This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456'.



AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
CHAPTER 1 - HUMAN PERFORMANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
The  investigation  and  study  of  error  has  received  more  attention  in  aviation  than  in  many  other 
domains,  and  part  of  the  explanation  probably  lies  in  the  fact  that  aviation  accidents  tend  to  be 
expensive and unavoidably public.  About 40% of serious accidents in the Royal Air Force are ascribed 
to aircrew error.  Other military operators report similar proportions.  In the commercial aviation sector 
a variety of figures have been quoted, some as high as 80%.  In aviation, a post-accident inquiry often 
faces  a  difficult  question:  why  should  an  experienced,  motivated  professional,  with  undoubted  skill, 
make  such  a  mistake?  In  individual  cases,  the  question  can  seem  very  perplexing.    Viewing  a  large 
number of such events adds to the confusion.  The first step necessary in addressing this problem is to 
recognize  the  wide  variety  of  ways  in  which  mistakes  come  about,  and  to  consider  classifying  errors 
according  to  the  characteristic  mechanisms  involved  or  the  contributory  factors.    There  are  several 
ways  of  approaching  this  problem,  depending  on  the  degree  to  which  theory  or  data  determine  the 
classification scheme and, of course, the theoretical bias of the classifier. 
2. 
A long term (20 year) study, which still continues in the RAF, involves independent investigation of 
aircrew error accidents.  The results of these investigations are classified according to a scheme which is, 
as far as possible, data-driven.  No particular theoretical view is adopted.  The broad findings of the study 
are presented in Table 1.  This shows all those factors found to be at least possible contributory causes in 
more than 10% of the investigations.  They are fairly arbitrarily assigned to three broad, common-sense 
categories:  predispositions  contributed  by  the  aircrew  themselves;  enabling  factors  contributed  by  the 
organization,  tasks  and  equipment  imposed  on  aircrew;  and  what  can  only  be  described  as  immediate 
causes - the actions, conditions or events that lead directly to an error. 
Table 1 Factors Implicated In Aircrew Error 
Predisposition 
Enabling Factors 
Personality 
22% 
Ergonomics 
22% 
Inexperience 
20% 
Training/briefing 
18% 
Life stress 
14% 
Administration 
17% 
Immediate Causes 
Acute stress 
25% 
False hypothesis 
13% 
Cognitive failure 
18% 
Disorientation 
12% 
Distraction 
16% 
Visual illusion 
12% 
Notice  that  there is no clearly dominant factor.  In addition, accidents are usually complex events, so 
often  several  factors,  out  of  a  repertoire  of  about  40,  are  cited  as  contributors.    These  facts  suggest 
that  simple,  global  remedies  will  not  be  found.    Reducing  the  toll  of  accidents  is  likely  to  require  a 
combination  of  specific  remedies  targeted  on  relatively  small  sub-groups  of  accidents  (improving  the 
conspicuousness  of  aircraft  to  reduce  mid-air  collisions,  for  example,  or  modifying  a  regulation  or 
instruction  to  avoid  ambiguity)  and  a  broad  assault  designed  to improve the routine identification and 
elimination of risks. 
3. 
Several of the terms in Table 1 (for example disorientation, visual illusion) are clearly peculiar to 
aviation  though  several  of  the  larger  categories  do,  however,  appear  to  be  potentially  more  generally 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
relevant.    They  are  personality,  life  stress,  acute  (reactive)  stress,  cognitive  failure  (a  mismatch 
between  intentions  and  actions),  and  a  clutch  of  enabling  factors  (ergonomics,  training  and 
administration)  which  together  account  for  about  40%  of  aircrew  error  accidents.    The  topics  to  be 
considered are, therefore, cognitive function and its limitations, long term predispositions to error, short 
term factors degrading performance, and enabling factors that make errors more likely. 
COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND ITS LIMITATIONS 
Experience 
4. 
The  gulf  between  an  expert’s  and  a  novice’s  performance  can  seem  immense.    The  novice’s 
mistakes  are  easy  to  understand,  but  inexperience  seems  (from  Table  1)  not  to  make  a  dominating 
contribution  to  aircrew  error  -  and  this  in  military  aviation,  a  profession  which  by  its  very  nature  puts 
large demands on young shoulders.  To understand why skilled operators sometimes make mistakes it 
is  first  necessary  to  understand  how  normal  skilled  behaviour  is  achieved,  because  it  appears  that 
errors are a consequence of the normal characteristics of skill and expertise.  The cognitive strategies 
that  enable,  say,  the  expert  pianist  to  achieve  a  polished  performance  are  the  same  ones  that 
distinguish  the  captain  of  an  airliner  from  a  trainee  pilot.    They  also  form  the  basis  of  more  common 
skills that everyone takes for granted, and entail particular risks. 
Mental Activity 
5. 
An important feature of human behaviour is that some activities seem to require little or no mental 
effort, and so can be performed in parallel with other activities.  Others seem to absorb all our mental 
capacity.    It  is  not  just  a  matter  of  conflicting  motor  actions;  it  is  a  central,  mental  resource  that  is 
implicated.    Most  adults  can  ride  a  bicycle  and  talk  or  do  mental  arithmetic  at  the  same  time,  but  try 
multiplying  two  two-digit  numbers  during  a  hard  fought  game  of,  say,  squash  or  badminton.    The 
unpredictability of the overtly physical game precludes unrelated mental effort.  It is also significant that 
activities  can  be  moved  from  the  mentally  demanding  group  to  the  low-mental-effort  group  simply  by 
practice;  there  is  no  hard  and  fast  categorization.    Indeed  a puncture or unexpected obstacle at high 
speed can suddenly, temporarily reverse the process and change riding a bicycle into the sort of task 
that excludes all other thoughts. 
6. 
Introspection offers an indication of the nature of this limited mental resource.  When we perform 
a difficult or novel task, what it demands is our attention; the task becomes the principal thing of which 
we are conscious, and attention seems to be flexible, both in terms of the sensory modalities to which it 
refers, and temporally.  The contents of consciousness need not be the results of current stimulation; 
they  can  be  formed  from  memories  of  past  events,  or  imaginative  constructions.    Attention  has  the 
character  of  memory  for  the  present.    It  enables  information  of  present  interest,  from  a  variety  of 
sources, to be held in consciousness while it is evaluated or used in decision making or computation. 
Working Memory 
7. 
Working  memory  appears  to  have  three  components.    The  best  understood,  known  as  the 
articulatory loop, handles speech based information.  Its capacity is limited to only a few items - about 
enough for a telephone number - and decay takes only a few seconds.  The memory can, however, be 
maintained  indefinitely  by  rehearsal  using  articulatory  processes  connected  with  speech.    There 
appears  to  be  an  independent  but  structurally  similar  component  used  for  storing  spatial  information.  
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
Like the articulatory loop it involves a passive information store and an active rehearsal mechanism, in 
this case possibly based on the system that controls eye movements. 
8. 
The least well understood component of working memory is known as the central executive.  It is 
believed to be capable of handling any type of information, and to be responsible for the integration of 
information  from  disparate  sources  as  well  as  scheduling  the  allocation  of  mental  resources.    Its 
capacity is believed to be limited, but has so far defied measurement.  The central executive’s rather 
grand title reflects the importance attached to its functions.  It has also been aptly described as an area 
of  residual  ignorance.    It  is,  perhaps,  inevitable  that  all  the  (so  far)  experimentally  inaccessible 
functions  of  working  memory  should  seem  to  reside  in  one  enigmatic  block.    If  any  progress  can  be 
made in this area, a more complex, but also more satisfying picture should emerge.  For the moment 
some  important  features  of  working  memory  are  clear:  although  both  spatial  and  speech  based 
information can be stored, the overall capacity is limited, and maintaining the memory for more than a 
few  seconds  demands  effort  and  consumes  precious  resources.    Information  in  working  memory  is 
also  vulnerable to interference from new inputs.  These limitations demand effort-saving strategies in 
gathering information from the world and controlling our actions. 
Long Term Memory 
9. 
In contrast to working memory, long term memory appears to have an enormous capacity, and to 
store information indefinitely.  We are only aware of this information, however, when it is transferred to 
working memory.  Long term memory also seems to involve several sub-systems, but the distinctions 
involved  are  not  always  clearly  drawn.    For  example,  it  is  clear  that  some  of  the  information  in  long 
term memory can be described as semantic.  It involves knowledge about the world.  Other information 
is  best  described  as  episodic.    It  relates  to  one’s  own  personal  experience.    It  is  not  clear,  however, 
that  different  processes  are  involved  in  forming  these  two  types  of  memory,  and,  sometimes,  the 
distinction between them is difficult to make.  It is interesting that interviewing accident survivors often 
reveals  an  apparent  change  in  the  way  the  story  is  told  after  several  repetitions  from  a  detailed, 
possibly confused pattern, which seems to invoke actual impressions of the event, to a more coherent, 
sparser account that is often less informative (and sometimes at variance with other evidence).  This 
may  reflect  a  change  in  the  way  the  information  is  stored,  semantic  coding  being  more  economical.  
The  change  that  takes  place  in  fishermen’s  tales  with  retelling  probably  involves  a  similar  shift  in 
balance between the more truthful episodic encoding and the more "meaningful", semantic encoding. 
10.  Another useful distinction is between declarative knowledge (which embraces both semantic and 
episodic  memory)  and  procedural  knowledge.    Procedural  knowledge  is  of  particular  interest  in  the 
context  of  error  because  it  involves  the  mechanisms  that  control  or  guide  performance  of  a  task 
without reference to underlying factual knowledge.  Knowing how to ride a bicycle is a good example of 
procedural  knowledge.    Once  attained,  the  knowledge  persists  indefinitely,  and  is  instantly  available 
should  the  opportunity  to  exercise  it  arise.    It  is  also  peculiarly  difficult  to  communicate  the 
fundamentals of the skill verbally.  This last point is not true of all procedural knowledge, however, and 
the distinction with declarative knowledge is not entirely clear cut.  In the context of error analysis some 
have  found  it  useful  to  classify  tasks  according  to  the  type  of  knowledge  involved  in  their  execution.  
The most automatic activities are described as skill-based; they demand little conscious attention, and 
explanation  of  the  processes  involved  may  be  difficult.    Rule-based  behaviour  involves  more  easily 
described procedures, for example "i" before "e" except after "c".  It demands a little more conscious 
monitoring if actions are to be performed in the right order, without omissions.  The most demanding 
activities are described as knowledge-based.  Here the activity is largely unautomatic, the mental load 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
is  considerable,  and  artificial  memory  aids  may  be  required,  for  example;  check  lists,  computational 
notes, diagrams and maps. 
11.  Again  it  is  often  difficult,  if  not  impossible,  to  make  precise  distinctions  in  practical  cases.    Most 
complex tasks involve more or less unconscious procedural elements and overall strategies based on 
explicitly  definable  knowledge.   With increasing experience, the trainee’s behaviour on some aspects 
of his tasks might be said to progress from one level to the next as less and less conscious attention is 
required.    This  is  surely  not  a  general  description  of  skill  or  expertise  acquisition,  however.    It  is,  for 
example,  possible  to  describe  the  sequence  of  actions  involved  in  changing  gear  in  a  car.    Some 
people  are  even  capable  of  explaining  in  detail  the  mechanical  consequences  of  these  control 
movements.  For most people, however, gear changing is simply a 'knack'; attempting to convey it in 
words to a learner driver can be almost pointless.  With a little practice, however, the knack is acquired 
- whether or not the learner understands the mechanical details.  Nevertheless, the distinction between 
skill,  rule,  and  knowledge-based  behaviours  does  not  have  the  merit  of  reflecting  an  important 
descriptor  of  a  task  in  the  degree  of  conscious  attention  it  demands  of  the  operator.    It  is  interesting 
that  errors  in  knowledge-based  behaviour  do  not  appear  under  immediate  causes  in  Table 1,  but 
cognitive failures are well represented.  Cognitive failures involve a mismatch between intentions and 
actions.  The correct drill is selected, but items are omitted, confused with others from a similar drill, or 
operated in reverse (raising rather than lowering a lever).  Cognitive failures are often associated with 
distractions  or  preoccupation  in  otherwise  normal  and  undemanding  circumstances.    Where 
knowledge-based errors are identified in an investigation, they are very often associated with failures in 
training  or  briefing,  or  the  administrative  background  (which  includes  the  framing of orders, manuals, 
and instructions). 
12.  Aircrew-error  data  point  to  cognitive  failure  as  an  important  area  of  vulnerability  in  skilled 
performance,  though  it  is  certainly  not  confined  to  aviation.    It  is  true,  however,  that  aviation,  military 
aviation in particular, involves highly standardized routines and rituals, which are designed to minimize 
the workload entailed in knowledge-based performance.  Such a strategy promises a high probability of 
success  in  extremely  demanding  missions,  without  raising  personnel  selection  criteria  to  unrealistic 
levels.    It  also  necessarily  biases  the  type  of  error  likely  to  predominate  in  any  collection  of  accident 
investigations. 
Sensory Stores 
13.  Very  little  of  the  information  available  at  any  moment  in  the  sensory  domain  is  allowed  into  the 
focus of attention.  But that focus can shift very quickly - from reading this text to sounds coming from 
another room, say, or the sensations produced as your hands support the book.  When the impetus for 
a shift of attention is produced by an unexpected external event, such as your own name cropping up 
in  the  conversation  in  the  next  room,  some  antecedents  of  that  stimulus  (the  beginning  of  the 
sentence,  for  example)  may  also  be  noticed.    Experimental  evidence  suggests  that  this  remarkable, 
and useful, feat is not achieved through prescience, but by routine, very short term storage of sensory 
information.    Sensory  stores  seem  to  have  unlimited  capacity,  but  retain  information  for,  at  most,  a 
second  or  so.    This  allows  not  only  selection  of  the  information  to  be  processed,  but  also  some 
interpretation on the basis of past experience and current context. 
14.  Perception  is,  therefore,  in  part  driven  by  expectation.    This  is  a  labour-saving  ruse  that  takes 
advantage of redundancy and predictability in the real world in constructing a representation of it.  The 
written word is particularly redundant, as this sentence about a tailoring deficiency shows: "Th# sl##v#s 
#f  th#  sh#rt  w#r#  a  l#ttl#  t##  sh#rt".    Despite  the  lack  of  vowels,  it  is  unlikely  to  take  much  longer  to 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
decipher this sentence than it would normally, and the interpretation of "sh#rt" should change naturally 
with  context.    The  advantages  of  this  system  are  considerable:  it  reduces  the  resources  required  to 
interpret  the world, and allows some flexibility in selection and interpretation based on succeeding as 
well as preceding information. 
15.  The  disadvantage  is,  of  course,  a  risk  of  misinterpretation  by  too  great  a  reliance  on  previous 
experience and present expectations.  In Table 1 these errors appear in the false hypothesis category.  Often 
they are associated with a preceding cognitive failure.  The pilot is distracted or preoccupied during his pre-
landing  checks.    The  checks,  which  he  has  done  so  often  that  he  hardly  need  think  about  them,  are 
completed, but with an omission.  He "knows" he has lowered the undercarriage, so a routine glance at the 
undercarriage  indicator  gives  the  expected  result,  not  the  true  state  of  affairs,  and  the  landing  continues 
without wheels.  Even after landing, the pilot may not correctly diagnose the cause of the strange noise and 
bumps as the aircraft slides down the runway, so strong is his expectation. 
Overview 
16.  The  system  described  above  is  flexible  and  efficient.    In  familiar  situations  the  effort  required  is 
minimized;  well  practised  routines  and  rules  of  thumb  operate  almost  automatically,  and  the  signals 
required to direct actions or initiate new responses are selected without much deliberation.  In taxing or 
problematic situations, a more effort-intensive approach can be adopted.  The environment is scanned for 
the  signs  that  identify  the  problem  or  situation;  previously  effective  solutions  are  recalled  from  past 
experience and implemented.  When the situation is novel, a deliberate, more or less systematic exercise 
in information gathering and conceptual reasoning may be required.  The expert approaches his task with 
all three strategies at his disposal.  Long-term goals may be consciously set, and these define the skills 
required and the experience he will have to draw on in executing his shorter-term plans. 
17.  The  weaknesses  of  the  system  are  characteristic  of  the  resources  deployed  in  each  type  of 
approach.    The  capacity  of  working  memory  is  an  all  too  evident  limit  on  efficiency  in  conceptual 
reasoning.  When diagnosis and response are required in a fairly short time, and aides memoire are not 
available,  then  it  is  common  that  some  relevant  information  is  overlooked  or  given  insufficient  weight, 
particularly if it does not fit the first tenable hypothesis that comes to mind.  Solutions may be proposed 
that  are  focused  on  the  observable  symptoms,  but  without  thought  for  possible  side-effects  of  the 
solutions  (a  trivial  example  is  replacing  a  blown  fuse  with  one  of  higher  rating).    When  there  is just too 
much  to  think  about,  there  is  a  strong  temptation  to  test  hypotheses  in  a  concrete  manner  without 
considering  the  possible  consequences  of  the  intervention.    In  more  routine  circumstances,  minor  slips 
and lapses are more likely.  Monitoring may fail to detect the signs; the situation is seen as normal - as 
expected.    About  two  thirds  of  the  cognitive  failures  reported  in  Table  1  happened  in  routine, 
undemanding  circumstances.    Often  all  that  was  required  was  a  minor  distraction.    The  consequences 
seem  out  of  proportion  to  the  precipitating  event.    It  is  an  important  finding  for  any  safety  oriented 
occupation that normal behaviour, in normal circumstances, carries a significant risk of serious error. 
FACTORS AFFECTING PERFORMANCE 
The Environment and Arousal 
18.  Military  aircrew  have  to  contend  with  a  variety  of  environmental  stress  creators  not  commonly 
encountered  in  other  occupations;  heat,  vibration,  noise,  and  acceleration  are  all  catered  for  with 
special  equipment.    The  acute,  reactive  stress  associated with life-threatening emergencies is not so 
easily countered. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
19.  The  effects  of  stress  creators  on  performance  are  complex  and  varied.    To  some  extent  the 
concept  of  arousal  simplifies  (perhaps  oversimplifies)  discussion  of  these  effects.    It  implies  a 
continuum  of  activation  from  extreme  drowsiness to extreme excitement.  Psychological indicators of 
arousal  level  include  alertness,  sensitivity  to  simulation  and  performance  on  tests.    Physiological 
indicators,  such  as  heart  rate,  skin  resistance,  etc,  sometimes,  but  only  sometimes,  show  useful 
correlations  with  psychological  variables.    Fig 1  embodies  two  ideas  which  have  proved  a  useful,  if 
incomplete,  description  of  the  relationship  between  arousal  level  and  performance  for  many  years.  
The  first  idea  is  that  there  is  an  optimum  arousal  level  for  any  task.    This  implies  an  inverted  "U" 
relationship  with  performance.    This  is  a  difficult  hypothesis  to  test  experimentally,  of  course.    The 
second  idea  is  that  easy  tasks  are  more  tolerant  of  high  arousal  levels  than  difficult  ones.    Difficulty 
level  in  this  context  obviously  depends  on  the  training  and  experience  of  the  operator.    Further 
individual differences (see the section on personality) also complicate the picture.  Variations in arousal 
level  seem  to  affect  performance  largely  by  changing  attentional  capacity  and  processing speed.  To 
some extent these changes are moderated by learned strategies in the control of attention. 
20.  At low levels of arousal, such as might occur after a long period of work, at night, particularly if the 
work is unstimulating or monotonous, responses take longer and lapses of attention and omissions are 
more  likely  to  occur.    Given  noise,  stimulants  (such  as  caffeine  or  interesting  conversation),  or 
sufficient motivation, apparently normal levels of efficiency can be achieved - though the less important 
tasks may be neglected. 
21.  Fatigue and sleep deprivation commonly produce stress, but they do not figure in Table 1.  This is 
not  to  suggest  that  they  never  contribute  to  aircrew  error,  but  the  evidence  is  that  they  make  only  a 
minor contribution.  In civil aviation, which routinely involves long periods on duty, time zone shifts and 
disruption  of  circadian  rhythms,  there  may  be  more  scope  for  fatigue  and  sleep  deprivation  to  affect 
performance.    In  both  the  military  and  civilian  sectors,  however,  duty  cycles  and  rest  periods  are 
regulated and closely monitored. 
6-1 Fig 1 Arousal Levels 
22.  At  high  levels  of  arousal,  such  as  might  be  provoked  by  an  emergency,  information  may  be 
processed more quickly, but at the expense of a reduction in the capacity of working memory.  Control 
of  attention  becomes  more  of  a  problem.    The  reduction  in  capacity  of  working  memory  can  be 
compensated  for  by  increased  attentional  selectivity  -  focusing  intently  on  the  important  information  - 
but  impairment  of  perceptual  discrimination  may  allow  superficially  relevant  stimuli  to  become 
distracting, so disrupting performance. 
Acute Reactive Stress 
23.  The errors coded under "Acute stress" in Table 1 were mainly caused by mechanical problems - 
engine fires, bird strikes, etc.  A few were due to prior mishandling by the pilot, or disorientation.  The 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
major  category  of  problems  generated  (about  30%)  are  best  described  as  a  disorganization  of 
responses: the wrong drills were selected, or the pilot’s analysis of the emergency was haphazard and 
ineffective.    Slow  responses  and  precipitate  action  were  about  equally  likely  (about  10%  of  the  total 
each).  Narrowing of attention and cognitive failure together accounted for another 30% of the cases. 
24.  There  is  no  reason  to  suppose  that  this  pattern  is  in  any  way  unusual  nor  likely  to  be 
representative of that found in non-aviation emergencies.  Extremely detailed knowledge of the job, the 
emergency,  and  the  operator  would  be  required  to  predict  the  type  of  failure  to  be  expected.    Some 
general guidance on the operator’s contribution is given in the section on predisposition. 
PREDISPOSITION 
Trait : Life Stress 
25.  A  popular  lay  explanation  for  aircrew  error  involves  domestic  and  other  pressures.    The 
association  between  stressful  life  events  (both  positive  and  negative)  and  heart  disease  and  other 
illnesses  is  well  known.    A  similar  statistical  association  between  the  incidence  of  life  events  and 
involvement  in  flying  accidents  has  been  reported  at  least  once,  but  this  is  clearly  a  difficult  area  for 
research,  and  further  analysis  can  suggest  other  interpretations.    Close examination of the accidents 
coded in Table 1 under "Life stress" reveals at most only two cases in which a link with life events can 
confidently  be  averred.    Both  were  arguably  rather  special  cases,  and  did  not  involve  a  general 
depletion of ability to cope with the stresses of work. 
26.  It  is  possible  that  military  aviation  allows  greater  compartmentalization  than  some  other  activities.  
The  crew  are  isolated  from  other  distractions  and  pressures  while  performing  the  task  and,  in  many 
cases,  the  critical  parts  of the task (ie whilst airborne) last for relatively short periods.  Many individuals 
can cope under these circumstances, unless the stress is causing noticeable sleep disruption.  It is also 
likely that individual differences play a large part in determining the impact of life events. 
Trait:  Personality 
27.  The scientific description of personality can be approached in a variety of ways.  Two dimensions 
that have proved useful in many fields of investigation are extraversion and neuroticism.  Questionnaire 
tests  of  extraversion  and  neuroticism  distinguish  different  types  of deviant personality and psychiatric 
disorder, and also show reliable differences between professional groups.  In addition, scores on such 
tests  account  for  some  of  the  variation  in  the  way  people  approach  tasks,  cope  with  a  range  of 
stressful  situations,  and  behave  generally.    Extraverts  are  assumed  to  require  more  stimulation  than 
introverts  to  excite  the  central  nervous  system.  As a result, while extraverts are active, sociable and 
impulsive,  introverts  are  passive,  reserved  and  thoughtful.    A  high  neuroticism  score  indicates  an 
unstable autonomic nervous system; it would be associated with an emotional or moody disposition.  A 
low score would indicate stability. 
28.  Introverts tend to work in a methodical manner, and hence to be slower than extraverts, who may 
make more mistakes in the interests of speed.  Stimulants and threatening circumstances, by raising 
arousal level, would tend to be detrimental for introverts (by over-arousal), but may improve extraverts’ 
performance, since they tend to be chronically under-aroused.  The introvert performs better, however, 
when sustained vigilance is required. 
29.  A high neuroticism score has implications for performance in threatening circumstances.  Anxiety 
may divert mental resources into unproductive worry and degrade performance.  Psychosomatic illness 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
can result from prolonged exposure to such stress.  A high score may also accentuate the differences 
between introverts and extraverts in terms of liability to accidents. 
30.  Several  studies  in  aviation  or  road  safety  have  implicated  neuroticism  or  some  form  of 
maladjustment.    High  extraversion  scores  have  also  been  found  to  be  associated  with  accident 
involvement.    Contradictory  findings  and  failures  to  find  any  association  are  by  no  means  unknown, 
however, and it is not possible to claim that a clear picture has emerged.  Bearing in mind that not all 
accidents  are  likely  to  involve  an  important  contribution  from  personality  variables,  it  is  obvious  that 
large  numbers  would  be  needed  to  establish  any  correlations.    It  is  also  likely  that  some  attention 
should be given to classifying types of accident (further increasing the numbers required). 
31.  Table  1  shows  that  about  22%  of  aircrew-error  accidents  have  a  possible  association  with 
personality.  It has been possible to classify about two thirds of these on the basis of descriptors used 
in  personal  records.    Two  groups  have  emerged.    One  is  described  as  under-confident,  nervous  or 
prone to over-react; the other as over-confident, reckless, heedless of rules.  It is tempting to apply the 
labels  'unstable  introvert'  and  'unstable  extravert'  respectively,  but  more  evidence  is  required.    It  is 
clear,  however,  that  one  group  (the  first)  tends  to  be  associated  with  accidents  involving  mishandled 
emergencies,  and  the  other  with  accidents  involving  unauthorized  or  risky  manoeuvres,  or  failure  to 
appreciate risk. 
32.  Parallels  probably  exist  in  many  other  professions.    Even  if  "joy  riding"  is  not  possible,  there  is 
always  some  scope  for  ill-considered  experimentation,  corner-cutting  and,  of  course,  mishandling  of 
emergencies.    It  is  also  clear  that  future  research  should  not  be  expected  to  produce  simple 
correlations  between  personality  measures  and  accident  involvement.    It  would  be  wise  to  expect  a 
bipolar  relationship  with  extraversion  mediated  by  neuroticism,  and  to  classify  accidents  according  to 
the types of error involved.  Personality tests can provide some guidance in selecting aircrew, and are 
used by many airlines.  They are, however, relatively imprecise instruments and their utility in selection 
obviously depends on the ratio of suitable candidates to vacant posts.  In most contexts, differences in 
personality remain a management issue. 
Trait:  Cognitive Function 
33.  Individual differences in cognitive functioning may play a part in liability to accidents.  The ability to 
cope  with  chronic,  mild  stress,  and  liability  to  cognitive  error  may  both  be  related  to  stable  biases  in 
cognitive  style, those with a more obsessional style being less vulnerable to stress and less prone to 
cognitive  failure.    There  is  also  some  evidence  that  under  stress  cognitive  styles  may  become  more 
extreme.  Thus cognitive style may identify those who are vulnerable to life stress and even, possibly, 
mediate a relationship between life stress and accident involvement. 
ENABLING FACTORS 
System-induced Errors 
34.  The first three enabling factors listed in Table 1 together account for about 40% of the accidents 
conventionally  described  as  due  to  "aircrew  error".    The  potential  for  such  system-induced  errors 
increases  with  the  sophistication  and  power  of  the  systems  employed.    Aviators  increasingly  rely  on 
indirect apprehension of important data and indirect control of the system.  There are obvious benefits 
in  the  use  of  technology  to  supplement  human  capabilities,  but  the  designer  of  equipment  faces  real 
challenges in devising suitable interfaces.  Conflicting requirements have to be met.  Both the novice 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
and  the  expert  require  easily  interpretable  displays  and  accessible,  simple  controls.    The  expert, 
however,  may  require  more  detailed  information,  or  a  more  flexible  operating  style  than  the  novice.  
Ease of operation in controls is obviously desirable, but may facilitate mis-selections.  In addition, the 
training and administrative background set the context in which the operator works, and both can easily 
provide opportunities for mis-information and confusion. 
Professionalism 
35.  The variety of enabling factors is enormous.  One unifying aspect is the fact that such problems 
are identifiable before they cause an accident, and, in contrast with most of the psychological factors 
discussed  above,  are  in  principle  amenable  to  relatively  simple  remedies.    The  inquiries  into  many 
major disasters (Chernobyl, Challenger, the Herald of Free Enterprise) have provided examples.  The 
failure  to  remedy  this  type  of  problem  may  be  due  to  lack  of  imagination,  error  of  judgement  or  an 
unfortunate ordering of priorities.  Professionals expect to be able to cope.  Performing under less than 
optimum  conditions  does  afford  some  satisfaction.    Complaining  about  inadequate  equipment,  or 
questioning  common  practice  may  seem  "unprofessional",  particularly  if  it  involves  an  admission  that 
something is not understood.  In both military and civilian aviation steps have been taken to circumvent 
this problem, and these are dealt with under "Remedies" below. 
REMEDIES 
Analysis 
36.  The  picture  of  the  human  presented  above  appears somewhat discouraging.  Although capable of 
acquiring complex skills and of retaining large amounts of knowledge, he is yet likely to fail in a number of 
ways.   If the task is unusually demanding or the context too stressful, his behaviour is likely to become 
disorganized,  skills  may  break  down,  information  may  well  be  overlooked,  disregarded,  or  improperly 
interpreted; if things are going well, and the task demands are slight, the experienced operator may yet 
fail to execute 'simple' procedures properly, or become inattentive.  Depending on his personality, he may 
tolerate  stress  only  poorly,  or  impulsively  deviate  from  standard  practice.    Some  of  these  problems  are 
relatively  intractable  features  of  human  nature.    Long  term  research  may  eventually  provide  palliatives.  
But  our  perspective  so  far  has  been  exclusively  error-orientated.    It  is  as  well  to  bear  in  mind  that,  in 
contrast  with  the  situation  in  experimental  studies,  it  is  not  unusual  for  many  hours  of  successful 
performance to separate errors in real tasks, and humans do routinely identify and correct slips, lapses 
and  misunderstandings.    The  very  rarity  of  error  makes  applied  research  and  planning  for  practical 
remedial  action  difficult.    Nevertheless,  pro-active  remedial  action  is  possible.    Three  major  features  of 
pro-active effort in aviation are standardization, simulation and competency checks. 
Standards 
37.  Standardization applies to all aspects of aviation.  As far as possible all the equipment fitted to a 
fleet  of  aircraft  will  conform  to  a  common  standard.    To  some  extent  common  standards  are  applied 
across  fleets.    There  are  economic  reasons  for  this  approach,  but safety advantages accrue as well.  
More  importantly,  standard  operating  procedures  are  defined  according  to  the  best  available  advice 
and experience.  This ensures that crews who have never met before can work together efficiently and 
safely, and that the best practice is applied universally.  When flaws in equipment design or procedures 
do come to light, again remedies can be applied universally; the number and variety of risks latent in 
the system is minimized. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
38.  An  advantage  of  standardization  is  the  criteria  it  provides  against  which  to  judge  performance.  
Aircrew  are  regularly  assessed  for  basic  skills  and  for  their  ability  to  cope  with  emergencies.    A 
standard  set  of  emergencies  is  defined  (for  example  engine  failure  during  take-off),  and  the  crew-
members  have  to  demonstrate  their  ability  to  handle  these  emergencies  at  regular  intervals.    The 
procedures  under  which  these  skills  are  assessed  are  themselves  monitored  and  standardized  by 
independent authorities. 
Simulators 
39.  Simulation  has  provided  the  means  of  testing  skills  in  emergency  situations  safely,  and  more 
effectively.  The technology used in flight simulators can support effective assessment and instruction 
through the use of replays, graphical records etc.  Regular simulator training in emergencies, besides 
ensuring  competence  in  handling  the  most  likely  and  most  threatening  mishaps,  also  increases  the 
crew’s general confidence and may make them more resistant to the stress of unexpected problems.  
In  addition,  simulators  are  increasingly  being  used  in  support  of  special  courses  designed  to  make 
aircrew aware of human factors issues and, in particular, the effective use of resources, both material 
and  human.    A  prominent  element  of  many  such  courses  is  guidance  in  interpersonal  relations  and 
successful crew co-operation. 
Feedback 
40.  The  management  of  any  modern  flying  enterprise  necessarily  involves  consideration  of  safety 
issues.  Not only accidents, but also minor incidents are investigated thoroughly.  The lessons learned 
are  fed  back  into  operational  practice  through  flight  safety  organizations  that  permeate  almost  every 
level  of  the  management  structure.    These  organizations  also  seek  out  hazards  through  flight  safety 
inspections  or  routine  monitoring  of  the  records  made  by  airborne  data  recorders.    Such  measures 
obviously have to be applied with a degree of tact and sympathy, if the co-operation of the operators is 
to be maintained. 
Reporting 
41.  In addition to the mandatory incident reporting schemes, both military and civilian operators also 
have  confidential  reporting  systems.    Again  there  is  potential  for  unnecessary  embarrassment  or 
mistrust  but,  with  care,  such  schemes  do  provide  valuable  information  and,  obviously,  have  the 
potential to prevent accidents. 
CONCLUSIONS 
42.  Many  of  the  most  important  errors  derive  directly  from  normal  characteristics  of  human  skilled 
behaviour.    General  principles  on  how  to  cater for this vulnerability are by no means established, but 
recognizing  the  fact  has,  at  least,  moved  the  debate  on  in  aviation  from  issues  of  blame  to  research 
issues  and  possible  remedy.    In  general,  by  relying  on  standardized  procedures,  aviation  seems  to 
have reduced the potential for errors in knowledge-based activity; as a result the predominant, primary, 
immediate cause of aircrew error appears to be cognitive failure. 
43.  There  is  some  evidence  suggesting  that  personality  may  predispose  some  individuals  to  a 
particular  type  of  risk.    Many  airlines  use  personality  tests  in  their  selection  procedures.    Such  tools 
obviously  provide  only  guidance  rather  than  identification,  and  their  utility  in  a  selection  process 
inevitably depends on the ratio of high quality candidates to vacant posts. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-1 - Human Performance 
44.  The stress due to emergencies does contribute to aircrew error, but regular simulator training, and 
competency  checks,  serve  to  reduce  its  impact.    The  role  of  domestic  stress  is  best  described  as 
undecided.  The nature of the military aviation task may provide a measure of protection.  Many other 
stresses  associated  with  flying  are  routinely  contained.    Fatigue  may,  in  general,  be  counted  among 
these because of regulation and monitoring. 
45.  Aviation has, in large measure, embraced a safety orientated culture.  Standardization, simulation 
and competency checks are entrenched in the system, and serve to limit the potential for risk and its 
impact.  In addition, there is an active interest in identifying risks through inspection, investigation and 
incident reporting schemes. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 - 6-2 - Leadership and Captaincy 
CHAPTER 2 - LEADERSHIP AND CAPTAINCY 
Introduction 
1. 
The Aircraft Commander is the aircrew member designated by a competent authority as being in 
command  of  an  aircraft,  and  responsible  for  its  safe  operation  and  accomplishment  of  the  assigned 
mission (see Military Aviation Authority (MAA) Regulatory Article (RA) 2115). 
2. 
Captaincy  is  the  generic  term  used  for  the  judgement  and  asset  management  skills  of aircrew when 
performing  their  primary  duties  as  an  aircraft  commander.    Although  the  Aircraft  Commander  is  usually  a 
pilot,  in  some  aircraft  roles  the  Aircraft  Commander  may  be  of  other  aircrew  category.    MAA  RA  2115 
establishes the authority and defines the responsibilities of an Aircraft Commander.  It does not, however, 
cover the qualities required by such a team leader.  Those qualities are described within this chapter. 
Leadership 
3. 
Leadership is a quality difficult to define, although it has long been recognized and appreciated by 
the  human  race.    Leadership  is  required  to  carry  through  any  enterprise  of  importance  and  often 
seemingly  hopeless  causes  have  been  brought  to  a  successful  conclusion  due  to  the  determination 
and personal influence of some individual.  A leader has an aim and plans out the activities required to 
achieve  it.    Tasks  are  allocated  to  the  most  suitable  subordinate  and,  by  encouragement,  drive  and 
example,  the  leader  inspires  them  to  success.    The  leader  considers  the  problems  of  others  and 
exercises sound judgement in whether to allow these to influence progress towards the aim. 
4. 
Leadership  is  already  detected  in  all  aircrew  because  many  of  those  personal  attributes  are 
required  to  become  aircrew.   Many of these attributes are inherent, and the great leaders throughout 
history  were  probably  born  such.    However,  much  can  be  done  to  acquire  leadership  qualities  and 
those qualities already present can be honed by careful study, thought and training. 
The Aircraft Commander 
5. 
An  aircraft’s  crew  is  composed  of  professionally  competent  people  all  possessing  leadership 
qualities  to  a  greater  or  lesser  extent.    Nevertheless,  it  is  essential  that  one  member  should  be 
appointed as the Aircraft Commander, and should be recognized as such, in order to direct the crew’s 
efforts and take overall responsibility for achieving the task.  The Aircraft Commander should possess 
and demonstrate suitable qualities, including: 
a. 
The ability to influence by personal example, in terms of character and ideals. 
b. 
Sufficient professional ability to command the respect of others. 
c. 
Attentiveness  to  the  administration  and  welfare  of  crew  members,  thereby  fostering  an 
opportunity for mutual loyalties to develop. 
The Qualities of a Captain 
6. 
The qualities of a captain are broadly those of a good officer and include: 
a. 
Skill and experience. 
b. 
Moral character, which includes: 
(1)  Personality. 
(2)  Tenacity. 
Revised Jul 11 
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 - 6-2 - Leadership and Captaincy 
(3)  Loyalty. 
(4)  Sense of responsibility. 
(5)  Personal influence. 
(6)  Courage. 
(7)  Initiative. 
c. 
Physical and mental fitness. 
The ways in which an Aircraft Commander employs these personal qualities, and develops the skills of 
captaincy, will influence the level of achievement by the crew. 
7. 
Skill and Experience.  A very high degree of skill is needed to ensure that an aircraft is operated 
to  its  maximum  capability.    Flying  is  a  professional  business  and  a  good  captain  is  one  whose 
professional  standards  are  such  as  to  be  beyond  the  criticism  of  the  crew.    The  captain  must 
endeavour to extract the maximum value from every sortie and should consult other aircrew of known 
ability  and  experience.    Experience  comes  only  with  time  and  exposure  to  the  problems  of  aviation.  
Not  all  captains  can  be  well  experienced  at  the  outset  but  the  ability  to  learn  quickly,  and  thus  gain 
experience, will rapidly improve captaincy skills.  The more experience gained, coupled with foresight 
and  careful  planning,  the  more  successfully  a  captain  will  be  able to anticipate difficult situations and 
lead the crew to deal with them. 
8. 
Personality.  Personality is generally understood to be the distinction of personal character, the means 
whereby  one  individual  is  distinguished  from  another.    Personal  integrity  is  essential to a good personality 
and is a quality which promotes trust.  A captain’s integrity must be unquestionable and beyond reproach; a 
good example must be set to the crew members in all things, both professional and social.  A captain should 
be patient, cheerful, understanding and flexible.  However, the captain’s personality must be strong enough 
to leave the crew in no doubt that the captain’s role is primarily as a commander, with authority over them 
and with responsibility for crew discipline.  If necessary, individual crew members must be prevailed upon to 
adjust their own personalities in the interests of crew harmony. 
9. 
Tenacity.  Tenacity is resoluteness combined with persistence.  It is closely allied to determination 
and encompasses the desire and ability to see a difficult matter through to a successful conclusion in 
spite of disheartening or apparently overwhelming odds.
10.  Loyalty.    An  Aircraft  Commander  must  be  loyal  to  superiors  and  subordinates  alike  and  this 
loyalty  must  be  manifestly  sincere.    A  captain  should feel a moral obligation to justify and respond to 
the faith and trust proffered by others. 
11.  Sense  of  Responsibility.
Aircrew  are  expected  to  have  a  highly  developed  sense  of 
responsibility.  It is the Aircraft Commander’s task to foster this and give it purpose.  Members of the 
crew must be made aware of the importance of their tasks.  The captain should take a detailed interest 
in  an  individual’s  activities  and  offer  good  advice  or  make  valid  criticism  in  order  to  encourage 
excellence.  The Aircraft Commander is responsible for crew coordination.  This implies obtaining the 
wholehearted and active cooperation of the crew in ensuring that there is no unnecessary duplication 
of  effort  and  that  all  the  aircraft’s  systems  and  facilities  are  utilized  to  the  maximum  efficiency.    The 
Aircraft Commander should take an interest in crew welfare in a tactful and unobtrusive way to alleviate 
problems which are likely to affect the efficiency of the crew. 
12.  Personal Influence. Personal influence is the ability to inspire a crew to further efforts when their 
inclination  is  to  give  up  or  turn  back.    The  personal  influence  of  a  good  Aircraft  Commander  should 
ensure that the crew members invariably give of their best.
Revised Jul 11 
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 - 6-2 - Leadership and Captaincy 
13.  Courage. Courage is of two kinds - mental or moral, and physical.  Courage is not synonymous 
with fearlessness.  Indeed, if one is not afraid, one cannot show courage since courage is an effort of 
will  to  overcome  fear.    Physical  courage  is  the  ability  to  stick  to  the  job  to  the  end  despite  injury, 
privation and approaching death.  Moral courage is reflected in the attitude of mind required to make 
just but unpopular decisions.
14.  Initiative. Initiative may be said to be the ability to combine and utilize common sense, foresight 
and imagination under difficult conditions.  More specifically, it is the ability of an individual to originate 
a  course  of  action  without  prior  reference  to  his  superiors,  in  order  to  cope  with  unexpected 
circumstances.  It consists of refusing to be defeated by circumstances or events for which no specific 
instructions have been given.  It is affected by personal integrity, professional knowledge, courage and 
confidence and should be in the make-up of all aircrew.
15.  Physical and Mental Fitness. The ever-increasing performance of modern aircraft demands the 
highest levels of physical and mental fitness.  One of the essential requirements of leadership, mental 
stamina (the ability to think clearly and act decisively and quickly in an emergency) will suffer if fitness 
is  not  maintained.    Cockpit  complexities  in  a  fast-moving  scenario  require  the  captain  to  have  high 
levels of mental and physical stamina although some of the burden can be relieved, but not eliminated, 
in multi-crew aircraft.  The possibility of having to react to emergencies often calls on hidden reserves 
of physical strength.  Furthermore, the fortitude derived from physical and mental fitness may well be 
required in any ensuing survival situation, particularly if captured or hurt or if injured crew members are 
involved.  It is important for crews to understand the factors which go to make up the particular state of 
health  necessary  for  maximum  efficiency,  and  Aircraft  Commanders  should  set  a  good  example  to 
their crews.
Training 
16.  Training  instils  confidence  and  the  ability  to  react  instinctively  to  both  routine  and  unexpected 
incidents.    It  is  of  particular  value  in  an  emergency  where  instinctive  execution  of  emergency  drills  is 
vital.    A  good  captain  should  appreciate  the  value  and  importance  of  training in the broader concept.  
Every  flight  should  be  analysed  for  its  training  value  and  post-flight  discussions  should  be  held  to 
augment knowledge and take the benefit of experience.  Regular training opportunities must be taken, 
particularly to practise emergency procedures. 
Conclusion 
17.  The  qualities  of  a  good  captain  are  present,  to  a  greater  or  lesser  extent,  in  the  make-up  of  all 
aircrew.  The responsibilities of the Aircraft Commander are laid down in MAA RA2115 and are reinforced 
by other local orders and instructions.  The Aircraft Commander has a most responsible job which calls 
for mature judgement and sound leadership, often under the most difficult of circumstances.  The Aircraft 
Commander is ultimately responsible for the safety of the aircraft, its crew, its passengers and its cargo 
whilst carrying out a specified mission.  An intelligent study of the requirements of captaincy, the fostering 
of  natural  talent  and  the  acquisition  of  the  appropriate  skills  and  techniques,  together  with  the  genuine 
desire to be a good leader, go a long way towards achieving such an aim. 
Revised Jul 11 
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
CHAPTER 3 - AIRMANSHIP 
Introduction 
1. 
The term 'airmanship' is akin to 'seamanship' as used for mariners.  Both terms represent a level 
of knowledge and skill that is desired, and essential, to one who aspires to operate safely within such 
environments. 
2. 
A  demonstration  of  poor  airmanship  will  produce  poor  professional  results,  failure  on  courses  of 
training,  and  possibly  result  in  an  aircraft  accident.    Some  aspects  of  airmanship  are  not  as 
straightforward as "see something, do something".  These more complex aspects involve the thought 
processes concerned with decision-making.  Breaking airmanship down into its constituent parts would 
provide a basis for improved, specifically targeted, training. 
3. 
The Royal Air Force has developed training objectives and a diagnostic tool for the assessment of 
airmanship performance.  This assessment method has been mandated at all RAF flying training units, 
and is known as the 'RAF Airmanship Model'.  However, the airmanship performance principles upon 
which the RAF Airmanship Model is based can be applied to all aircrew.  Within this chapter, therefore, 
the terms 'aviator', 'aircrew' and 'student' are used synonymously. 
MEMORY FUNCTIONS 
4. 
To  understand  the  requirements  of  the  RAF  Airmanship  Model,  some  knowledge  of  basic 
psychology and memory function is beneficial.  Volume 6, Chapter 1 explained human performance in 
such  respect.    The  following  paragraphs  summarize  the  relevant  background  points  and  explain 
terminology. 
Memory 
5. 
For  ease  of illustration, a computer analogy is used to describe the functional areas of the brain 
that are relevant to airmanship.  Although these areas are complex and not fully understood, there is 
agreement  amongst  scientists  and  psychologists  at  the  following  level  of  detail.    Memory  is  itself 
divided into long and short term: 
a. 
Long-term Memory.  Long-term memory can be compared to a computer’s hard drive.  It is 
where all permanent data is stored and can be further divided into several areas.  For simplicity, 
only the following areas need to be considered: 
(1)  Semantic  Memory.    Semantic  memory  is  where  data  such  as  facts,  rules  and 
information are stored.  Examples would include cockpit checks and procedures, emergency 
drills, and technical data. 
(2)  Motor  Memory.    Motor  (or  mechanical)  skills,  such  as  aircraft  handling,  are  stored  in 
motor  memory  after  practice  or  consolidation.    They  can  be  accessed  and  used  sub-
consciously and, as such, do not always use up short-term memory either for processing or 
for monitoring. 
(3)  Episodic Memory.  Specific episodes or events, such as a first solo flight, complex in-
flight  emergencies,  or  memory  of  the  last  sortie  or  combat  are  stored  in  episodic  memory.  
These  stored  events  are  the  individual’s  perception  of  what  happened,  rather  than  what 
actually happened, and may be altered by more recent events, new perceptions or a debrief.  
Episodic memory can be likened to a stored low definition photo or video clip. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 7 



AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
b. 
Short-term  Memory.    Short-term  memory  (or  working  memory)  equates  to  a  computer’s  RAM 
(Random  Access  Memory).  The capacity of this memory depends on the individual, but is limited to 
between 5 and 9 'slots' available for holding data.  Some data may be compressed to maximize storage 
space  in  short-term  memory.    Such  examples  are  regularly-used  radio  frequencies,  or  telephone 
numbers, that tend to be stored and recalled as one 'chunk' of data rather than individual digits.  The 
data will only be held for between 10 and 30 seconds, unless it is refreshed or updated, and it may be 
corrupted  by  other  data  inputs.    This  is  effectively  where  data  from  the  senses  (seeing,  hearing, 
touching  etc),  and  that  retrieved  for  use  from  long-term  memory,  is  held  whilst  it  is  processed.    The 
number of available 'slots' dictates how many tasks (or what types of tasks) an individual can perform 
simultaneously; this is often labelled 'mental capacity' by aircrew. 
Mental Capacity 
6. 
Figure  1  illustrates  how  short-term  memory  deals  with  primary  and  secondary  tasks.    The 
rectangle  represents  a  person’s  full  information-processing  capacity.    The  shaded  area  represents  a 
hypothetical primary task with the clear area showing the amount of resource available for completing 
a secondary task, ie spare mental capacity. 
6-3 Fig 1 Short-term Memory - Processing Capacity 
Secondary 
Task
Secondary 
Task
Primary 
Primary 
Task
Task
a  Dealing with a Familiar Primary Task
b  Dealing with a Less Familiar Primary Task
7. 
There  is  a  limit  to  the  amount  of  information  that  the  human  mind  can process at any one time.  
The human mind can allocate the mental resources required by the primary task, and, by default, the 
available reserve capacity will be determined.  Therefore, the higher the demand of the primary task, 
the lower the spare capacity that can be allocated to the secondary task and, consequently, the worse 
the  performance  of  the  secondary  task.    During  flying  training,  pilots  usually  manage  to  successfully 
defend  the  performance  of  the  primary  task  (flying  the  aircraft)  from  secondary  task  intrusion.  
Consequently,  flight  control  error  does  not  normally  increase  as  a  result  of  secondary  tasks  being 
present.    So,  within  the  broad  concept  of  the  human  mind  having  limited  information  processing 
capability, and that the performance of a primary task uses some of those resources, the ability to carry 
out a secondary task is a useful tool in determining the spare 'mental capacity' of a pilot.  It has also 
been  identified  that,  in  flying  training,  it  is  important  to  ensure  that  the  primary  skill  is  automated  as 
much  as  possible  (by  practice  and  experience),  thereby  freeing  up  more  capacity  for  the  secondary 
task, which includes further learning. 
Perception 
8. 
Perception  is  an  important  factor  when  studying  both  cognitive  and  psychomotor  performance.  
This is because sensory data, episodic memory and the way the analysis is performed are all subject 
to modification based on stored perceptions.  An example of this is that, sometimes, people hear what 
they expect or want to hear, rather than what is actually said.  This can also manifest itself in a sortie 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
debrief,  which  may  reveal  different  versions  of  the  same  sortie  from  different  aircrew.    In  essence, 
perception plays a major part in the construction of the mental picture of the surrounding environment 
that is essential to situational awareness, airmanship and the decision-making process. 
9. 
Investigation has demonstrated that perception emerges repeatedly as one of the most important 
factors in the whole learning and thinking process.  Fig 2 illustrates the stages of the decision-making 
process.    The  required  end  product  is  an  action,  but  to  perform  an  action  a  prior  decision  has  to  be 
made.  To make the decision, a number of factors must be analysed, but first, those factors must be 
correctly  recognized  or  perceived.    If  they  are  not  correctly  recognized  or  perceived,  the  required 
decision-making  cycle  will  not  be  followed.    Thus,  perception  of  an  event  or  factor  is  critical  to  the 
whole airmanship process. 
6-3 Fig 2 Perception in the Decision-making Process 
Perception
Recognition
Analysis
Decision
Action
10.  Because  of  the  importance  of  perception  in  any  decision-making  process,  one  of  the  core  aims 
during any training course should be to assist in the formation of perceptions.  In order for a factor to 
be perceived correctly, knowledge must be placed in context.  Perception can be considered to consist 
of  both  knowledge  and  contextual  experience,  as  shown  at  Fig 3.    Therefore,  training  may  need  to 
focus on these discrete, but closely related, areas. 
6-3 Fig 3 Perception Formation 
Contextual
Knowledge
Experience
Perception
11.  Effective  decision-making  loops  are  essential  to  good  airmanship.    Aircrew  are  required  to 
observe,  and  react  to,  events  that  occur  both  within  the  cockpit  and  in  the  environment  outside  the 
aircraft.    They  must  then  use  the  information  sensed  in  order  to  make  decisions  and  take  actions, 
which will ensure the safety of the aircraft. 
THE DECISION-MAKING LOOP 
The Need for Effective Decision-making 
12.  The importance of decision-making loops has been recognized for a long time.  An early concept, 
developed by Col John Boyd USAF, was the 'OODA Loop' - Observe, Orient, Decide, Act.  This loop 
was  used  by  members  of  the  USAF’s  fighter  community  of  the  late  1960’s,  as  the  basis  to  redefine 
fighter  tactics.    The  derivation  of  this  loop  was  based  on  air-to-air  combat,  where  time  is  a  critical 
factor.    The  participant  who  was  able  to  complete  the  loop  in  the  least  time  was  likely  to  gain  the 
advantage,  as  he  would  be  able  to  actively  dictate  the  fight  whilst  his  opponent  would  be  forced  to 
become entirely reactive.  Because of the specific and time-related nature of this decision-making loop, 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
its  use  in  routine  airmanship  assessment  is  limited.    However,  the  OODA  Loop  served  as  a  useful 
basis for developing a decision-making cycle for the RAF. 
The RAPDA(R) Decision-making Loop 
13.  As  part  of  the  development  of  the  RAF  Airmanship  Model,  the  need  was  identified  for  a 
comprehensive  decision-making  loop,  which  could  be  applied  to  general  situations.    The  resultant 
decision-making  loop,  which  encompasses  the  principles  of  applied  airmanship,  is  the  Recognize 
Analyse Prioritize Decide Act (Review) loop (Fig 4).  This loop requires the student to: 
a. 
Recognize.    Everyone  observes  their  environment,  but  the  key  skill  is  to  recognize  those 
significant events or factors, within that environment, that are important or likely to impact on the 
performance  of  the  task.    Therefore,  awareness  or  perception  of  what  is,  and  what  is  not, 
important is required.  If an event or factor is not recognized as important, it may be ignored and 
not receive attention and resources for analysis. 
b. 
Analyse.  Once an event or factor has been recognized as significant, it must be analysed for 
its likely effects. 
c. 
Prioritize.    When  faced  with  multiple  or  newly  recognized  events  or  factors,  an appropriate 
priority  must  be  allocated  during  the  analysis  phase  so  that  the  task  can  be  accomplished 
efficiently.    This  requires  an  awareness  of  the  relative  importance  of  each  individual  recognized 
event or factor.  It could be argued that prioritization is required before the sequential analysis of 
multiple factors; however, this order was chosen as some analysis is likely to be required before 
accurate priorities can be allocated, and there may not always be multiple factors to prioritize. 
d. 
Decide.  The student must then decide on the most appropriate course of action. 
e. 
Act.  Having made the decision, the student must initiate the most appropriate course of action. 
f. 
Review.    An  important  part  of  any  decision-making  process  is  to  ensure  that  the  correct 
actions  have  been  taken.    The  environment  will  also  continue  to  change,  possibly  as  a  result  of 
the action.  Any new significant events or factors must be recognized to prompt the loop to be re-
started.    Since  the  action  originates  from  the  recognition  and  analysis  phases  of  the  decision 
cycle, it is essential that the whole process is reviewed, not just the action taken. 
6-3 Fig 4 The RAPDA(R) Decision-making Loop 
Recognize
Analyse
Prioritize
Decide
Act
REVIEW
Environmental change as a result of actions
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
THE RAF AIRMANSHIP MODEL 
14.  The RAF Airmanship Model comprises the following elements: 
a. 
Situational Awareness. 
b. 
Decisiveness. 
c. 
Communication. 
d. 
Resource Management. 
e. 
Mental Performance. 
f. 
Spare Mental Capacity. 
Situational Awareness 
15.  Situational Awareness (SA) is widely regarded as the dominant factor in aircrew cognitive ability - 
those  aircrew  with  good  SA  tend  to  be  successful  whilst  those  with  poor  SA  are  not.    SA  requires 
awareness of current position within the environment and recognition of factors significant to the sortie 
aim within that environment.  There are two types of SA demanded of aircrew - positional and tactical. 
16.  Positional  SA.    Aircrew  must  be  aware  of  all  the  information  required  for  the  normal,  safe 
positioning  of  the  aircraft.    This  requirement  is  known  as  'Positional  SA'.    To  possess  positional  SA, 
aircrew must be aware of current and projected aircraft position in terms of: 
a. 
Height, attitude, and speed. 
b. 
Geographic  location  and  proximity  to  geographical  features  such  as  coastlines,  mountains, 
cities and airfields. 
c. 
Aeronautical  features  including  airways  and  other  controlled  airspace,  navigation  aids  and 
procedural flight paths. 
d. 
Meteorological  features  including  clouds,  precipitation,  turbulence,  tropopause,  reduced 
visibility and jetstreams. 
e. 
Other aircraft. 
17. Tactical SA.  Aircrew must also recognize events or factors that may affect the current, future or 
possible operation of the aircraft or formation.  This task is complex as it both complements positional 
SA  and  is  separate  from  it.    This  task  is  known  as  'Tactical  SA'.    For  example,  once  the  aviator 
recognizes that he is about to penetrate an airway (positional SA), tactical SA would involve recognition 
that  permission  was  required  and  that,  if  it  had  not  been  gained,  to  continue  would  be  highly  likely  to 
prejudice the timely achievement of the sortie aims.  As another example, tactical SA would include the 
realization, from a background transmission to another aircraft, that the weather had deteriorated and a 
change  to  diversion  fuel  allowance  may  be  required.    Emergencies  also  fall  into  tactical  SA,  in  that  a 
malfunction is an event that is likely to affect the future operation of the aircraft or formation. 
18.  Summary.  Many events and factors are included in SA.  Positional SA is awareness of position within 
the environment, while tactical SA is recognition of other significant factors within that environment, and the 
appreciation of the unexpected.  A poor performance in SA may show that the student has not developed a 
perception  of  the  importance  or  relative  importance  of  environmental  factors.    It  does  not  show  that  the 
student is incapable of analysis or that there is insufficient spare mental capacity. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
Decisiveness 
19.  Making decisions is a critical part of airmanship.  In addition to recognizing and analysing factors, 
aircrew must be capable of making a decision as to the required action.  Within decision-making itself, 
there  is  a  clear  distinction  between  merely  making  a  decision  and  making  the  correct  or  most 
appropriate  decision.    Furthermore,  once  a  decision  has  been  made,  on  many  occasions  it  must  be 
implemented by positive action.  Initiating positive action itself requires a further decision. 
a. 
Decision-making.  A student may be able to recognize and analyse factors, but if there is no 
resultant decision there will be no subsequent action.  A poor performance in this area indicates 
an indecisive student. 
b. 
Quality  of  Decisions.    Ideally,  the  decision  should  be  correct  for  the  circumstances.  
However, in some situations there may be more than one acceptable solution, in which case the 
decision  should  be  'reasonable'.    An  incorrect  decision  may  be  derived  from  poor  analysis, 
incorrect perceptions, or failure to recognize significant environmental factors. 
c. 
Translation  of  Decision  into  Action.    Having  made  a  decision,  it  must  be  implemented.  
This will require the correct action(s) to be taken.  Some decisions result in positive action but, in 
some  cases,  the  best  course  of  action  may  be  to  do  nothing.    However,  that  must  also  be  a 
positive decision, and not occur through failure to act or a lack of decision.  Poor ability in this area 
may indicate a lack of self-confidence on the part of a student. 
Communication 
20.  Communication  is  the  passing  of  information  and  is  required  to  support  SA  and  elements  of 
analysis and decision-making.  It is also likely to be required to enable a crew or formation to act once 
a  decision  has  been  made.    In  all  circumstances,  communication  must  be  effective.    It  is  also 
necessary  to  pass  or  acquire  information  using  standard  R/T  phraseology  where  it  exists.  
Communication may be: 
a. 
Within the aircraft. 
b. 
Within a formation. 
c. 
With external agencies. 
To meet these demands, aircrew must have fluent ability in R/T phraseology and be knowledgeable in 
terms of standard terminology and phrases used at unit level. 
Resource Management 
21.  Management  of  available  resources  is  a  key  component  skill  within  airmanship.    Use  of  the 
available resources may be categorized as: 
a. 
Management of Aircraft Systems.  In addition to having sufficient knowledge of the aircraft 
systems,  the  aviator  must  be  able  to  apply  that  knowledge  to  ensure  the  efficient  and  safe 
operation of the aircraft in flight, particularly within an operational environment. 
b. 
Management of Cockpit Resources.  The organization of cockpit resources includes flight 
instrument  displays,  maps  and  documents  to  allow  timely  and  efficient  access  to  relevant 
information for the operation of the aircraft or formation.  One example might be the positioning of 
maps, to allow smooth transition from the navigational chart to the target map during the approach 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-3 - Airmanship 
to the target area.  Another example would be the appropriate layering of display pages on multi-
function instruments. 
c.
Management  of  Crew/Formation  Resources.    Control  of  other  crew  members,  and  other 
aircraft  within  the  formation  must  be  effective.    It  must  also  make  a  timely  contribution  towards 
sortie  aims.    Management  and/or  direction  of  individual  contributions  should  enhance  team 
awareness and analysis in pursuance of the task. 
d. 
Management of External Resources.  Resources external to the aircraft must also be managed 
to ensure safe operation, and efficient pursuance of the task.  Those resources external to the aircraft 
include  other  formation  members,  air  traffic  control  (ATC),  ground  control  intercept  (GCI)  facilities, or 
other airborne or surface forces.  Aircrew need to be knowledgeable in terms of the services on offer 
from, or requirements specific to, the external resource concerned. 
Mental Performance 
22.  There are a number of cognitive skills that must be mastered by aircrew for successful operation 
of an aircraft: 
a. 
Situational  Analysis.    It  is  important  to  analyse  recognized  events  or  factors,  including 
associated  risks,  and  make  appropriate  plans  and  projections  whilst  continuing  to  operate  the 
aircraft  safely.    This  requires  the  holding  of  a  sufficient  quantity  of  information  in  short-term 
memory and processing it whilst simultaneously performing routine psychomotor skills. 
b. 
Priority Allocation.  Where multiple events are presented, and recognized, it is essential for 
the  aviator  to  prioritize,  make  plans,  and  implement  actions,  in  an  appropriate  order,  and  in 
pursuance of the task. 
c. 
Mental Flexibility.  The aviator may have to make new plans (or change existing ones), as a 
result of changed circumstances which occur during flight.  As always, the aim is to continue the 
pursuance of the task. 
Spare Mental Capacity 
23.  Flying an aircraft requires the aviator to perform the required tasks to a high standard.  In addition, 
the  aviator  must  be  able  to  recognize  and  deal  with  unexpected  tasks  and  events,  such  as 
emergencies.    It  is  the  ability  to  cope  with  this  additional  workload  that  is  termed  'Spare  Mental 
Capacity'.    For  example,  a  student  pilot  must  be  capable  of  flying  a  loop  to  a  prescribed  standard.  
However, whilst doing so, should an emergency occur, it must be recognized, and the correct actions 
taken - whilst still maintaining control of the aircraft. 
24.  In the training environment, experience will have an important effect on a student’s level of spare 
mental capacity. 
a. 
Relatively new pilots are using cognitive skills all the time, in order to learn and practise new 
flying skills.  With time, many of these tasks will become automated and move into motor memory. 
b. 
As  a  student  advances  through  a  course,  the  level  of  spare  capacity  exhibited  will  vary 
markedly  depending  on  the  exercise  that  is  being  undertaken.    For  example,  it  could  be 
anticipated  that  a  student  on  an  initial  formation  sortie  may  have  very  little,  or  even  zero,  spare 
capacity  due  to  the  high  workload.    However,  the  same  student,  on  the  final  sortie  of  formation 
training, would be expected to demonstrate a fair degree of spare capacity. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
CHAPTER 4 - PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ALTITUDE 
Introduction 
1. 
Flight  at  high  altitude  exposes  flying  personnel  to  environmental  conditions  in  which  the 
unprotected  human  body  may  not  be  able  to  function.    It  is  important,  therefore,  that  the  physical 
limitations  of  the  body,  and  method  of  extending  these  limitations,  are  thoroughly  understood  by  all 
aircrew, and particularly by captains of aircraft who may be responsible for the safety and well-being of 
untrained passengers. 
2. 
In order to understand the effects of altitude on humans, it is essential to know something about 
the characteristics of the atmosphere, and also to have a basic understanding of the requirements of 
the human respiratory system. 
Physics of the Atmosphere 
3. 
Physics of the atmosphere is dealt with fully in Volume 1, Chapter 1; it is only necessary here to 
emphasize a few factors which are of particular significance in a study of the effects of altitude on the 
aviator. 
a. 
Composition  of  the  Atmosphere.    For  all  practical  purposes,  the  composition  of  the 
atmosphere  can  be  considered  constant  from  ground  level  to  300,000 ft.    The  composition,  by 
volume, of dry air is: 
(1)  21 % oxygen. 
(2)  79 % nitrogen (including the rare gases, of which argon is the main one). 
(3)   A trace of carbon dioxide. 
Ozone,  which  is  formed  by  the  action  of  ultraviolet  radiation  on  oxygen,  is  also  present  at  trace 
concentrations.    The  concentration  of  water  vapour  in  the  atmosphere  varies  with  the  degree  of 
saturation  (relative  humidity)  and  the  temperature.    Typically,  water  vapour  forms  1  to  2%  by 
volume of atmospheric air. 
b. 
Atmospheric  Pressure  and  Altitude.    With  ascent  from  the  surface  of  the  earth,  the 
atmosphere  becomes  progressively  less  dense.    Thus,  the  pressure  exerted  by  the  atmosphere 
falls in an approximately exponential manner with vertical distance from the ground, the pressure 
at  an  altitude  of  18,000  ft  being  half  that  at  sea-level.    The  relationship  between  the  pressure 
exerted by the atmosphere and altitude (ICAO international standard atmosphere) is given, in an 
abbreviated form, in Table 1.  Since the relationship between atmospheric pressure and altitude is 
exponential,  the  change  of  pressure  for  a  given  change  of  altitude  falls  with  ascent  to  altitude.  
The change of pressure per 1,000 ft change of altitude is illustrated in Table 2. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
Table 1 Relationship Between Atmospheric Pressure and Altitude 
Pressure 
Altitude (ft) 
mm Hg 
psi 
KPa 
mb 

760 
14.70 
101.38 
1013.25 
8,000 
565 
10.92 
75.37 
752.91 
18,000 
380 
7.34 
50.69 
506.08 
25,000 
282 
5.45 
37.62 
376.00 
34,000 
188 
3.63 
25.08 
250.28 
40,000 
141 
2.72 
18.81 
187.60 
50,000 
87 
1.68 
11.61 
116.00 
60,000 
54 
1.04 
7.20 
71.71 
100,000 

0.16 
1.07 
11.03 
Table 2 Change of Pressure with Altitude 
Change of Pressure per 
Altitude (ft) 
1,000 ft Altitude 
mm Hg
KPa
500 
27.10 
3.62 
10,000 
20.20 
2.70 
20,000 
14.60 
1.95 
30,000 
10.30 
1.37 
40,000 
6.80 
0.91 
c. 
Partial  Pressure  of  Gases.    The  physiological  effects  of  a  given  gas  are  related  to  its 
molecular  concentration,  which  is  expressed  as  the  'partial  pressure'  of  the  gas.    The  partial 
pressure  exerted  by  a  gas,  in  a  mixture  of  gases, is the pressure which it would exert if it alone 
occupied  the  same  volume  as  the  whole  mixture.    Thus,  the  partial  pressure  of  a  gas x,  (Px), 
which constitutes y% by volume of a gas mixture having a total pressure of PT is given by: 
y
P =
× P
x
T
100
For example, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO ) in dry air at a pressure of 760 mm Hg is: 
2
21× 760
P
=
= 160 mm Hg
O2
100
Similarly, the partial pressure of nitrogen (PN ) in dry air at a pressure of 760 mm Hg is: 
2
79 × 760
P
=
= 600 mm Hg
N 2
100
The  sum  of  the  partial  pressures  of  the  constituents  of  a  gas  mixture  equals  the  total  pressure 
(PT) exerted by the mixture.  Thus, for dry air: 
+
=
O
P
N
P
T
P
2
2
Since the total pressure exerted by the atmosphere falls exponentially with altitude (see sub-para 3b), it 
follows that the partial pressure of oxygen in dry air falls with altitude in a similar manner, as illustrated in 
Table 3. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
Table 3 Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Atmosphere at Altitude 
Partial Pressure of Oxygen 
Altitude (ft) 
mm Hg
KPa

160.00 
21.34 
8,000 
118.70 
15.83 
18,000 
79.80 
10.65 
25,000 
59.20 
7.90 
40,000 
29.60 
3.95 
d. 
Temperature  and  Altitude.   Solar radiation heats the surface of the Earth, and this warms 
the lowest layer of the atmosphere.  Above the surface of the Earth, the temperature falls steadily 
with  altitude  throughout  the  troposphere  at  the  adiabatic  rate  of  approximately  2 ºC per 1,000 ft.  
This  fall  in  temperature  ceases  at  the  tropopause,  which  varies  in  height  around  35,000  ft  (the 
tropopause  is  higher  over  the  equator,  and  lower  over  the  poles).    In  the  stratosphere,  the 
temperature is fairly constant at about –55 ºC. 
e. 
International  Standard  Atmosphere.    The  International  Standard  Atmosphere  is  derived 
from average conditions, and is defined fully in Volume 1, Chapter 1, Paragraph 10. 
Anatomy and Physiology of Respiration 
4. 
The  energy  essential  for  living  processes  is  obtained  by  the  oxidation  of  complex  foodstuffs.    Thus, 
oxygen is one of the most important materials required for the maintenance of normal function by living cells.  
The cells of the brain are particularly sensitive to a lack of oxygen.  The human body is only able to store very 
small quantities of oxygen.  Thus, cessation of the oxygen supply to the brain results in unconsciousness in 
six  to  eight  seconds,  and  irreversible  damage ensues if the oxygen supply is cut off completely for longer 
than about four minutes.  The maintenance of normal function requires that oxygen be delivered to the cells 
of all tissues of the body, and that the supply is matched to the rate of consumption of oxygen, so that the 
partial pressure of oxygen (PO ) is maintained above a certain critical value.  Oxidation of complex foodstuffs 
2
produces, amongst other substances, carbon dioxide.  The carbon dioxide so formed must be removed from 
the tissues and vented to the atmosphere, since accumulation in the tissues interferes with normal function.  
The process whereby the oxygen in the atmosphere is transported to the tissues, and the carbon dioxide in 
the  tissues  is  transported  to  the  atmosphere,  is  termed  'respiration'.    Several  steps  are  involved  in  these 
transport systems: 
a. 
Exchange between the atmosphere and the gas within the lungs - by ventilation of the lungs 
(breathing). 
b. 
Carriage of oxygen and carbon dioxide between the lungs and the tissues by the circulating 
blood. 
c. 
Exchange  between  the  circulating  blood  and  the  tissues,  where  oxygen  is  consumed  and 
carbon dioxide is produced. 
5. 
Gas  exchange  between  the  external  atmosphere  and  the  blood,  which  transports  oxygen  and 
carbon dioxide around the body, takes place within the lungs.  The structure of the lungs is well suited 
to  promoting  the  rapid  transfer  of  oxygen  and  carbon  dioxide  between  the  lung  gas  and  the  blood.  
Within the lungs, the air passages divide repeatedly, ending eventually in very small air sacs (alveoli), 
of  which  the  adult  lung  contains  some  300  million,  giving  an  effective  area  for  gas  exchange  of 
between  50  and  100  square  metres.    The  walls  of  the  alveoli  are  very  thin,  and  the  blood  flowing 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
through  the  lungs  is,  therefore,  brought  into  very  close  proximity  to  the  gas  in  the  air  sacs  (alveolar 
gas). The passage of a gas across the walls of the alveoli is controlled by the difference of the partial 
pressures  of  the  gas  in  the  blood  and  alveolar  gas.    Thus,  oxygen  is  taken  up  by  the  blood  flowing 
through the lungs, as long as the partial pressure of oxygen (PO ) in the alveolar gas is greater than the 
2
PO   in  the  blood  flowing  into  the  lungs.    As  oxygen  enters  the  blood,  increasing  the  concentration  of 
2
oxygen  in  it,  the  PO   of  the  blood  also  rises.    The  area  of  the  alveolar  wall  is  so  great,  and  the  wall 
2
separating the alveolar gas and the blood is so thin, that the PO  of the blood leaving the lungs is nearly 
2
always equals to the PO  in the alveolar gas.  Similarly, the exchange of carbon dioxide is driven by the 
2
difference between the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in the blood flowing into the lungs and 
the lower PCO2 in the alveolar gas.  In addition, the PCO2 of the blood leaving the lungs is equal to the 
PCO2 in the alveolar gas.  Thus, the PO  and P
2
CO2 in the alveolar gas closely reflect the partial pressures 
of  these  gases  in  the  blood  flowing  from  the  lungs  to  the  tissues  of  the  body.    The  oxygen  removed 
from the alveolar gas by the blood is replenished by the ventilation of the lungs with air.  This process 
(external respiration) also removes the carbon dioxide added to the alveolar gas by the blood flowing 
through the lungs. 
6. 
Air  enters  the  nose  and  mouth  during  inspiration  and  is  carried  down,  through  the  larynx  (voice 
box) and the trachea (windpipe), to the lungs.  During its passage, the air is: 
a. 
Warmed to body temperature (37 ºC). 
b. 
Humidified,  so  that  it  becomes  saturated  with  water  vapour  at  body  temperature  (partial 
pressure of water at 37 ºC is 47 mm Hg). 
c. 
Filtered. 
Within  the  lungs,  the  inspired  air  mixes  with  the  alveolar  gas,  thereby  adding  oxygen  to  it.    Carbon 
dioxide is carried to the atmosphere by the portion of the alveolar gas expelled from the lungs during 
expiration.    The  ventilation  of  the  lungs  with  air  is  normally  regulated  so  that  the  PCO2 of the alveolar 
gas  is  held  constant  over  a  wide  range  of  rates  of  production  of  carbon  dioxide  by  the tissues of the 
body.    Thus,  at  rest,  the  average  volume  of  each  breath  is  approximately  0.5  litres,  and  the  average 
rate  of  breathing  is  approximately  16  breaths  per  minute,  so  that  the  lung  ventilation  is  0.5  ×  16  =  8 
litres per minute.  When the rate of production of carbon dioxide is increased, as in physical exercise, 
both the depth and rate of breathing are increased.   
7. 
The  composition  of  the  alveolar  gas  depends  on  the  composition  of  the  inspired  gas,  and  the 
balance between ventilation of the lungs on the one hand and the rates of consumption of oxygen and 
production of carbon dioxide on the other.  It has already been stated (para 6) that the ventilation of the 
lungs is normally regulated in relation to the latter, so that the PCO2 of the alveolar gas is held constant.  
The  'normal'  average  value  of  the  alveolar  PCO2  is  40  mm  Hg  (range  38 to 42 mm  Hg).    The 
composition  of  the  alveolar  gas  when  breathing  air  at  sea  level  is  given  in  Table  4.    The  table  also 
shows the concentration of each gas by volume of the dry gas. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
Table 4 Composition of Alveolar Gas - Breathing Air at Ground Level 
Partial Pressure 
Concentration 
Gas 
of Dry Gas by 
mm Hg 
KPa 
Volume % 
Oxygen 
100 
13.34 
14.00 
Carbon Dioxide 
40 
5.33 
5.60 
Nitrogen 
573 
76.44 
80.40 
Water Vapour 
47 
6.27 

