  may  be  readily  demonstrated  in  similar  fashion  to  the  instrument  descriptions  in 
Volume 5, Chapter 20. 
Classification of Gyroscopes 
5. 
Conventional gyroscopes are classified in Table 1 in terms of the quantity they measure, namely: 
a. 
Rate Gyroscopes.  Rate gyroscopes measure the rate of angular displacement of a vehicle. 
b. 
Rate-integrating  Gyroscopes.    Rate-integrating  gyroscopes  measure  the  integral  of  an 
input with respect to time. 
c. 
Displacement Gyroscopes.  Displacement gyroscopes measure the angular displacement 
from a known datum. 
Table 1 Classification of Gyros 
Type of Gyro
Uses in Guidance and Control
Gyro Characteristics
Rate Gyroscope 
Aircraft Instruments 
Modified single-degree-of-freedom gyro. 
Rate-integrating 
Modified single-degree-of-freedom gyro. 
Older IN Systems 
Gyroscope 
Can also be a two-degree-of-freedom gyro. 
Displacement 
Heading Reference 
Two degrees of freedom. 
Gyroscope 
Older IN Systems 
Defines  direction  with  respect  to  space,  thus 
Aircraft Instruments 
it is also called a space gyro, or free gyro. 
Page 3 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
6. 
It should be realized, however, that the above classification is one of a number of ways in which 
gyroscopes  can  be  classified.    Referring  to  Table  1,  it  will  be  seen  that  a  displacement  gyroscope 
could be classified as a two-degrees-of-freedom gyro or a space gyro.  Note also that the classification 
of Table 1 does not consider the spin axis of a gyroscope as a degree of freedom.  In this chapter, a 
degree of freedom is defined as the ability to measure rotation about a chosen axis. 
LAWS OF GYRODYNAMICS 
Rigidity in Space 
7. 
If  the  rotor  of  a  perfect  displacement  gyroscope  is  spinning  at  constant  angular  velocity,  and 
therefore constant angular momentum, no matter how the frame is turned, no torque is transmitted to 
the spin axis.  The law of conservation of angular momentum states that the angular momentum of a 
body  is  unchanged  unless  a  torque  is  applied  to  that  body.    It  follows  from  this  that  the  angular 
momentum of the rotor must remain constant in magnitude and direction.  This is simply another way 
of saying that the spin axis continues to point in the same direction in inertial space.  This property of a 
gyro is defined in the First Law of Gyrodynamics. 
The First Law of Gyrodynamics 
8. 
The first law of gyrodynamics states that: 
"If a rotating body is so mounted as to be completely free to move about any axis through the centre of 
mass, then its spin axis remains fixed in inertial space however much the frame may be displaced." 
9. 
A  space  gyroscope  loses  its  property  of  rigidity  in  space  if  the  spin  axis  is  subjected  to  random 
torques, some causes of which will be examined later. 
Precession 
10.  Consider  the  free  gyroscope  in  Fig  3,  spinning  with  constant  angular  momentum  about  the  XX1
axis.  If a small mass M is placed on the inner gimbal ring, it exerts a downward force F so producing a 
torque  T  about  the  YY1  axis.    By  the  laws  of  rotating  bodies,  this  torque  should  produce  an  angular 
acceleration about the YY1 axis, but this is not the case: 
a. 
Initially,  the  gyro  spin  axis  will  tilt  through  a  small  angle  (∅  in  Fig  3),  after  which  no  further 
movement takes place about the YY1 axis.  The angle ∅ is proportional to T and is a measure of 
the work done.  Its value is almost negligible and will not be discussed further. 
b. 
The  spin  axis  then  commences  to  turn  at  a  constant  angular  velocity  about  the  axis 
perpendicular to both XX1 and YY1, ie the ZZ1 axis.  This motion about the ZZ1 axis is known as 
precession and is the subject of the Second Law of Gyrodynamics. 
Page 4 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 3 Precession 
Z
Spin
Precession
Y

X
Ø
M

T
F

The Second Law of Gyrodynamics 
11.  The second law of gyrodynamics states that: 
"If  a  constant  torque  (T)  is  applied  about  an  axis  perpendicular  to  the  spin  axis  of  an 
unconstrained, symmetrical spinning body, then the spin axis will precess steadily about an axis 
mutually  perpendicular  to  the  spin  axis  and  the  torque  axis.    The  angular  velocity  of 
T
precession (Ω) is given by  Ω =
." 
ω
I
12.  Precession ceases as soon as the torque is withdrawn, but if the torque application is continued, 
precession will continue until the direction of spin is the same as the direction of the applied torque.  If, 
however, the direction of the torque applied about the inner gimbal axis moves as the rotor precesses, 
the direction of spin will never coincide with the direction of the applied torque. 
Direction of Precession 
13.  Fig 4 shows a simple rule of thumb to determine the direction of precession: 
a. 
Consider the  torque  as being  due to a force acting at right  angles to  the plane  of spin  at a 
point on the rotor rim. 
b. 
Carry this force around the rim through 90º in the direction of rotor spin. 
c. 
The torque will apparently act through this point and the rotor will precess in the direction shown. 
Page 5 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 4 Determining Precession 
Precession
Spin
90°
Force causing
Torque
Torque
This point moves as
indicated by Force
Carry Force round by 90°
CONSERVATION OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM 
Explanation 
14.  In linear motion, if the mass is constant, changes in momentum caused by external forces will be 
indicated by changes in velocity.  Similarly, in rotary motion, if the moment of inertia is constant, then 
the action of an external torque will be to change the angular velocity in speed or direction and, in this 
way,  change  the  angular  momentum.    If,  however,  internal  forces  (as  distinct  from  external  torques) 
act to change the moment of inertia  of a rotating system, then the angular momentum is unaffected.  
Angular  momentum  is  the  product  of  the  moment  of  inertia  and  angular  velocity,  and  if  one  is 
decreased  so  the  other  must  increase  to  conserve  angular  momentum.    This  is  the  Principle  of 
Conservation of Angular Momentum. 
15.  Consider the  ice-skater starting her pirouette  with arms extended.  If she now retracts her arms 
she will be transferring mass closer to the axis of the pirouette, so reducing the radius of gyration.  If 
the  angular  momentum  is  to  be  maintained  then,  because  of  the  reduction  of  moment  of  inertia,  the 
rate of her pirouette must increase, therefore: 
a. 
If  the  radius  of  gyration  of  a  rotating  body  is  increased,  a  force  is  considered  to  act  in 
opposition to the rotation caused by the torque, decreasing the angular velocity. 
b. 
If  the  radius  of  gyration  is  decreased,  a  force  is  considered  to  act  assisting  the  original 
rotation caused by the torque, so increasing the angular velocity. 
Cause of Precession 
16.  Consider the  gyroscope rotor in Fig  5a spinning about the XX1 axis  and free to  move about  the 
YY1 and ZZ1 axes.  Let the quadrants (1, 2, 3 and 4) represent the position of the rotor in spin at one 
instant during  the application  of an external force to the spin axis, producing  a torque about the  YY1
axis.  This torque is tending to produce a rotation about the YY1 axis whileat the same instant the rotor 
Page 6 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
spin is causing particles in quadrants 1 and 3 to recede from the YY1 axis, increasing their moment of 
inertia  about  this  axis,  and  particles  in  quadrants  2  and  4  to  approach  the  YY1  axis  decreasing  their 
moment  of  inertia  about  this  axis.    Particles  in  quadrants  1,  2,  3  and  4  tend  to  conserve  angular 
momentum about YY1, therefore: 
a. 
Particles in quadrants 1 and 3 exert forces opposing their movement about YY1. 
b. 
Particles in quadrants 2 and 4 exert forces assisting their movement about YY1. 
17.  Hence, 1 and 4 exert forces on the rotor downwards, whilst 2 and 3 exert forces upwards.  These 
forces can be seen to form a couple about ZZ1, (Fig 5b), causing the rotor to precess in the direction 
shown in Fig 5c. 
Gyroscopic Resistance 
18.  In  demonstrating  precession,  it  was  stated  that,  after  a  small  deflection  about  the  torque  axis, 
movement about this axis ceased, despite the continued application of the external torque.  This state 
of equilibrium means that the sum of all torques acting about this axis is zero.  There must, therefore, 
be a resultant torque  L, acting about this axis  which  is equal  and opposite to the external  torque,  as 
shown in Fig 6.  This resistance is known as Gyroscopic Resistance and is created by internal couples 
in a precessing gyroscope. 
19.  Consider now the gyroscope in Fig 5c spinning about an axis XX1 and precessing about the ZZ1
axis under the influence of a torque T, about the YY1 axis.  The rotor quadrants represent an instant 
during the precession and spin.  Using the argument of para 16, the particles in quadrants 1 and 3 are 
approaching the ZZ1 axis and exerting forces acting in the direction of precession, while in quadrants 2 
and 4 the particles are receding from the ZZ1 axis and exerting forces in opposition to the precession.  
The resultant couple is therefore acting about the YY1 axis in opposition to the external torque.  This 
couple  is  the  Gyroscopic  Resistance.    It  has  a  value  equal  to  the  external  torque  thus  preventing 
movement about the YY1 axis. 
13-33 Fig 5 Instant of Spin and Precession 
X
Z
X
Z
Force
2 & 3
1
2
1
2

4
3
Y

4
3
Y
Rotor
Rotor
Spin
Torque
Spin
1 & 4


X


Z
(a)
Force
(b)
1
2

4
3
Y
Rotor
Spin
Torque
Precession


(c)
Page 7 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 6 Gyroscopic Resistance 
Z
Precession
Resistance
Spin