Total 
760 
101.38 
100.00 
8. 
When  breathing  air  at  higher  altitude,  the  fall  of  the  PO   in  the  atmosphere  (see  sub-para  3c) 
2
produces a fall in the PO  in the alveolar gas.  Reduction of the alveolar oxygen tension to below 55 to 60 
2
mm Hg produces a reflex increase in the ventilation of the lungs, so that the ventilation increases relative 
to the rate of production of carbon dioxide by the body, and the alveolar PCO2 is reduced below normal.  
The  lower  the  alveolar  PO   is  below  55  to  60  mm  Hg,  the  greater  is  the  increase  in  ventilation, and the 
2
larger is the reduction of alveolar PCO2.  The partial pressure exerted by the water vapour in the alveolar 
gas is unaffected by ascent to altitude, as it depends solely on the temperature of the gas in the lungs, 
which remains constant at 37 ºC.  Typical values of the partial pressures of the constituents of the alveolar 
gas, when breathing air at various altitudes, are illustrated in Table 5 and Fig 1. 
6-4 Fig 1 Composition of Alveolar Gas - Breathing Air at Altitude
800
)
700
g
H
m
(m
600
re
u
s
s
re
500
P
l
rtia
a
400
P
300
Nitrogen
200
Oxygen
100
Carbon
Dioxide
Water
Vapour
0
10,000
20,000
30,000
Altitude (ft)
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
Table 5 Typical Partial Pressures of Alveolar Gases when Breathing Air at Various Altitudes 
Partial Pressure in Alveolar Gas of: 
Altitude (ft) 
Water Vapour 
Oxygen 
Carbon Dioxide 
Nitrogen 
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 

47 
6.27 
100 
13.34 
40 
5.33 
573 
76.44 
8,000 
47 
6.27 
65 
8.67 
40 
5.33 
413 
56.43 
18,000 
47 
6.27 
40 
5.33 
28 
3.74 
265 
35.35 
25,000 
47 
6.27 
30 
4.00 
22 
2.93 
183 
24.41 
35,000 (*) 
47 
6.27 
18 
2.40 
12 
1.60 
102 
13.74 
(*) Immediately after rapid decompression to 35,000 ft 
Carriage of Oxygen in the Body 
9. 
Oxygen  is  transported  from  the  lungs  to  the  tissues,  and  the  carbon  dioxide  produced  by  the 
tissues is transported to the lungs, by the circulating blood.  Although both oxygen and carbon dioxide 
are soluble in water, the amount of oxygen that is carried in solution in the blood is much too small to 
meet the demands of the tissues.  The blood red cells contain a red pigment (haemoglobin), with which 
oxygen  forms  a  loose  compound  (oxyhaemoglobin).    The  amount  of  oxygen  held  in  the  blood  as 
oxyhaemoglobin is a function of the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood (PO ).  Oxygen is taken up 
2
where  the  PO   is  higher,  as  in  the  lungs,  and  released  where  the  P   is  lower,  as  in  the  tissues.    A 
2
O2
special mechanism also exists in the blood, whereby its capacity to dissolve carbon dioxide is greatly 
increased compared to water.  Carbon dioxide is taken up where the PCO2 is higher, as in the tissues, 
and  released  where  the  PCO2  is  lower,  as  in  the  lungs.    As  has  been  described  earlier  (para  5),  the 
partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide of the blood leaving the lungs are equal to the partial 
pressures of these gases in the alveolar gas.  The blood pumped to the tissues, by the heart through 
the systemic arteries, also has the same PO  and P
2
CO2 as the alveolar gas.  As the blood flows through 
the  extensive  network  of  thin  walled,  small  vessels  (capillaries)  which  permeate  all  the  tissues  of  the 
body,  oxygen  is  released  and  carbon  dioxide  is  taken  up.    The  blood  flow  to  an  organ  is  normally 
regulated  so  that  it  matches  the  demands  for  oxygen  delivery  and  carbon  dioxide  removal  of  its 
tissues.    When  these  increase,  as  in  muscle  tissue  during  physical  exercise,  the  muscle  blood  flow, 
and  indeed  the  amount  of  blood  pumped  by  the  heart,  are  greatly  increased.    Thus,  heavy  physical 
exercise, such as running, increases the output of the heart by about five times the resting value.  The 
matching of blood flow to tissue demands for oxygen is normally such that between 25% and 75% of 
the oxygen contained in the arterial blood is given up by the blood as it flows through the tissues.  The 
blood  flowing  from  the  tissues  to  the  lungs  has  therefore  a  lower  PO ,  and  a  higher  P
2
CO2,  than  the 
arterial blood and the alveolar gas.  These differences of partial pressure result in oxygen being taken 
up, and carbon dioxide unloaded, as the blood flows through the lungs and comes into intimate contact 
with the alveolar gas. 
10.  Because  of  the  fall  of  the  PO   in  the  alveolar  gas  which  occurs  with  ascent  to  altitude  whilst 
2
breathing  air  (para  8),  the  blood  leaving  the  lungs  and  arriving  at  the  tissue  capillaries  has  both  a 
reduced PO  and a lower oxygen content (see Fig 2).  This reduction, if moderate, will not decrease the 
2
rate  at  which  oxygen  is  delivered  to  the  tissues,  but  will  reduce  the  partial  pressure  of  oxygen  in  the 
tissue.  Several mechanisms, including an increase in blood flow, come into operation to minimize the 
fall of PO  in the tissues.  If the reduction is more severe, then the P  in parts of the tissues may fall to 
2
O2
zero, in spite of the compensatory mechanisms coming into play.  The critical level of alveolar PO  at 
2
which this situation arises in the brain, causing unconsciousness, is of the order of 30 to 35 mm Hg. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
6-4 Fig 2 Relationship between Blood and Alveolar Oxygen Pressure at Various Altitudes 
Altitude  (X 1,000)
Sea Level
22 20
15
10
5
100
n
e
g

80
y
x
O

ith
w

60
in
b
lo
g
o
m
e

40
a
H
f
o
n
tio

20
ra
tu
a
S
%

0
20
40
60
80
100
Partial Pressure of Alveolar Oxygen (mm Hg)
Hypoxia 
11.  Oxygen is one of the most important elements required for the maintenance of normal function by 
living  matter.    The  human  body  is  extremely  sensitive  and  vulnerable  to  the  effects  of  deprivation  of 
oxygen.  The absence of an adequate supply of oxygen (either in terms of quantity or partial pressure), 
is called 'hypoxia', and almost always results in a rapid deterioration of most body functions, and may 
cause death.  A 25% reduction of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO ) in the atmosphere, associated 
2
with ascent to an altitude of 8,000 ft, produces a detectable impairment of mental performance; whilst 
sudden  decompression  to  50,000  ft,  which  reduces  the  alveolar  PO   to  10  mm  Hg,  causes 
2
unconsciousness in ten seconds, and death in four to six minutes. 
12.  It  is  generally  recognized  that  the  most  serious  single  hazard  to  humans  during  flight  is  the 
reduction  of  the  PO   as  a  result  of  ascent  to  altitude.    Failure  of  oxygen  equipment  and/or  cabin 
2
pressurization, so that the individual has to breathe air at high altitude, quickly leads to incapacitation, 
and  even  death.    The  risks  are  greater  in  aviation,  in  that  a  degree  of  hypoxia  which,  from  the 
physiological  viewpoint  might  not  be  fatal  in  itself,  may  have  fatal  results  because  of  deterioration  of 
performance  in  an  individual,  leading  to  loss  of  control  of  an  aircraft.  Although  improvements  in  the 
performance and reliability of cabin pressurization and oxygen delivery systems have greatly reduced 
incidents and accidents due to hypoxia, constant vigilance remains essential. 
13.  The causes of hypoxia in flight are: 
a. 
Ascent to altitude without supplemental oxygen. 
b. 
Failure  of  personal  breathing  equipment  to  supply  oxygen  at  an  adequate  concentration 
and/or pressure. 
c. 
Decompression of pressure cabins at high altitude. 
d. 
The presence of toxic fumes in the cabin. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
The  rate  at  which  the  changes  produced  by  breathing  air  at  altitude  take  place,  is  a  function  of  the 
manner in which the condition is induced.  Typically, the changes occur slowly as a result of ascent at 
the usual rate for an aircraft (2,000 to 3,000 ft per minute); more rapidly by the reversion to breathing 
air  after  failure  of  oxygen  delivery  equipment;  and  fastest  by  a  rapid  decompression.    Although 
breathing  air  during  a  steady  ascent  at  2,000  to  3,000  ft  per  minute  is  now  an  uncommon  cause  of 
hypoxia, it is convenient to describe the changes induced in this way, since the relatively slow rate of 
climb allows a semi-steady state to be maintained.  The manner in which these changes are modified 
by other causes of hypoxia will then be described. 
Symptoms and Signs of Hypoxia 
14.  The  speed  and  order  of  appearance  of  signs,  and  the  severity  of  symptoms,  produced  by 
breathing air at altitude depend on the final altitude, rate of ascent (or the rate of failure of the oxygen 
supply at altitude) and duration of the exposure to altitude. Generally, the higher the altitude, the more 
marked  the  symptoms.    Rapid  rates  of  ascent,  however,  allow  higher  altitudes  to  be  reached  before 
severe symptoms occur.  In these circumstances, unconsciousness may occur before any, or many, of 
the  symptoms  of  hypoxia  appear.  Even  when  these  factors  are  kept  constant,  there  is  considerable 
variation between individuals in the effects of hypoxia, although for the same individual the pattern of 
effects  does  tend  to  follow  the  same  trend  from  one  occasion  to  another.  Other  factors  affecting  the 
intensity of hypoxia at altitude include: 
a. 
Physical activity: exercise exacerbates the features of hypoxia. 
b. 
Ambient temperature: a cold environment will reduce tolerance to  hypoxia, in part at least, by 
increasing metabolic workload. 
c. 
Illness:  the  additional  metabolic  load  imposed  by  ill  health  will  increase  susceptibility  to 
hypoxia. 
d. 
Use of certain drugs, including alcohol. 
15.  The  effects  of  slow  ascent  (less  than  4,000  ft  per  min)  to  altitude  whilst  breathing  air  are  as 
follows: 
a. 
Altitudes  up  to  10,000  ft.    At  altitudes  up  to  10,000  ft,  the  seated  individual  has  no  symptoms 
(except during heavy exercise).  The ability to perform most complex tasks is unimpaired.  The speed of 
reaction  to  novel  conditions  is,  however,  significantly  impaired  at  altitudes  above  about  8,000  ft.   It is 
possible to show in the laboratory, that the ability to detect targets at low levels of illumination is impaired 
at altitudes above 6,000 ft.   
b. 
Altitudes  between  10,000  and  15,000  ft.    At  altitudes  between  10,000  and  15,000  ft,  the 
resting  individual  has  little  or  nothing  in  the  way  of  symptoms,  but  the  ability  to  perform  skilled 
tasks,  such  as  aircraft  control  and  navigation,  becomes  progressively  impaired;  the  impairment 
increasing with altitude above 10,000 ft.  The individual is frequently unaware of the hypoxia, or of 
the impairment of performance it produces. Indeed, a common misconception is that performance 
is  better  than  usual!  Physical  exercise,  particularly  at  altitudes  above  12,000  ft,  frequently 
produces mild symptoms, especially breathlessness.  Exposure to these altitudes for longer than 
10 to 20 minutes often induces a severe headache. 
c. 
Altitudes  between  15,000  and  20,000  ft.    Above  about  15,000  ft,  symptoms  of  hypoxia 
occur,  even  in  individuals  at  rest.    There  is  marked  impairment  of  performance,  even  of  simple 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
tasks,  together  with  a  loss  of  critical  judgement  and  will  power.  Because  of  the  loss  of  self-
criticism,  there  is  usually  a  lack  of  awareness  of  any  deterioration  in  performance  or  indeed  the 
presence  of  hypoxia.  Thinking  is  slowed,  there  is  muscular  inco-ordination,  with  trembling  and 
clumsiness, and marked changes in emotional state.  Thus, the individual may become euphoric, 
garrulous,  pugnacious,  or  morose,  and  perhaps  physically  violent.    Again,  the  individual  usually 
has no awareness of the condition; an effect which makes hypoxia such a potentially dangerous 
hazard in aviation.  The individual frequently feels light-headed and experiences tingling in the lips 
and limbs.  Darkening of vision is a common symptom, although, generally, the subject is unaware 
of the change until oxygen is restored, when there is a marked apparent brightening of the level of 
illumination.    Hearing  is  not  usually  markedly  impaired,  until  the  hypoxia  becomes  severe.  
Physical  exertion  greatly  increases  the  severity  of  all  of  the  effects.  It  often  causes 
unconsciousness. 
d. 
Altitudes  above  20,000  ft.    Breathing  air  at  altitudes  above  20,000  ft  results  in  severe 
symptoms,  even  in  individuals  at  rest.    Mental  performance  and  comprehension  decline  rapidly, 
and unconsciousness supervenes with little warning.  Jerking of the upper limbs occurs quite often 
before  consciousness  is  lost,  and  convulsions  may  occur  after  unconsciousness  has  occurred.  
Physical exertion at altitudes above about 20,000 ft rapidly leads to unconsciousness. 
16.  In moderate and severe hypoxia, the depth and rate of breathing are increased.  This effect can usually 
be seen on exposure to breathing air at altitudes above 15,000 to 18,000 ft.  Above 18,000 ft, the presecence 
of high concentration of haemoglobin that has given up its oxygen in the capillaries of the skin, gives rise to 
blueness of the lips, tongue and face, as well as the skin of the limbs (most noticeable in the finger nails). 
17.  Interruption  of  the  supply  of  supplemental  oxygen  at  altitudes  above  10,000  ft,  with  reversion  to 
breathing air, is a more frequent cause of hypoxia in flight than ascent without added oxygen.  As the altitude 
is increased, the time between the reversion to breathing air and the consequent impairment of performance 
rapidly decreases (as does the time to loss of consciousness at higher altitudes).  The time which elapses 
between  sudden  reversion  to  breathing  air  and  loss  of  useful  consciousness,  i.e.  the  point  at  which  an 
individual  is  no  longer  able  to  carry  out  a  purposeful  action,  is  very  variable,  especially  at  altitudes  below 
28,000  to  30,000 ft.    This,  so  called,  Time  of  Useful  Consciousness  (or  Effective  Performance  Time)  at 
various altitudes, is presented in Table 6 and Fig 3. 
Table 6 Time of Useful Consciousness Following Sudden Reversion to Breathing Air 
Time of Useful Consciousness 
Altitude (ft) 
(range - seconds) 
25,000 
150 to 360 
27,000 
130 to 250 
30,000 
100 to 180 
34,000 
60 to 100 
36,000 
55 to 85 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 9 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
6-4 Fig 3 Time of Useful Consciousness at Given Altitudes 
6
5
4
3
Reversion from Breathing
Oxygen to Breathing Air
2
Mean
1
Range
Rapid Decompression
(When Breathing Air) 
from 8000 Ft to Altitude
Shown
0
25,000
30,000
35,000
40,000
Cabin Altitude (ft)
18.  When  hypoxia  is  induced  by  a  sudden  failure  of  the  pressure  cabin  of  an  aircraft  (i.e.  the  time  for 
decompression to an altitude in excess of 20,000 ft is less than 1½ minutes), the severity and rate of onset 
are considerably greater than when the hypoxia is induced by cessation of supplemental oxygen at the same 
altitude.  Thus, serious impairment of performance will occur within 1½ minutes on rapid decompression to 
25,000 ft, whilst breathing air.  It may be seen (Fig 3) that the higher the final altitude, the shorter the time 
between  the  decompression  and  the  consequent  impairment of performance.  Oxygen breathing must be 
commenced within a few seconds of the beginning of a rapid decompression to altitudes between 15,000 
and 30,000 ft, if no impairment of performance due to hypoxia is to occur.  Rapid decompression to altitudes 
above 30,000 ft, will result in transient impairment of performance even if 100% oxygen is breathed as the 
decompression  commences.    These  facts  emphasize  the  importance  of  the  correct  use  of  oxygen 
equipment in the event of the decompression of an aircraft which is pressurized to provide a cabin altitude 
below  8,000  ft  (i.e.  one  in  which  the  occupants  will  probably  be  breathing  air  whilst  the  aircraft  is  at  high 
altitude).    This  is  even  more  important  in  aircraft  with  small,  highly-pressurized  cabins  when  loss  of  a 
windscreen  or  door  will  result  in  an  explosive  decompression  of  the  cabin,  and  hence  the  very  rapid 
development of hypoxia. 
Prevention of Hypoxia at Altitude 
19.  It has been explained (para 15) that the hypoxia associated with breathing air at altitudes greater 
than 8,000 ft (an alveolar partial pressure of oxygen of 65 mm Hg), produces a significant impairment 
of  the  skills  required  for  flying.    The  maximum  cabin  altitude  at  which  aircrew  may  operate  without 
supplemental  oxygen  is,  therefore,  8,000 ft.    In  a  low  differential  pressure  cabin  aircraft  (in  which  the 
cabin  altitude  reaches  16,000  to  25,000  ft  at  the  ceiling  of  the  aircraft),  it  is  normal  practice  to  use 
supplemental oxygen from ground level since, with high rates of ascent, it is possible to exceed a cabin 
altitude of 8,000 ft rapidly.  The reduction of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO ) in the air, which occurs 
2
with  ascent  to  altitude,  and  which  gives  rise  to  hypoxia,  can  be  prevented  by  increasing  the 
concentration of oxygen in the inspired gas.  In all RAF oxygen delivery systems designed for use by 
aircrew, the concentration of oxygen is increased with ascent to altitude so that the PO2 of the alveolar 
gas  does  not  fall  below  that  associated  with  breathing  air  at  ground  level  (i.e.  an  alveolar  PO   of  100 
2
mm Hg (Table 4)).  The oxygen concentration required at an altitude of 34,000 ft in order to maintain 
an alveolar PO  of 100 mm Hg is 100% (Table 7). 
2
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 10 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
Table 7 Partial Pressure of Alveolar Gases, Breathing 100% Oxygen at Altitude 
Altitude (ft) 
Partial Pressure 
34,000 
40,000 
45,000 
of:
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 
Oxygen 
100 
13.34 
60 
8.00 
36 
4.80 
Carbon Dioxide 
40 
5.33 
34 
4.54 
28 
3.74 
Water Vapour 
47 
6.27 
47 
6.27 
47 
6.27 
Total Pressure 
187 
24.94 
141 
18.81 
111 
14.81 
20.  Ascent to altitudes above 34,000 ft, even whilst breathing 100% oxygen, results in the alveolar PO2
falling  below  that  resulting  from  breathing  air  at  ground  level  (PO   of  100  mm  Hg).    Breathing  100% 
2
oxygen  at  an  altitude  of  40,000  ft,  produces  an  alveolar  PO2  of  about  60  mm  Hg  (Table  3),  (i.e.  an 
intensity  of  hypoxia  equivalent  to  that  produced  by  breathing  air  at  an  altitude  of  8,000  to  10,000 ft).  
Ascent to altitudes higher than 40,000 ft while breathing 100% oxygen, gives rise to significant hypoxia.  
As  indicated  by  the  corresponding  levels  of  alveolar  PO2,  the  intensity  of  the  hypoxia  produced  by 
breathing  100%  oxygen  at  45,000  ft  (Table  7)  is  slightly  more  severe  than  the  hypoxia  produced  by 
breathing  air  at  18,000  ft  (Table 5).    Considering  hypoxia  alone,  the  maximum  altitude  at  which  it  is 
acceptable  to  fly  an  unpressurized  aircraft,  when  100%  oxygen  is  breathed  at  ambient  pressure,  is 
40,000  ft.    In  the  event  of  decompression  of  a  pressurized  aircraft,  when  rapid  descent  is  initiated 
immediately  the  pressure  cabin  fails,  breathing  100%  oxygen  at  ambient  pressure  will  provide 
adequate protection against severe hypoxia at cabin altitudes up to 43,000 ft.  Severe hypoxia can only 
be avoided on exposure to altitudes above 40,000 ft, however, by increasing the total pressure of the 
gases  in  the  lungs  above  the  pressure  of  the  environment,  a  technique  termed  'positive  pressure 
breathing' (usually abbreviated to 'pressure breathing'). 
Pressure Breathing 
21.  Prevention  of  hypoxia  on  exposure  to  altitudes  above  40,000  ft  involves  administration  of  100% 
oxygen while maintaining the total pressure of the alveolar gas equal to that which exists at 40,000 ft 
(i.e.  141 mm Hg).    This  is  achieved  by  delivering  100%  oxygen  to  the  respiratory  tract  at  a  pressure 
greater  than  that  of  the  environment,  the  technique  being  known  as  'positive  pressure  breathing'.  
When the altitude to which protection is required is greater than 60,000 ft, or if protection above 40,000 
ft is required for longer than a few minutes, the pressure at which oxygen is delivered to the respiratory 
tract is chosen so that it maintains the total pressure within the oxygen mask, and hence in the alveoli, 
equal to 141 mm Hg.  The positive pressures required at various altitudes to maintain this standard are 
presented  in  Table 8.    Other  standards,  which  are  discussed  in  later  paragraphs,  are  also  shown  in 
Table 8. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 11 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
Table 8 Illustrative Schedule of Positive Pressure Breathing above 40,000 ft 
Positive Pressure Required: 
Atmospheric Pressure 
To maintain 141 mm Hg 
Mask Alone 
18.81 KPa absolute 
Altitude (ft) 
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 
mm Hg 
KPa 
40,000 
141 
18.81 

0.00 

0.00 
45,000 
111 
14.81 
30 
4.00 
17 
2.27 
50,000 
87 
11.61 
54 
7.00 
30 
4.00 
56,000 
66 
8.80 
75 
10.00 


70,000 
33 
4.40 
108 
14.41 


100,000 

1.07 
133 
17.74 


22.  Positive pressure breathing, which creates pressure differentials between the respiratory tract and 
other parts of the body, produces a number of disturbances, some of which limit the magnitude of the 
pressure which can be applied.  These disturbances also determine the counter-measures which must 
be taken in order to allow the use of higher pressures. 
a. 
Effect of Pressure Breathing on Head and Neck
(1)  The  most  striking  feature  of  breathing  at  high  pressure  using  an  oxygen  mask  is  the 
distension of the mouth and throat that occurs when the pressure exceeds about 10 to 15 mm Hg.  
At higher pressures, the floor of the mouth and the whole of the throat are widely distended, and 
above about 60 to 70 mm Hg, this distension can give rise to severe discomfort. 
(2)  In certain individuals, oxygen under pressure may force its way up the tear ducts, which 
connect  the  inner  corners  of  the  eyes  to  the  nose,  and  blow  onto  the  surface  of  the  eyes 
causing spasm of the eyelids. 
(3)  In order to sustain breathing pressures in excess of 70 mm Hg, a pressurized helmet is 
used;  this  applies  the  same  pressure  to  the  eyes  and  neck  as  is  being  transmitted  to  the 
lungs.    This  support  to  the  neck  and  throat  avoids  the  effects  described  above  and  also 
permits speech at high breathing pressures. 
b. 
Effect of Pressure Breathing on Respiration
(1)  Pressure  breathing  inflates  the  lungs,  causing  the  lungs  and  chest  to  expand.    In  the 
relaxed  subject,  a  breathing  pressure  of  only  20 mm  Hg  distends  the  lungs  completely.  
During  the  normal  breathing  cycle,  inspiration  is  achieved  by  active  muscular  contraction, 
whereas breathing out simply requires the relaxation of the muscles.  In pressure breathing, 
this  process  is  reversed.    Breathing  in  consists  of  a  controlled  relaxation  of  the  muscles  as 
the gas under pressure inflates the lungs.  Breathing out consists of controlled contraction of 
the  same  muscles.    Thus,  the  pattern  of  muscular  contraction  required  during  pressure 
breathing differs markedly from that of normal breathing.  The unusual pattern is associated 
with a tendency to over-breathe.  Pressure breathing is a technique that has to be learnt. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 12 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
(2)  The maximum pressure which can be breathed, without counter-pressure to the chest is 30 
mm Hg. So called chest counter-pressure minimizes the respiratory  disturbances  produced  by 
pressure breathing. 
c. 
Effects  of  Pressure  Breathing  on  the Circulation.  The rise of pressure within the chest, 
produced by pressure breathing, has very significant effects upon the heart and circulation.  The 
rise  of  pressure  in the lungs is transmitted to the blood in the heart and great vessels within the 
chest  and  abdomen.    The  increase  of  pressure  in  these  areas  results  in  blood  being  displaced 
from within the trunk into the limbs, and to the loss of the fluid part of blood out of the vessels into 
the tissues of the limbs.  The amount of blood displaced out of the chest and abdomen increases 
as  the  breathing  pressure  increases.    The  amount  of  fluid  lost  into  the  tissues  of  the  limb  is 
greater the higher the breathing pressure, and the longer the time for which it is operative.  Both 
the  displacement  of  blood  into  the  periphery  and  the  loss  of  fluid  into  the  tissues,  reduce  the 
amount of blood available for the maintenance of the circulation.  When this reduction exceeds a 
critical  value,  the  blood  pressure  falls  and  a  faint  occurs.    There  are  limits,  therefore,  to  the 
magnitude and duration of pressure breathing which can be tolerated with safety.  This tolerance 
can be increased by applying counter-pressure to the limbs (as in the Typhoon with full coverage 
anti-G  trousers),  so  reducing  the  displacement  of  blood  and  the  loss  of  circulating  fluid  into  the 
tissues. 
23.  In  practice,  pressure  breathing,  with  or  without  counter-pressure  to  parts  of  the  body,  is  used  to 
provide  short  duration  protection  against  hypoxia  during  emergency  exposures  to  altitudes  above 
40,000 ft, produced either by failure of cabin pressurization or ejection at high altitude. In addition to the 
disturbances  produced  by  pressure  breathing,  the  other  effects  produced  by  decompression  to  high 
altitude, e.g. decompression sickness (para 29), limit the duration of the exposure.  Descent should be 
initiated immediately decompression occurs and, provided that there is no serious structural damage to 
the aircraft, carried out at the maximum possible rate.  Compromises related to the maximum absolute 
pressure  in  the  lungs  and  the  maximum  breathing  pressure  have  been  accepted  and  proved 
experimentally, thereby providing a number of high altitude protective assemblies. 
a. 
Pressure Breathing Mask Alone.  The maximum pressure which can be breathed using a 
mask  alone  is  30  mm  Hg.    The  compromise  set  in  this  assembly  is  to  provide  this  breathing 
pressure at an altitude of 50,000 ft (Table 8).  As indicated by the total pressure in the mask and 
alveolar  gas  employed  in  this  assembly  at  50,000  ft,  i.e.  30  +  87  =  117  mm  Hg,  it  results  in 
considerable hypoxia at the maximum altitude at which it is used.  A pressure-sealing mask used 
with  an  oxygen  regulator  which  provides  a  pressure  of  30 mm  Hg  at  50,000  ft,  will  provide 
protection  to  an  altitude  of  50,000  ft,  provided  that  descent  is  initiated  within  one  minute  of  the 
start of the decompression, at a rate exceeding 10,000 ft per min. 
b. 
Pressure Breathing Mask, with Chest Counter Pressure Garment and Full Coverage Anti-G 
Trousers. 
The displacement of blood and fluid into the lower limbs produced by pressure breathing 
may  be  greatly  reduced  by  inflating  full  coverage  anti-G  trousers.  The  pressure  breathing  for  altitude 
(PBA) schedule employed in the Typhoon delivers breathing pressures up to 70 mm Hg. 