X
L

Y
Torque
Force

20.  Gyroscopic Resistance is always accompanied by precession, and it is of interest to note that, if 
precession is prevented, gyroscopic torque cannot form, and it is as easy to move the spin axis when 
it is spinning as when it is at rest.  This can be demonstrated by applying a torque to the inner gimbal 
of a gyroscope with one degree of freedom.  With the ZZ1 axis locked, the slightest touch on the inner 
gimbal will set the gimbal ring (and the rotor) moving. 
Secondary Precession 
21.  If  a  sudden  torque  is  applied  about  one  of  the  degrees  of  freedom  of  a  perfect  displacement 
gyroscope the following phenomena should be observed: 
a. 
Nodding,  or  nutation  occurs.    Here  it  is  sufficient  to  note  that  nutation  occurs  only  for  a 
limited period of time and eventually will cease completely.  Additionally, nutation can only occur 
with  a  two-degree-of-freedom  gyro  and,  to  a  large  extent,  it  can  be  damped  out  by  gyro 
manufacturers. 
b. 
A  deflection  takes  place  about  the  torque  axis,  (dip),  which  remains  constant  provided  that 
the gyro is perfect, and the applied torque is also constant. 
c. 
The gyro precesses, or rotates, about the ZZ1 axis. 
22.  If, however, an attempt is made to demonstrate this behaviour, it will be seen that the angle of dip 
will increase with time, apparently contradicting sub-para 21b. 
23.  To  explain  this  discrepancy,  consider  Fig  7.    If  the  gyro  is  precessing  about  the  ZZ1  axis,  some 
resistance  to this precession must take place  due to  the friction  of the outer gimbal bearings.  If this 
torque T is resolved using the rule of thumb given in para 13, it will be seen that the torque T causes 
the spin axis to dip through a larger angle.  This precession is known as secondary precession. 
Page 8 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 7 Precession Opposed by Secondary Precession 
Z
Precession
T
Spin

X

T

Secondary
Precession
Y
24.  Secondary  precession  can  only  take  place  when  the  gyro  is  already  precessing,  thus  its  name.  
Note also that secondary precession acts in the same direction as the originally applied torque. 
THE RATE GYROSCOPE 
Principle of Operation 
25.  Fig  8  shows  a  gyroscope  with  freedom  about  one  axis  YY1.    If  the  frame  of  the  gyro  is  turned 
about an axis ZZ1 at right angles to both YY1 and XX1, then the spin axis will precess about the YY1
axis.  The precession will continue until the direction of rotor spin is coincident with the direction of the 
turning about ZZ1. 
13-33 Fig 8 Gyro with One degree of Freedom – Precession 

Spin

X
Precession

Y
Z
Turn
Page 9 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
26.  Suppose  the  freedom  of  this  gyroscope  about  the  gimbal  axis  is  restrained  by  the  springs 
connecting the gimbal ring to the frame as in Fig 9.  If the gyroscope is now turned about the ZZ1 axis, 
precession about the YY1 axis is immediately opposed by a torque applied by the springs.  It has been 
shown  that  any  torque  opposing  precession  produces  a  secondary  precession  in  the  same  direction 
as  the  original  torque  (see  para  24).    If  the  turning  of  the  frame  is  continued  at  a  steady  rate,  the 
precession  angle  about  the  YY1  axis  will  persist,  distending  one  spring  and  compressing  the  other, 
thereby  increasing  the  spring  torque.    Eventually,  the  spring  torque  will  reach  a  value  where  it  is 
producing secondary precession about ZZ1 equal to, and in the same direction as, the original turning.  
When this state is reached, the gyroscope will be precessing at the same rate as it is being turned and 
no further torque will be applied by the turning.  Any change in the rate of turning about the ZZ1 axis 
will require  a different spring torque to produce equilibrium, thus the  deflection  of the spin axis (∅ in 
Fig 9) is a measure of the rate of turning.  Such an arrangement is known as a Rate Gyroscope, and 
its function is to measure a rate of turn, as in the Rate of Turn Indicator. 
13-33 Fig 9 Rate Gyroscope 

Spin
Precession

X
Spring
Torque
Tilt
(Ø)

Spring
Force
Z
Turn
Secondary Precession
27.  The relationship between the deflection angle and rate of turn is derived as follows: 
Spring Torque is proportional to ∅ or 
Spring Torque = K∅ (where K is a constant) 
At equilibrium: 
Rate of Secondary Precession = Rate of Turn 

K
ie 
 = Rate of Turn 
ω
I
∴ ∅ is proportional to Rate of Turn × Iω
(Iω is the angular momentum of the rotor and is therefore constant). 
The angle of deflection can be measured by an arrangement shown at Fig 10 and the scale calibrated 
accordingly. 
Page 10 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 10 Rate of Turn Indicator 
1
0
R
1
IG
2
2
HT
3
LEFT 3
4
4
2
Spring
Force
Spin
3
1
Turn
THE RATE-INTEGRATING GYROSCOPE 
Principle of Operation 
28.  A rate-integrating gyroscope is  a single degree of freedom gyro  using viscous restraint to  damp 
the  precessional  rotation  about  the  output  axis.    The  rate-integrating  gyro  is  similar  to  the  rate  gyro 
except that the restraining springs are omitted and the only factor opposing gimbal rotation about the 
output axis is the viscosity of the fluid.  Its main function is to detect turning about the input axis (YY1 in 
Fig 11), by precessing about its output axis (ZZ1 in Fig 11). 
Page 11 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 11 Simple Rate-integrating Gyroscope 
Z
Output
Axis
Frame
Y
Viscous 
Liquid
Rotor
X

Spin
Axis
Inner
Gimbal
Input
Axis


29.  The rate-integrating gyro was designed for use on inertial navigation stable platforms, where the 
requirement  was  for  immediate  and  accurate  detection  of  movement  about  three  mutually 
perpendicular axes.  Three rate-integrating gyros are used, each performing its functions about one of 
the  required  axes.    These  functions  could  be  carried  out  by  displacement  gyros,  but  the  rate-
integrating gyro has certain advantages over the displacement type.  These are: 
a. 
A small input rate causes a large gimbal deflection (gimbal gain). 
b. 
The gyro does not suffer from nutation. 
30.  Fig  11  shows  a  simple  rate-integrating  gyro.    It  is  basically  a  can  within  which  another  can  (the 
inner gimbal) is pivoted about its vertical (ZZ1) axis.  The outer can (frame) is filled with a viscous fluid 
which  supports  the  weight  of  the  inner  gimbal  so  reducing  bearing  torques.    The  rotor  is  supported 
with  its  spin  (XX1)  axis  across  the  inner  gimbal.    In  a  conventional  non-floated  gyro,  ba1l  bearings 
support  the  entire  gimbal  weight  and  define  the  output  axis.    In  the  floated  rate-integrating  gyro  the 
entire  weight  of  the  rotor  and  inner  gimbal  assembly  is  supported  by  the  viscous  liquid,  thereby 
minimizing frictional forces at the output (ZZ1) axis pivot points.  The gimbal output must, however, be 
defined  and  this  is  done  by  means  of  a  pivot  and  jewel  arrangement.    By  utilizing  this  system  for 
gimbal axis alignment, with fluid to provide support, the bearing friction is reduced to a very low figure. 
31.  The gyroscope action may now be considered.  If the whole gyro in Fig 12 is turned at a steady rate 
about  the  input  axis  (YY1),  a  torque  is  applied  to  the  spin  axis  causing  precession  about  the  output 
axis (ZZ1).  The gimbal  initially accelerates (precesses) to a turning rate such that the  viscous restraint 
equals  the  applied  torque.    The  gimbal  then  rotates  at  a  steady  rate  about  ZZ1,  proportional  to  the 
applied  torque.    The  gyro  output  (an  angle  or  voltage)  is  the  summation  of  the  amount  of  input  turn 
derived  from  the  rate  and  duration  of  turn  and  is  therefore  the  integral  of  the  rate  input.  (Note  that  the 
rate gyro discussed in paras 25 to 27 puts out a rate of turn only).  The movement about the output axis 
may  be  made  equal  to,  less  than,  or  greater  than  movements  about  the  input  axis  by  varying  the 
viscosity of the damping fluid.  By design, the ratio between the output angle (∅) and the input angle (θ) 
can be arranged to be of the order of 10 to 1.  This increase in sensitivity is called gimbal gain. 
Page 12 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 12 Function of Rate-integrating Gyroscope 
Precession

Spin Axis
X

Applied Turn
0
Input Axis
Output Axis
Y

32.  A  gyro  mounted  so  that  it  senses  rotations  about  a  horizontal  input  axis  is  known  as  a  levelling 
gyro.    Two  levelling  gyros  are  required  to  define  a  level  plane.    Most  inertial  platforms  using 
conventional gyros align the input axis of their levelling gyros with True North and East. 
33.  Motion  around  the  third  axis,  the  vertical  axis,  is  measured  by  an  azimuth  gyro,  ie  one  in  which 
the input axis is aligned with the vertical, as in Fig 13. 
13-33 Fig 13 Rate-integrating Azimuth Gyroscope 
X
Z Input