Hyperventilation 
24.  The  ventilation  of  the  lungs  is  controlled  by  the  respiratory  centre  in  the  brain,  which,  in  turn,  is 
controlled  by  the  partial  pressure  of  carbon  dioxide  (PCO2)  in  the  blood.    A  rise  of  PCO2  in  the  blood 
stimulates the respiratory centre and increases ventilation of the lungs.  A decrease in blood PCO2 has 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 13 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
the  opposite  effect.    The  respiratory  centre  is  extremely  sensitive  to  small  changes  in  PCO2  and 
continuously adjusts the ventilation of the lungs to maintain the partial pressure of carbon dioxide at the 
normal  level.    During  exercise,  the  rate  and  depth  of  respiration  increase  to  keep  pace  with  the 
increased  rate  of  production  of  carbon  dioxide  by  the  tissues.    Thus,  over  a  wide  range  of  physical 
activity,  the  PCO2  of  the  alveolar  gas  remains  constant  at  the  resting  value  of  about  40 mm  Hg 
(Table 4), in spite of the rate of production of carbon dioxide varying 8 to 10 fold. 
25.  The  ventilation  of  the  lungs  may  be  increased  out  of  proportion  to  the  rate  of  production  of  carbon 
dioxide, in which case the PCO2 in the alveolar gas and in the blood and tissues will be reduced below their 
normal values.  This condition is termed 'hyperventilation'.  Hyperventilation may be produced voluntarily.  It 
can also be produced by anxiety, apprehension, or fear.  The condition occurs commonly in student aircrew 
during  flying  training.  It  is  also  produced  by  a  rise  of  body  temperature  and  whole  body  vibration  at 
frequencies  of  the  order  of  4  to 8 Hz. Pressure breathing may also lead to hyperventilation (see sub-para 
22b(1)). Most importantly, however, hyperventilation is the bodies reflex response to hypoxia (para 11). 
26.  The  excessive  removal  of  carbon  dioxide  from  the  blood  and  tissues,  which  results  from 
hyperventilation, gives rise to the following symptoms: 
a. 
 Tingling in the hands, the feet, and the lips. 
b. 
Vague feeling of unreality. 
c. 
Light-headedness and dizziness. 
d. 
Faintness. 
e. 
Spasm of the muscles of the hands and feet. 
f. 
Impaired performance. 
g. 
Unconsciousness. 
27.  Hyperventilation is a condition to be avoided.  In order to reduce the likelihood of hyperventilation 
occurring in flight, the following points should be observed: 
a. 
Learn to breathe in a normal manner, particularly when carrying out tasks which are known to 
predispose to hyperventilation. 
b. 
Beware of the tendency to over-breathe during periods of intense concentration or tension. 
c. 
Do not attempt to overcome suspected hypoxia by voluntary over-breathing. 
28.  It  is  possible  for  individuals  to  confuse  the  symptoms  of  hypoxia  and  hyperventilation.    When 
symptoms  are  experienced  at  cabin  altitudes  at  which  hypoxia  could  occur,  it  should  always  be 
assumed  that  the  cause  is  hypoxia.    A  thorough  check  and  recheck  of  oxygen  equipment  should  be 
made immediately, whilst every effort is made to breathe in a normal and controlled manner. 
Decompression Sickness 
29.  Decompression sickness is the name given to a group of symptoms which may occur as a result of 
exposure  to  reduced  atmospheric  pressure,  excluding  those  due  to  hypoxia  or  the  expansion  of  pre-
existing  gas  contained  in the hollow cavities of the body.  It can, therefore, occur either in an aircraft at 
altitude, or in a decompression chamber.  It is sometimes referred to as 'the bends', a term which is used 
to describe the commonest symptoms of decompression sickness, namely, pain in the muscles or joints. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 14 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
30.  Decompression sickness can occur in normal individuals who have no predisposing disease, and 
there is a very wide individual variation in susceptibility.  It is rare below 25,000 ft.  The incidence of the 
condition increases rapidly with increasing height above that altitude.  The duration of exposure to low 
pressure  is  also  a  very  significant  factor  in  the  development  of  the  condition.    The  symptoms  of 
decompression sickness are: 
a. 
Bends.  The commonest severe symptom of decompression sickness is pain in a joint or limb, 
the so-called 'bends'.  The pain may be mild or severe.  A mild pain will often develop into severe or 
agonizing pain if altitude is maintained.  If the pain is accompanied by pallor, sweating and nausea or 
vomiting,  the  subject  is  very  likely  to  collapse.    Less  frequently,  the  pain  may  disappear  without 
becoming severe.  The pain is most likely to occur in the upper part of the arm near the shoulder, the 
knee, wrist, and ankle; more than one of these areas may be affected at the same time.  It usually 
starts  as  a  mild  ache,  rather  like  the  after-effect  of  unaccustomed  exercise  and,  if  allowed  to 
progress,  may  become  a  deep  pain  spreading  up  and  down  the  limb  causing  clumsiness  and 
weakness and eventually complete disablement of the limb.  The early mild pain often encourages 
the  subject  to  move  or  rub  the  affected  part,  which  only  makes  matters  worse.    On  descent, 
symptoms  pass  off  around  18,000  ft  to  22,000  ft,  although  residual  stiffness  and  a  mild  ache  may 
persist for some time. 
b. 
Effects  on  the  Skin.    Itching  and  tingling  of  the  skin  frequently  occur,  but  are  usually 
transient effects and of little significance.  Localized skin rashes are sometimes observed. 
c. 
Chokes.  'Chokes' is the name given to a respiratory disturbance which may occur, but is a 
misnomer, as the subject does not choke.  It takes the form of a sore, burning feeling in the centre 
of  the  chest,  with  pains  on  breathing  in  and  paroxysms  of  coughing.    The  symptoms  of  chokes 
could  be  described  as  similar  to  those  caused  by  the  inhalation  of  an  irritant  gas.    This  is  not  a 
very  common  condition,  but  it  should  be  taken  very  seriously;  an  immediate  descent  to  below 
18,000 ft should be started, otherwise collapse may follow.  Chokes may or may not be preceded 
by the bends.  Although the condition is relieved by descent, there may be a residual soreness in 
the chest. 
d. 
Neurological Symptoms.  The effects on the nervous system are very varied.  Neurological 
symptoms should be taken seriously.  Commonly, the eyes are affected in the form of a temporary 
defect  in  the  field  of  vision.    Infrequently,  there  may  be  weakness,  or  even  paralysis,  of  one  or 
both  limbs  of  one  side  of  the  body.    There  is  often  a  feeling  of  uneasiness  or  an  inability  to 
concentrate.    After  recompression,  a  severe  headache  may  develop.    Steps  listed  in  para  33 
should be followed if neurological symptoms develop above 18,000 ft cabin altitude. 
e. 
Collapse.  Collapse can occur with or without other symptoms being present.  The collapse 
is  a  typical  faint,  and  is  characterized  by  pallor,  sweating,  nausea,  giddiness,  and  then 
unconsciousness.  Post decompression, collapse may occur after return to ground level and up to 
five hours, or even longer, after landing.  This type of collapse is usually preceded by some form 
of  decompression  sickness  at  altitude,  but  not  always.    Decompression  collapse  is  not  common 
but, should it occur, must be treated as a medical emergency. 
31.  Decompression  sickness  is  caused  by  the  liberation  of  nitrogen  bubbles  in  the  body  due  to 
exposure  to  a  lowered  atmospheric  pressure.    The  body  is  normally  saturated  with  nitrogen,  so  that 
there is sufficient nitrogen in solution in each tissue and fluid of the body to produce a partial pressure 
of gas equal to the PN2 in the alveolar gas.  When the pressure of the environment is lowered by ascent 
to altitude, the nitrogen in solution in the tissues, saturated at sea level pressure, will now be in a state 
of  super-saturation  and,  under  certain  conditions,  will  come  out  of  solution.    Bubble  formation  is 
influenced by many factors, such as movement of the tissues (hence the need to restrict movement of 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 15 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
the affected part), alterations in the circulation of body fluids, and rapid change in gas pressure.  The 
bubbles  tend  to  be  released  in  tissues  with  the  least  blood  supply  and  greatest  amount  of  dissolved 
nitrogen.  This combination of circumstances occurs principally in fatty tissues.  The bubbles which are 
released cause pain by pressing on nerve endings.  They also pass into the circulation and can cause 
disturbances in the lungs, heart and brain. 
32.  The factors influencing the incidence of decompression sickness are: 
a. 
General Factors.
(1)  Altitude.    The  condition  rarely  occurs  below  25,000  ft,  and  even  more  rarely  below 
18,000 ft.  The frequency increases with altitude above 25,000 ft. 
(2)  Rate of Ascent.  The range of rates of ascent which occur in aircraft does not affect the 
incidence. 
(3)  Duration of Exposure.  The longer the duration of exposure, the greater the proportion 
of individuals affected. 
(4)  Exercise.  Exercise, whilst at altitude, markedly increases the incidence and severity of 
symptoms. 
(5)  Re-exposure.    Re-exposure  to  altitude  immediately  after  the  first  exposure  generally 
has been considered to increase susceptibility to decompression sickness.  
(6)  Hyperbaric Exposure.  Exposure to breathing air at pressures above one atmosphere, 
such as occurs in scuba diving, by increasing the amount of nitrogen dissolved in the tissues, 
greatly  increases  susceptibility  to  the  condition.    Thus,  after  a  recent  dive,  breathing  air, 
decompression sickness may occur on ascent to as low an altitude as 6,000 ft (see para 35). 
b. 
Personal Factors
(1)  Age.    The  incidence  increases  with  age;  each  decade  approximately  doubles  the 
susceptibility. 
(2)  Body Weight.  As has already been mentioned, fat has a higher nitrogen content than 
other body tissues, so that obesity predisposes to symptoms of decompression sickness. 
(3)  Recent  Injury.    There  is  some  evidence  to  suggest  that  joint  lesions  and  recent  limb 
injuries increase susceptibility. 
33.  The treatment of decompression sickness is immediate recompression, as fast as is tolerable, to 
as low an altitude as possible.  Except where operational considerations make maintenance of altitude 
essential, descent should be made to an aircraft height at which the cabin altitude is less than 10,000 
ft.  In severe cases, or if symptoms persist, a landing should be made as soon as possible.  If practical, 
the affected individual, if suffering from severe bends, chokes, neurological disturbances, or collapse, 
should be laid flat and given 100% oxygen to breathe.  Medical advice should be sought immediately.. 
Whenever  decompression  sickness  occurs  in  flight,  the  affected  individual  should  receive  medical 
attention  as  soon  as  possible  after  landing.    This  is  of  great  importance,  since  seemingly  innocuous 
symptoms may progress rapidly to life-threatening conditions if treatment is not instituted.  It must also 
be borne in mind that it may take some time to arrange transport and hyperbaric treatment for a patient 
whose condition deteriorates. 
34.  The  incidence  of  decompression  sickness  can  be  markedly  reduced  by  pre-oxygenation,  i.e.  by 
washing out the nitrogen in the body with oxygen.  This is done by breathing 100% oxygen at ground 
level for some time before take-off.  For example, breathing oxygen at ground level for three hours will 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 16 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
protect a high percentage of subjects when exposed to 40,000 ft for three hours.  Individuals who pre-
oxygenate  on  the  ground  must  proceed  to  their  aircraft  and  transfer  to  100%  oxygen  on  the  aircraft 
system, without taking a breath of atmospheric air. 
35.  Decompression  sickness  is  a  condition  which  is  best  avoided.    The  most  satisfactory  method of 
prevention is limiting the maximum altitude to which aircrew are exposed to below 25,000 ft, by means 
of  pressurization  of  the  cabin  or,  in  unpressurized  aircraft,  limiting  the  maximum  cabin  altitude  to 
25,000 ft. The marked increase in susceptibility to decompression sickness which follows exposure to 
breathing air at environmental pressures greater than one atmosphere requires that, following such an 
exposure, individuals must not ascend to altitude either in an aircraft or a decompression chamber until 
sufficient time has elapsed for the excess nitrogen to be eliminated from the body.  The period spent at 
ground  level  before  flight  should  be  no  less  than  12  hours  after  swimming  using  compressed-air 
breathing apparatus, and no less than 24 hours if a depth of 10 m has been exceeded. 
Vaporization of Tissue Fluids 
36.  A further effect of exposure to a reduced pressure is the vaporization of tissue fluids, resulting in a 
quite  rapid,  painless  swelling of the affected part.  Above 63,000 ft, the total atmospheric pressure is 
less  than  the  vapour  pressure  of  the  body  fluids  at  deep  body  temperature.    In  regions  of  the  body 
where the hydrostatic pressure of the body fluids is low, collections of water vapour could be formed.  
In  practice,  this  condition  is  not  likely  to  occur  until  the  pressure  is  considerably  lower  than  the 
equivalent  of  63,000  ft.    This  condition  has  been  observed  in  the  hands  of  subjects  wearing  partial 
pressure  suits  at  very  high  altitudes  (above  65,000  ft).    It  disappears  again  on  descent  below  that 
height.  There is no residual disturbance of function due to this phenomenon, and it can be prevented 
by applying pressure to the area concerned.  In the case of the hands, for example, it can be avoided 
by wearing close-fitting leather gloves. 
Effect of Change of Altitude on the Ears and Sinuses 
37.  The head contains a number of gas-filled cavities which communicate with the nose; these are the 
middle ear cavities and the nasal sinuses.  The gas contained in these spaces expands and contracts on 
ascent and descent and, so long as communication with the nose remains open to permit gas to flow out 
of  and  into  these  cavities,  no  disturbances  will  occur.    However,  if  free  exchanges  of  gas  in  and  out  of 
these cavities do not occur with change of altitude, a very high pressure difference can soon arise, with 
painful  and  serious  consequences.    As  already  noted  in  para  3,  the  change  of  pressure  for  a  1,000 ft 
change  of  height  is  much  greater  at  low  than  at  high  altitude,  and  thus  the  disturbances  caused  in  the 
ears and sinuses by change of altitude occur predominantly at the lower altitudes. 
38.  The cavity of the middle ear is separated from the exterior by a thin diaphragm, the eardrum, and 
communicates  with  the  nose  via  the  Eustachian  tube,  whose  walls  are  soft  and  normally  collapsed 
together (Fig 4). 
39.  During  ascent,  as  the  ambient  pressure  decreases,  the  expanding  gas  in  the  middle  ear  cavity 
readily escapes along the Eustachian tube, so that pressure is equalized on either side of the eardrum.  
Since  the  anatomical  structure  of  the  tube  is  such  that  this  gas  can  escape  easily  (see  Fig  4), 
disturbances are very rare during ascent.  This passive ventilation of the middle ear may be heard as a 
popping sensation in the ear. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 17 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
6-2 Fig 1 The Human Ear 
Inner Ear
Bony Wall
Cochlea
Nerve
External Canal
Ear
Middle
Drum
Ear 
Cavity
Eustachian
Tube
40.  During descent, the collapsed wall of the Eustachian tube tends to act as a valve, preventing gas 
from flowing back into the middle ear cavity.  The increase in pressure on the outside of the eardrum 
progressively distorts the drum inwards as the descent continues.  Gas must flow into the middle ear 
cavity  via  the  Eustachian  tube  during descent if the drum head is to be restored to its normal resting 
position.  Several actions may be employed to open the Eustachian tube and allow gas to flow into the 
middle ear, such as yawning, swallowing or pushing the jaw forward.  If such actions fail, pinching the 
nose and blowing into it (as if blowing the nose so as to blow the fingers apart) is very effective.  This is 
called  the  'Valsalva'  manoeuvre  and  it  must  be  used  with  some  care,  lest  the  ears  become  over-
inflated, resulting in discomfort which can be confused with a failure to clear the ears.  Another widely 
used  method  is  to  pinch  the  nose,  close  the  glottis  (the  gap  between  the  vocal  cords),  and  raise  the 
floor of the mouth.  Individuals soon find, by trial and error, the method which suits them best. 
41.  During  a  descent,  the  ears  must  be  cleared  constantly  as  difficulty  is  likely  to  occur  when  the 
pressure  difference  across  the  eardrum  is  allowed  to  build  up.    This  pressure  build-up  pushes  in  the 
eardrum,  causing  pain  and  deafness  which  can  become  very  severe  as  the  pressure  differential 
increases.  The condition is known as an 'ear block' or 'otitic barotrauma'  (i.e. 'damage to the ear by 
pressure').  As the differential across the drum reaches about 50 mm Hg, the pain is very severe and, 
when it reaches approximately 90 mm Hg, it is not possible to equalize this pressure or 'clear the ears' 
by  voluntary  effort.    Further  descent  at  this  stage  can  cause  rupture  of  the  drum.    In  cases  where 
voluntary actions, such as those described, fail to relieve the condition, it is best to climb again until the 
ears are clear and let down again at a reduced rate, being careful to keep the middle ears inflated. 
42.  A head cold is likely to cause congestion and swelling of the Eustachian tubes, just as the lining of 
the nose is affected.  Thus, it may become difficult or impossible to clear the ears.  Aircrew with head 
colds should not fly, unless they can clear their ears satisfactorily on the ground. 
43.  The nasal sinuses are cavities in the bones of the face and skull, having a lining similar to that of 
the nose, with which they communicate along narrow tunnels.  During ascent and descent, gas flows 
freely out of and into the sinuses.  In the presence of inflammation of the lining of these sinuses, as in 
sinusitis or with a severe head cold, swelling may obstruct the outlets.  This will cause pain, which can 
be  severe,  during  a  descent.    The  condition  is  known  as  'sinus  barotrauma'  and  may  be  felt  in  the 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 18 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
cheek, upper teeth, forehead, or deep in the head.  In severe cases, the pain can be quite blinding, and 
also accompanied by watering of the eyes.  If sinus barotrauma occurs during flight, the rate of descent 
should be slowed and attempts made to force gas into the sinuses by raising the pressure in the nose 
by pinching the nostrils, closing the mouth, and breathing out hard.  Any infection or inflammation in the 
sinuses is a further reason for seeking medical advice about fitness to fly. 
Abdominal Distension 
44.  In  healthy  individuals,  the  stomach  and  intestines  contain  a  variable  quantity  of  gas  (0  to  300 
millilitres).    On  ascent,  this  abdominal  gas  expands  and  normally  will  escape  either  upwards  or 
downwards through the mouth or anus, as the case may be.  A few individuals have particular difficulty 
in  venting  this  gas,  even  at  modest  rates  of  ascent;  this  is  most  common  amongst  inexperienced 
aviators.  The higher the rate of ascent, the greater is the problem of expelling the gas quickly as it is 
expanding.    Healthy  experienced  aircrew  may,  on  occasions,  experience  difficulty  during  particularly 
rapid  and  large  increases  in  altitude.    The  symptoms  caused  by  an  inability  to  expel  this  gas  during 
ascent  vary  from  mild  discomfort  to  severe  pain  in  the  abdomen,  and  vomiting.    The  incidence  of 
symptoms  from  the  expansion  of  abdominal  gas  is,  however,  insignificant  amongst  experienced 
aircrew, except at cabin altitudes in excess of 30,000 ft.  This problem can be aggravated by intestinal 
infection or the consumption of too many gas-forming foods. 
Teeth 
45.  Healthy teeth do not contain gas.  Recently filled teeth, and those affected by dental caries, may 
contain small gas cavities which can give rise to toothache when climbing.  If this occurs, descent will 
relieve the pain.  Prevention is straightforward; maintain good dental health, do not fly within 24 hours 
of dental repair work, and remind the dentist that no air pockets should be left when cavities are filled. 
Effects of Changes of Pressure on the Lungs 
46.  The  lungs,  being  air-containing  cavities,  are  also  affected  by  rapid  change  of  environmental 
pressure.  Only extremely high rates of decrease in the environmental pressure could, however, cause 
damage  to  the  lungs  by  over-expanding  them  to  the  point  of  rupture,  because  of  the  relatively  wide 
bore  air  passages  along  which  the  gas  can  escape  from  the  lungs.    In  practice,  very  rapid 
decompressions  over  a  wide  range  of  pressure,  which  could  possibly  give  rise  to  lung  damage,  will 
only  occur  in  the  event  of  a  serious  structural  failure  of  an  aircraft.    It  is  possible,  however,  for  lung 
damage  to  occur  if  the  breath  is  held  during  a  wide  range  decompression.    It  is  clearly  important, 
therefore, to ensure that intentional breath holding is avoided during practice decompression.  Such an 
action, particularly with inflated lungs, would carry a grave risk of lung rupture. 
47.  Lung  damage  due  to  rapid  or  explosive  decompression  is  extremely  rare,  even  when  the 
decompression occurs over a wide pressure differential. 
Effects of Low Temperature 
48.  The effects of low temperature on the body depend on four factors: 
a. 
The absolute temperature. 
b. 
The speed of air movement. 
c. 
The duration of exposure. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 19 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
d. 
The amount of protection. 
49.  As  already  stated  at  the  beginning  of  this  chapter,  the  temperature  falls  steadily  with  altitude 
throughout  the  troposphere  at  the  adiabatic  lapse  rate  of  approximately  2  ºC  per  1,000  ft.    In  the 
stratosphere,  the  temperature  is  fairly  constant  at  about  –55  ºC.    Table  9  gives  some  typical 
temperatures at various altitudes. 
Table 9 Atmospheric Temperatures at Various Altitudes 
Altitude (ft)
Temperature (ºC)
Sea Level 
15 
5,000 

10,000 
-5 
15,000 
-15 
20,000 
-25 
25,000 
-35 
30,000 
-45 
35,000 
-55 
40,000 
-55 
50.  Exposure to a temperature of –40 ºC, when wearing normal flying clothing, leads to gross impairment of 
function after only a few minutes.  Parts of the body which are bare, or only lightly clad, very soon become 
cold, numb, still and functionless; this is particularly noticeable in the fingers.  There is an associated dulling 
of  the  senses,  and  general  incapacity.    If  exposure  to  this  temperature  is  continued,  the  deep  body 
temperature drops to a critically low level, producing a state of coma and, in time, death. 
51.  Exposure to a low environmental temperature in flight due, for example, to the loss of the canopy, 
can  become  a  limiting  factor  in  deciding  the  altitude  at  which  the  flight  can  be  continued.    In  many 
cases,  it  may  be  necessary  to  initiate  immediate  descent  and,  even  then,  frostbite  of  the  exposed 
areas of the body may occur, particularly if the aggravating factor of wind-chill is present.  The chances 
of frostbite occurring will be greater if hypoxia is present. 
52.  In  the  event  of  high  altitude  escape,  there  is  a  marked  possibility  of  frostbite,  but  even  a  light 
covering, such as afforded to the hand by cape leather gloves, is sufficient to delay, and even prevent, 
serious damage. 
Cabin Pressurization 
53.  Aircrew  operating  aircraft  at  moderate  and  high  altitudes  are  normally  protected  against  the 
effects  of  exposure  to  the  environment  in  which  the  aircraft  is  flying  by  pressurization  of  the  crew 
compartment.    Conditioned  air  is  fed  into  the  cabin  and  allowed  to  escape through discharge valves.  
The  opening  of  the  discharge  valves  is  controlled,  so  that  the  desired  pressure  difference  is  created 
between the interior of the cabin and the external environment of the aircraft. 
54.  The human body is accustomed to sea level conditions, so it would be ideal to maintain sea level 
pressure in the aircraft cabin at all times.  For military aircraft, however, this is impracticable, and not 
always  desirable,  from  the  point  of  view  of  weight,  complexity,  and  the  hazards  arising  from  loss  of 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 20 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
pressure  due  to  enemy  action.    In  practice,  the  pressure  differential,  and  thus  the  cabin  altitude,  is 
chosen  for  a  particular  aircraft  as  a  compromise  between  the  physiological  ideal  and  the  proposed 
performance and role of the aircraft. 
55.  Two  major  types  of  cabin  pressure  schedules  are  employed  in  military  aircraft,  namely  high 
differential  and  low  differential.    In  aircraft  with  high  differential  pressure  cabins,  the  maximum  cabin 
altitude is generally 8,000 ft.  A differential pressure of 9 psi is required at an aircraft altitude of 50,000 
ft  to  produce  a  cabin  altitude  of  8,000  ft.    High  differential  pressure  cabins are typically used in large 
aircraft  such  as  medium  bombers,  maritime  reconnaissance,  and  transports.    The  crew  and 
passengers  flying  in  this  type  of  pressure  cabin  normally  breathe cabin air throughout flight.  Oxygen 
equipment is fitted in order to provide protection against hypoxia in the event of a decompression.  In 
combat situations, when the risk of decompression is increased, some or all of the crew may use their 
oxygen  equipment  at  a  cabin  altitude  of  6,000  to  8,000  ft,  in  order  to  ensure  full  protection  against 
hypoxia  should  cabin  pressurization  be  lost.    The  degree  of  pressurization  employed  in  the  low 
differential pressure schedule is such that, at the altitude ceiling of the aircraft, the cabin altitude is in 
the range 20,000 to 25,000 ft, the exact value varying from one aircraft type to another.  A maximum 
differential pressure of approximately 5 psi is typically employed in this type of pressurization schedule.  
The  low  pressure  differential  schedule  is  used  in  fighter  aircraft,  where  the  risk  of  failure  of  the 
pressure cabin due to battle damage, or loss of a canopy, is higher and the large weight penalty of a 
high differential pressure cabin is unacceptable.  Crew operating low differential pressure cabin aircraft 
use  their  oxygen  equipment  throughout  flight.    Some  military  aircraft  with  high  differential  pressure 
cabins  are  also  fitted  with  a  cabin  pressure  control  system,  whereby  a  low  differential  pressure 
schedule can be selected, as desired, in flight. 
Loss of Cabin Pressure 
56.  The  pressurization  of  the  cabin  of  an  aircraft  may  fail  because  air  is  no  longer  pumped  into  the 
cabin,  there  is  a  failure  in  the  cabin  pressure  control  system,  or  a  defect  develops  in  the  wall  of  the 
cabin.  In military aircraft, the jettisoning of a canopy prior to ejection is an example of the latter type of 
failure.    The  rate  at  which  the  cabin  altitude  increases  varies  with  the  type  of  failure,  the  aircraft  and 
cabin altitudes, and the size of the opening or defect in the cabin wall.  When a defect in the wall of the 
pressure cabin is the cause, the final cabin altitude after loss of pressure may considerably exceed the 
actual  altitude  of  the  aircraft.    This  additional  reduction  of  the  pressure  within  the  cabin  is  due  to  the 
external flow of air over the defect.  The effect is termed 'aerodynamic suction'.  Its magnitude varies 
from  aircraft  to  aircraft,  with  the  position  of  the  defect,  and  with  the  aircraft  speed.    It  can  result,  for 
example, in a cabin altitude of 50,000 ft at an aircraft altitude of 40,000 ft.  Loss of cabin pressurization 
does not necessarily imply loss of cabin heating since, if the failure is in the integrity of the cabin wall, 
hot air will continue to enter the cabin from the engines.  Large aircraft also have a considerable heat 
capacity, so that a period of time may elapse before the cabin air temperature approaches that of the 
external environment. 
57.  Failure of a pressure cabin has two distinct groups of effects upon the cabin occupants.  The first 
group of effects are caused by the change in pressure itself, and include lung damage and abdominal 
distension.    The  effects  in  the  second  group  are  due  to  the  exposure  of  the  occupants  to  increased 
altitude. 
a. 
Effects due to Pressure Change.  The severity of the first group of effects is related to the 
magnitude of the pressure change and the rate at which it occurs.  Even when the loss of cabin 
pressure  is  very  rapid,  the  incidence  of  lung  damage  will  be  infinitesimally  low.    Following  rapid 
decompression, a small proportion of aircrew may suffer from abdominal distension. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 21 of 22 