Y
Output


THE DISPLACEMENT GYROSCOPE 
Definition 
34.  A displacement gyro is a two-degree-of-freedom gyro.  It can be modified for a particular task, but 
it always provides a fixed artificial datum about which angular displacement is measured. 
Page 13 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
Wander 
35  Wander is defined as any movement of the spin axis away from the reference frame in which it is set. 
36.  Causes of Wander.  Movement away from the required datum can be caused in two ways: 
a. 
Imperfections  in  the  gyro  can  cause  the  spin  axis  to  move  physically.    These  imperfections 
include such things as friction and unbalance.  This type of wander is referred to as real wander since 
the spin axis is actually moving.  Real wander is minimized by better engineering techniques. 
b. 
A  gyro  defines  direction  with  respect  to  inertial  space,  whilst  the  navigator  requires  Earth 
directions.    In  order  to  use  a  gyro  to  determine  directions  on  Earth,  it  must  be  corrected  for 
apparent wander due to the fact that the Earth rotates or that the gyro may be moving from one 
point on Earth to another (transport wander). 
37.  Drift and Topple.  It is more convenient to study wander by resolving it into two components: 
a.
Drift.    Drift  is  defined  as  any  movement  of  the  spin  axis  in  the  horizontal  plane  around  the 
vertical axis. 
b.
Topple Topple is defined as any movement of the spin axis in the vertical plane around a 
horizontal axis. 
38.  Summary.  Table 2 summarizes the  types of  wander.  From para 36 it should  be apparent that 
the main concern when using a gyro must be to understand the effects of Earth rotation and transport 
wander on a gyro. 
Table 2 Types of Wander 
Real Wander
(Actual movement of the spin axis)
Real Drift
Real Topple
Apparent Drift
Apparent Topple
(Actual movement
(Actual movement
(Apparent  movement
(Apparent movement
 about the  vertical axis)
about the horizontal axis)
about the vertical axis)
about the horizontal axis)
Earth Rotation 
39.  In order to explain the effects of Earth rotation on a gyro it is easier to consider a single-degree-
of-freedom gyro, since it has only one input and one output axis.  The following explanation is based 
on a knowledge of rotational vector notation. 
40.  Consider a gyro positioned at a point A in Fig 14.  It would be affected by Earth rotation according 
to how its input axis was aligned, namely: 
Page 14 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
a. 
If its input axis was aligned with the Earth’s spin axis, it would detect Earth rate (Ωe) of 15.04 º/hr. 
b.
Azimuth  Gyro.    If  its  input  axis  was  aligned  with  the  local  vertical  it  would  detect 
15.04 × sin φ  º/hr, where φ = latitude.  Note that, by definition, this is drift. 
c.
North  Sensitive  Levelling  Gyro.    If  its  input  axis  were  aligned  with  local  North,  it  would 
detect 15.04 × cos φ º/hr.  Note that, by definition, this is topple. 
d. 
East Sensitive Levelling Gyro.  Finally, if the input axis were aligned with local East, that is, 
at right angles to the Earth rotation vector, it would not detect any component of Earth rotation. 
13-33 Fig 14 Components of Earth Rate 
15.04°/hr
15.04°/hr
φ
15.04 sin φ°/hr
A
φ
Transport Wander 
41.  If an azimuth gyro spin axis is aligned with local North (i.e. the true meridian) at A in Fig 15 and 
the gyro is then transported to B, convergence of the meridians will make it appear that the gyro spin 
axis has drifted.  This apparent drift is in addition to that caused by Earth rotation.  The gyro has not in 
fact drifted; it is the direction of the True North which has changed.  However, if the gyro is transported 
North-South, there is no change in the local meridian and therefore, no apparent drift.  Similarly, as all 
meridians  are  parallel  at  the  Equator,  an  East-West  movement  there  produces  no  apparent  drift.  
Transport rate drift thus depends on the convergence of the meridians and the rate of crossing them; 
i.e.  the  East-West  component  of  ground  speed  (U).    The  amount  of  convergence  between  two 
meridians (C) is ch long ×  sin lat.  Any given  value of U thus produces an increase in apparent gyro 
drift as latitude increases. 
Page 15 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 15 Apparent Drift 
Meridian
Convergence
Apparent
NP
Drift
B
A
E
Q
The amount of drift due to transport rate may be found as follows: 
C (º/hr) = [ch long/hr] × sin φ. 
ch Eastings (nm / hr )
  Now, ch long/hr = 
× sec φ 
60
      and, since 1º = 60 nm and ch Eastings (nm/hr) = U 
U
        C = 
× sec φ × sin φ (º/hr) 
60
1
       but, sec φ × sin φ = 
×sin φ
 
cos φ
sin φ
 
    = 
= tan φ
 
cos φ
U
∴ C =
× tan φ (°/hr)
60
π
This can be converted to radians/hour by multiplying by  180
U
π

π
C =
 
× tan φ×
 = U × tan φ ×
60
180
60 ×180
Now an arc of length 60 nm on the Earth’s surface subtends an angle of 1º (π/180º) at the centre of 
the Earth 
π
∴ R ×
= 60  where R= Earth’s radius 
180
1
π
or,  
=
R
60×180
Substituting into the above equation for Meridian Convergence (radians/hour) 
1
C = U × tan φ × R
U
     or,     C = 
× tan φ (radians/hour) 
R
Page 16 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
42.  Consider now two levelling gyros, whose input axes are North and East respectively, and whose 
output axes are vertical. 
a. 
The  East  component  of  aircraft  velocity  in  Fig 16  will  be  sensed  by  the  North  gyro  as  a 
U
torque of 
 about its input axis.  If the gyro is not corrected for this transport wander, it is said, 
R
by definition, to topple. 
V
b. 
Similarly, due to the effect of aircraft velocity North, the East gyro will topple at the rate of 

R
13-33 Fig 16 Transport Wander 
Velocity
V
A
U
Apparent Wander Table 
43.  All of the equations  derived  in the study  of Earth rate  and  transport  wander rate are summarized  in 
Table 3.  The units for Earth rate can be degrees or radians, whilst for transport wander they are radians. 
44.  Correction  Signs.    The  correction  signs  of  Table  3  apply  only  to  the  drift  equations,  and  they 
should  be  applied  to  the  gyro  readings  to  obtain  true  directions.    These  correction  signs  will  be 
reversed for the Southern Hemisphere. 
Table 3 Components of Drift and Topple – Earth Rate and Transport Wander Rate 
Input Axis Alignment
Local North
Local East
Local Vertical
Correction Sign
Earth Rate 
degrees (or radians) per 
Ωe cos φ
Nil 
Ωe sin φ

hour 
Transport Wander 
U
−V
U tan φ 
+E 
radians per hour 
R
R
R
–W 
Topple 
Drift 
Ωe = Angular Velocity of the Earth 
 
R = Earth’s Radius 
φ  = Latitude 
U = East/West component of groundspeed            V = North/South component of groundspeed 
Page 17 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
Practical Corrections for Topple and Drift 
45.  If all the corrections of Table 3 were applied to three gyros with their input axes aligned to true North, 
true East and the local vertical, true directions would be defined continuously, and in effect the gyros would 
have been corrected for all apparent wander.  However, these corrections make no allowance for the real 
wander  of  a  gyro  and  consequently  an  error  growth  proportional  to  the  magnitude  of  the  real  drift  and 
topple will exist.  As a rough rule of thumb, an inertial platform employing gyros with real drift rates in the 
order of 0.01º/hr will have a system error growth of 1 to 2 nm/hr CEP. 
46.  Flight instruments, on the other hand, employ cheaper, lower quality gyros whose drift rates may 
be  in  the  order  of  0.1º/hr.    If  these  real  drift  rates  were  not  compensated  for,  system  inaccuracies 
would be  unacceptably  large.   For this reason, some flight instruments make use of the local gravity 
vector to define the level plane, thus compensating for both real and apparent drifts. 
47.  Specifically, gyro wander may be corrected in the following ways: 
a. 
Topple.  Topple is normally corrected for in gyros by the use of either gravity switches (see 
Figs 17 and 18), or by case levelling devices (see Fig 19).  These devices sense movement away 
from the vertical and send appropriate signals to a torque motor until the vertical is re-established.  
The levelling accuracy of these methods is approximately 1º. 
b.
Drift.  Drift corrections can be achieved by: 
(1)  Calculating corrections using Table 3 and applying them to the gyro reading. 
(2)  Applying a fixed torque to the gyro so that it precesses at a rate equal to the Earth rate 
for a selected latitude.  Although this method is relatively simple, it has the disadvantage that 
the compensation produced will only be correct at the selected latitude. 
(3)    Applying  variable  torques,  using  the  same  approach  as  in  (2)  above,  but  being  able  to 
vary the torque according to the latitude.  These azimuth drift corrections make no allowance 
for real drift, which can only be limited by coupling the azimuth gyro to a flux valve. 
13-33 Fig 17 Gravity Sensitive Switch 
B
C
Mercury which completes the
circuit A-B or A-C when the
switch is tilted
A
Page 18 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 18 Gravity Levelling 
Torque Motor
Outer ring
Inner Ring
Gravity 
Sensitive 
Switch
13-33 Fig 19 Synchro Case Levelling Device 
Null Posn
Outer Ring
Brushes 
Fixed to 
Commutator fixed 
Outer 
to Inner Ring
Ring
Insulating Strip
To Torque Motor
48.  To complete this study  of the  displacement gyro, it remains to mention a  limitation  and an  error 
peculiar to this type of gyro, namely gimbal lock and gimbal error. 
Gimbal Lock 
49.  Gimbal  lock  occurs  when  the  gimbal  orientation  is  such  that  the  spin  axis  becomes  coincident 
with  an  axis  of  freedom.    Effectively  the  gyro  has  lost  one  of  its  degrees  of  freedom,  and  any 
attempted movement about the lost axis will result in real wander.  This is often referred to as toppling, 
although drift is also present. 
Gimbal Error 
50.  When a 2-degree-of-freedom gyroscope with a horizontal spin axis is both banked and rolled, the 
outer gimbal must rotate to maintain orientation of the rotor axis, thereby inducing a heading error at 
the outer gimbal pick-off.  The incidence of this error depends upon the angle of bank and the angular 
difference  between  the  spin  axis  and  the  longitudinal  axis  and,  as  in  most  systems,  the  spin  axis 
direction is arbitrary relative to North, the error is not easily predicted.  Although the error disappears 
Page 19 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
when the aircraft is levelled, it will have accumulated in any GPI equipment, producing a small error in 
computed position. 
OTHER TYPES OF GYRO 
The Ring Laser Gyro 
51.  Introduction.  The ring  laser gyro  is  one of the modern alternatives  to conventional gyros for a 
number  of  applications  including  aircraft  inertial  navigation  systems  and  attitude/heading  reference 
systems.  The ring  laser gyro has no moving  parts and is  not  a gyroscope in the normal meaning  of 
the word.  The ring laser gyro is, however, a very accurate device for measuring rotation and became 
the  system  of  choice  for  use  with  strapdown  inertial  navigation  systems.    A  schematic  diagram  of  a 
ring laser gyro is at Fig 20. 
13-33 Fig 20 Schematic Diagram of a Ring Laser Gyro 
Detector
Prism
Path
Length
Mirror
Control
Cavity
Anode
Anode
Cervit
Monoblock
Axis of Rotation
Mirror
Mirror
Path
Path
Length
Length
Control
Control
Cathode
52.  Principle  of  Operation.    In  ring  laser  gyros,  the  rotating  mass  of  the  conventional  gyro  is 
replaced by two contra-rotating beams of light.  The main body of the gyro consists of a single piece 
(or 'monoblock') of a vitreous ceramic of low temperature coefficient (typically 'Cervit' or 'Zerodour').  A 
gas-tight  cavity  is  accurately  machined  into  the  monoblock  and  this  cavity  is  then  filled  with  an  inert 
gas, typically a mixture of Helium and Neon.  A DC electrical discharge ionizes the gas and causes the 
lasing  action.    Two  beams  of  light  are  produced,  flowing  in  opposite  directions  in  the  cavity.    Mirrors 
are  used  to  reflect  the  beams  around  the  enclosed  area,  producing  a  'laser-in-a-ring'  configuration.  