AP3456 -.6-4 - Physiological Effects of Altitude 
b. 
Effects due to Exposure to Increased Altitude.  The incidence and severity of the effects 
which arise due to the exposure to increased altitude are closely related to the final cabin altitude.  
The  most  important  effect  is  hypoxia,  and  its  magnitude  is  influenced  by  whether  the  crew  are 
breathing  air  or  oxygen  (see  para  18).    Decompression  sickness  is  rare  if  the  duration  of  the 
exposure to high altitude is short (a few minutes only).  If, however, hypoxia is prevented, and the 
occupants of the cabin are exposed to altitudes in excess of 25,000 ft for any length of time, some 
of  them  will  develop  decompression  sickness  (see  para  29).    A  reduction  in  cabin  temperature 
may be associated with loss of cabin pressure.  If the duration of exposure to low temperature is 
short,  little  reduction  in  efficiency  will  occur.    Once  the  exposure  is  extended  beyond  a  few 
minutes, however, serious impairment of performance and injury will occur. 
58.  In  summary,  the  principle  physiological  hazard  associated  with  failure  of  the  pressure  cabin  of  an 
aircraft  at  high  altitude,  is  hypoxia.    If  descent  to  low  altitude  is  delayed,  for  operational  or  structural 
reasons, then decompression sickness or the effects of low temperature, or both together, will be added 
to the risk of hypoxia.  The immediate action to be taken in the event of a failure of cabin pressurization at 
altitude, is to ensure that oxygen is being delivered to the oxygen mask, and that the latter is adequately 
sealed to the face.  Whenever structural and operational considerations allow, immediate descent to as 
low  an  altitude  as  possible  should  be  carried  out  at  the  maximum  practical  rate.    Rapid  descent  is 
essential  when  a  decompression  results  in  a  cabin  altitude  greater  than  40,000  ft,  since  none  of  the 
pressure  breathing  systems  available  in  the  Royal  Air  Force  provides  long  duration  protection  against 
hypoxia or decompression sickness. 
59.  Whenever a decompression results in a cabin altitude greater than 25,000 ft, descent to a cabin 
altitude  below  this  level  should  be  carried  out  as  soon,  and  as  quickly,  as  operational  considerations 
allow.  When passengers are being carried in transport aircraft, immediate emergency descent (so that 
the  cabin  altitude  is  reduced  to  less  than  15,000  ft  (ideally  8,000  ft))  is  essential,  even  if  passenger 
oxygen equipment is available, since it is unlikely that more than half the passengers will use the latter 
correctly during and immediately after the decompression.  Should fuel and operational considerations 
make  maintenance  of  a  higher  cabin  altitude  essential,  then  the  re-ascent  should  only  be  performed 
after the appropriate checks that the passengers are receiving oxygen have been made. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 22 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
CHAPTER 5 - PHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ACCELERATION 
Introduction 
1. 
Changes  in  either  magnitude  or  direction  of  velocity  (termed  acceleration)    may  produce 
considerable effects on the body. These effects depend on the: 
a. 
Magnitude of the acceleration. 
b. 
Duration of the acceleration. 
c. 
Direction of the acceleration. 
d. 
Site of action of the acceleration. 
e. 
Onset rate of the acceleration (sometimes called ‘jolt’). 
2. 
The magnitude of acceleration is usually stated in units of 'G', which is the ratio of actual acceleration to 
acceleration due to earth’s gravity or 'g' (9.8 m/s2).  Hence, an acceleration of 4 G is four times that due to 
gravity, or 39.2 m/s2.  The direction of action of acceleration is defined on a three-co-ordinate system based 
on the human spine, where Z is the vertical axis, X the fore and aft axis and Y the lateral axis.  Positive and 
negative signs are used to specify direction along each axis such that a 'headwards' acceleration is +Gz, a 
forward’s acceleration is +Gx, and a right lateral acceleration is +Gy.  'Footwards', backwards and left lateral 
accelerations, therefore, become –Gz, –Gx and –Gy respectively. 
3. 
It is important to note that the force which is sensed by the individual is the inertial reaction.  This 
reaction is at all times equal in magnitude, but opposite in sign to the applied acceleration and applies 
equally to every part of the body.  Thus, a headwards acceleration (+Gz) tends to force the body down 
onto the seat and to displace blood towards the feet.  
4. 
The three types of acceleration to be considered are: 
a. 
Linear acceleration caused by change in speed. 
b. 
Radial acceleration caused by change in direction. 
c. 
Angular acceleration caused by change in rate of rotation (ie change of speed and direction). 
5. 
The following is a brief summary of the chief accelerations which can occur in aviation: 
a. 
Linear Accelerations.  Linear accelerations include: 
(1)  Catapult or rocket assisted take-off (+Gx). 
(2)  Arrested landings, barrier engagements (–Gx). 
(3)  Crashes, crash landings, ditching (initially –Gx and +Gz). 
(4)  Buffeting (predominantly ±Gz). 
(5)  Seat ejection (initially +Gz). 
(6)  Parachute opening shock and landing by parachute (predominantly +Gz). 
b. 
Radial  Accelerations.    Radial  accelerations  are  caused  by  rotation  about  a  distant  axis.  
They act outwards from the centre of rotation and are experienced whenever an aircraft changes 
direction (predominantly +Gz). 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
c. 
Angular  Accelerations.    Angular  accelerations  are  experienced  if  the  rate  of  rotation 
changes, or if a second axis of rotation is added to the first.  The principal effects on the body are 
those related to the vestibular apparatus (organ of balance) and it is convenient to discuss these 
separately (see Volume 6, Chapter 6). 
Effects of Linear Acceleration 
6. 
Linear  accelerations  result  from  an  increase  of  speed  (take-off).    Decelerations  result  from  a 
decrease of speed (landings and crashes).  The problems associated with buffeting and seat ejection 
are dealt with in paras 14 to 19. 
7. 
During catapult-assisted take-off, an acceleration of +4 Gx may be experienced, and deceleration 
of  –3  Gx  may  occur  during  an  arrested  landing.    In  wheels-up  landings  or  ditchings,  the  force  may 
exceed –10 Gx, and in crashes may exceed –25 Gx.  Linear forces encountered in aviation usually last 
for less than one second, though prolonged linear accelerations are imposed during the launching and 
re-entry of space vehicles.  The problems associated with sustained G forces will be discussed more 
fully when dealing with radial accelerations. 
8. 
It  has  been  shown  that  the  human  body,  properly  supported,  can  tolerate  a  very  much  greater 
acceleration than most aircraft structures.  In rocket sledge experiments, values of +40 Gx have been 
imposed  on  the  human  body  without  injury.    Values  as  great  as  +60 Gx  have  been  reached  with 
survivable  injuries.    In  general,  it  is  not  necessary  to  provide  protection  against  accelerations  higher 
than  ±25  Gx  since  values  as  great  as  this  will  only  be  attained  in  disastrous,  uncontrolled  crashes 
involving massive structural disintegration of the aircraft. 
9. 
The  problems  of  short  duration  acceleration  usually  concern  body  restraint  and  body  posture.  
These are particularly important in the use of ejection seats (paras 15-19). 
10.  During crash decelerations in forward-facing seats (–Gx), unrestrained occupants may be flung forward 
and injured or killed by striking solid objects in front of them.  Even low decelerative forces have produced 
fatal results in road traffic accidents.  The simplest form of restraint is the lap belt, but this is not satisfactory 
as it does not prevent the body flexing at the hips, thereby permitting the head to move forward and strike 
any solid object in its path.  Also, this sharp forward flexion of the hips is liable to cause fractures at the lower 
end of the spine.  Furthermore, since the area of restraint provided by the lap belt is small, the associated 
high contact pressure is liable to cause internal abdominal injuries. 
11.  The  conventional  four-point  seat  harness  in  an  aircraft  has  both  a  lap  belt  and  shoulder  straps.  
The restraint afforded by the lap belt across the thighs is intended to reduce both vertical and forward 
movement  of  the  hips,  and  the  shoulder  harness  is  designed  to  prevent  forward  flexion  during  –Gx 
acceleration.  A five-point harness has a negative G strap attaching the harness quick release fitting to 
the front of the seat pan.  This provides a greater reduction in vertical movement than can be achieved 
with  the  conventional  harness.    The  head  is  unrestrained  and  forward  flexion  of  the  neck  is  likely  to 
occur  in  crash  decelerations.    In  order  to  prevent  damage  to  the  head,  effort  is  made  during  cockpit 
design to ensure a clear path for a distance of 40 cm in front of the head.  Where an object intrudes, a 
head-up display for example, it should be adequately padded to prevent an incapacitating head impact 
in the event of a crash or barrier engagement.  Further protection is provided by a well-fitting helmet. 
12.  Standard  Service  harnesses  protect  the  wearer  against  forward  decelerations  of  up  to  25  G, 
provided that they are properly fitted, tight, and with the lap belt as low as possible and shoulder straps 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
locked.  A high lap strap could allow the wearer to slip forwards underneath the harness during forward 
decelerations.    The  negative  G  strap  in  a  five-point  harness  prevents  this  occurring  by anchoring the 
centre point of the harness and holding the lap belt down.  Seat and harness attachments must also be 
stressed  to  ±25  Gx.    In  cases  where  there  is  a  separate  parachute  quick  release  fitting,  it should  be 
located  higher  than  the  seat  harness  quick  release  fitting,  otherwise  it  could  be  driven  back  by  the 
second fitting and possibly cause internal injury. 
13.  In  passenger  aircraft,  it  is  difficult  to  provide  the  occupants  with  a safety harness which will give 
adequate  restraint  and,  at  the  same  time,  reasonable  freedom  of  movement  and  comfort.  The 
passenger seat is fitted with a simple lap belt to restrain the occupant in turbulence, and in the event of 
other  axes  of  acceleration  occurring  during  crashes.    A  head-rest  is  essential  to  prevent  neck  injury 
and, ideally, it should have forward projections at each side to provide lateral restraint.  
Buffeting 
14.  Vibrations occur during flight for a number of reasons, but most significant in relation to harness 
restraint is the buffeting which can occur when an aircraft flies fast in turbulent conditions, eg in cloud, 
over  mountains,  or  at  low  level,  particularly  in  hot  climates,  or  over  uneven  terrain.    These  rapidly 
alternating vertical accelerations are usually of the order of ±1.5 Gz to 2 Gz, but occasionally values as 
great  as  ±3 Gz  may  occur.    They  are  governed  in  amplitude  and  frequency  by  the  speed  and  wing 
loading  of  the  aircraft,  as  well  as  by  the  amount  of  turbulence.    One  of  their  effects  is  to  hasten  the 
onset of fatigue in the individual, but, if of sufficient amplitude, they may make control difficult or even 
cause  an  inadequately  restrained  occupant  to  strike  their  head  against  the  cockpit  canopy  or  cabin 
roof.  At certain frequencies, buffet accelerations may interfere with vision.  The wearing of a protective 
helmet,  in  addition  to  a  properly  tightened  harness,  prevents  head  injury.    It  is  the  captains’  duty  to 
ensure that their crew and passengers have harnesses secure when there is a possibility of flying into 
turbulent conditions. 
Seat Ejection 
15.  In order to clear high tail structures, and also give a low-level escape capability, the ejection gun 
has  to  provide  the  highest  possible  velocity,  and  hence  gain  in  altitude,  without  exceeding  the 
acceleration  tolerance  of  the  seat  occupant.    Early  investigations  showed  that,  not  only  was  there  a 
limit to the peak acceleration which could be employed, but there was also a limit to the rate at which 
this  acceleration  could  be  applied.    It  was  established  that  the  absolute  limit  of  human  tolerance  to 
ejection was +25 Gz, and that at no time must the rate of rise of G exceed 300 G per second (G/s). 
16.  Ejection acceleration loads depend not only upon the energy of the gun system and weight of the 
seat  occupant,  but  also  upon  the  transmission  of  energy  from  the  seat  to  the  occupant.    This 
transmission is influenced by the elastic properties of equipment stowed in the seat pan, as well as by 
the  dynamic  response  of  the  occupant.    The  presence  of  extra  cushioning  material  between  the 
occupant and the seat pan may cause the occupant to reach peak accelerations of higher than 25 Gz.  
This  'dynamic  overshoot'  is  a  result  of  poor  coupling  of  the  occupant  to  the  seat  allowing  the  seat  to 
reach  a  high  velocity  before  the  occupant.    The  occupant  then  undergoes  a  greater  acceleration  to 
match  the  seat  velocity  when  the  seat  cushioning  is  fully  compressed.    It  is  essential  that  no 
unauthorized  equipment  is  placed  in  the  seat  pan,  nor  should  the  contents  of  survival  packs  or 
cushions be altered in any way. 
17.  To overcome the limitations of performance imposed by human tolerance to acceleration, rocket-
assisted seats are used.  The advantage of rocket assistance is that it permits a longer application of 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
thrust, therefore achieving the necessary clearance from the aircraft with lower peak acceleration and 
lower rate of onset of acceleration.  Older ballistic ejection seats approached 25 Gz peak acceleration, 
while a typical rocket-assisted seat has a peak acceleration of +16 Gz to +18 Gz. 
18.  To  minimize  the  risk  of  injuries  on  ejection,  the  harness  should  have  well-tightened  lap  and 
negative G straps, and have the shoulder straps retracted and locked, with the occupant in the correct 
ejection posture.  These measures will ensure good coupling of the occupant to the seat and minimize 
the chance of forward flexion of the spine during ejection. 
19.  After  ejection,  particularly  at  high  indicated  air  speeds,  further  accelerations  will  be experienced, 
some of which may be associated with a seat tumbling or deceleration resulting from the deployment 
of stabilizing equipment.  Further consideration of these matters will be found in Volume 8, Chapter 9. 
Parachute Opening Shock 
20.  High  accelerations  may  be  experienced  on  parachute  deployment,  the  opening  shock  load 
increasing with air speed and altitude. Parachute opening shock accelerations are greater at altitude due 
to two factors.  Firstly, the parachute will open quicker in lower density air leading to higher accelerations.  
Secondly,  higher  accelerations  can  occur  due  to  the  relative  differences  in  the  terminal  velocity  of  the 
aircrew/ejection seat and the reduced terminal velocity of the aircrew on the inflated parachute at high and 
low altitudes. At 7,000 ft the opening shock load for a 7 m (24 ft) canopy is approximately 9 G, whereas at 
42,000 ft this same canopy would give an opening shock load of about 32 G. An opening shock load as 
high as this would almost always cause severe damage to the canopy and also to the aircrew member. 
For  this  reason  alone,  it  is  undesirable  to  permit  canopy  deployment much above 20,000 ft, quite apart 
from the fact that a delayed opening reduces the time spent at high altitude, where the problems caused 
by lack of oxygen and low temperature would be significant. 
Parachute Landing 
21.  The  deceleration  experienced  during  parachute  landing  is  very  variable,  depending  on  the 
parachute, the body weight, the landing attitude, wind velocity and the terrain.  Aircrew are not usually  
experienced  in  actual  parachute  landings,  therefore  it  is  important  to  ensure  that  the  situation  is  not 
aggravated  by  increasing  the  rate  of  descent  by  attempting  to  carry  out  difficult  parachuting 
manoeuvres near the ground.  Some parachutes produce a horizontal velocity component, or 'drive', of 
several metres per second.  This allows a smaller canopy to give an acceptably low descent rate, and 
also damps out instability so that landing should be more controlled. 
Effects of +Gz Acceleration 
22.  As  early  as  1918,  during  test  flights  in  a  Sopwith  Triplane,  aviators  reported  visual  loss  and 
'fainting' as a result of +Gz acceleration exposure by their aircraft. 
23.  Radial accelerations are most commonly experienced in turns, especially in high performance aircraft.  
The formula relating centripetal acceleration (a) to velocity (v) and radius of turn (r) is as follows: 
v2
r
As centrifugal force (F) is equal to mass (m) times acceleration (a), the following formula applies: 
mv 2
=
r
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
From this formula it can be seen that doubling the velocity of flight along a curved path quadruples the 
force applied to the aircraft and crew, while halving the radius of turn doubles the force.  This force is 
felt as an increase in weight in proportion to the amount of acceleration.  A 6 G acceleration is felt as a 
sixfold increase in weight. 
24.  Under increased +Gz acceleration, the weight of the whole body, and its components (especially 
the blood) is increased with the following effects: 
a. 
Fluid  and  tissues  are  displaced  downwards.    This  is  most  apparent  in  the  face,  where  the 
skin can be seen to sag. 
b. 
Since  the  weight  of  the  body  may  be  increased  many  times  while  the  power  of  the  muscles 
remains unaltered, movements become progressively more difficult.  If the head is lowered, it may not 
be possible to raise it again, especially if a heavy helmet is worn.  Neck injuries are possible, especially 
if acceleration is applied suddenly and unexpectedly, or if the head is moved or held in a rotated and/or 
flexed  position,  such as in the 'Check 6' position.  At +2.5 Gz it is almost impossible to rise from the 
sitting position and unaided escape from an aircraft would be virtually impossible. 
c. 
A  pressure  gradient  develops  in  the  blood  between  the  heart  and  the  brain,  resulting  in 
reduced blood pressure at head level.  This can reduce the supply of oxygen to the eye and brain, 
ultimately leading to G-Induced Loss of Consciousness (G-LOC). The blood pressure in the blood 
vessels of the lower parts of the body rises with increasing G, and flow of blood back to the heart is 
reduced.  The high blood pressure in parts of the body below heart level can be sufficient to rupture 
small  capillaries  in  the  feet  and  forearms,  leaving  a  fine  rash  (‘G  measles’)  -  this  is  a  normal 
response to accelerations greater than about 4 Gz, and does not have any long-lasting effect.  Arm 
pain can occur at +6 Gz and above. 
25.  As the level of acceleration is increased, inadequate blood pressure to supply oxygen to the retina 
causes partial loss of vision ('grey-out'), followed by total loss of vision ('black-out').  Loss of vision begins 
at  the  periphery  of  the  visual  field  and  gradually  moves  into  the  centre,  so  that  the  grey-out  phase  has 
been likened to looking down a foggy tunnel.  The reason for visual disturbance occurring before loss of 
consciousness  can  be  explained  in  simple  mechanical  terms.    The  pressure  needed  to  supply  the  eye 
with  blood  is  greater  than  that  required  to  supply  the  brain,  because  the  eyeball  has  a  positive  internal 
pressure.  Thus, the fall in blood pressure at head level which results from +Gz acceleration first affects 
the blood supply to the retina and produces impairment of vision. 
26.  Under conditions of gradual onset of acceleration, the warning presence of grey-out or black-out 
allows  the  pilot  to  avoid  loss  of  consciousness  by  either  decreasing  the  amount  of  Gz  the  aircraft  is 
pulling,  or  by  increasing  the  anti-G  straining  manoeuvre  (sub-para  32b).    Modern  agile  aircraft  are 
capable  of  high  rates  of  G  onset,  up  to  10  G/s  or  more.    Under  these  conditions  the  brain  becomes 
deprived of blood and oxygen at virtually the same time as the eye so that G-LOC may occur without a 
warning impairment in vision.  10-20% of all aircrew have experienced G-LOC and studies have shown 
that  simple  recovery  takes  up  to  15  seconds,  while  a  further  30  seconds  to  45  seconds  may  pass 
before  it  is  possible  to  appreciate  the  situation  and  take  appropriate  action  to  recover  the  aircraft.  A 
syndrome  called  ‘Almost  Loss  of  Consciousness’  (A-LOC)  is  also  recognised,  in  which  aircrew  may 
show  poor  response  to  sounds  (eg  radio  calls),  an  abnormal  sensation  in  the  limbs,  a  lack  of  recall, 
confusion  or  a  dream-like  state,  euphoria,  apathy,  or  disorientation  but  without  a  complete  loss  of 
consciousness.  The risks associated with A-LOC are often just as great as G-LOC, as control of the 
aircraft is impaired. 
27.  As  in  many  other  situations,  the  body  makes  some  attempt  to  compensate  for  these  circulatory 
changes.  If a level of acceleration which first produced grey-out is sustained, it is possible that vision 
will return to normal.  This is due to a reflex increase in blood pressure to maintain a satisfactory supply 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
to  the  eye,  heart  and  brain.    Similarly,  black-out  may  improve  to  grey-out  or  normal  vision  may  be 
recovered.  However, this reflex is slow (7-10 seconds) and G-LOC may occur before it acts. 
28.  The severity of these effects is not solely dependent upon the level of acceleration; the duration of 
exposure is a significant factor.  Brief exposure to high levels of acceleration may cause loss of control, 
or even damage to the aircraft, but will not have time to cause symptoms as both brain and eye contain 
a sufficient store of oxygen to function for 3 seconds to 4 seconds in the absence of a fresh supply of 
blood.  Therefore, in describing levels of normal response to +Gz acceleration, it is necessary to define 
both the level of acceleration and its duration. 
29.  For  a  relaxed  individual  with  no  anti-G  trousers,  an  acceleration  of  +3  Gz  to  +4  Gz  acting  for  4 
seconds to 6 seconds is sufficient to cause some reduction in peripheral vision.  An acceleration of +4 Gz 
to  +5  Gz  may  produce  black-out  or  even  loss  of  consciousness.    These  levels  can  vary  widely  from 
individual  to  individual,  or  even  in  the  same  person  depending  upon  factors  such  as  lack  of  food, 
dehydration, fatigue, illness, hypoxia, or the after effects of alcohol (see para 32g).  In general, the grey-
out threshold is about 0.5 to 1 G below the black-out threshold, and this, in turn, is about 0.5 to 1 G below 
the  threshold  for  unconsciousness.    The  range  is  wide,  however,  and  some  individuals  can  lose 
consciousness at as low as + 3 Gz. 
30.  As G-LOC may be followed by confusion for 30 seconds to 45 seconds, the greatest risk is ground 
impact, although mid air collision is also possible.  Avoidance of G-LOC or A-LOC is achieved primarily 
through a G straining manoeuvre that is initiated in good time to prevent the onset of grey-out or black-
out  (see  para  32b);  waiting  for  the  grey-out  to  appear and then straining to clear it is potentially risky 
and may put you at risk of G-LOC, particularly at high G onset rates. Recovery from unconsciousness 
is  frequently  associated  with  jerky  and  uncontrolled  movements  of  the  head  and  limbs.    These 
movements may interfere with the control of the aircraft.  At least 50% of individuals suffering G-LOC 
have no recollection of losing consciousness. 
31.  The distribution of blood and air within the lungs is affected by +Gz acceleration, and the efficiency of 
gas transfer is impaired causing the concentration of oxygen in arterial blood to fall which can reduce mental 
performance.    Repeated  exposures  to  +Gz  while  breathing  high  concentrations  of  oxygen  may  lead  to  a 
condition of 'acceleration atelectasis' ('oxygen lung') in which the lower parts of the lungs become collapsed 
and  give  rise  to  shortness  of  breath,  cough,  chest  pain  and  difficulty  in  taking  a  deep  breath.    Aircraft 
featuring  on  board  oxygen  generators  may  be  more  likely  to  cause  atelectasis.  The  symptoms  usually 
disappear  after  a  few  deep  breaths  are  taken,  but  occasionally  persist  to  cause  discomfort  and  exercise 
limitation after flight.   
Increasing Tolerance to G 
32.  Tolerance to G can be enhanced by factors that maintain blood supply to the head, by supporting 
the circulation.  These include: 
a. 
Anti-G  Trousers.    An  anti-G  suit  is  standard  equipment  in  almost  all  UK  MOD  high 
performance  aircraft.    It  consists  of  a  pair  of  trousers  of  inelastic  lightweight  material  beneath 
which  bladders  are  inflated  to  apply  counter-pressure  to  the  calves,  thighs  and  abdomen.    The 
bladders are inflated automatically from engine bleed air via an anti-G valve.  For all aircraft types 
except  Typhoon,  a  pressure  of  1.5  psi  (10.3  kPa)  comes  in  abruptly  at  +2  Gz  (in  Typhoon  the 
pressure  rises  smoothly  from  the  baseline).    Anti-G  trouser  pressure  increases  linearly  with 
increasing  G  to  around  10  psi  (70  kPa)  at  +9  Gz.    Conventional  five-bladder  (skeletal)  anti-G 
trousers  raise  the  black-out  threshold  of  a  relaxed  subject  by  1  G  to  1.5  G.  They  also  make 
performance  of  the  anti-G  straining  manoeuvre  easier,  and  reduce  the  amount  of  fatigue 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
experienced  by  aircrew  carrying  out  repeated  manoeuvres  at  high  G.    Full  coverage  anti-G 
trousers  (FCAGT)  used  in  Typhoon  and  Lightning  II  feature  circumferential  bladders  covering  a 
greater  surface  area  of  the  lower  limbs,  and  raise  the  black-out  threshold  by  2  G  to  2.5  G.    An 
advanced  anti-G  valve  giving  more  rapid  inflation  for  improved  protection  during  high  G  onset 
rates is fitted to Typhoon and Lightning II. 
b. 
Anti-G  Straining  Manoeuvre.    The  'anti-G  straining  manoeuvre'  (AGSM)  comprises  2 
elements:  muscle  tensing  and  breathing  strain.    One  of  the  normal  mechanisms  for  propelling 
blood  along  the  veins  and  back  to  the  heart  is  by  the  squeezing  action  of  surrounding  muscles.  
Continuous  tensing  of  the  muscles  in  the  calf  and  thighs  throughout  the  G  exposure  (without 
relaxing)  is  therefore  beneficial  and  has  the  additional  effect  of  raising  blood  pressure  by 
increasing  the  resistance  to  blood  flow  through  the  limbs.    Raising the pressure within the chest 
and abdominal cavity, by straining (attempting to force air out out against a closed throat) will raise 
the blood pressure.  Correct timing of the manoeuvre is essential; the strain should last no longer 
than 3 seconds to 4 seconds to allow a breath to be taken and blood to move from the peripheral 
veins  to  the  heart.    A  longer  strain  may  reduce  blood  flow  back  to  the  heart.    The  AGSM  is  a 
practical  skill  which  must  be learned during centrifuge training (see sub-para d).  In combination 
with  correctly  fitted  anti-G  trousers,  the  anti-G  straining  manoeuvre  should  enable  aircrew  to 
tolerate sustain +7 Gz to +8 Gz for 15 seconds without losing central vision, or suffering a G-LOC, 
and  this  is  extended  to  +9  Gz  for  pilots  using  Typhoon  equipment.  The  individual  piloting  the 
aircraft is likely to have a higher black-out threshold than a non-handling crew member as the pilot 
is  in  a  position  to  anticipate  the  required  actions.    Timing  of  the  AGSM  is  critically  important, 
especially  at  high  G  onset  rate.    Muscle  tensing  can  be  started  before  G  is  applied,  but  the 
breathing  strain  must  not  be  started  until  G  onset  or  G  tolerance  may  be  reduced.  For  high  G 
onset  manoeuvres,  it  is  essential  that  G  straining  is  proactive,  and  not  reactive  to  visual 
symptoms, or G-LOC may occur without warning.  
c. 
Positive  Pressure  Breathing.    In  addition  to  full  coverage  anti-G  trousers,  Typhoon  pilots  are 
supplied  with  breathing  gas  through  the  mask  at  a  positive  pressure.    Pressure  breathing  for  G 
protection (PBG) cuts in at +4 Gz and rises linearly to 60 mm Hg (8 kPa) at +9 Gz.  PBG increases G 
tolerance  in  the  same  way  as  the  breathing  component  of  an  anti-G  straining  manoeuvre,  and  can 
reduce  fatigue  and  extend  the  time  spent  at  high  G.    It  also  makes  breathing  easier  at  high  levels 
of +Gz  acceleration.    PBG  is  subjectively  more  transparent  than  pressure  breathing  for  altitude 
protection  and  is  very  readily  tolerated.    In  a  PBG  system,  the  breathing  regulator  delivers  gas  at  a 
pressure  proportional  to  the  applied  G  by  responding  to  the  outlet  pressure  of  the  anti-G  suit  supply 
valve.  This arrangement prevents pressure breathing being applied without inflation of the anti-G suit, 
thus avoiding a situation which could be deleterious for G tolerance. 
d. 
Centrifuge  Training.    The  G-LOC  rates  in  air  forces  around  the  world  (including  the  RAF) 
have  prompted  the  introduction  of  centrifuge  training.    To  promote  G  awareness,  recognize  the 
personal symptoms of impending G-LOC, and develop an effective anti-G straining manoeuvre, all 
UK  MOD  fast-jet  aircrew  undergo  centrifuge  training  at  the  ab-initio  stage.    Additional  centrifuge 
training up to +9 Gz is provided for those aircrew converting to the Typhoon life support system, 
and refresher training is required for all aircrew at 5 yearly intervals. 
e. 
Physical  Fitness.    Physical  conditioning  may  be  beneficial  to  G  tolerance  and  may  also 
reduce  the  risk  of  neck  injury.    The  Aircrew  Physical  Conditioning  (ACP)  programme  (see 
Volume 6,  Chapter  16)  has  been  introduced  to  promote  the  right  balance  between  anaerobic 
training,  which  may  increase  the  time  for  which  aircrew  can  sustain  high  levels  of  +Gz 
acceleration,  and  aerobic  conditioning.    Aerobic  exercise  may  improve  G  tolerance  but  in  some 
individuals  it  can  make  matters  worse,  especially  if  the  resting  heart  rate  is  below  55 beats/min.  
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
The ACP also features core stability and neck strengthening exercises to reduce the risk of neck 
and back pain. 
f. 
Position.  Alterations in posture can reduce the vertical heart-to-brain distance and improve the 
efficiency of the circulation to the eye and brain.  Pilots in World War II crouched forwards to increase 
the black-out threshold by nearly 1 G, and some aircraft also featured a high rudder pedal position to be 
used  in  combat  manoeuvring.    In  theory,  tolerance  to  G  can  be  further  increased  by  tilting  the  seat 
backwards,  or  by  placing  the  pilot  in  a  prone  or  supine  position.  However,  this  is  impractical  due  to 
cockpit design, external vision and ejection problems, and current Service aircraft do not feature a seat 
position which improves G tolerance. 
g. 
G Awareness.  A number of factors can reduce G tolerance below the expected level, and it 
is important for aircrew to be aware of this possibility.  Some of these are within the control of the 
pilot  and  some  are  not,  but  it  is  important  to  realise  that  G  tolerance  can  vary  quite  extensively 
from  day  to  day.    For  example,  tolerance  may  be  reduced  by  dehydration  (inadequate  intake  of 
fluid  or  excessive  sweating),  hunger  (an  empty  stomach  and  gut  and  lowered  blood  sugar).  
Fatigue,  either  physical  or  mental,  may  reduce  G  tolerance,  as  may  heat  stress  which  diverts 
blood to the skin.  The after-effects of alcohol, and some medicines including those available over 
the counter may reduce tolerance.  Even after a week away from flying G tolerance may be below 
that expected.  It is important for pilots to have G awareness in mind when planning and executing 
sorties that will include high G manoeuvring. 
h.  G-Warm.  A ‘G warm’ should be carried out prior to any high G (> 4 Gz) manoeuvring.  The G-
warm provides confidence that the anti-G system is working correctly, allows a check for any day 
to day variation in personal G tolerance, and provides an opportunity to focus on and practice the 
AGSM. If carried out shortly before high G manoeuvring, the G-warm can improve G tolerance for 
the following 3 to 5 minutes by boosting the amount of adrenaline in the blood and improving the 
blood pressure response. 
Effects of –Gz Acceleration 
33.  When  the  resultant  of  radial  acceleration  and  gravity  is  directed  towards  the  head,  as  in  a  bunt, 
the body experiences 'footwards' acceleration (–Gz).  This feels more unpleasant than the equivalent 
positive  G;  even  simple  inversion  (–1  Gz)  causes  engorgement  of  the  head  and  neck  due  to  the 
abnormally high venous pressure.  When the level of –Gz acceleration is increased, the face becomes 
painfully congested, and the lower lids may droop over the eyes so that sunlight shines through them 
and appears red (possibly the cause of 'red-out').  Unsupported blood vessels in the white of the eyes 
may  rupture  due  to  the  high  pressure  and  the  resulting  red  discolouration  takes  several  days  to 
clear up.  Negative acceleration also has marked effects on the heart, provoking a reflex triggered by 
blood  pressure  sensors  in  the  neck,  which  slows  or  even  stops  the  heart  for  several  seconds.  While 
this  (very  rarely)  may  cause  unconsciousness  directly from negative G exposure, the more important 
effect  in  aviation  is  what  happens  if  positive  G  is  pulled  immediately  afterwards.    This  effect, 
sometimes  called  the  'push-pull  effect',  causes  G  tolerance  to  be  reduced  by  1  G,  or  possibly  more, 
after a negative G manoeuvre (e.g. inverted spin recovery).  Even short exposures in the range 0 Gz to 
+1  Gz  are  sufficient  to  reduce  positive  G  tolerance  for  the  next  10  seconds  to  15  seconds 
(e.g. unloading  to  increase  airspeed  and  then  pulling).    There  is  no  means  of  protecting  against  the 
push-pull effect other than anticipating the reduction in G tolerance it may cause and straining to make 
up  the  deficit.    Equally,  there  is  no  practicable  method  of  protection  against  sustained  negative  G, 
although  manoeuvres  involving  –Gz  are  much  less  common  than  those  involving  +Gz,  chiefly  being 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-5 - Physiological Effects of Acceleration 
confined to aerobatic display flying.  The limit of tolerance for sustained negative G is in the order of   –
3 Gz  for  30  seconds,  though  –5  Gz  or  more  may  be  tolerated  for  very  brief  periods  (1  second  to  2 
seconds) in trained individuals.   
Effects of ±Gy Acceleration 
34.  Lateral force control has been introduced in experimental aircraft by the use of additional vertical 
fins forward of the aircraft’s centre of gravity and thrust vectoring.  The imposed forces are of the order 
of  ±1 Gy,  or  less,  and  have  no  significant  physiological  effects,  though  if  sustained  may  lead  to 
increased fatigue of neck muscles.  In the Typhoon aircraft, up to 2 Gy may be experienced briefly in 
rapid roll rates at high angles of attack, but this type of manoeuvring has not been associated with any 
aeromedical problems. 
Reviewed Nov 15 Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
CHAPTER 6 - SPECIAL SENSES 
VISION 
General 
1. 
The  ability  to  see  well  is  a  necessary  requirement  in  flying.    The  aviator  is  completely  reliant  on 
sight at every stage of flight, in order to see the ground, the instruments and other objects.  However, 
vision is more than just an act of seeing; it depends on the proper utilisation of the eyes and then on 
the correct interpretation of the visual picture by the brain. 
The Eye 
2. 
The  eye  receives  rays  of  light  directly  from  luminous  sources  or  reflected  from  objects.    It  then 
focuses  this  light  on  the  retina  at  the  back  of  the  eyeball,  by  means  of  the  cornea  at  the  front  of  the 
eye,  and  the  lens  within  it.    Photoreceptors  in  the  retina  convert  light  into  nerve  impulses,  which  are 
then transmitted by the optic nerve to the brain, where they are interpreted as a picture. 
3. 
Eyeballs  are  roughly  spherical,  and  approximately  2.5  cm  in  diameter.    They  lie  within  the  bony 
orbit,  suspended  in  fat,  and  are  protected  against  damage  from  all  directions,  except  at  the  front, 
where protection is limited to that provided by the eyelids. 
4. 
The  eyeball  is  filled  with  fluid  and  depends  on  its  own  internal  pressure  to  maintain  its  shape  and 
integrity.    It  is  composed  of  three  skins,  which  are  modified  at  the  front  to  admit  light  (see  Fig  1).    The 
outermost  skin,  the  'sclera',  is  tough,  supportive  and  relatively  free  from  blood  vessels.    It  has  a 
transparent  region  at  the  front  called  the  'cornea'.    The  middle  skin,  or  'uvea',  contains  many  blood 
vessels;  its  prime  function  is  nutritive.    At  the  front,  this  middle  skin  becomes  the  'ciliary  body'  and  iris, 
while  at  the  rear  it  forms  the  'choroid'.    The  innermost  skin  is  the  retina,  which  is  light  sensitive  and 
corresponds to the choroids in its extent.  A person’s best visual acuity is obtained when an image falls on 
the central area of sensory cells (the 'fovea') which is situated on a pigmented area in the centre of the 
retina, called the 'macula'.  The globe of the eyeball is divided into two main compartments by the lens iris 
diaphragm;  a  large  rear  compartment  filled  with  a  clear  jelly,  called  the  'vitreous',  and  a  smaller  front 
chamber filled with a clear liquid, called the 'aqueous'.  The circular iris contracts as light levels increase in 
order to make the pupil (the opening in the iris in the centre of the eye) smaller and limit the amount of 
light falling on the retina.  As light levels decrease, the iris dilates to admit more light. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
6-6 Fig 1 The Human Eye 
Pupil (Black Area)
Iris (Colour of Eye)
Sclera
(White of Eye)
Aqueous Humour
Cornea
(Glassy Front of Eye)
Retina
Lens
Ciliary Body
Vitreous
Uvea (Choroid)
Humour
Fovea
Optic Nerve
5. 
It is conventional to compare the human eye with a camera, but this analogy is too simple.  The 
eye  can  adjust  over  an  enormous  range  of  brightness;  it  is  capable  of  discrimination  between  fine 
hues; and it can distinguish detail which subtends visual angles of less than 30 seconds of arc. 
6. 
This  sophisticated  visual  performance  is  due  principally  to  co-ordination  between  eye  and  brain.  
The  brain  and  the  neural  retina  process  visual information to improve the image falling on the retina, 
adding, subtracting and comparing data, as necessary. 
Visual Function 
7. 
It is convenient to separate the visual function into its three component senses, light, form, and colour. 
8. 
The eye is capable of functioning over a wide range of luminance.  The luminance of an object is 
a  measure  of  its  brightness;  it  is  the  product  of  the  illumination  falling  on  an  object  and  the  object’s 
reflectance.   The eye is capable of detecting light as dim as faint starlight; the maximum limit, where 
discomfort is evident, is as high as bright sunlight on snow.  Two visual mechanisms function over this 
range.    'Scotopic'  (or  'rod')  vision  operates  over  the  lowest  quarter  of  luminance;  over  this  range  the 
ability to see form is poor, and colour is not perceived.  Over the remainder of the range, 'photopic' (or 
'cone') vision takes over, progressively giving, with increasing luminance, the advantages of good form 
sharpness  and  the  ability  to  discriminate  colours.    The  transitional  stage,  when  both  rods  and  cones 
are functioning, is known as 'mesopic' vision, and corresponds roughly to the light available under full 
moonlight. 
9. 
The  eye  requires  time  to  adjust  to  varying  luminance  because  the  control  is  a  photochemical 
reaction.  When the eye adapts from dark to light, the adjustment is rapid, but in adapting from light to 
dark,  the  adjustment  is  slower.    The  dark  adaptation  curve  (Fig 2)  shows  the  threshold  luminance 
required to see a light source (as a function of total darkness).  It can be seen that there is not a steady 
increase in sensitivity.  The curve is in two portions, the initial rapid adaptation being that of the cones, 
and  the  slower  adaptation  that  of  the  rods.    A  further  feature  of  rod  and  cone  vision  is  their  different 
colour sensitivity.  Rods are most sensitive to blue/green light and cones to yellow/green light (see Fig 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
3).    This  differing  colour  sensitivity  is  evident  at  dusk,  when  red  objects  appear  darker  whereas  blue 
objects retain their apparent brightness. 
6-6 Fig 2 Dark Adaptation Curve 
0
e
c
-1
Cone Adaptation
n
a
)
2
in
m -2
m
r
Rod Adaptation
u
e
L
p -3
ld
s
o
la
h
e
d -4
s
re
n
h
a
T
(C -5
g
lo
-6
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
Time (mins)
6-6 Fig 3 Rod and Cone Colour Sensitivity 
100
Scotopic (Night)
Photopic (Day)
Response
Response 
(Peaking in
(Peaking in
80
blue-green)
yellow-green)
ity
Rods.
Cones.
s
o
60
in
m
u
L
40
e
tiv
20
la
e
R
400
500
600
700
Violet  Blue  Green  Yellow  Orange  Deep Red
Wavelength m-9
10.  The field of view of each eye, defined as that portion of the external world visible to the stationary 
eye,  extends  from  about  60º  nasally  to  75º  temporally.    These  limits  are  imposed  by  anatomical 
features, such as the bridge of the nose and the depth of recession of the eyes.  On the temporal side 
of  each  visual  field  there  is  a  blind  spot  covering  about  5º  of  which  the  observer  is  largely  unaware.  
This is where the optic nerve leaves the eye (Fig 1), and there are no photoreceptors.  The fields of the 
two  eyes  overlap  by  approximately  60º,  where  the  same  object  is  seen  with  both  eyes;  in  this  region 
vision  is  binocular,  so  the  physiological  blind  spot  is  not  noticed.    Helmets,  visors,  and  aircrew 
spectacles are designed to have minimal impairment on the field of view. 
11.  When an object is viewed it is imaged on the fovea and the surrounding macula.  The fovea is a 
specialised region of the retina, composed entirely of cones.  Covering approximately 1º, the fovea is 
where  vision  is  sharpest,  and  colours  are  most  readily  seen.    Peripheral  to  the  fovea  the  retina  is 
composed  of  both  rods  and  cones;  the  ratio  of  rods  to  cones  increases,  and  visual  resolution 
decreases, with distance from the fovea. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
12.  As a result of this double mechanism for light appreciation, objects in dim light are best detected 
by  looking  'off-centre',  using  the  rods.    Furthermore,  to  maintain  dark  adaptation  it  used  to  be 
customary to wear red goggles in lighted crew rooms, and to use red cockpit lighting, since rods (unlike 
cones) are insensitive to the longer red wavelengths.  The advantages of preserving rod adaptation are 
limited,  as  few  flight  tasks  can  be  performed  with  rod  vision.  In most cases, the sharpness of vision 
given by the cones is imperative, and the disadvantages involved with red cockpit lighting systems in 
colour discrimination, the increased focusing effort required, and the distortion in the relative luminance 
of coloured objects, might outweigh any theoretical advantage. 
13.  A valuable feature of rod vision is its ability to detect movement as an image traverses the retina.  
It  is  useful,  therefore,  in  search  procedures at night, not to allow the rod image to stabilise within the 
range of involuntary eye movements, but to scan the area of search in small arcs, inducing a moving 
image of a stationary object on the retina. 
14.  Under good conditions, the eye can resolve detail which subtends a visual angle of 30 seconds of 
arc.  However, under some special circumstances, much finer resolution is possible.  A single line may 
be differentiated against a plain background when it subtends a visual angle as small as 0.5 seconds 
of arc.  This is more a measure of contrast than of resolution, but it is important in aviation, as aircraft 
or wires may first be sensed by their contrast against the sky. 
15.  There are many factors which may influence the resolution of the eye.  These include atmospheric 
conditions,  the  optical  quality  and  cleanliness  of  interposed  transparencies,  the  requirement  for 