The  frequency  of  oscillation  of  each  beam  corresponds  to  the  cavity  resonance  condition.    This 
condition requires that the optical path length of the cavity be an integral number of wavelengths.  The 
frequency of each beam is therefore dependant on the optical path length. 
53.  Effect  of  Movement.    At  rest,  the  optical  path  length  for  each  beam  is  identical;  therefore,  the 
frequencies of the two laser beams are the same.  However, when the sensor is rotated about the axis 
perpendicular to the lasing plane, one beam travels an increased path length, whilst the other travels a 
reduced  path  length.  The two resonant frequencies change to  adjust to the  longer or shorter optical 
path,  and  the  frequency  difference  is  directly  proportional  to  the  rotation  rate.    This  phenomenon  is 
Page 20 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
known  as  the  Sagnac  effect.    The  frequency  difference  is  measured  by  the  beaming  of  an  output 
signal  for  each  wave  on  to  photo  detectors  spaced  one  quarter  of  a  wavelength  apart,  causing  an 
optical  effect  known  as  an  interference  fringe.    The  fringe  pattern  moves  at  a  rate  that  is  directly 
proportional  to  the  frequency  difference  between  the  two  beams.    It  is  converted  to  a  digital  output, 
where  the  output  pulse  rate  is  proportional  to  the  input  turn  rate,  and  the  cumulative  pulse  count  is 
proportional to the angular change.  This effect can be quantified using simplified maths, where it can 
be shown that the frequency difference ∆f of the two waves is: 
4 Ω
A
∆f =
L
λ
Where
A is the area enclosed by the path.
λ is the oscillating wavelength.
L is the length of the closed path.
Ω is the rate of rotation.
54.  Gyro  Control.    The  reason  why  the  two  beams  have  to  occupy  the  same  physical  cavity  is  the 
sensitivity of laser light to cavity length.  If they did not, a temperature induced difference in path length 
could  result  in  a  large  frequency  mismatch  between  the  two  beams.    The  path  length  control 
mechanism is used to  alter the  intensity  of the laser and thus control expansion  due to excess heat.  
To  help  avoid  perceived  differences  in  path  length  due  to  flow  of  the  Helium/Neon  gas  mix,  two 
anodes are used to balance any flow caused by ionization. 
55.  Error  Sources.    Ring  laser  gyros  are  subject  to  a  number  of  errors,  the  most  notable  of  which 
are: 
a. 
Null  Shift.    Null  shift  arises  due  to  a  difference  in  path  length  as  perceived  by  the  two 
opposite  beams,  thus  producing  an  output  when  no  rotation  exists.    The  major  causes  of 
perceived path length difference are: 
(1)  Differential movement of the gas in the cavity. 
(2)  Small changes in the refractive index of the monoblock material as the direction of travel 
of the laser light changes. 
b. 
Lock-in.  Lock-in occurs when the input rotation rate of the gyro is reduced below a critical 
value causing the frequency difference between the clockwise and anti-clockwise beams to drop 
to zero.  One of the main causes of this phenomenon is backscatter of light at the mirrors.  Some 
of  the  clockwise  beam  is  reflected  backwards,  thereby  contaminating  the  anti-clockwise  beam 
with the clockwise frequency.  Similarly, backscattering of the anti-clockwise beam contaminates 
the  clockwise  beam.    With  low  input  rotational  rates,  the  two  beams  soon  reach  a  common 
frequency  which  renders  detection  of  rotation  impossible.    Several  methods  are  used  to  ensure 
that  lock-in  is  minimized.    One  method  is  to  physically  dither  the  gyro  by  inputting  a  known 
rotation rate in one direction, immediately followed by a rotation rate in the opposite direction.  As 
the dither rate is known, it can be removed at the output stage.  The dither ensures that the two 
frequencies are kept far enough apart to avoid lock-in. 
56.  Advantages of the Ring Laser Gyro.  The main advantages of the ring laser gyro are: 
a. 
Its performance is unaffected by high 'g'. 
b. 
It has no moving parts and therefore has high reliability and low maintenance requirements. 
Page 21 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
c. 
It has a rapid turn-on time. 
57.  Disadvantages  of  the  Ring  Laser  Gyro.    The  technical  problems  associated  with  ring  laser 
gyros can all be overcome.  However, solution of these problems inevitably increases costs which are 
already very high due to the complex, 'clean-room' manufacturing facilities needed to provide: 
a. 
Precision machining and polishing. 
b. 
High quality mirrors. 
c. 
Very good optical seals. 
d. 
A carefully balanced mix of Helium and Neon, free of contaminants. 
58.  Summary.    While  the  ring  laser  gyro  represents  a  major  advance  over  the  traditional  spinning 
gyro,  it  is  only  one  of  a  number  of  possible  alternatives.    The  search  for  new  gyroscopic  devices 
continues, driven by considerations of both cost and accuracy. 
Fibre Optic Gyros 
59.  As  previously  outlined,  the  major  disadvantage  of  ring  laser  gyros  is  their  high  cost  due  to  the 
precise  engineering  facilities  required  to  manufacture  them.    The  fibre  optic  gyro  (see  Fig  21),  first 
tested  in  1975,  works  on  the  same  principal  as  the  ring  laser  gyro  (the  Sagnac  effect)  but  no  longer 
relies on a complex and costly block and mirror system since it uses a coil of fibre optic cable. 
13-33 Fig 21 Fibre Optic Gyro 
Fibre Optic Loop
Light
Beam Splitter
Source
Signal Processor
Photo
 Detector
Converts 
o
ph to detector
signals into angular rate
Optical
Electrical
Vibrating Gyros 
60.  Vibrating  gyros  work  by  exploiting  the  Coriolis  effect  and,  while  not  yet  as  accurate  as  optical 
gyros, are much smaller and cheaper to produce. 
61.  The  'GyroChip'  (Fig  22)  uses  a  vibrating  quartz  tuning  fork  as  a  Coriolis  sensor,  coupled  to  a 
similar fork as a pickup to produce the rate output signal.  The piezoelectric drive tines are driven by 
an  oscillator  to  vibrate  at  a  precise  amplitude,  causing  the  tines  to  move  toward  and  away  from  one 
another at a high frequency.  This vibration causes the drive fork to become sensitive to angular rate 
about an axis parallel to its tines, defining the true input axis of the sensor. 
Page 22 of 23 