spectacles, and eye disease.  The large pupillary diameters, which occur in near darkness, reduce the 
depth of field of the eye, rendering the decrement caused by the need for corrective spectacles more 
evident. 
16.  Recognition of targets is profoundly influenced by the inductive state of the retina.  One part of the 
retina  modifies  the  function  of  another  part.    This  is  known  as  'spatial  induction'.    In  aviation,  spatial 
induction  will  enhance  the  recognition  of  aircraft  against  the  sky.    The  bright  sky  diminishes  retinal 
sensitivity,  and  a  grey  aircraft  therefore  appears  darker,  with  a  consequent  increase  of  the  contrast 
between the target and the sky.  However, a stimulus on a portion of retina will also affect the function 
of that portion to a subsequent stimulus.  This is known as 'temporal induction’ and may reduce target 
recognition.  If a bright object, such as the sun, forms an image on a portion of the retina, the sensitivity 
of that portion will be depressed for a considerable period of time.  This may cause low contrast targets 
to remain unseen. 
17.  Visual  resolution  is  greatly  influenced  by  contrast  between  target  and  background,  and  by  the 
prevailing brightness of the target.  Sharpness improves with increasing luminance, up to a moderate 
level,  beyond  which  no  further  increase  occurs.    At  very  high  luminance,  sharpness  may  even  be 
impaired.    The  best  resolution  is  achieved  when  the  luminance of the target and the ambient lighting 
are  similar.    If  an  aviator  is  placed  in  a  dark  cockpit  with  only  a  small  window  on  the  world,  the 
resolution  of  bright  external  targets  will  suffer.    When  cockpit  illumination  is  increased,  resolution 
improves.  Conversely, resolution will be impaired with a bright cockpit and a dim target. 
18.  Colour  sense  is  a  function  of  cones,  and  therefore  of  photopic  (day)  vision.    According  to  the 
generally accepted theory of colour vision, there are three classes of cones present at the macula, in 
the  ratio  of  1:10:10.    These  cones  have  absorption  peaks  at  blue,  green,  and  red  in  the  colour 
spectrum.    A  combination  of  these  three  primary  colours,  in the correct proportions, is seen as white 
light.    By  varying  the  proportions  and  saturation  (subtraction  of  white  light),  any  other  colour  can  be 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
matched.    The  fovea  is  rod-free  and  possesses  few  blue  cones.    As  a  result,  if  signal  lights  may  be 
seen only as point sources, it is important not to use blue, which might be seen as white. 
Psychology of Vision 
19.  The  eyes  of  new-born  human  babies  can  take  in  light  for  processing  in  the  brain;  they  have  the 
sensation of seeing.  However, they are unable to interpret what they are seeing until some considerable 
time after birth.  The interpretative aspect of sight must be learned.  The learned ability to interpret visual 
stimuli is called 'perception'.  Thus visual sensation is innate whereas perception is learned. 
20.  Unfortunately,  because  the  brain  must  interpret  visual  stimuli  and  give  them  meaning  before  an 
object is perceived, any inadequacy of the stimulus can lead to faulty perceptions.  Humans do not see 
the world in the exactly same way as a camera can record it.  Perceptions tend to be inaccurate, often 
incomplete,  distorted  and  usually  influenced  by  highly  personalised  views  of  the  nature  of  the  world.  
Seeing what is expected (or wanted), rather than what is actually there, is common. 
21.  The  eye  is  a  not  a  particularly  good  optical  instrument, but the image that the brain perceives is 
remarkably  stable  and  has  excellent  definition.    The  brain  uses  a  number  of  methods  to  reduce  the 
confusion  of  sensation,  and  to  ensure  that  the  visualised  image  is  stable  and  consistent.    Some  of 
these methods are: 
a. 
Expectancy.    The brain depends on experience and memory to interpret the visual images 
presented  to  it.    The  process  by  which  memory  influences  perception  is  called  'expectancy'  - 
seeing what is expected.  An example of this would be missing out the second "the" in the phrase 
"A  bird  in  the  the  hand".    The  second  "the"  is  seen  physically,  but  not  perceived,  as  the  brain 
ignores it on the basis that there is normally only one "the" in this phrase. 
b. 
Perceptual Organization.  The brain arranges groups of objects into certain patterns which 
make  perception  easier.    An  example  of  how  this  is  exploited  in  aircraft  design  is  the  layout  of 
cockpit instruments.  These are so arranged that related instruments are placed together and are 
viewed as a whole, rather than individually. 
c. 
Size Constancy.  There is a memory store within the brain which relates known objects and 
their size.  Irrespective of the size of an image at the eye, the object is perceived at its known size.  
This phenomenon is exploited by artists who may include a familiar object (a human, a car, or a 
house, for instance) in a landscape picture to give the viewer a sense of scale. 
22.  Although  the  eye  uses  all  of  these  means  in  an  attempt  to  obtain  a  consistent  and  stable  visual 
picture,  it  can  still give incorrect information.  This occurs in some conditions of disorientation, where 
either  the  eye  misinterprets  the  correct  information  it is given, or it is given inappropriate information.  
This is discussed further in paragraph 47. 
23.  Perception Time.  Perception time is the elapsed time between the image of an object falling on the 
retina to focused central fixation and recognition.  For a familiar object, this may be of the order of a second.  
An unfamiliar object, viewed under adverse conditions, will have an extended perception time.  This intrinsic 
delay is important when considering hazard avoidance or ground target detection. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
Visual Function in Flight 
24.  There are several visual problems which are specific to aviation.  These are outlined below: 
a. 
Empty  Field  Myopia  and  Night  Myopia.    During  flight,  particularly at night or in cloud, the 
external  scene  is  often  featureless.    Without  visual  cues  to  attract  attention,  the  eye  frequently 
comes  to  focus  at  a  point  in  space,  one  or  two  metres  distant,  making  the  aviator  functionally 
short-sighted.  If another aircraft enters the visual field, it might not be seen, as objects at infinity 
would be blurred.  For this reason, it is important that aircrew periodically look at objects at virtual 
infinity, such as wing tips or head-up display symbols, in order to extend their focus. 
b. 
Perception Time in High Speed Flight.  Large distances may be travelled during the time 
taken  to  perceive  and  react  to  objects  appearing  in  the  visual  field.    This  problem  may  become 
critical in the high-speed, low-level role, especially when vibration may increase pilot stress.  Table 
1  lists  the  estimated  times  required  for  the  various  operations  from  an  image  falling  on  the 
peripheral retina to perception, reaction and the finish of aircraft manoeuvre.  It is not possible to 
reduce these periods and, indeed, they may be extended under adverse conditions.  When a pilot 
transfers  attention  from  scanning  the  external  field  to  reading  an  instrument  and  returns  to  the 
external  field,  there  is  a  time  interval  of  up  to  2.5  seconds,  during  which  time  the  aircraft  might 
cover  a  considerable  distance.    This  is  why  vital  information  is  often  presented  with  a  head-up 
display,  in  order  that  attention  need  not  be  removed  from  the  external  scene.    Important 
instruments are designed, sited and illuminated so that the information they give may be extracted 
rapidly. 
Table 1 Distance Travelled by an Aircraft whilst the Pilot is Perceiving and Reacting to an 
Object Approaching in the Visual Field 
Distance Travelled (nm) 
Elapsed 
by an Aircraft Flying at: 
Stage in Avoidance of an Object 
Time 
250 kt 
500 kt 
(seconds) 
(1)  Time taken from image first falling on peripheral retina to 
1.0 
0.07 
0.14 
focused central fixation and recognition. 
(2)  Time taken for decision and subsequent action. 
2.5 
0.17 
0.35 
(3)  Time taken for aircraft to change heading. 
1.5 
0.10 
0.21 
Total time elapsed 
5.0 
0.35 
0.70 
Note: The above distances must be doubled when two aircraft, travelling at the same 
speed, are on a head-on collision course. 
c. 
Dynamic Visual Acuity.  In the previous paragraphs, where visual resolution was discussed, 
it was assumed that the object of interest was stationary.  Where a target moves across the visual 
field, the eye must track it in order to maintain its image on the part of the retina which will give the 
sharpest  picture  (the  fovea).    The  ocular  pursuit  mechanism  is  capable  of  maintaining  steady 
fixation on a moving target where the angular velocity does not exceed a value of about 30º per 
second.    At  an  angular  velocity  of  about  40º  per  second,  visual  acuity  may  drop  to  half its static 
value, the decrement increasing further as angular velocity increases. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
d. 
Depth  Perception.    Both  binocular  and  monocular  cues  are  used  to  assess  depth.    The 
binocular  cues  of  accommodation  and  convergence  have  a  limited  value  at  the  visual  ranges 
important in aviation.  This limitation is largely due to the small distance between the two eyes of 
about  6  cm,  making  the  base  of  the  'rangefinder'  too  short.    These  binocular  cues  will  provide 
depth  information  at  up  to  one  kilometre.    Stereopsis,  which  is  produced  by  the  slightly  different 
images of the object falling on the fovea of the two eyes (due to the separation of the eyes), also 
gives some depth perception but only to 40 to 50 metres.  Monocular cues to depth perception are 
as follows: 
(1)  Parallax.    Head  movements  cause  targets  which  are  at  different  distances  from  the 
observer  to  move  in  opposite  directions  relative  to  each  other.    The  nearer  target  moves  in 
the reverse direction to the head movement. 
(2)  Perspective.  The property of converging parallels, such as runways and railway lines, 
allows us to reconstruct the relative distances of parts of a scene. 
(3)  Relative Size.  Objects of known size can, by virtue of the angle they subtend, provide 
information as to their distance from the observer. 
(4)  Relative Motion.  If two objects are moving at the same speed, parallel to the horizon (i.e. at 
right angles to the viewer’s line of sight), the angular velocity of the nearer will be greater than the 
angular  velocity  of  the  farther.    Since  angular  velocity  is  determined  by  the  object’s  velocity  and 
range, a knowledge of either would enable an estimate of the other to be made. 
(5)  Overlapping Contours.  An object which overlaps another must be closer than the other. 
(6)  Aerial  Perspective.    Objects  at  great  distances  appear  more  blue,  owing  to  the 
scattering  of  light  by  particles  in  the  atmosphere.    White  lights  may  appear  more  red  when 
seen  at  a  distance  because  the  red  component  is  less  subject  to  scatter  than  the  blue 
component.  This is a further reason to exclude blue signal lights in aviation. 
Visual Illusions 
25.  The most important illusions in flight are those associated with the vestibular apparatus; these illusions 
are dealt with later in this chapter.  Only those illusions which are purely visual are included here. 
26.  Autokinesis.    A  light,  such  as  a  star  or  aircraft  tail  light,  seen  against  a  black  background,  will, 
after  a  short  time  lapse,  appear  to  wander  in  different  directions.    These  apparent  movements  occur 
because the background does not provide sufficient information about the involuntary eye movements 
which are occur normally.  These eye movements are then interpreted as movements of the light. 
27.  Flicker.  The flicker produced by helicopter rotors has been found to cause epileptiform episodes.  
The problem arises when the frequency is between 5 and 20 Hz, being worst at 12 Hz.  Anti-collision 
strobe lighting systems, which are favoured for their conspicuity, have a flash frequency of around 60 
flashes per minute (ie 1 Hz) and are normally harmless. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
Vision Protection Devices in Military Aviation 
28.  In military aviation, vision has to be protected from several possible hazards.  These are outlined 
in the following paragraphs. 
29.  Solar Glare.  Glare from direct, reflected, or scattered sunlight causes discomfort and reduction in 
visual  sharpness.    In  transport  aircraft,  spectacles  suffice  to  overcome  the  problem,  but  in  high-
performance aircraft, where crews wear protective helmets, an adjustable tinted visor, integral with the 
helmet,  provides  protection  against  external  glare  and  gives  an  undiminished  view  of  the  flight 
instruments.  In the fully lowered position, the visor is capable of filtering all of the incoming light.  The 
amount  of  tint  in  the  spectacles,  or  visor,  is  chosen  to  be  a  reasonable  compromise  between 
attenuating  high  luminances,  without  producing  a  significant  visual  decrement.    The  tint  is  neutral,  in 
order  to  avoid  affecting  colour  discrimination,  particularly  the  recognition  of  red  warning  signals.    As 
discomfort from glare is eliminated, it is also necessary to attenuate blue light, and infra-red and ultra-
violet  radiation,  in  order  to  avoid  the  possibility  of  retinal  damage.    The  field  of  view  is  as  wide  as 
possible,  and  the  optical  and  physical  properties  conform  to  carefully  calculated  specifications.  
Unapproved sunglasses are unlikely to satisfy these requirements. 
30.  Protection  of  the  Face  against  Birdstrike.    The  hazard  of  birdstrike  is  always  present  during 
flight (during day or night) at low level.  The majority of birdstrikes in the UK occur below 500 ft AGL.   
The incidence of birdstrikes in low-level, high-speed flight is such that a strike in the cockpit area is not 
an uncommon emergency.  Ideally, cockpit transparencies should be strong enough to withstand bird 
impact, but the cost in weight may be prohibitive.  In the absence of other forms of protection, the use 
of a helmet-mounted visor made of a strong transparent material, such as polycarbonate, is essential.  
The  visor  protects  much  of  the  face  as  well as the eyes.  Tinted and clear visors are incorporated in 
current helmets to provide protection against both glare and birdstrike. 
31.  Blast  Protection.    During  a  high-speed  ejection,  the  head  is  exposed  to  high  aerodynamic  forces.  
These may damage the face and eyes.  With the visor lowered, the helmet, visor and mask are so integrated 
that they remain in place throughout the ejection and provide the necessary protection. 
32.  Canopy Fragmentation Devices.  With aircraft designs in which there is no reasonable certainty 
that the canopy would be clear of the aircraft before the ejection seat moved, explosive devices may be 
fitted  to  shatter  the  transparencies  and  permit  the  seat  and  occupant  to  pass  safely  through.    There 
have  been  a  number  of  occasions  in  which  lead  spatter  from  the  explosive  charges  has  caused 
superficial damage to the face and the eyes.  It is most unlikely that any such damage would result if 
the visor were lowered or the eyes closed at the time of ejection. 
33.  Lasers.  Lasers are devices which produce intense, coherent and collimated beams of monochromatic 
light,  usually  of  small  diameter.    The  energy  density  within  the  beam  decreases  slowly  with  increasing 
distance  from  the  laser.    The  eye  has  the  ability  to  focus  the  collimated  beam  of  some  lasers,  and  to 
concentrate  the  energy  into  small  image  sizes  on  the  retina.    Thus,  lasers  can  damage  eyes  at  a 
considerable  distance  from  the  source.    The  applications  of  lasers  in  military  aviation  include  ranging  and 
target  illumination.    Protection  is  best  provided  by  distance.    Codes  of  practice,  such  as  BS  EN  60825, 
JSP 390  and  STANAG  3606,  give  guidance  on  the  method  of  calculating  the  Nominal  Ocular  Hazard 
Distance (NOHD) – the distance within which the laser may be hazardous.  The calculation is based upon 
knowledge of the maximum safe corneal energy, or power density, for the particular laser system, together 
with the beam divergence and maximum output of that system.  Hazard distance will increase with the use of 
magnifying optical instruments, e.g. binoculars or telescopes, as a result of the greater amount of radiation 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
collected by the object glass.  The necessity for protection of pilots from their own lasers is debatable.  The 
presence of of a specular reflector in the range area, orientated normal to the beam, will be very unlikely; but 
should  a  reflector  be  present,  its  reflectivity  at  the  laser  wavelength  is  not  likely  to  be  high.    Where  it  is 
considered necessary, protection may be provided by goggles or visors with the requisite level of protection 
at  the  laser  wavelength.    In  military  operations,  one  of  the  most  frequently  encountered  lasers  is  the 
neodymium-yag  laser,  a  near-infrared  laser  operating  at  1064  nanometres.    This  laser  is  widely  used  in 
target  designators,  both  ground  and  air  based.    Its  beam  is  invisible,  and  operational  lasers  can  cause 
permanent  retinal  damage  at  distances  of  up  to  15  to  20 nm.    Because  of  its  widespread  use,  and  high 
potential for injury, visors and spectacles are available to protect against it. 
34.  Nuclear Flash.  The fireball resulting from a nuclear explosion is capable of producing direct and 
indirect flash blindness and, indeed, may cause eye damage.  By day, the small pupillary diameter and 
the  optical  blink  reflex  should  prevent  retinal  burns  from  direct  flash  at  distances  at  which  survival  is 
possible.  Similarly, indirect flash blindness, from scattered light within the atmosphere and the globe of 
the eye itself, does not pose a problem.  Temporary blindness from the image of the fireball is difficult 
to  avoid,  but  at  survival  distances,  the  irradiated  area  is  likely  to  be  small.    Even  in  the  worst  case, 
where the fireball is imaged on the macula, para-macula vision should allow all vital flight procedures to 
continue.    At night, when the pupil is dilated, the situation is much worse and indirect flash blindness 
may deprive the aviator of all useful vision for an unacceptably long time.  In short, protection against 
nuclear  flash  is  desirable  by  day,  but  vital  at  night.    Protection  devices  are  being  developed  for  this 
purpose. 
HEARING 
General 
35.  A good standard of hearing is important to aircrew because the recognition of auditory signals is an 
integral  part  of  their  tasks.    Audition  is  more  than  the  act  of  passive  listening,  and  involves  the 
interpretation  by  the  brain  of signals, often embedded in background noise.  The ear receives pressure 
variations,  or  sound  waves,  normally  through  the  air,  and  converts  these  into  neural  impulses.    For  the 
normal  adult,  the  frequency-range  of  vibrations  within  the  audible  spectrum  is  20  Hz  to  10,000  Hz, 
although the frequency limits of the ear can vary between 2 Hz and 20,000 Hz.  Within the audible range, 
the ear is most sensitive to frequencies between 750 Hz and 3,000 Hz. 
36.  The  function  of  the  hearing  apparatus  is  to  collect  sound  waves  and  convert  them  into  nerve 
impulses.  It consists of three main parts, the outer ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear, and is shown 
in  Fig  4.    The  eardrum  is  in  the  outer  wall  of  the  middle  ear  cavity,  separating  it  from  the  outer  ear.  
Sound  waves  are  collected  by  the  external  ear  and  directed  onto  the  eardrum,  which  vibrates.  
Attached  to  the  inner  surface  of  the  eardrum  is  a  system  of  three  small  bones,  lying  in  the  air-filled 
cavity of the middle ear, which condition the vibrations and transfers them to the fluid-filled inner ear.  
The air-filled cavity of the middle ear is vented via the Eustachian tube.  Temporary hearing loss can 
occur  when  there  is  a  pressure  difference  between  the  middle  and  outer  ear,  as  may  be  caused  by 
descent from altitude (see Volume 6, Chapter 4).  A common cold, respiratory infection, or severe hay 
fever  can  cause  the  Eustachian  tube  to  become  blocked.    A  climb  or  descent  in  this  condition  can 
result in rupture of the eardrum.  This is one reason for not flying with a cold.  It is the part of the inner 
ear, known as the 'cochlea', which transduces vibrations into nerve impulses, essentially performing an 
analysis of sound by frequency. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 9 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
6-6 Fig 4 The Human Ear 
Inner Ear
Bony Wall
Cochlea
Nerve
External Canal
Ear
Middle
Drum
Ear 
Cavity
Eustachian
Tube
37.  More  than  1%  of  the  total  power  output  of  a  jet  engine  is  in  the  form  of  noise,  ranging  from  the 
lower  limits  of  audibility  to  ultrasonic  oscillations.    Sound  intensity  is  measured  in  decibels  (dB)  (a 
logarithmic  unit  of  the  ratio  of  the  measured  sound  intensity  to  a  reference  sound  intensity).    A 
logarithmic formula is used to avoid an excessively large scale, since the range of responsiveness of 
the  human  ear  is  very  wide.    The  noise  levels  in  decibels  of  certain  familiar  sounds  are  given  in 
Table 2.  Note that an increase of 3 dB represents a doubling of sound intensity. 
Table 2 Noise Levels of Familiar Sounds 
140
Turbojet at 50ft.
Jet Takeoff at 50 ft.
120
Inside Low Level Fighter
Large Jet Landing at 50ft.
Inside Helicopter
100
Pneumatic Drill
ls
e
80
ib
c
e
Street Corner Traffic
D
Normal Speech at 3ft.
in
ity
s
60
Office
n
te
Living Room
In
40
Library
20
Broadcasting Studio
0
Reference Value
38.  Intense sounds or noise can induce temporary hearing loss and produce ringing in the ears when 
the  noise  ceases, although recovery from this is fairly rapid.  The extent of temporary hearing loss is 
related  to  the  frequency  of  the  sounds,  their  intensity  and  duration.    The  reduction  in  sensitivity  is  at 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 10 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
frequencies higher than those of the stimulating noise.  A noise at one intensity will produce the same 
temporary loss of hearing as another noise at double the intensity, if the duration of the former sound is 
double  that  of  the  latter.    Noise-induced  loss  is  not  normally  induced  by  sounds  at  below  80 dB.    If 
noise  levels  which  induce  temporary  hearing  loss  are  experienced  regularly  over  a  period  of  years, 
then  permanent  loss  of  hearing  is  likely.    Permanent  loss  of  hearing  is  observed  first  at  the  higher 
frequencies,  with  a  pronounced  loss  at  4,000  Hz.    Permanent  loss  of  hearing  can  be  allayed  by 
keeping the noise dose within specific limits.  Very intense sounds can invoke special responses even 
in a short time.  At 120 dB, localised discomfort in the ear is experienced, 140 dB produces pain in the 
ear and the eardrum may be ruptured at levels above 160 dB. 
39.  Sounds  and  voices  are  normally  perceived  within  a  background  of  unwanted  noise.    Sounds  of 
similar  frequencies  interfere  and  make  hearing  difficult.    To  offset  the  effects  of  this  masking,  it  is 
necessary to have the signal at a greater intensity than the background noise.  A difference of 15 dB 
will ensure accurate recognition and, as the difference increases, so will accuracy of recognition.  It is 
possible to mitigate the effect of a poor signal to noise ratio – hearing in a noisy environment – by using 
familiar, meaningful and predictable signals or words. 
40.  The noise inside a jet aircraft is generated by four sources: 
a. 
Environmental control systems (pressurisation) and communications. 
b. 
Boundary layer noise, at higher IAS. 
c. 
Engine exhaust, although this is often inaudible over the pressurisation. 
d. 
Special sources, such as armament discharge. 
These four sources combine to produce different noise pictures for different aircraft types.  The fast jet will 
show a flat noise spectrum, with a high proportion of boundary-layer noise, whereas a helicopter will show 
high  noise  at  the  low  frequencies  because  of  the  rotor  and  blade  mechanisms.    The  wearing  of  properly 
fitting  headgear  is  very  important  because  helmets,  with  their  ear  cups,  can  attenuate  impinging  noise 
considerably.    Wearing  earplugs  within  the  ear  cups  further  attenuates  noise,  although  they  tend  also  to 
reduce the audibility of intercom and radio.  Increasingly aircrew are being issued with fitted ear plugs with 
self-contained  communication  speakers  but  active  noise  reduction  measures  are  being  considered  in 
addition to the usual helmet ear cup protection, owing to new industrial noise protection standards and their 
strict  enforcement.    These  standards  will  mean  that  more  effective  noise  protection  mechanisms  will  be 
required  to  provide  adequate  protection  in  some  aircraft,  as  well  as  for  many  carrying  out  roles  on  the 
ground.    Minimising  noise  levels  not  only  safeguards  hearing  but  also  reduces  the  stress  caused  by  high 
noise  levels.    Work  in high noise levels increases fatigue, irritation and an accompanying risk of accident, 
although there are wide differences in the stress reaction of individuals to noise. 
41.  People not directly involved in aviation are most likely to be disrupted by aircraft noise, so it is important 
that  as  much  of  the  ground  running  of  aircraft  as  is  possible  is  done  away  from  buildings  housing  such 
personnel.  Additionally, it is advantageous to protect buildings in aircraft movement areas by such means as 
double-glazing of windows.  Individuals who, by nature of their work, are required to be in high noise areas 
must be suitably protected by means of personal noise-excluding ear protectors. 
THE SENSE OF BALANCE 
General 
42.  The  constant  barrage  of  information  coming  from  the  specialised  organs  of  balance  in  the  inner 
ear, which signal movement of the head and its orientation (attitude) to the Earth’s gravitational force, 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 11 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
goes  mostly  unnoticed,  unlike  sight  or  sound.    It  is  only  when  these  sense  organs  are  stimulated  by 
unusual patterns of linear or angular motion, as in flight, or when their function is disturbed by disease, 
that the signals from these receptors give rise to disturbing sensations. 
The Vestibular Apparatus 
43.  The inner ear is made up of the cochlea (the organ of hearing) and the vestibular apparatus (the 
organ of balance).  The labyrinthine structure of the vestibular apparatus is shown diagrammatically in 
Fig 5.  It consists of three thin-walled tubes – the semicircular canals, disposed in planes approximately 
at  right  angles  to  each  other.    These  communicate  with  sac-like  structures  called  the  'otolith'  organs 
('utricle' and 'saccule').  The whole system is filled with fluid and is tethered within a bony cavity at the 
base  of  the  skull.    The  vestibular  apparatus  on  one  side of the head is a mirror image of that on the 
other. 
a. 
Semicircular Canals – Transduction of Angular Acceleration.  In each semicircular canal, 
there is a swelling where the sensory cells are located.  Sensory hairs from these cells pass into 
the  substance  of  a  gelatinous  flap  (the  'cupula')  which  lies  across  the  bulge  (or  'ampulla')  of  the 
canal  (see  Fig 6).    An  angular  acceleration  in  the  plane  of  the  canal  causes  a  deflection  of  the 
flap, because its motion is resisted by the inertia of the ring of fluid.  Deflection of the flap bends 
the  sensory  hairs  and  produces  a  corresponding  alteration  of  the  neural  signal  which  is 
transmitted  to  the  brain.    The  flap  has  the  same  density  as  the  fluid  in  the  canal,  so  it  is  not 
deflected by linear accelerations. 
6-6 Fig 5 The Vestibular Apparatus 
Semicircular
Canal
Utricle
Vestibular Nerve to Brain
Auditory
Nerve
Saccule
Cochlea
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 12 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
6-6 Fig 6 Section of Semicircular Canal 
Nerve Transmitting
Sensory Cells
Signals from Sensory 
Cells to Brain
Flap (Cupula)
(Deflected)
Ampula
Flap (Cupula)
Utricle
(Rest Position)
Angular
Acceleration
of Skull
Membranous
Motion of
Tube
Fluid Relative
to Skull
b. 
Otolith Organs – Transduction of Linear Acceleration.  Each otolith organs houses a plate-
like congregation of sensory hair cells, covered by a gelatinous layer that carries in its free surface a 
'frosting' of calcium carbonate crystals (see Fig 7).  The density of this mineral is more than twice that 
of the fluid which fills the system, so it behaves as an inertial mass, restrained and supported by the 
hairs of the sensory cells.  Accordingly, a linear acceleration, acting in the plane of the otolithic plate, 
deflects the hairs and alters the neural signal from the sensory cells.  The otolithic plate, unlike the 
cupula of the semicircular canal, is not heavily damped, so it conveys information to the brain about 
the  magnitude  and  direction  of  linear  accelerations,  and  rate  of  change  acceleration  (jerk), 
experienced  by  the  head.    Like  any  man-made  linear  accelerometer,  the  otolith  organs  are 
influenced both by their orientation to the Earth’s gravitational acceleration (the gravitational vertical) 
and by applied linear accelerations and, like the ball in the turn and slip indicator, they indicate the 
direction of the resultant force vector.  The configuration of the four otolith organs allows the direction 
and magnitude of resultant linear accelerations in any axis to be sensed. 
6-6 Fig 7 Section of an Otolith Organ 
Calcium Carbonate
Crystals of Otolithic
Membrane
Gelatinous
Fluid
Substance
Hairs of 
Sensory
Nerve Fibres
General 
Sensory Cells
Cells
Leading to Brain
View
Enlarged Cross Section
Orientation on the Ground and in the Air 
44.  The ability of humans to determine their position, attitude and motion (ie spatial orientation), with 
respect  to  a  reference  system  provided  by  the  Earth’s  surface  and  the  gravitational  vertical,  is 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 13 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
dependent  upon  sensory  information  provided  by  the  eyes,  by  the  organs  of  balance  and  by  other 
receptors in the skin, joints and muscles which are stimulated by forces acting upon them (Fig 8). 
6-6 Fig 8 Orientation 
Sensory Receptors
Perception
Orientation of
Of Eyes
Head and Body in
Space (Earth Ref)
Orientation of
Integration and Interpretation
Head and Body
Of Inner Ear
of Signals Based on
relative to own
Past Experience and Expectancy
Aircraft and/or
other  Aircraft
Orientation of
Of Skin, Joints
Aircraft in Space
Supporting Tissues
(Earth Ref) and/
or relative to 
other Aircraft
a. 
The Eyes.  Both on the ground and in the air, the visual sense is pre-eminent, for it provides 
a wealth of information about position, attitude and movement of the head in relation to the fixed 
external environment.  Even when external visual references are absent, as when flying in cloud, 
the only reliable information is visual, and comes in symbolic form from the flight instruments. 
b. 
Other  Sensory  Systems.    On  the  ground,  balance  and  orientation  to  gravity  can  be 
maintained in the absence of vision because of information provided by the vestibular apparatus, 
and  by  the  more  widely  distributed  pressure  and  movement  receptors  located  in  the  skin, 
muscles, capsules of joints and supporting tissues.  The dynamic range (sensitivity and frequency 
response)  of  these  receptor  systems  is  nicely  matched  to  the  angular  and  linear  motion  stimuli 
which  occur  during  normal  activities,  (like  walking  and  running)  in  a  stable  normogravic  (1g) 
environment.  However, in the flight environment the body can be exposed to patterns of angular 
and  linear  motion  which  are  outside  the  functional  range  of  these  non-visual  sensory  systems.  
Consequently,  they  may  either  fail  to  give  adequate  information,  or  they  may  give  erroneous 
information  and  lead  to  disorientation.    Without  visual  cues,  sustained  manual  control  of  the 
attitude and flight path of an aircraft is impossible.  Despite these inadequacies, the vestibular and 
other  acceleration-sensitive  receptors  do  provide  the  aviator  with  information  about  the  onset  of 
motion  that  can  aid  aircraft  control,  because  the  movement  is  sensed  with  less  delay  than  the 
change of position of an external visual reference or an instrument display. 
Spatial Disorientation in Flight 
45.  There are several reasons why the task of maintaining correct spatial orientation in flight is more 
difficult than when on the ground.  These may be summarised as follows: 
a. 
In flight, angular and linear motions differ in intensity and duration from that to which humans 
are functionally adapted. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 14 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
b. 
The  aircraft  operates,  and  has  to  be  controlled  in,  six  degrees  of  freedom  (3  linear  and 
3 angular).    On  the  ground,  there  are  normally  only  five  degrees  of  freedom,  and  a  stable 
reference. 
c. 
The  appearance  of  the  external  visual  world  can  be  difficult  to  interpret,  especially  when 
visual cues are sparse or unfamiliar. 
d. 
When instrument references are employed, the cues are symbolic and separate; integration 
and  interpretation  of  such  information  is  more  demanding  than  when  unambiguous  visual 
references are employed.  For example, a glance at the visual horizon frequently enables a pilot to 
assess  the  attitude  of  the  aircraft  in  all  three  planes.    However,  two  separate  instruments  are 
needed  (the  attitude  indicator  for  pitch  and  roll,  and  the  turn  needle  for  yaw)  to  obtain  the  same 
information when the visual horizon is obscured. 
46.  False  sensations  (or  perceptions)  of  attitude,  position,  or  motion  are  a  common  experience  of 
flying  personnel,  and  are  a  quite  normal  manifestation  of  the  limitations  of  sensory  function  and 
information processing.  Usually, the aviator is aware that the sensation being experienced is false (i.e. 
it is illusory), because it is contradicted by correct information about aircraft orientation provided by the 
flight instruments; this is termed Type 2 Spatial Disorientation.  Rarer, though much more serious, are 
those  incidents  in  which  the  pilot  is  not  aware that the sensations are incorrect, and bases control of 
the  aircraft  on  a  false  perception  (termed  Type  1  Spatial  Disorientation).    This  implies  that  control  is 
lost, or at least inappropriate, and so flight safety is jeopardised. 
47.  Many  different  kinds  of  erroneous  sensation  or  perception,  falling  within  the  broad  definition  of 
spatial  disorientation,  have  been  reported,  and  there  are  numerous  causes.    Some  of  the  more 
common types of disorientation are described and explained below. 
a. 
Failure  to  Sense  Changes  in  Aircraft  Orientation.    Changes  in  aircraft  attitude  and  flight 
path can occur which are below the threshold detection level of the non-visual sensory systems.  
Thresholds  are  dependent  upon  the  intensity  and  duration  of  the  motion  stimulus.    When  the 
changes  are  prolonged,  ie  more  than  20  seconds,  then  acceleration  is  the  important  variable.  
Average  figures  are  0.3º/sec2  for  an  angular  movement  and  0.1  m/sec2  (0.0l  g)  for  a  linear 
movement.  When the movement is more transient, ie 10 seconds or less, detection is determined 
by the change in velocity that occurs; typical values are 1.5º/sec for angular motion and 0.3 m/sec 
for  linear  motion.    These  figures  come  from  laboratory  studies,  in  which  the  subject’s  task  was 
only to detect motion.  In flight, many other factors and sensory stimuli compete for the aviator’s 
attention, and so changes in attitude or velocity substantially greater than these 'threshold' values 
can occur without being detected.  In the absence of a visual reference, aircrew can, on occasion, 
be quite unaware of an extreme change in attitude. 
b. 
False Sensations of Angular Motion.  False sensations of angular motion are caused by: 
(1)  Sustained  Rotation.    In  general,  misleading  sensations  of  angular  motion  are  due  to 
dynamic  limitations  of  the  semicircular  canals  which,  as  noted  earlier,  are  imperfect 
transducers  of  angular  velocity.    The  time  constant  of  the  leaky  integration  of  angular 
acceleration is about 5 to 10 seconds.  Thus, at the beginning of a rotational movement (such 
as  a  turn  or  a  spin),  the  change  in  angular  velocity  is  correctly  transduced,  provided  it 
exceeds the threshold value.  However, once a steady rate of turn is achieved, and there is 
no  longer  any  angular  acceleration,  the  deflected  flaps  of  the  canals  in  the  plane  of  the 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 15 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
motion slowly return to their rest position and the associated sensation of turn dies away (see 
Fig  9).    Provided  there  is  no  appreciable  change  in  angular  velocity,  the  turn  can  continue 
without  any  sensation  of  turn  being  evoked.    Recovery  from  the  turn  is  associated  with  an 
angular  acceleration  in  the  opposite  direction  to  that  on  entering  the  turn.    The  cupulae  are 
deflected from their rest position and will erroneously signal rotation in the opposite direction, 
at a rate commensurate with the change in velocity that has occurred.  This false sensation 
decays  somewhat  more  quickly  than  the  decay  of  the  correct  sensation  during  the  initial 
phase of the turn but, whilst this is happening, the presence of inappropriate eye movements, 
induced  by  the  vestibular  stimulus,  can  degrade  vision  and  impair  the  pilot’s  only  reliable 
source  of  information.    The  intensity  of  these  post-rotational  effects  is  a  function  of  the 
duration  of  the  rotational  manoeuvre  and  of  the  angular  velocity  achieved;  accordingly, 
disorientation is most likely to be a problem on recovery from prolonged, high-rate rolling or 
spinning manoeuvres. 
6-6 Fig 9 False Sensations of Angular Motion 
Right
100
Angular
Velocity
0
+100
Flap
(Cupula)
Deflection
Sensation : Turning Left
0
Arbitrary
Sensation : Turning Right
Units
-100
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Time (sec)
(2)  Cross-coupled Stimulation.  Cross-coupled stimulation of the semicircular canals occurs 
whenever  an  angular  movement  of  the  head  is  made  while  rotating  about  another  axis.  
However, disorientating sensations are evoked only when rotation is prolonged and semicircular 
canals do not signal correctly the sustained turn.  For example, if the pilot’s head is moved in 
pitch at the beginning of a prolonged spin, the sensation of both head and aircraft motion will be 
correct.    However,  if  the  same  head  movement  is  made  15  to  20  seconds  into  the  spin,  the 
head  movement  will  elicit  an  entirely  illusory  sensation  of  rotation  in  roll.    Head  movements 
made  during  the  recovery  phase  cause  even  stronger  and  more  bizarre  sensations.    As  a 
general  rule,  a  head  movement  made  in  one  axis,  after  rotating  for  some  time  about  an 
orthogonal axis, produces an illusory sensation in the third orthogonal axis. 
(3)  Middle  Ear  Pressure  Change  (Pressure  Vertigo).   The semicircular canals may also 
be stimulated by changes of pressure in the middle ear.  Characteristically, on the first rapid 
ascent of a sortie, there is a sudden onset of a false sensation of turning (ie vertigo), which is 
associated with the venting of air from the middle ear.  This disorientating sensation usually 
dies  away  within  15  to  20  seconds,  although  initially  it  can  be  quite  intense,  and  be 
accompanied  by  blurring  of  vision  and  apparent  movement  of  the  visual  scene.    The  same 
symptoms  may  also  be  produced  if  an  over-pressure  in  a  middle  ear  is  achieved  when  the 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 16 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
ears are 'cleared' by a too forceful 'Valsalva' manoeuvre.  Usually, the disability is associated 
with impaired middle ear ventilation, due to a common cold or other respiratory tract infection, 
and it is another reason for not flying when affected by these common ailments. 
 (4)  Effect  of  Alcohol.   Alcohol modifies vestibular function and increases the likelihood of 
disorientation.  The vertigo which accompanies a change in position of the head with respect 
to  gravity  is  the  best-known  effect  of  alcohol.    However,  it  is  not  generally  appreciated  that 
such  a  'positional  vertigo'  can  be  induced  many  hours  after  the  blood  alcohol  level  has 
returned  to  zero.    While  in  the  presence  of  high  g  forces,  the  abnormal  response  may  be 
elicited for up to two days after the consumption of alcohol.  Alcohol, and certain other drugs, 
also  tends  to  increase  the  visual  disturbances  produced  by  erroneous  semicircular  canal 
signals,  as,  for  example,  on  recovery  from  a prolonged spin.  Normally, these inappropriate 
eye  movements  are  suppressed  within  a  few  seconds  (2  to  5)  but,  when  intoxicated,  the 
ability  to  suppress  the  movements  is  impaired,  so  vision  may  be  blurred  for  a  substantially 
longer  time  (15 to 20  seconds).    This  increase  of  eye  movement  occurs  at  quite  low  blood 
alcohol  levels  (10 to 20  mg/100  ml)  though,  unlike  the  positional  vertigo,  it  does  not  persist 
after the blood alcohol has returned to zero. 
c. 
Misleading Attitude Sensations – Terminology
(1)  Sustained  Linear  Accelerations  –  Somatogravic  Illusion.    In  the  presence  of  the 
constant acceleration of Earth’s gravity, the otolith organs, and the other gravitational indicators, 
provide  information  which  allows  the  orientation  of  the  head  and  body  to  be  sensed  with 
accuracy.  Furthermore, the brain is able to distinguish changes of attitude from transient linear 
accelerations.    However,  perceptual  errors  arise  when  the  imposed  linear  acceleration  or 
deceleration is sustained, as in an aircraft when power is applied, or dive brakes are operated 
(see Fig 10a-c).  In such circumstances, the resultant of the imposed acceleration and gravity is 
accepted  as  the  vertical  reference,  so  there  is  an  erroneous  perception  of  attitude  which 
increases  the  longer  the  acceleration  is  sustained.    The  false  sensation  of  pitch-up  on 
accelerating  is  the  more  serious,  for  if  a  pitch-down  corrective  response  is  made,  the  radial 
acceleration  of  the  induced  bunt  causes  a  larger  deviation  of  the  resultant  vector,  and  the 
illusion is intensified.  Likewise, the failure to sense accurately the angle of bank during a turn is 
also  due  to  the  resultant  of  the  radial  and  gravitational  accelerations  being  accepted  as  the 
vertical;  for  in  a  co-ordinated  turn,  the  resultant  vector  remains  normal  to  the  aircraft’s 
longitudinal axis and aligned with the long axis of the pilot’s head and body (see Fig 10d). 
(2)  The  Leans.    A  false  sensation  of  roll  attitude  is  one  of  the  commonest  illusions 
experienced  by  aircrew.    It  usually  occurs  on  recovery  from  a  prolonged  turn,  or  from  a 
previously undetected banked attitude, to straight and level flight.  In both of these conditions, 
the affected aviator feels that the aircraft is straight and level before it rolls out.  The change 
in  bank  on  roll  out  is  made  within  a  few  seconds  and  is  sensed  by  the semicircular canals.  
This vestibular information is interpreted as roll from the wings-level attitude to one of bank in 
a direction opposite to that which existed before recovery was initiated.  The curious feature 
of 'the leans' is that it may persist for many minutes, even though instruments indicate level 
flight.  Characteristically, the illusion disappears as soon as an unambiguous external visual 
reference is present. 
(3)  Effect of Head Movement.  The disorientating sensations produced when head movements 
are made in a turning aircraft are not solely due to a cross-coupled stimulation of the semicircular 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 17 of 24 







AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
canals.  The presence of a linear acceleration greater than 1g means that the otoliths will also be 
stimulated  in  an  atypical  manner  when  the  head  is  moved.    The  principal  effect  on  moving  the 
head  under  high  g  is  to  generate  an  otolithic  signal,  which  corresponds  to  a  greater  change  in 
attitude,  relative  to  the  acceleration  vector,  than  has  actually  occurred.    The  semicircular  canals 
and receptors in the neck signal the angular movement of the head with little error, and so there is 
a mismatch which is interpreted as a change of attitude of the aircraft in the plane and direction of 
the  head  movement.   At higher accelerations (5 to 6g), a sensation of tumbling, as well as of a 
change in attitude, can accompany the head movement.  In high performance aircraft, appreciable 
g forces are developed at low rates of turn.  As the angular rates are close to the threshold for the 
semicircular canals, the intensity of the cross-coupled stimulus accompanying the head movement 
is  insignificant,  and  so  any  disorientating  sensations  are  most  probably  caused  by  otolithic 
mechanisms. 
6-6 Fig 10 Misleading Attitude Sensations 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 18 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
(4)  Somatogyral Illusion.  The name 'somatogyral' is derived from 'soma' (meaning body) 
and  'gyral'  (meaning  turning).    The  illusion  is  a  false  sense  of  rotation  which  persists  after 
rotation  has  stopped.    The  false  sensation  of  rotation  is  felt  in  the  opposite  direction  to  the 
original rotation.  This may occur after spin recovery, when a powerful sensation of rotation in 
the opposite direction can develop, particularly if spin recovery occurs in cloud or at night. 
(5)  Coriolis Illusion.  The coriolis illusion can cause an intense, unpleasant sensation of rotation.  
It is caused by head movements during sustained rotation.  Consider rotation in the yaw plane.  If 
the  head  is  moved  to  look  down,  one  canal  will  be  taken out of the plane of rotation, giving it a 
deceleration stimulus, while another canal will enter the plane of rotation, giving it an acceleration 
stimulus.    The  result  is  an  illusory  sensation  of  rotation  which  can  be  intense  and  is  often 
associated  with  nausea.    The  illusion  can  be  avoided  by  minimising  head  movements  when 
undergoing significant angular acceleration.  Regrettably, aircraft manufacturers have not always 
understood this phenomenon and in some high-performance aircraft large head movements are 
required to locate frequently used instruments and switches. 
(6)  'G-Excess' Illusion.  The G excess illusion occurs as a result of head movements made 
in  an  abnormal  G  environment.    Under  increased  G,  the  response  of  the  otolith  is 
disproportionately high compared with information derived from visual cues and semi-circular 
canals.    The  illusion  may  be  one  of  rotation,  or  a  less  specific  sensation  of  disorientation 
which may be difficult to describe in terms of change in attitude and motion.  The sensation, 
nevertheless,  may  be  powerful,  particularly  when  the  head  is  moved  quickly.    Although  the 
exact nature of this illusion is controversial, it is suggested that looking up and into a turn can 
give the illusion of being under-banked and nose-up, resulting in an inappropriate over-bank 
and nose-down attitude. 
d. 
Errors  in  the  Perception  of  Visual  Cues.    Although  many of the disorientating sensations 
experienced  by  aircrew  are  caused  by  inadequate  vestibular  signals,  spatial  disorientation  may 
also arise because of errors or deficiencies in the aviator’s perception of visual cues. 
(1)  External  Visual  Cues.    Disorientation  is  likely  to  occur  when  the  pilot  attempts  to  use 
external visual cues, rather than referring to the instruments (both performance and attitude), 
in  those  conditions  where  visibility  is  impaired,  or  where  there is a paucity of external cues.  
During  flight  over  featureless  terrain,  such  as  sand  or  snow  or  over  a  waveless  sea, 
judgement  of  height  is  likely  to  be  difficult  or  misleading.    Similar  difficulties  arise  when 
attempting to maintain hover or to land on terrain which is poorly illuminated, or indicated by 
an inadequate array of lights, thus reducing visual references.  In addition, 'the leans' is often 
experienced when formation flying in cloud or in hazy conditions.  Even when visual cues are 
largely  unambiguous,  they  may  be  misinterpreted  because  they  differ  from  those  which  the 
aviator  expects  to  be  present.    One  example  is  the  use  of  a  cloud  top  as  a  horizontal 
reference.  Cloud tops are commonly horizontal, but on the rare occasion when they are not, 
this visual cue is erroneous and the pilot who accepts it will have a false perception of aircraft 
attitude.  Errors in the perception of height and distance also occur when ground features are 
not of the expected size.  These range from gross features, like the aspect ratio of a runway, 
to finer detail, such as the size of trees and shrubs, or even surface texture.  Less commonly, 
there  is  gross  misinterpretation  of  external  visual  cues;  the  acceptance  that  the  lights  of  a 
fishing fleet are stars and that the aircraft is in an inverted attitude, is an example. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 19 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
(2)  Instrument  Cues.    Errors  in  the  perception  of  the  symbolic  cues  displayed  by  the 
aircraft  instruments  are  occasionally  responsible  for  disorientation.    Instruments  can  fail, 
albeit  rarely,  without  any  indication  of  failure  being  represented  or  detected  by  the  aviator.  
More  common is the situation in which there is a breakdown of the normal instrument scan 
and  of  the  perceptual  integration  of  the  various  elements  of  the  head-up  or  head-down 
display.  Attention is focused on one instrument, to the exclusion of the others, and the pilot 
fails to obtain a comprehensive perception of the attitude and flight path of the aircraft.  This 
'coning of attention' is more likely to occur at times of high workload and high arousal, such 
as during an aircraft emergency. 
Prevention of Disorientation 
48.  Knowledge of the causes of spatial disorientation, and of the flight conditions in which it is likely to 
occur,  should  lead  either  to  the  avoidance  of  provocative  flight  environments  and  manoeuvres,  or, 
when this is impracticable, to the exercise of special care in such situations. 
49.  Illusory sensations are much more likely to be experienced, and to distract the pilot, when visual 
cues  are  inadequate.    Therefore,  a  high  degree  of  proficiency  at  instrument  flying  is  essential  if  the 
aviator  is  to  correctly  resolve  conflicting  sensory  cues  and  maintain  proper  control  of  the  aircraft.  
Proficiency, in this context, implies: 
a. 
A high standard of instrument flying. 
b. 
Being in current practice. 
c. 
Having an intimate knowledge of the specific aircraft, and relevant instrument procedures. 
50.  Any prolonged period of ground duty leads to a loss of skill in operating the aircraft and a heightened 
susceptibility  to  disorientating  sensations.    Aircrew  should,  therefore,  be  particularly  vigilant  on  return  to 
flying  duties  after a ground tour, when a properly planned and supervised period of refresher training is 
essential.  Even after a week or two without flying there is some loss of habituation to the motion stimuli of 
flight.  Accordingly, on return from leave it is desirable that the first flight should not be a demanding IMC 
sortie. 
51.  Advice on preventative measures may be summarised as follows: 
a. 
Do not allow control of the aircraft to be based at any time on 'seat of the pants' sensations, 
even when temporarily deprived of visual cues. 
b. 
Do not unnecessarily mix flying by instruments with flying by external visual cues. 
c. 
Aim to make an early transition to instruments in poor visibility; once on instruments, stay on 
instruments until external cues are unambiguous. 
d. 
Maintain a high proficiency at instrument flying. 
e. 
Avoid  unnecessary  manoeuvres  of  aircraft  or  head  movements  which  are  known  to  induce 
disorientation. 
f. 
Be particularly vigilant in high-risk situations in order to maintain intellectual command of the 
orientation and position of the aircraft.  These high-risk situations include: 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 20 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
(1)  Night flying. 
(2)  Flying in poor visibility. 
(3)  Landing at unfamiliar airfields. 
(4)  Flying when ground cues are obscured or absent such as with snow or sand. 
(5)  Flying in formation. 
(6)  Air-to-air refuelling, particularly in adverse weather conditions. 
g. 
Do not fly: 
(1)  With an upper respiratory tract infection. 
(2)  When under the influence of drugs or alcohol. 
(3)  When mentally or physically debilitated. 
h. 
After a period off flying, the first sortie should be a simple day VMC one. 
i. 
Remember, experience does not confer immunity. 
Coping with Disorientation 
52.  A  minor,  but  persistent,  disorientating  sensation,  such  as  the  Leans,  may  be  dispelled  by  a 
redirection  of  attention  to  other  aspects  of  the  flying  task,  provided  that  the  correct  orientation  of  the 
aircraft has been established, and instrument references have been cross-checked.  Some aircrew find 
that  a  quick  shake  of  the  head  is  effective,  although  it  is  important  that  such  head  manoeuvres  be 
made only when the aircraft is established in straight and level flight. 
53.  If  there  are  strong  illusory  sensations,  and  difficulty  in  establishing  orientation  and  control  of  the 
aircraft, the following procedures are recommended: 
a. 
Transfer  to  instruments  and  regain  straight  and  level  flight  with  the  power  set  for  cruise 
speed. 
b. 
Establish  a  selective  radial  scan  for  straight  and  level;  check  altitude  and  compare  with  the 
safety altitude. Climb above safety altitude if necessary. 
c. 
Avoid using external visual references until they are unambiguous; trust the instruments. 
d. 
Seek help if severe disorientation persists.  Consider handing control to another pilot on the 
flight deck; ensure that air traffic control is aware of your predicament.  Try to find better weather. 
e. 
If control cannot be regained, abandon the aircraft with safe ground clearance.  Do not leave 
it too late. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 21 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
Conclusion 
54.  Remember,  nearly  all  disorientation  is  a  normal  response  to  the  unnatural  environment  of  flight.  
Any  alarming  flight  incidents  should  be  discussed  with  colleagues,  including  the  Station  Medical 
Officer.    What  may  appear  to  have  been  an  unusual  experience  might  turn  out  to  have  been 
commonplace. 
AIR SICKNESS 
General 
55.  Air sickness, like other forms of motion sickness (e.g. car sickness, sea sickness or space sickness) is 
not  a  pathological  condition  but  is  the  normal  response  of  the  human  body  to  certain  motion  stimuli.  
Typically,  on  exposure  to  provocative  motion,  there  is  initially  a  slight  feeling  of  malaise,  then  nausea  of 
increasing severity and eventually, vomiting.  These symptoms are commonly accompanied by  feelings of 
warmth, sweating and pallor, and more variably, by headache, dizziness, increased salivation, drowsiness, 
apathy  or  depressed  mood.    This  collection  of  signs  and  symptoms  constitutes  the  motion  sickness 
syndrome and, if caused in flight by motion of the aircraft, is called 'airsickness'. 
Causal Mechanisms 
56.  Why humans react in this curious way on being exposed to particular motion stimuli is not known; 
there  is,  however,  a  reasonable  understanding  of  what  makes  them  'motion  sick',  and  why  certain 
types  of  motion  induce  sickness  while others do not.  The current concept is that individuals develop 
motion  sickness  when  the  various  sense  organs  that  signal  body  motion  provide  discordant 
information.    The  essential  feature  of  this  discord  is  a  mismatch  between  the  motion  information 
provided  by  the  eyes  and  the  inner  ear,  and  the  information  that  is  'expected'  by  the  central  nervous 
system (see Fig 11). 
6-6 Fig 11 Mismatch 
Stimuli (Input)
Receptors
Brain Mechanisms
Responses
(Output)
Neural
Updates Neural
Store
Store (Adaptation)
of
‘Expected
Signals’
Eyes
Neural
Mis-
Semi-
Centres
Motion
Motion
Match
Circular
Controlling
Comparator
Sickness
Stimuli
Canals
Signs &
Signal
Syndrome
Symptoms 
of Motion
Sickness
(Pallor,
Sweating,
Otoliths
Nausea,
Vomiting,
Drowsiness,
Apathy, etc.)
57.  Various types of 'mismatch' can be identified.  Most important is the mismatch of signals from the 
vestibular apparatus of the inner ear, in which the semicircular canals and the otoliths do not provide 
concordant information.  For example, when head movements are made in an aircraft which is turning, 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 22 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
both the semicircular canals and the otoliths can provide erroneous and incompatible signals which are 
likely  to  differ  substantially  from  those  generated  by  the  same  head  movement  in  a  normal  1g 
environment.    Likewise,  low  frequency  (below  0.5  Hz)  linear  accelerations  (such  as  occur  in  flight 
through turbulence, repeated high rate turns and aerobatic manoeuvres) can also generate conflicting 
vestibular signals, and hence be a potent cause of motion sickness. 
58.  The  mismatch  of  visual  and  vestibular  information  can  also  be  an  important  causal  factor.    For 
example,  personnel  who  cannot  see  out  of  the  aircraft  in  which  they  are  travelling  are  more  likely  to 
suffer  from  airsickness  than  those  with  a  good  external  visual  reference.    This  is  because,  in  those 
people without an external view, the motion sensed by the inertial receptors of the vestibular apparatus 
is not accompanied by any visual motion cues.  Sickness can also be induced by purely visual motion 
in the absence of any motion of the individual, as in some simulators which have a convincing external 
visual display but no motion of the simulator cockpit. 
59.  Anxiety,  and  the  presence  of  environmental  features,  such  as  the  smell  of  the  aircraft  or 
manoeuvres which have previously caused sickness, may increase susceptibility to motion sickness in 
some individuals.  However, in general these factors are of secondary importance. 
Factors Affecting Susceptibility 
60.  There  are  very  large  differences  between  individuals  in  their  response  to  provocative  motion 
stimuli.    Some  are  never  sick;  others  might  succumb  within  minutes  –  perhaps  on  exposure  to  only 
mild  turbulence;  only  those  without  a functioning vestibular system are truly immune.  There are also 
considerable  differences  in  the  way  people  adapt  to  repeated,  or  prolonged,  exposure  to  provocative 
motion, as well as differences in the retention of adaptation following exposure. 
61.  Air sickness is most likely to occur on initial exposure to an unfamiliar motion; thus it is seen most 
frequently  in  student  aircrew  during  the  initial  phases  of  flying  training,  with  recurrence  on  first 
experiencing the more provocative flight manoeuvres such as spinning, high-rate turns and aerobatics.  
With  continuing  flight  experience,  the  majority  of  students  adapt  and  air  sickness  is  no  longer  a 
problem.  However, a few do not develop protective adaptation, or are very slow to adapt, and training 
can be impaired by continuing sickness. 
62.  The retention of adaptation is also highly variable.  In a few individuals, it is lost within days; more 
commonly,  the  decay  of  adaptation  is  relatively  slow.    On  return  to  flying  (which  can  be  from  a 
fortnight’s  leave  to  a  ground  tour  lasting  years),  many  aircrew  find  that  their  tolerance  to  provocative 
motion  has  decreased.    Fortunately,  re-adaptation  usually  proceeds  more  rapidly  than  the  initial 
adaptation.    Adaptation  can  be  highly  specific:  it  is  not  uncommon  for  flying  personnel  who  have 
adapted to the motion of one type of aircraft to suffer from airsickness on transfer to another type with 
different  motion  characteristics.    Pilots  may  also  experience  malaise  when  flying  as  a  passenger  but 
not when they are in control of the aircraft. 
Prevention 
63.  Air  sickness  can  be  prevented,  or  at  least  the  onset  of  symptoms  delayed,  by  a  number  of 
methods; however, those available to aircrew are limited by operational constraints.  Head movement 
should be reduced to a minimum, and good restraint of the body ensured.  Provision of a good external 
visual reference is advantageous, as is involvement in a task, provided this does not involve additional 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 23 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-6 - Special Senses 
head movements or introduce conflicting visual cues (such as might happen when reading a book or 
map in turbulence). 
64.  A  number  of  drugs  increase  tolerance  to  provocative  motion,  though  there  are  considerable 
differences  between  individuals  in  the  efficacy  of  a  particular  drug  and  the  incidence  of  side  effects.  
Unfortunately, all of these drugs are sedative and can impair performance, so they should not be used 
by  pilots  when  in  command  of  an  aircraft,  or  by  other  aircrew  who  have  a  critical  role  to  play  during 
flight.    They  are,  however,  valuable  in  allaying  symptoms  in  passengers,  and  a  short  course  of  anti-
motion  sickness  drugs  can  help  student  aircrew  to  tolerate  aircraft  motion  while  acquiring  protective 
adaptation – Nature’s own cure. 
65.  No  medication  should  be  taken  by  aircrew  prior  to  flying  without  consultation  with  a  Military 
Aviation Medical Examiner (MAME).  If motion sickness persists, in spite of efforts by the aviator and 
medical staff to overcome it, referral to the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine for desensitisation training 
should be considered. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 24 of 24 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
CHAPTER 7 - THERMAL PHYSIOLOGY 
Introduction 
1. 
JSP 539 Version 2.2 - 'Climatic Illness and Injury in the Armed Forces: Force Protection and Initial 
Medical  Treatment'  provides  a  useful  reference  point  for  further  information  regarding  the  prevention 
and management of heat and cold injuries. 
THERMAL STRESS IN AVIATION 
General 
2. 
Thermal  stress  arises from an imbalance between an individual’s metabolic heat production and 
the  net  result  of  their  heat  exchange  with  their  environment.    Factors  influencing  the  latter  can  be 
divided into three main groups: 
a. 
Thermal Environment. Aircraft operate over a wide range of thermal environments meaning 
that,  for  much  of  the  time,  crews  are  directly  exposed  to  local  climatic  conditions.    This  is  also 
important during survival following a crash, ditching or ejection.  In-flight, cabin conditioning offers 
protection  from  the  outside  however  occupants  of  rotary  aircraft,  operating  with  the  doors  open, 
face the risk of heat or cold stress due to exposure to the external environment. 
b. 
Aircraft Factors.  Sources  of  heat  include  the  avionics  systems,  but  also  aerodynamic 
friction  associated  with  high-speed  flight.    With  an  effective  ECS  however  these  are  generally 
negated. 
c. 
Aircrew Factors.  Metabolic  heat  production  may  increase  by  two  to  three  times  during 
demanding flight activity when compared to sedentary levels.  For rear crew undertaking physical 
activity,  such  as  loading,  this  may  be  even  higher.    Vigorous  physical  exercise  may  raise 
metabolic  heat  production  by  up  to  25  times  more  than  at  rest.    Flying  clothing  as  well  as 
additional  protective  equipment,  such  as  helmets  and  body  armour,  will  generally  interfere  with 
heat loss processes increasing the thermal burden further. 
Human Heat Exchange 
3. 
Central  (core)  body  temperature  is  maintained  around  37  ºC  and  is  essential  for  proper  enzyme 
and  nerve  function.    Although  humans  can  cope  with  fluctuations  above  or  below  this  temperature, 
such  changes  can  affect  physical  and  mental  performance.    Regulation  of  core  body  temperature, 
otherwise  known  as  thermoregulation,  is  achieved  through  a  number  of  means  including  behavioural 
responses to temperature change, changes in blood flow to the core and skin, sweating and shivering. 
4. 
Heat can be gained from or lost to the environment through a number of processes, these being: 
a. 
Conduction.  This describes heat exchange between two solid surfaces in direct contact or at 
solid-fluid interfaces.  This is of particular importance following cold water immersion (e.g. following 
ejection  or  ditching)  as  water  conducts  heat  away  from  the  body  25  times  more  readily  than  air 
significantly  increasing  the  rate  of  cooling  of  core  body  temperature  and  the  onset of hypothermia.  
To  remain  comfortable  for  any  period  of  time  following  water  immersion,  the  water  temperature 
needs to remain around 34 to 35 ºC as cooling is inevitable at temperatures below this. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
b. 
Convection.  This is mass transfer of heat by movement within a fluid medium (normally air 
or  water)  where  molecules  retain  their  heat  energy  while  moving  within  the  confines  of  the 
medium.    In  hot  environments,  the  convective  effect  of  wind  will  help  to  cool  while  in  the  cold, 
leading to wind chill and an increased risk of cold injury.  Following water immersion, convection 
due  to  water  turbulence  in  a  sea  state  will  increase  the  rate  of  heat  loss  and  therefore 
hypothermia. 
c. 
Evaporation. When  water  evaporates  from  a  surface,  energy  is  absorbed  during  the 
transition from the liquid to the gaseous state.  This is how heat is lost through the evaporation of 
sweat  from  the  skin’s  surface.    When  the  ambient  temperature  exceeds  the  mean  skin 
temperature  (33  ºC)  the  evaporation  of  sweat  becomes  the  sole  means  of  heat  loss.    The 
presence  of  wind  will  increase  evaporation  thereby  adding  to  the  heat  loss  associated  with 
convection in a hot environment.  With increasing humidity, evaporation of sweat decreases and 
the risk of heat illness increases. 
d. 
Radiation
All  objects  possessing  heat  emit  thermal  radiation.    The  thermal  energy  from 
solar radiation can become trapped within an aircraft canopy resulting in the ‘greenhouse effect’. 
Thermal Effects of Clothing 
5. 
Aircrew  are  normally  clothed  in  multi-layer  clothing  with  warm  air  becoming  trapped  between 
layers  and  within  the  clothing  fibres  themselves  to  provide  insulation.    Ingress  of  water  or  wind  will 
reduce this insulation as will physical exertion that induces an exchange of air beneath the clothing with 
the ambient air, a phenomenon known as the ‘bellows effect’. 
6. 
Open-weave, highly permeable materials (e.g. knitted inner coverall) will trap air within the weave 
which is then heated by the body.  This insulation is soon lost however if exposed to wind which can 
easily penetrate the weave and replace the warm air with cooler air.  More impermeable materials may 
protect against this effect however have the disadvantage of trapping perspiration which then dampens 
insulating layers thereby reducing their insulating effect. 
HOT ENVIRONMENTS 
Effects of Heat 
7. 
Without  heat  loss  processes,  core  body  temperature  would  increase  by  about  1  ºC/hr  owing  to 
metabolic  heat  production.    There  are  a  number  of  effects  of  excessive  heat  on  the  human  body.  
Thermal discomfort may lead to distraction.  There is plenty of research on the association of dehydration 
and mental performance.  Some studies suggest an impairment of cognitive function at levels as low as 
2%  dehydration.    Levels  of  1  to  2%  dehydration  are  commonly  seen  in  aircrew  on  single  sorties.  
Dehydration will also lead to a reduction in sweating, in order to preserve fluid, which can further impair 
heat  loss.    Aerobic  performance  is  reduced  in  the  heat  and  even  mild  heat  stress  may  lead  to  a 
degradation in memory, attention and vigilance as well as reasoning and decision-making. 
Sunburn 
8. 
Even  milder  degrees  of  sunburn  can  cause  sufficient  damage  to  interfere  with  the  delivery  of 
sweat to the skin surface thereby compromising this route of heat loss. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
Heat Illness 
9. 
This  is  a  spectrum  of  illness  caused  by  a  rise  in  core  body  temperature.    Although  traditionally 
subdivided  into  heat  syncope,  heat  exhaustion  and  heat  stroke,  it  can  be  difficult  to  define  a  precise 
separation, except for heat stroke.  Most cases will occur in temperate climates. 
10.  There are several factors that may increase an individual’s risk of developing heat illness.  These 
include general health (e.g. obesity, poor physical fitness or nutrition), lifestyle (e.g. sleep deprivation, 
alcohol) and previous episodes of heat illness. 
Signs and Symptoms of Heat Illness 
11.  These depend on severity and include: 
a. 
Thirst 
b. 
Headache 
c. 
Dizziness 
d. 
Agitation 
e. 
Nausea and vomiting 
f. 
Weakness 
g. 
Poor coordination 
h. 
Staggering 
i. 
Confusion 
j. 
Collapse 
12.  Heat Stroke.  This  is  a  medical  emergency  and  has  a  high  mortality  rate  if  not  recognised  and 
treated  promptly.    Core  body  temperature  has  exceeded  40  ºC  and  the  individual  often  suddenly 
collapses,  convulses  or  becomes  delirious.    An  individual  with  heat  stroke  will  be  hot  but  dry,  rather 
than sweaty as seen with heat illness.  This is due to the cessation of sweating which means that the 
ability to control body temperature has been lost.   
13.  Treatment of Heat Illness.  Core body temperature is an unreliable guide to the severity of heat 
illness.  If heat illness is suspected the following actions should be carried out: 
a. 
Remove the casualty from the heat. 
b. 
Lay them down in the shade and raise their legs. 
c. 
Remove clothing, wet them down and fan them to encourage heat loss (‘strip, spray, fan’). 
d. 
Administer cool oral fluids (if conscious). 
e. 
Consider evacuation (even if apparent recovery). 
f. 
If  heat  stroke  is  suspected,  the  casualty  should  be  cooled  rapidly  by  whatever  means 
possible.  They should be immediately evacuated, and cooling measures should not be interrupted 
during their transfer for more definitive medical care. 
14.  Prevention Of Heat IllnessMost  cases  of  heat  illness  should  be  preventable  through  the 
application of simple measures.  These include:
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
a. 
Pre-deployment  Training.    A  6-week  pre-deployment  training  programme  incorporating  an 
initial 3 to 4 weeks to improve aerobic fitness.  This will reduce the time to acclimatisation. 
b. 
Risk  Assessment.    This  should  include  the  use  of  a  heat  stress  index  (e.g.  WBGT)  to 
determine  appropriate  levels  of  physical  activity  on  the  ground  in  order  to  minimise  the  risk  of 
developing heat stress.  This is of particular relevance to those new in theatre who may not have 
had time to fully acclimatise. 
c, 
Rest Periods
Fifteen  minutes  of  rest  during  every  hour  of  heat  exposure  has  been 
shown to dramatically reduce the incidence of exertional heat stress in the Israeli Defence Force. 
d. 
Water Discipline.  This is the most important factor in preventing heat illness.  As previously 
stated,  dehydration  leads  to  a  reduction  in  sweating  and  hence  heat  loss.    Thirst  should  not  be 
used as a guide to rehydration, appearing at approximately 2% dehydration.  Urine colour should 
be used as a guide to adequate fluid intake aiming to maintain a ‘straw-coloured’ urine.  Further 
guidance to water requirements can be found in JSP 539 Chapter 2 Annex B. 
e. 
Environment.  The period prior to takeoff or between sorties can be a critical time for aircrew 
with respect to heat stress.  Air-conditioned buildings and transport of aircrew to their aircraft will 
minimise  thermal  exposure.    Adequate  hydration  facilities  should  be  provided  to  prevent 
dehydration.  Aircraft should be parked out of direct sunlight or sun shades used with time spent 
‘in-cockpit’  on  the  ground  minimised  to  that  which  is  necessary.    Alternative crews may be used 
for pre-flight inspections. 
Acclimatisation 
15.  This process involves repeated exercise over a two-week period to raise and maintain an elevated 
core temperature for at least an hour each day.  It should ideally be carried out in-theatre although an 
alternative  would  be  to  acclimatise  in  conditions  that  replicate  the  theatre  environment  including 
elements  such  as  temperature,  humidity  etc.    Partial  acclimatisation  (approximately  75%)  is  normally 
achieved after about 8 days.  Full acclimatisation will generally be lost after spending 14 days or more 
in a cooler environment. 
16.  The purpose of acclimatisation is to make sweating more efficient.  An acclimatised individual will 
sweat  more  with  sweating  occurring  sooner  and  at  a  lower  skin  temperature  for  the  same  level  of 
activity when compared to an un-acclimatised individual.  Less salt will be lost in the sweat produced.  
Personnel  will  need  to  increase  their  water  intake  to  account  for  this  increased  sweating  during  the 
acclimatisation period. 
Clothing for Hot Conditions 
17.  The  requirements  of  aircrew  clothing  as  well  as  additional  protective  equipment  (e.g.  CBA)  and 
the need for cockpit integration means that military clothing assemblies may not meet the ideal design 
features  for  clothing  suitable  for  hot  conditions.    Where  practicable  however,  aircrew  can  minimise 
thermal burden by simple measures such as the removal of extra clothing layers or opening clothing to 
allow heat loss. 
18.  During  off-duty  periods,  aircrew  can  reduce  the  risk  of  heat  stress  through  the  use  of  clothing 
which is: 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
a. 
Lightweight and open-weave (to minimise insulation and facilitate heat loss). 
b. 
Light-coloured (to reflect radiant heat). 
c. 
Loose-fitting (to facilitate the ‘bellows effect’ of air exchange with movement). 
d. 
Absorbable (e.g. linen, cotton) and vapour-permeable (to facilitate evaporative heat loss). 
COLD ENVIRONMENTS 
Effects of Cold 
19.  Exposure  to  cold  conditions  in  the  absence  of  adequate  thermal  protection  may  result  in  either 
peripheral  cold  injury  or  hypothermia.    There  are  several  factors  that  may  influence  individual 
susceptibility, and these include ethnicity, health and lifestyle (e.g. physical fitness, nutrition, concurrent 
illness), inappropriate clothing and a history of cold-related problems. 
Wind Chill 
20.  Wind  cannot  lower  the  ambient  temperature  however  the  presence  of  wind  in  a  cold  setting  will 
make it feel colder than it is.  This is known as wind chill.  Table 1 shows the cooling effect of wind chill 
at different temperatures (SAT = still air temperature).  The equivalent chill temperature is the ambient 
temperature needed to produce the same effect on bare skin in the absence of wind.  The chart is of 
little use in predicting the time to hypothermia. 
Table 1 The Cooling Effect of Wind Chill 
Equivalent chill temperature (oC) 
SAT (oC) 