AP3456 – 13-33 - Introduction to Gyroscopes 
13-33 Fig 22 The 'GyroChip' Vibrating Gyro 
Drive Oscillator
Drive
Tines
Amplitude
A
Controller
DC Rate
Signal
-
+
Filter
Amplifier
Synch
Filter
Pickup
Demodulator
A
Amplifier
Tines
Pickup Amplifier
62.  Vibration  of  the  drive  tines  causes  them  to  act  like  the  arms  of  a  spinning  ice  skater,  where 
moving them in causes the skater’s spin rate to increase and moving them out causes a decrease in 
rate.    An  applied  rotation  rate  causes  a  sine  wave  of  torque  to  be  produced,  resulting  from  'Coriolis 
Acceleration', in turn causing the tines of the Pickup Fork to move up and down (not toward and away 
from one another) out of the plane of the fork assembly. 
63.  The  pickup  tines  thus  respond  to  the  oscillating  torque  by  moving  in  and  out  of  plane,  causing 
electrical  output  signals  to  be  produced  by  the  Pickup  Amplifier.    These  signals  are  amplified  and 
converted  into  a  DC  signal  proportional  to  rate  by  use  of  a  synchronous  switch  (demodulator)  which 
responds  only  to  the  desired  rate  signals.    The  DC  output  signal  of  the  'GyroChip'  is  directly 
proportional  to  input  rate,  reversing  sign  as  the  input  rate  reverses,  since  the  oscillating  torque 
produced by Coriolis reverses phase when the input rate reverses. 
Page 23 of 23 

Document Outline