-1 
-7 
-12 
-18 
-23 
-29 
-34 
-40 
-46 


-1 
-7 
-12 
-18 
-23 
-29 
-34 
-40 
-46 


-4 
-12 
-15 
-21 
-26 
-32 
-37 
-43 
-48 
)
h
p

10 
-1 
-9 
-15 
-23 
-29 
-34 
-37 
-51 
-57 
-62 
 (m
d

15 
-4 
-12 
-21 
-29 
-34 
-43 
-51 
-57 
-65 
-73 
e
e
p

20 
-7 
-15 
-23 
-32 
-37 
-46 
-54 
-62 
-71 
-79 
 s
d
in

25 
-9 
-18 
-26 
-34 
-43 
-51 
-59 
-68 
-76 
-84 
 w
d

30 
-12 
-18 
-29 
-34 
-46 
-54 
-62 
-71 
-79 
-87 
re
u
s
a

35 
-12 
-21 
-29 
-37 
-46 
-54 
-62 
-73 
-82 
-90 
e
M

40 
-12 
-21 
-29 
-37 
-48 
-57 
-65 
-73 
-82 
-90 
Danger – risk of cold 
Freezing within one 
Freezing within 30 
injury 
minute 
seconds 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
Peripheral Cold Injury 
21.  Exposure  to  sub-zero  conditions  is  likely  to  result  in  freezing  cold  injury  (FCI)  commonly 
recognised as frostnip or frostbite.  Prolonged exposure to wet conditions in more temperate conditions 
is more likely to result in non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) e.g. immersion foot. 
a. 
Frostbite
This involves freezing of the tissues.  The term frostnip refers to brief freezing 
which  resolves  completely  within  30  minutes  of  re-warming.    An  early  symptom  of  frostbite  is 
numbness.  If appropriate action is not taken at this stage, frostbite will worsen leading to swelling 
and  blistering.    Tissue  loss  becomes  more  likely  with  deeper  progression.    Once  frostbite  has 
been recognised, the following steps should be taken: 
(1)  The  individual  should  be removed from the cold to prevent further progression and the 
affected  area  padded  to  prevent  further  injury.    Rubbing  or  applying  pressure  should  be 
avoided as these may worsen any tissue damage. 
(2)  In order to avoid increased tissue damage associated with thawing and re-freezing, re-
warming in field conditions should only be undertaken if evacuation is delayed.  Walking on a 
painless, frozen foot will cause less damage than attempts to walk on a thawing, painful one. 
(3)  The individual should be evacuated. 
b. 
Non-freezing Cold Injury (NFCI)
This may develop within hours when tissue is exposed 
to wet conditions in temperatures as mild as 5 to 10 ºC.  As the name suggests, there is no tissue 
freezing however NFCI can result in long term persistent pain and ‘cold sensitivity’ if unrecognised 
and  managed  appropriately.    Initial  treatment  involves  pain  relief  and  keeping  the  area  dry  and 
warm while awaiting further medical assessment. 
Hypothermia 
22.  Core  body  temperature  has  fallen  below  35  ºC  resulting  in  impaired  function  of  mental  and 
physical processes.  The severity of symptoms depends on the time hypothermia has taken to develop 
and  the  level  to  which  core  temperature  has  fallen.    At  a  core  temperature  of  around  28  ºC,  cardiac 
arrest is likely to occur. 
23.  The progressive signs and symptoms of hypothermia include: 
a. 
Feeling intensely cold, strong shivering 
b. 
Subtle changes e.g. tiredness 
c. 
Mental confusion, slurred speech 
d. 
Poor coordination 
e. 
Limb rigidity 
f. 
Reduced conscious level 
g. 
Death 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
24.  Initial Management of HypothermiaWhether  hypothermia  has  developed  slowly  (e.g.  survival 
on land) or more rapidly (e.g. water immersion), the priority is to reduce further heat loss and re-warm 
the  casualty.    On  land,  shelter  should  be  sought  or  erected.    At  sea,  the  priority  is  to  get  out  of  the 
water and into a life raft.
a. 
Wet  clothing  should  be  removed  and  replaced  with  dry  clothing,  if  available.    If  not,  wet 
clothes should be left on and covered with waterproof material and any available extra insulation.  
Warm,  sweet  drinks  should  be  administered  to  a  conscious  casualty.    Alcohol  has  no  place  in 
management as it increases skin blood flow and hence the risk of further heat loss. 
b. 
The  presence  of  shivering  indicates  that  hypothermia  is  likely  to  be  mild.    Once  core  body 
temperature has fallen below 32 ºC, indicating moderate or severe hypothermia, shivering stops.  
In  these  cases,  it  is  important  to  avoid  excessive  handling  or  rapid  re-warming  of  a  casualty  as 
this may precipitate irregular heart rhythms leading to cardiac arrest. 
Clothing for Cold Conditions 
27.  The aim is to achieve insulation by trapping warm air between clothing layers while excluding the 
ingress of wind and water.  The advantage of a layering system is that layers can be added or removed 
as dictated by environmental conditions and work requirements. 
28.  Windproof/Waterproof Layers.  Clothing insulation is reduced by 30% in a 9 mph wind therefore 
in  windy  conditions;  the  addition  of  an  external  windproof  outer  layer  will  serve  to  reduce  this 
convective  heat  loss.    A  waterproof  layer,  often  combined  with  wind  proofing,  will  protect  against  the 
50%  loss  of  insulation  that  can  be  seen  with  wetting of clothing.  ‘Breathable’ fabrics (e.g. Gore-Tex) 
are impermeable to water in liquid form however allow water vapour to pass through. 
29.  Head, Hands and Feet.  
The head, hands and feet present special problems in the cold.  Heat 
loss  from  the  head  can  exceed  50%  of  the  metabolic  heat  production.    Aircrew  generally  wear 
protective flying helmets but, as these may be lost when an aircraft is abandoned, survival kits should 
contain  additional  head  protection.    Footwear  should  be  designed  with  climatic  conditions  in  mind, 
providing  adequate  insulation  and  a  waterproof  layer.    Good  hand  protection  in  the  cold  is  generally 
incompatible  with  the  maintenance  of  sufficient  sensitivity  and  dexterity  so  a  compromise  must  be 
sought.  Mittens are best when the still air temperature falls below about -10 ºC. 
30.  Immersion Coveralls.  In itself, an immersion coverall does not provide insulation.  However, by 
preventing  the  ingress  of  water  following  water  immersion,  it  protects  the  insulation  provided  by 
underlying  clothing.    Although  it  will  delay  the  onset  of  hypothermia  it  is  not  designed  for  prolonged 
immersion however ‘buys time’ to get out of the water.  It will also provide protection against cold shock 
following entry into cold water.  Although there may be the temptation to alter the seals for comfort, this 
will compromise the watertight integrity of the coverall.  As little as a 500 ml leak into the coverall can 
reduce underlying insulation by 30%. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-7 - Thermal Physiology 
31.  A useful mnemonic for the desirable properties of clothing for cold weather is: 
Clean (so that it will not mat down or become greasy and so lose its insulating properties) 
Open weave 
Layered 
Dry 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
CHAPTER 8 - NOXIOUS SUBSTANCES IN AVIATION 
Introduction 
1. 
Noxious  substances  may  be  defined  as  those  which  are  capable  of  producing  a  temporary  or 
permanent adverse effect on an individual’s health, well-being, or performance.  They pose particular 
problems  in  aviation  since  even  a  minor  decrement  in  the  performance  of  aircrew  is  a  flight  safety 
hazard.    Moreover,  the  effects  of  exposure  to  a  noxious  substance  may  be  greatly  increased  in  the 
presence  of  physiological  stresses  of  flight  such  as  'G',  cold,  or  hypoxia.    Thus,  an  exposure  to  a 
noxious substance at a concentration which would have little or no effect on a man on the ground may 
produce a hazardous situation in flight.  The following paragraphs outline the ways in which exposure 
to  noxious  substances  may  occur  and  the  possible  effects  of  such  exposures,  the  precautions  and 
remedial actions required, and the major groups of noxious substances important in aviation. 
Noxious Substances 
2. 
The number of noxious substances which may be encountered in aviation is very large and grows 
as  new  materials  are  introduced.    Some  substances,  such  as  aircraft  consumables  like  fuels  and 
lubricants, are noxious in themselves; protection against these is by preventing their contact with flight 
or  ground  crews.    Toxic  hazards  may  also  result  from  the  decomposition  of  normally  harmless 
materials, such as occurs during a fire.  Noxious substances may exist in any physical form; they may 
be  solids,  liquids,  gases,  vapours,  or  aerosols  (finely  divided  solid  or  liquid  particles  suspended  in  a 
gas, or in air). 
Routes of Entry to the Body 
3. 
Noxious substances may gain access to the body by one or more of the following routes: 
a. 
Inhalation.  In aviation, as in ground working environments, the most common route of entry of a 
noxious  substance  to  the  body  is  the  inhalation  of  a  gas,  vapour,  or  aerosol.    Substances  absorbed 
through  the  lungs  rapidly  reach  all  parts  of  the  body  via  the  bloodstream.    The  contaminant  may  be 
present in the cockpit or cabin air or, very much less frequently, in the oxygen supply. 
b. 
Ingestion.  Ingestion of noxious substances occurs less frequently than inhalation.  However, 
one problem that arises all too frequently is illness as a result of consuming food or drink which is 
contaminated either with a toxic substance or food poisoning organisms.  It is vital for aircrew to take 
all possible precautions to avoid this risk, particularly when operating away from their home base in 
areas where local hygiene standards may be questionable or poor.  Food poisoning may be totally 
incapacitating,  and  the  onset  of  symptoms  may  be  sudden.    Noxious  substances  may  also  be 
ingested  if  a  person  eats  or  smokes  with  hands  contaminated  by  a  toxic  substance.    Rarely,  a 
noxious substance may be inadvertently swallowed, should a splash enter the open mouth. 
c. 
Skin Absorption.  Corrosive or irritant substances will cause a local effect if they come into 
contact with skin, but many substances such as solvents are able to pass unnoticed through intact 
skin, then to be transported to all parts of the body in the bloodstream.  This may occur if noxious 
substances are not cleansed rapidly from the skin, or if contaminated clothing remains in contact 
with the skin.  This hazard is not confined to liquids; solid substances may dissolve in sweat and 
then be absorbed. 
d. 
Inoculation.  Contamination of the eye with a toxic dust or liquid, or exposure to a toxic gas, 
may  result  in  absorption  into  the  eye.    The  eye  is  a  very  sensitive  organ  and  is  often  affected 
before other parts of the body, resulting in discomfort, and impaired vision. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
e. 
Injection.    Noxious  substances  may  be  inadvertently  injected  through  the  skin.    This  may 
occur if a wound is produced by a contaminated object, or if a fine jet of liquid at high pressure hits 
the skin.  The latter may occur, for example, as a result of a leak from a hydraulic system. 
Effects of Noxious Substances 
4. 
Noxious substances which gain access to the body may produce a localized effect such as irritation 
or  inflammation  of  exposed  skin  or  eyes,  or  more  generalized  symptoms  such  as  headache,  or 
disturbance or loss of consciousness.  Some substances produce both local and generalized effects.  The 
effects may be 'acute' (appearing rapidly after exposure begins and often resolving rapidly afterwards), or 
'chronic'  (resulting  in  long  term  illness  or  disability).    Some  substances  produce  both  an  acute  and  a 
chronic effect.  Following exposure, there may be a 'latent interval' before any effects become manifest.  
Latent intervals of hours or even days are not uncommon, but they may be extremely long, measured in 
years.  In most cases, a substance will exert its major effect on one organ or physiological system, known 
as the 'target' organ or system for that particular noxious substance. 
5. 
The most immediate flight safety concern is the acute effect of an exposure.  This may range from 
a  minor  annoyance  to  a  major,  possibly  life-threatening  disturbance.    Most  in-flight  exposures  have 
been the result of contamination of the cockpit or cabin atmosphere and this may often be recognized 
by the presence of smoke or an unusual odour.  It is, however, possible for a colourless and odourless 
gas (such as carbon monoxide) to impair performance without the subject being aware of its presence, 
or of the developing impairment.  Aircrew who become aware that their thought processes or actions 
are  becoming  slow  or  inaccurate,  or  who  notice  a  performance  decrement  in  another  crew  member 
should consider this possibility.  A further problem is posed by substances that exert an effect after a 
latent  interval.    An  individual  may  attach  little  significance  to  a  toxic  exposure  at  the  time,  only  to 
become  unwell  some  time  later.    In  this  context,  aircrew  must  also  remember  that  they  may  be 
impaired by exposure to a toxic substance whilst off-duty, particularly during leisure activities such as 
car maintenance or household 'd-i-y'.  In addition, the onset of disabling food poisoning symptoms may 
be delayed by hours or days following the causative meal. 
Control and Protection 
6. 
To  minimize  the  risk  of  exposure  to  noxious  substances,  the  materials  used  in  aircraft 
construction  and  the  consumables  used  during  operations  are  assessed  to  ensure  that  the  safest 
practicable options are chosen.  Design also aims to provide adequate containment or segregation of 
toxic  materials  to  prevent  aircrew  exposure.    Work  practices  employed  during  aircraft  servicing  are 
assessed  and  controlled  to  protect  both  aircrew  and  ground  personnel.    Protective  clothing  and 
equipment is provided where it is not otherwise possible to remove or control the hazard.  It is essential 
that all personnel follow duly authorized procedures to ensure their safety and that of others. 
7. 
Aircrew must remain alert to the dangers posed by noxious substances both on and off duty and 
take precautions to avoid contact or exposure.  Any incident resulting in subjective symptoms must be 
reported and the individual must seek medical advice before flying again.  In addition, aircrew should 
seek medical advice following any but the most trivial contact with a known toxic substance even if no 
symptoms result at the time of contact, in view of the possibility of delayed reaction.  The risk of food 
poisoning has been mentioned above; aircrew must minimize this risk by scrupulous attention to food 
hygiene and food hygiene guidance. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
Cockpit or Cabin Contamination During Flight 
8. 
The  actions  to  be  taken,  should  contamination  of  the  crew  compartment  be  recognized  or 
suspected during flight, vary according to the aircraft type, oxygen system or equipment available, the 
crew position and the flight conditions.  The aim is to prevent or reduce inhalation of or contact with any 
noxious  substance  which  may  be  present.    Aircrew  must  be  fully  conversant  with  the  drill  for  their 
specific  aircraft  and  role,  as  detailed  in  Flight  Reference  Cards.    Required  actions  may  include,  as 
appropriate: 
a. 
Manual  selection  of  100%  oxygen  and  safety  pressure  on  demand  regulators,  the  latter  to 
prevent inward leakage of contaminated cockpit air. 
b. 
The use of portable oxygen sets by rear crews. 
c. 
Protection of the eyes by use of visors or goggles. 
d. 
Covering exposed skin where possible. 
e. 
Depressurising the aircraft if it is safe to do so; this may require reducing altitude. 
f. 
Increasing ventilation by any safe and practicable means. 
g. 
Declaring the emergency in order that medical and other services are immediately available 
on landing. 
Noxious Substances Encountered in Flight 
9. 
The  following  paragraphs  highlight  the  major  classes  of  noxious  substances  which  may  be 
encountered  by  aircrew.    Detailed  description  of  individual  substances  is not practicable in this chapter; 
the  intention  is  to  draw  attention  to  the  wide  range  of  substances  and  to  important  practical 
considerations.  Individual substances are mentioned for illustrative purposes; further specific information 
is available in engineering and health and safety instructions and publications.  Flight safety, health and 
safety, medical and engineering staffs should also be approached for specific guidance. 
Fuels and Propellants 
10.  The  risk  of  exposure  to  aircraft  fuels is greater for servicing personnel than for aircrew.  However, in 
certain  situations,  some  aircrew  may  perform  or  closely  supervise  refuelling  operations,  posing  a  risk  of 
contamination of skin or clothing.  Moreover, a spill during refuelling, particularly in still air and warm weather, 
can  result  in  significant  vapour  contamination  of  the  cabin  or  cockpit.    With  a  few  specialized  exceptions, 
aviation fuels are basically hydrocarbons (gasolines or mixtures of gasolines, kerosenes and aromatics) with 
various additives to modify physical properties or to improve combustion characteristics.  All can irritate the 
skin or eyes, but the principal hazard is inhalation of the vapour, when the severity of the effect will depend 
on  the  concentration  and  duration  of  exposure.    Exposure  to  vapour  concentrations  above  0.05%  may 
produce detectable effects, particularly if prolonged.  The main effect is on the nervous system, dulling both 
the senses and awareness; the dulling effect on the sense of smell may result in loss of awareness of the 
continued  danger.    A  low  dose  of  the  vapour,  such  as  breathing  0.2%  for  30  minutes,  generally  causes 
dizziness,  nausea,  and  headache.    Higher  concentrations  may  irritate  the  eyes  and  produce  signs akin to 
drunkenness,  or  even  unconsciousness,  convulsions  and  death.    The  various  additives  may  include 
compounds  of  lead,  aromatic  organic  substances  such  as  xylene  and  aniline,  and  other  toxic  substances 
such as the glycol ethers used as fuel systems icing inhibitors.  Many of these additives may be absorbed by 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
inhalation and some will pass through intact skin, when they are capable of producing a wide range of acute 
and chronic problems. 
11.  Specialized  fuels  and  propellants  are  employed  when  there  is  a  need  for  a  high  energy  output 
from  a  given  mass  of  fuel,  for  example  in  rockets,  missiles,  small  auxiliary  power  units  and  to  start 
some turbine engines.  The highly reactive substances required by these applications are usually also 
highly toxic.  Examples are aniline, hydrazine and isopropyl nitrate (AVPIN).  These are burnt, either in 
air,  or  with  liquid  oxygen  or  an  oxidizing  agent  such  as  hydrogen  peroxide  or  fuming  nitric  acid, 
resulting  in  the  production  of  hazardous  exhaust  gases.    In  addition  to  toxicity,  these  fuels  and 
oxidizers  pose  handling  problems.    For  example,  hydrazine  may  burn  spontaneously  on  exposure  to 
air, liquid oxygen may cause frostbite or produce ignition or detonation of some organic materials, and 
many  of  these  substances  require  special  containment.    Aircrew  who  are  at  any  risk  of  exposure  to 
these materials must be aware of the specific hazard and of the emergency actions to take in the event 
of a leak or of personal contamination. 
Combustion and Pyrolysis Products 
12.  Toxic  products  may  be  evolved  not  only  if  substances  are  actually  burnt,  but  also  if  they  are 
merely  overheated.    'Pyrolysis'  is  a  broad  term  embracing  both  situations.   The principal hazards are 
posed  to  aircrew  by  engine  exhaust  gases,  fires  on  aircraft  and  systems  failures  resulting  in 
overheating  of  components.    The  greatest  single  cause  of  aviation  incidents  involving  noxious 
substances  is  a  pyrolysis  product,  namely  carbon  monoxide.    In  view  of  its  importance,  this  is 
considered separately below. 
13.  Aircrew  may  be  exposed  to  engine  exhaust  gases  in  a  variety  of  ways.    In  the  past,  this  has 
occurred relatively frequently as a result of defective bulkhead sealing in single piston aircraft.  Exhaust 
gases are passed through heat exchangers in some aircraft types, to provide cabin heating.  A defect 
in  the  heat  exchanger  may  result  in  contamination  of  the  cabin  hot  air  supply  with  exhaust  gases.  
Engine running within hardened aircraft shelters may result in a build-up of exhaust gases, despite the 
measures  taken  to  provide  ventilation.    Helicopters,  particularly  when  hovering  close  to  the  ground, 
may  draw  in  exhaust  gases  from  their  own  efflux.    Fixed  wing  aircraft  are  not  immune  from  this 
problem, which may occur during certain conditions of flight or if there is a defect in the cabin wall close 
to the point of efflux. 
14.  In addition to carbon monoxide, exhaust gases contain other noxious components such as unburnt 
hydrocarbons,  carbon  dioxide,  oxides  of  nitrogen,  and  aldehydes.    Aldehydes,  present  in  significant 
concentrations in jet exhausts, and oxides of nitrogen, are highly irritant and may produce soreness of the 
eyes and impaired vision, as well as sore throat and coughing.  Aircrew, particularly those operating from 
hardened aircraft shelters, must minimize their exposure to exhaust gases prior to flight. 
15.  Aircraft  fires  produce  a  highly  noxious  smoke  containing  a  huge  variety of substances, including 
carbon monoxide.  This is despite the efforts made to reduce the potential hazard by selection of safe 
materials in  aircraft  construction.    The  smoke  is  characteristically  highly  irritant  to  the  eyes  and 
respiratory  system.    It  is  also  asphyxiant  and  narcotic,  capable  of  causing  rapid  dulling  and  loss  of 
consciousness.    The  importance  of  prompt  and  correct  application  of  the  appropriate  aircraft-specific 
emergency drills on suspicion of an aircraft fire cannot be overstressed. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
Carbon Monoxide 
16.  Carbon  monoxide  is  an  odourless,  colourless gas which is present in the smoke from almost all 
aircraft fires and in aircraft exhaust gases, particularly from piston engines where concentrations of up 
to  9%  may  be  encountered.    To  put  this  in  context,  the  long-term  exposure  limit  for  workers  on  the 
ground is 0.005% (50 parts per million). 
17.  Inhaled carbon monoxide passes easily into the bloodstream where it enters the red blood cells and 
binds to the haemoglobin, thus preventing the carriage of oxygen from the lungs to the tissues, so that the 
tissues become hypoxic.  Unfortunately, carbon monoxide binds to haemoglobin much more strongly than 
oxygen and the resulting compound, carboxyhaemoglobin, is more stable than the equivalent compound 
with oxygen.  In numerical terms, carbon monoxide’s affinity for haemoglobin is over 200 times as great 
as that of oxygen.  This means that even a very low concentration of carbon monoxide in the inspired air 
will result in a progressive build-up of carboxyhaemoglobin to harmful levels.  Increased rate and depth of 
breathing  as  a  result  of  exercise  or  hypoxia  will increase the rate of carboxyhaemoglobin build-up.  For 
example, breathing 0.1% carbon monoxide for 1 hour whilst at rest will result in approximately 20% of the 
body’s  haemoglobin  being  converted  to  carboxyhaemoglobin.    Taking  light  exercise  during  this  period 
would raise the percentage converted to around 40%. 
18.  As carboxyhaemoglobin builds up during an exposure, the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning 
appear and increase in severity.  Tissues most sensitive to hypoxia, such as the nervous system, are 
the  first  to  be  affected.    The  symptoms  which  occur  when  various  percentages  of  the  body’s 
haemoglobin  (Hb)  are  converted  to  carboxyhaemoglobin  (HbCO)  in  an  individual  breathing air at sea 
level are summarized in Table 1. 
19.  The Table only describes likely symptoms at sea level.  At altitude, the effects of a given level of 
carboxyhaemoglobin will be markedly increased by any hypoxia which exists as a result of the reduced 
partial  pressure  of  oxygen  in  the  inhaled  air.    However,  the  effect  of  a  given  concentration  of  carbon 
monoxide in the inhaled air will be reduced because of the lower partial pressure it exerts at altitude.  A 
further  point  of  particular  relevance  to  aircrew  is  that  mental  performance  has  been  shown  to  be 
impaired  at  carboxyhaemoglobin  levels  as  low  as  5%,  although  the  individual  may  feel  perfectly  well.  
At levels of 10% or more, aircrew performance is affected to the extent that flight safety is significantly 
degraded. 
6-8 Table 1 The Effects of Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning 
% Hb converted to 
Symptoms likely at Sea Level 
HbCO 
0 to 10 
None noticeable. 
10 to 20 
Slight frontal headache. 
Throbbing headache.  Breathlessness on exertion. 
20 to 30 
Possible nausea and weakness. 
Severe headache.  Weakness.  Dizziness.  Dimness of vision. 
30 to 40 
Nausea and vomiting.  Breathlessness at rest.  Possible collapse. 
Increasing  likelihood  of  collapse.    Increasing  pulse  rate.    Irregular  breathing.  
Over 40 
Collapse.  Convulsions.  Respiratory failure.  Death. 
20.  The  immediate  treatment  of  a  victim  of  carbon  monoxide  poisoning  consists  of  restoration  of  a 
safe breathing supply, preferably 100% oxygen if available, and rest at room temperature.  Overheating 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
should  be  avoided.    If  the  victim  is  not  breathing,  artificial  respiration  will  be  required,  possibly  for  a 
lengthy period.  Medical attention should be obtained as soon as possible. 
Fire Extinguishing Agents 
21.  The  ideal  fire  extinguishing  agent  would  be  effective,  in  as  small  a  bulk  as  possible,  against  all 
types  of  fire  (including  liquid  and  electrical  fires).    It  would  also  be  non-toxic  and  safe  for  use  in 
confined  spaces  or  where  high  voltages  are  exposed.    Further,  it  should  not  yield  toxic  pyrolysis 
products  when  applied  to  a  fire.    Unfortunately,  such  an  agent  does  not  exist.    Substances  used  in 
aircraft,  either  in  fixed  fire  suppression  systems  or  in  hand-held  extinguishers,  are  selected  to  be 
effective  against  the  types  of  fire  likely  to be encountered and to offer the best compromise between 
effectiveness and safety.  Aircraft fire extinguishers or fixed systems commonly use water (with glycol 
added  as  an  anti-freeze),  water  mist,  or  carbon  dioxide  gas.    Cabin  extinguishers  may  contain  dry 
powder for use on electrical fires and foam may be used particularly to counter fires in aircraft on the 
ground.  Most halogenated hydrocarbons (halons) are no longer permitted under the Montreal Protocol 
because  they  are  known  to  deplete  the  Ozone  layer.    Alternative  noxious  substances  introduced 
include Nitrogen, the inert gas Argon and some other agents termed halocarbons. 
a. 
Water/Glycol  Mixtures.    Water/glycol  mixtures  have  the  advantage  that  they  are  virtually 
non-toxic.  Use of such mixtures may become noxious if used on liquid or electrical fires against 
which they are ineffective and considerably hazardous. 
b. 
Water  Mist.    Water  mist  is  variously  described  as  water  fog  or  fine  water  spray.    It  works, 
primarily by the rapid absorption and dissipation of heat from the fire.  The small droplets ensure 
that  the  process  is  more  effective  than  with  conventional  sprinklers  or  water  sprays.    Therefore, 
relatively  small  quantities  of  water  are  required.    Unlike  conventional  water  extinguishers,  water 
mist can be effective against liquid fuel fires and is likely to cause minimal damage to electrical or 
other  equipment.    Exposure  of  equipment  to  freezing  temperatures  may  restrict  its  application 
although  benign  additives  may  be  included  which  alleviate  this  problem.    Although  a  water  mist 
discharge  may  reduce  visibility,  its  cooling  effect  will  significantly  enhance  survivability  in  a  fire 
inside an occupied enclosure.  Water mist may be used in fixed or portable applications. 
c. 
Carbon Dioxide.  Carbon dioxide is an asphyxiant gas which extinguishes fires by excluding 
oxygen.    It  is  of  limited  use  against  fires  of  combustible  solids  such  as  paper  or  cloth.    It  is 
unsuitable for use in confined spaces, since breathing concentrations above 2% causes adverse 
symptoms.  The initial effect is to produce laboured breathing, but, if the concentration rises to 3 to 
10%,  increasingly  severe  sensory  disturbances  and  dizziness  occur.    Breathing  10%  carbon 
dioxide may result in unconsciousness in as little as one minute. 
d. 
Foam.  Foams, which are available in many types and compositions, are particularly effective 
against liquid fuel fires where they form a barrier between the fuel and its oxygen supply.  Foams 
are suitable for fixed and hand-held applications, but the composition is corrosive. 
e. 
Dry  Powder.    Dry  powder  extinguishants  are  available  in  different  compositions  and  are 
effective against most fire types.  These are not generally noxious as such but risks in breathing in 
the  powder  must  be  considered.    Contamination  and  clean-up  after  discharge  can  be 
problematical.    Dry  powder  extinguishers  can  be  the  most  effective,  on  a  weight  basis,  and  are 
more usually confined to portable applications. 
f. 
Nitrogen/Inert  Gas  Blends.    Nitrogen,  the  inert  gas  Argon,  and  blends  of  both  with,  or 
without,  small  amounts  of  carbon  dioxide  are  effective  extinguishing  agents  against  all  types  of 
fire.    They  extinguish  fires  by  reducing  the  oxygen  concentration  inside  an  enclosure  to 
below 15%.    Provided  the  oxygen  concentration  remains  above  12%,  occupants  can  survive 
without significant adverse effects, caused by the agent, for a reasonable period.  The gases are 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
stored  in  heavy  high-pressure  cylinders.    Since  quite  large  quantities  are  required,  this  tends  to 
preclude use in hand-held containers. 
g. 
Halocarbon  Agents.    Following  the  restrictions  on  the  general  use  of  halons,  three  halocarbon 
agents  falling  within  two  categories  have  been  introduced  as  suitable  extinguishing  media.    The  two 
categories  are  Hydrofluorocarbons  (HFC)  -  within  which  Heptafluoropropane  and  Trifluoromethane 
have  been  approved  -  and  Perfluorocarbons  (PFC)  containing  the  approved  agent  Perfluorobutane.  
These  agents  work  on  all  fire  types  by  inhibiting  the  chemical  mechanism  of  the  fire  through  heat 
absorption.  They are less effective than the halons which they replace and require about twice as much 
agent  to  achieve  the  same  effect  as  a  halon.    The  process  of  extinguishing  a  fire  with  halocarbons 
produces  highly toxic and corrosive products, primarily hydrogen fluoride (HF) and this is one reason 
why these substances can be used only in controlled fixed systems.  However, incidents have occurred 
where  fire  suppression  systems  have  been  inadvertently  triggered  on  the  ground,  particularly  during 
servicing,  resulting  in  the  exposure  of  servicing  and  other  personnel  in  the  area  and  this  must  be 
considered in the maintenance environment. 
Other Aircraft Systems 
22.  A number of aircraft ancillary systems contain or use noxious substances. 
a. 
Hydraulic  Systems.    Hydraulic  systems  utilize  fluids  at  very  high  pressures.    In  normal 
circumstances,  the  fluid  is  completely  contained,  but  a  leak  in  a  hydraulic  line  may  result  in  an 
atomized jet of fluid entering the cockpit or cabin.  A very small defect in a hydraulic line or union 
may be invisible to the naked eye, as may be the jet of fluid leaking from it, but the velocity of the 
jet may enable it to pierce skin.  However, the most likely effect is the creation within the aircraft of 
an aerosol of microscopic fluid droplets which may be inhaled.  A wide variety of hydraulic fluids is 
in  use  and  their  toxicity  is  variable.    In general, the greatest risk is of inhalation of an aerosol or 
vapour,  though  some  can  be  absorbed  through  intact  skin.    Many  are  irritant  to  the  eyes  and 
respiratory  passages,  some  produce  nausea  or  drowsiness.    Medical  advice  must  always  be 
sought following exposure, since some hydraulic fluids contain substances such as glycol ethers 
which can produce serious long-term effects. 
b. 
Lubrication Systems.  Rarely, lubricating oil may gain access to an aircraft as a result of a 
mechanical  defect  permitting  oil  to  mix  with  the  air  in  the  compressor  stage  of  a  turbine  engine, 
upstream of the bleed providing cabin-conditioning air.  In this case, the oil may be in the form of a 
fine oil mist or vapour which may be irritant to the eyes and nose.  If this is inhaled, the result may 
be headache, nausea, and vomiting, followed by serious inflammation of the lungs, which may not 
occur for some hours.  Another possible source of exposure is oil in contact with hot engine parts, 
when pyrolysis will result in the generation of a highly irritant smoke. 
c. 
De-icing  Systems.    De-icing  fluids  consist  of  various  mixtures  of  alcohols  and  glycols  with 
water.  Exposure to de-icing fluid in an aircraft is usually due to the fracture of a pipe carrying the 
fluid, permitting a fine spray to enter the interior.  Although the fluids concerned are not very toxic, 
the result of breathing an aerosol or vapour may be irritation of the eyes and nose, and possibly 
headache and nausea. 
d. 
Refrigeration  Systems.    Refrigeration  systems  in  aircraft  contain  similar  substances  to 
those  in  domestic  refrigerators,  namely  hydrochlorofluorocarbons  (HCFC).    They  may  be 
anaesthetic in high concentration and some are capable of causing liver damage, but the principal 
risk  to  aircrew  is  posed  by  the  dangerous  pyrolysis  products,  such  as  chlorine,  fluorine,  and 
phosgene, which may be evolved in the event of a fire in the equipment. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-8 - Noxious Substances in Aviation 
Suspected Contamination of Oxygen Supply 
23.  Stringent quality control ensures that the purity of aircraft oxygen supplies is very high; incidents of 
contamination are very rare.  However, the presence of an odour in the breathing supply must suggest 
the  possibility.    Most  incidents  are  the  result  of  the  presence  of  a  contaminant  in  the  hoses  or  other 
components of the oxygen system, rather than in the supplied oxygen itself.  This may be the result of 
faulty  servicing  technique  such  as  inadequate  purging  following  the  use  of  degreasing  agents.  
Although a detectable odour is the result, the quantity of contaminant present is not normally significant 
in toxicological terms.  However, an unusual odour must never be ignored; the aircraft specific drills as 
detailed  in  the  Flight  Reference  Cards must always be performed.  These may include the use of an 
alternative oxygen supply where possible, or descent to an altitude where oxygen is not required.  It is 
vital that the problem is reported to the ground, so that immediate medical treatment and investigation 
is available on landing.  The oxygen system, including the mask and hose or PEC must be quarantined 
for full engineering investigation. 
Ozone 
24.  Ozone, a tri-atomic form of oxygen, is formed at high altitude by the action of solar ultra-violet light 
on  molecular  oxygen.    The  concentration  rises  above  40,000  ft  to  a  maximum  of  approximately  10 
parts per million (ppm)(by volume) at 100,000 ft.  Ozone is a highly irritant gas; exposure to one ppm 
for  one  hour  will  cause  serious  eye  discomfort  and  coughing.    Higher  concentration  will  cause 
dangerous inflammation of the lungs.  Fortunately for aviators, ozone decomposes on heating and little 
survives  passage  through  the  compressor  stage  of  an  aircraft  engine  and  the  cabin  conditioning 
system.  If this were not the case, the concentration in the cabin of an aircraft flying at 60,000 ft would 
be of the order of 4 ppm.  In practice, concentrations inside aircraft at high altitude are normally below 
0.1 ppm and rarely exceed 0.2 ppm. 
Cargo 
25.  Many  hazardous  substances  are  carried  by  air.    Regulations  specify  the  maximum  quantities  of 
specific substances which may be carried by an aircraft, together with specifications for safe packing, 
handling,  and  stowage.    It  is  important  that  aircrew  are  aware  of  the  potential  hazards  posed  by 
dangerous  air  cargo  items,  the  necessary  precautions,  and  the  immediate  actions  to  be  taken  in  the 
event of a leakage or other emergency.  Passengers cannot be expected to be aware of the hazards 
posed  by  many  everyday  items  when  they  are  taken  on  board  an  aircraft.    Loadmasters  and  others 
must  remain  vigilant  in  their  duties,  to  prevent  passengers  from  inadvertently  creating  a  hazard  by 
bringing  noxious,  or  potentially  noxious,  substances  on  board  in  their  luggage,  cabin  baggage  or  in 
their pockets.  Posters and other publicity media should be used to raise travellers’ awareness of the 
types of items which constitute dangerous air cargo. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
CHAPTER 9 - PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF LOW FLYING 
Introduction 
1. 
Aircrew obtain most information about the external world by means of vision, and the demands to 
process  visual  information  are  particularly  severe  at  low  altitude.   Consider,  for  example,  the  task  of 
searching  for  a  waypoint  whilst  maintaining  a  visually  judged  altitude  and  avoiding  wires,  birds,  and 
other  obstacles.   These  activities  may  have  to  be  undertaken  in  unfavourable  conditions  that  impair 
performance, for example excessive turbulence, noise or heat. 
2. 
This  chapter  describes  human  limitations  that  should be recognised by all those engaged in low 
flying.    Emphasis  is  placed  on  high-speed,  low-level  flight  which  is  essential  for  the  success  of 
missions within defended territory.   However, the discussion is relevant to other aspects of low flying, 
and  encompasses  both  fixed-  and  rotary-wing  operations.    The  reader  is  referred  to  Volume  6, 
Chapter 6 for supplementary information concerning the special senses. 
3. 
Since low flying restricts the margin of error available to aircrew, minimum acceptable heights are 
specified in the Military Aviation Authority (MAA) Regulatory Article (RA) 2330 and may be qualified in 
Command,  Group,  or  Station  Orders.     Continuous  flying  at  heights  below  100  ft  produces  an 
increased  flight  safety  hazard  which  must  be  balanced  against  the  increased  chances  of  survival  in 
the face of enemy defences. 
Vision 
4. 
Man’s  visual  system  was  not  designed  to  cope with  the  unnatural  demands of flight.   The major 
visual difficulties likely to be encountered by aircrew are discussed below. 
5. 
Loss of Visual Reference.   One of the most fundamental visual problems during low-level flight 
is the loss of the external visual reference in adverse weather conditions.  At 540 kt, the pilot may have 
insufficient  time  to  respond  to  a  hazard,  even  with  a  visual  range  of  2  nm.   Clearly,  the  decision  to 
carry  out  a  low-level  abort  must  be  made  as  early  as  possible,  with  the  pilot’s  scan  established  on 
head-down instruments very soon after beginning the appropriate abort procedure. 
6. 
Dynamic  Visual  Acuity.      During  flight,  the  relative  angular  velocity  of  a  ground-based 
object  depends  upon  aircraft  height  and  speed,  the  range  of  the  object  and  its  bearing  to  the  line  of 
flight. Since  only  objects  on  an  aircraft’s  track  have  no  angular  velocity,  the  resolution  of  detail 
in  the  external  scene  depends  largely  upon  dynamic  visual  acuity,  rather  than  the  static  acuity 
measured in routine eye tests.  Dynamic visual acuity is poorer than static acuity because the image of 
a target followed by the eye does not consistently fall on the area of greatest visual acuity in the centre 
of the retina; moreover, the higher the angular velocity, the more likely there is to be some movement 
of the target relative to the retina.  Visual acuity declines as target velocity increases; it is halved for a 
target  moving  at  40  degrees  per  second,  and  reduced  to  about  one-third  for  a  target  moving  at  80 
degrees  per  second.    This  presents  a  particular  problem  for  the  pilot  flying  at  high  speed  and  low 
level. 
7. 
Vibration  and  Vision.    Problems  of  dynamic  visual  acuity  are  not  confined  to  the  resolution 
of external objects; the reading of cockpit instrumentation is disrupted by aircraft vibration: 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
a. 
Low  Frequency  Vibration.   The  high  level  of  turbulence  often  encountered  at  low  altitude 
is  likely  to  induce  buffeting  of  the  airframe  structure,  subjecting  the  occupants’  bodies  to  low- 
frequency vibration.  Up to about 2 Hz, the head and body move together.  However, in the range 
of  3  Hz  to  4 Hz,  and  particularly  if  the  vibration  occurs  in  the  head-foot  (z)  axis  of  the  body,  the 
head  moves  independently  of  the  body,  interfering  only  slightly  with  perception  of  the  external 
world  but  disrupting  the  ability  to  read  instruments.      For  vibration  at  frequencies  up  to  10  Hz, 
some  stabilisation  of  the  eye  is  provided  by  automatic  eye  movements  compensatory  to  the 
direction of head movement, but residual movement of instrument displays relative to the eye can 
be expected.   If  the  frequency  of  this  movement  exceeds  1  Hz,  the  pursuit  reflex  (responsible 
for  tracking    moving    objects    with    the    eye)    breaks    down,    substantially    reducing    visual  
acuity.  Moreover,  the  automatic  eye  movements  described  above  are  almost  impossible  to 
suppress,  and  can  create  difficulties  when  using  helmet-mounted  displays  that  move  with  the 
head. 
b. 
High  Frequency  Vibration.    As  the  frequency  of  vibration  increases  beyond  the  critical 
range  of  3  Hz  to  4  Hz,  head  movements  become  progressively  smaller.    Since  most  helicopter 
vibration  occurs  at  relatively  high  frequencies  (typically  in  the  range  12  Hz  to  18  Hz),  rotary-
wing  aircrew  are  less  likely  to  be  adversely  affected  than  their  fixed-wing  colleagues.  
Nevertheless,  during  the  hover,  difficulties  in  reading  the  radar  altimeter  and  other  important 
displays may be experienced. 
c. 
Severe  Vibration.    Head  movements  during  particularly  severe  vibration  can  be  reduced 
by  removing  the  head  from  the  head-rest,  and  preferably  the  back  from  the  back-rest.    Further 
alleviation  of  this  problem  will  be  provided  by  improved  seating  and  developments  in  space- 
stabilised displays. 
8. 
NBC  Equipment  and  Vision.      The  Aircrew  Respirator  No  5,  if  correctly  fitted,  imposes 
little  restriction  upon  the  visual  field.      However,  its  use  impedes  head  movement,  and  may 
therefore interfere  with  look-out.   Misting  of  the  visor  does  not  occur  under  normal  circumstances, 
but may be experienced if there is a failure of the blown air supply, if the mask is incorrectly fitted, or if 
there  is  an  extreme  temperature  differential  between  the  internal  and  external  surfaces  of  the  visor. 
Since  aircrew  clad  in  the  NBC  Aircrew  Equipment  Assembly  are  likely  to sweat profusely after heavy 
physical exercise, their activities outside the cockpit must be undertaken at a more leisurely pace. 
9. 
Night Flying.  Night flying has a number of adverse effects on vision: 
a. 
Deprived  of  visual  cues  at  'infinity'  (i.e.  beyond  about  6  metres),  aircrew  may 
experience temporary short-sightedness, whereby the eye focuses to between 1 and 2 metres, or 
even  less, if there is a prominent canopy frame in near vision.   This degrades visual look-out by 
blurring  and  reducing  the  contrast  of  distant  objects,  and  by  making  them  appear  smaller  and 
hence more distant.   There  is  evidence  that  it  may  be  possible  to  train  aircrew  to  gain  voluntary 
control  over the focal distance of the eye; a more immediate means of alleviating this problem is 
to divert the gaze periodically towards a relatively distant feature, such as a wing-tip. 
b. 
Apparent motion of light sources may occur during night flying.  If a stationary point of light is 
observed  in  an  otherwise  dark  visual  field,  it  often  appears  to  move.   During  flight,  there  is  the 
further   problem   of   more   systematic   illusory   motion   produced   by   changes   in   the   force 
environment.   Forward  linear  acceleration  causes  an  apparent  upward  shift,  and  forward  linear 
deceleration  an  apparent  downward  shift,  of  objects  in  the  visual  field.   Angular  acceleration  is 
also a source of difficulty; during recovery from a sustained turning manoeuvre, objects appear to 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
rotate  in  the  opposite  direction.   These  effects  are  a  potential  source  of  spatial  disorientation. 
The pilot may perceive the apparent motion to indicate a change of aircraft attitude.  Similarly, the 
pilot may interpret a stationary light as another aircraft, and take avoiding action.  Little action can 
be  taken  to  prevent  the  occurrence  of  the  illusions  caused  by  motion.    However,  illusory 
movement  of  a  stationary  light  can  be  reduced  by  frequent  changes  in  the  direction  of  gaze;  a 
change in the aircraft’s flightpath can also help to reduce the illusion. 
c. 
At  night,  the  pilot’s  ability  to  fly  at  low  level  is  enhanced  by  electronic  aids  such  as  night 
vision  goggles  (NVGs)  (see  Volume  7,  Chapter  17).      There  are,  however,  disadvantages 
associated  with  the  use  of  NVGs.   They  provide  a  restricted  field  of  view,  and  they  produce  an 
image  of  relatively  low  contrast  and  resolution  that  lacks  cues  to  depth.   In  addition,  NVGs  add 
weight to the helmet and are a potential hazard in the event of ejection. 
10.  Attitude Indicators.
a. 
The fovea of the eye is an area of high visual acuity with the capacity for good colour vision, 
whereas  the  more  peripheral  retina  offers  greater  sensitivity  to  light  and  movement.      This 
distinction reflects the existence of two separate visual systems.  The foveal system answers the 
question "what?" (i.e. it enables us to identify objects); the peripheral system answers the question 
"where?"  (i.e.  it  informs  us  of  our  orientation  in  space,  often  without  our  awareness  that  we  are 
using  this  information).    Thus,  it  is  possible  to  walk  around  a  room,  unconsciously  avoiding 
obstacles, while devoting attention to reading a book. 
b. 
The  peripheral  system  is  better  suited  to  processing  attitude  information.    The  natural 
horizon stimulates this system, and hence provides powerful cues to orientation, even if attention 
is  directed  elsewhere.   The  attitude  indicator  presents  the  same  information,  but in a much less 
compelling form.  This instrument must be viewed directly, using the foveal visual system, and so 
attitude  must  be  interpreted  rather  than  effortlessly  apprehended,  increasing  both  workload  and 
the likelihood of disorientation. 
c. 
There  have  been  several  attempts  to  develop  attitude  indicators  that  present  information  to 
the  peripheral  visual  system.    The  Peripheral  Vision  Display  (PVD),  formerly  known  as  the 
Malcolm Horizon, represents one such approach.   In this system, a laser is used to project a bar 
of  light  across  the  instrument  panel;  the  bar  remains  parallel  with  the  horizon.   Other  possible 
solutions include displays mounted on the canopy arch. 
Perception 
11.  During  the  process  of  perception,  incoming sensory information is interpreted in the light of past 
experience.    Aircrew’s  'mental  models'  of  the  environment  therefore  depend  not  only  on  sensory 
information, but also on what they expect to perceive. 
12.  Illusions.   An  illusion  occurs  whenever  a  percept  does  not  correspond  to  reality.   Various types 
of illusion, each potentially hazardous, may be experienced during low level flight. 
a. 
Aircrew will use various cues to estimate distance and height.  Two common cues are:  
(1)  The size of the image on the eye of a ground-based object of known size. 
(2)  The texture of the terrain (unless, for example, it is covered by snow or sand). 
Both of these cues depend upon assumptions concerning the size of ground-based features.  If these 
assumptions  are  false,  misinterpretation  of  height  will  ensue.    For  example,  a  pilot  who  interprets 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
bushes  as  more  distant  trees  will  over-estimate  the  aircraft’s  height.    This  particular  problem  is 
prevalent in northern latitudes, towards the tundra, where plants are smaller due to reasons of climate. 
Care should be taken when the terrain is unfamiliar, eg during detachment to foreign regions.  Careful 
briefing and pre-flight planning greatly reduce the probability of such illusions occurring. 
b. 
Descent below the intended altitude may also be induced by the phenomenon of adaptation 
to motion.   The motion detectors on the retina generally fire at a rate proportional to the angular 
velocity  of  objects  in  the  visual  field.   However,  at  a  steady  speed,  their  rate  of  firing  gradually 
declines.   During  a  subsequent  manoeuvre,  the  pilot  may  tend  to  compensate  for  this  reduced 
sensitivity by losing height and so increasing visual angular velocity. 
c. 
During  a  low-level  abort  procedure,  the  inertial  force  associated  with  aircraft  acceleration 
combines  with  that  of  gravity  to  produce  a  resultant  that  is  displaced  from  the  vertical  (Fig  1a). 
This  apparent  shift  in  the  direction  of  the  gravitational  vertical  creates  a  compelling  illusory 
impression  of  positive  pitch  (Fig  1b).    Reduction  of  aircraft  pitch  in  response  to  this  illusion 
presents  an  obvious  threat  to  flight  safety;   moreover,  it  further  displaces  the  resultant  and  so, 
paradoxically,  increases  the  magnitude  of  the  apparent  positive  pitch.   The  pilot  who  has  made 
the decision to abort in good time, and who has become established on instruments, is unlikely to 
be influenced by this illusion during the abort procedure. 
6-9 Fig 1 False Vertical Due to Acceleration
Fig 1a  Actual Att itude
Fig 1b  Perceived Attitude
Acceleration
Inertial Force
due to Acceleration
I
(I)
Force of
g
Gravity
Resultant
R
(g)
(R)
13.  Collision  Course  Geometry.    Two  aircraft  on  a  collision  course,  each  flying  at  an  independent 
constant speed, will maintain a constant bearing relative to each other (see Fig 2).  The relative bearing 
(a) will depend on speeds, and relative tracks.   Each aircraft will therefore present a static image to the 
crew of the other aircraft, and be hard to detect when distant (i.e. small).   In such situations, detection is 
often  extremely  late  unless  the  aircrew  look  directly  towards  the  other  aircraft.   The  difficulty  of  visual 
acquisition has been demonstrated experimentally.  Aircrew failed to acquire a light aircraft on almost half 
of the occasions on which an interception had been deliberately engineered.   Good visual look-out, with 
efficient search of the entire visual field, is the only means of reducing the probability of mid-air collisions.  
Every  effort  should  be  made  to  minimise  the  dwell-times  between  eye  movements,  since  detection 
performance decreases with the duration of individual fixations. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
6-9 Fig 2 Aircraft on Constant Relative Bearing
Impact
Aircraft B
a
g
rin
a
e
B
tive
la
e
R
Angle a will depend
on individual aircraft
a
speeds and relative tracks
Aircraft A
Human Performance 
14.  Like  a  computer,  man’s  information-processing  system  has  a  finite  amount  of  processing 
resources.    The  everyday  term  'attention'  refers  to  the  allocation  of  these  resources  to  particular 
information sources or activities. 
15.  In general, it is possible successfully to divide attention between simultaneous activities, provided 
that  their  total  demands  do  not  exceed  the  available  resources.   However,  excessive  demand  may 
easily  be  experienced  during  low-level  flight.   Under  these  conditions,  it  is  necessary  either  to  shed 
some of the load completely or at least to defer the completion of activities of lesser importance until 
the  workload  peak  has  passed.    The  ability  to  respond  efficiently  during  periods  of  high  workload 
requires awareness of the priority that must be assigned to competing demands for attention; effective 
training and practice are necessary to enable individuals gain and retain such ability.   
16.  Training  has  the  further  important  function  of  reducing  the  incidence  of  excessive  workload 
(see Volume  6,  Chapter  1).      As  an  activity  is  practised,  its  demands  upon  the  limited  mental 
resources  decline.    Eventually,  automatic  routines  are  established  that  control  sequences  of  action 
without  the  need  for  conscious  intervention.    Paradoxically  however  the  delegation  of  activities  to 
automatic  control  can  lead  to  error,  particularly  if  the  demands  upon  mental  resources  from  other 
sources  are  high.    Errors  made  by  skilled  aircrew  tend  to  involve  sequences  of  action  that  are 
internally  coherent,  but  inappropriate  to  the  circumstances  –  conscious  awareness  is  often  triggered 
only  when  unintended  consequences  become  apparent.      The  reduced  margin  for  error  during 
low flying increases the need to ensure that actions are monitored as frequently as possible. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
17.  Interaction  with  Electronic  Aids.      The  electronic  aids  fitted  to  modern  military  aircraft 
greatly  reduce  mental  workload.    Head-up  displays  (HUDs)  minimise  the  need  to  make  large  eye 
and  head movements  to  take  in  the  outside  world  and  the  cockpit  interior,  and  facilitate  shifts  of 
attention  between  these  sources  of  information.    Terrain  avoidance  or  terrain  following  guidance 
similarly simplifies the aircraft control task.  However, these benefits carry potential penalties. 
a. 
Although  they  reduce  the  overall  level  of  aircrew  workload,  the  monitoring  component  is 
increased  since,  in  the  event  of  a  system  malfunction  or  damage,  the  aircrew  must  be  able  to 
take  over.   Furthermore,  as  avionics  technology  advances,  more  and  more  systems  tend  to  be 
crammed  into  the  cockpit,  so  exacerbating  the  situation.   Experimental  evidence  suggests  that 
reversion from HUD to cockpit instruments is unlikely to be accomplished in less than 3 seconds 
and  may  take  considerably  longer.   During  this  transition  period,  'seat  of  the  pants'  sensations 
concerning the behaviour of the aircraft may be illusory. 
b. 
The  low  frequency  fluctuations  in  z-axis  acceleration  associated  with  non-pilot-induced 
terrain following may lead to fatigue and to motion sickness. 
18.  Reaction  Time.    If  an  individual  is  expecting  a  single,  clearly  defined,  signal  to  which  a 
simple  response  must  be  made,  the  reaction  time  may  be  little  more  than  one-tenth  of  a  second.  
However, under less favourable conditions, reaction time is greatly increased.   The time to respond to 
an unexpected emergency during flight, for example, is likely to fall within the range of 2 to 7 seconds. 
a. 
Aircrew factors influencing reaction time include: 
(1)  Preparedness
Reaction    time    is    shorter    when    warning    is    given    of    the  
imminent occurrence of the signal. 
(2)  Age and Fitness.  Reaction  time  decreases  until  about  age  25,  thereafter  remaining 
relatively  constant  until  a  gradual  increase  is  observed  after  age  60.    Physical  fitness 
appears to be associated with faster responses. 
(3)  Stress  and  Anxiety.  Stress  and  anxiety  can  increase  arousal.      This  may 
decrease reaction time, but may also reduce accuracy. 
(4)  Experience.  Reaction  time,  even  to  very  simple  signals,  decreases  with  practice.  
An  important  role  of  simulator  training  is  therefore  to  provide  experience  in  responding  to 
emergencies during flight. 
b. 
Environmental influences on reaction time include: 
(1)  Retinal Position.   In general, reaction time to a visual signal increases with its distance 
from  the  centre  of  the  visual  field.    Important  warning  signals  are  therefore  presented  as 
centrally as possible. 
(2)  Intensity  of  the  Signal.  Reaction  time  decreases  as  the  intensity  of  the  signal 
increases. 
(3)  Sensory Modality.  Reaction time depends upon the sense organ to which the signal is 
presented.   For  example,  individuals  respond  more  quickly  to  an  auditory  than  to  a  visual 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
signal.  A further advantage of auditory signals is their ability to attract attention regardless of 
the  individual’s  direction  of  gaze.    Such  signals  are  therefore  commonly  used  to  present 
warnings to aircrew. 
(4)  Signal  and  Response  Characteristics.  Reaction  time  increases  with  the  number  of 
possible signals that may be presented, and the number of possible responses to these signals. 
(5)  Workload.  Reaction time to a signal is likely to increase as a function of workload. 
Stress and Arousal 
19.  The term 'arousal' refers to the individual’s level of alertness, extending from deep sleep to a state of 
frantic excitement.   For any task, there is a particular level of arousal that produces peak performance. 
As the difficulty of the task increases, so the optimal level of arousal decreases (Fig 3).   Many adverse 
environmental conditions increase or decrease the arousal level, and so affect performance. 
6-9 Fig 3 Relationship Between Arousal, Performance and Task Difficulty
Difficult Task
Easy Task
e
c
n
a
rm
rfo
e
P
Level of Arousal
20.  Over-arousal.    A  number  of  arousing  agents  can  be  identified  that  may  impair  efficiency 
during low-level flight: 
a. 
Workload.  The high workload associated with low-level flight increases the arousal level. 
b. 
Environmental  Factors.    Stressors  such  as  heat  and  noise  also  have  arousing  effects.  
At low levels, uncomfortable levels of heat may be experienced because of limited cockpit cooling. 
21.  The  Effect  of  Over-arousal.    Since  over-arousal  compromises  flight  safety,  its  effects  must 
be recognised.  The most important of these are listed below: 
a. 
Lessening  of  Calculative  Powers.      Activities  involving  the  storage  and  manipulation  of 
information  are  more  greatly  impaired  by  over-arousal  than  activities  simply requiring throughput 
of information.   Calculations of fuel reserves, for example, may be more severely disrupted than 
the control of aircraft attitude. 
b. 
Attentional  Effects.    Under  normal  conditions,  mental  resources  may  be  allocated 
voluntarily  to  various  aspects  of  the  flying  task.   However,  over-arousal  creates  a  focusing  of 
attention  on  particular  components  of  the  task;  it  may,  for  example,  induce aircrew to allocate a 
disproportionate amount of resources to a relatively minor malfunction. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
c. 
Impaired  Functional  Field  of  View.   A  phenomenon  related  to  over-arousal  is  shrinkage  of 
the  area  of  the  visual  field  from  which  information  may  be  extracted.    Consequently,  visual  look-out 
may be seriously impaired, with a reduced probability of detecting traffic in the visual periphery. 
d. 
Speed  Versus  Accuracy.    Over-arousal  tends  to  encourage  individuals  to  respond  rapidly 
but to sacrifice accuracy.  It may therefore degrade the quality of decision-making. 
e. 
Reduction  of  Mental  Resources.   Over-arousal  reduces  the  mental  resources  available 
for the performance of tasks. 
f. 
Reliance  on  'Automatic'  Behaviour.    Changes  in  the  amount  and  distribution  of  mental 
resources  encourage  the  delegation  of  well-practised  activities  to  automatic control, and present 
fewer opportunities to monitor their progress. 
g. 
Emergencies.     Several   accidents   involving   aircraft   malfunction   have   been   found   to  
be  attributable  more  directly  to  the  associated  state  of  over-arousal  than  to  the  original 
emergency. 
22.  Under-arousal.  Fatigue, generated by sleep loss or by prolonged work, may seriously impair the 
efficiency  of  aircrew  performance.    The  state  of  under-arousal  associated  with  fatigue  has  several 
consequences: 
a. 
Lessening  of  Routine  Task  Performance.      Contrary  to  the  effects  of  over-arousal, 
routine activities involving little information storage are more likely to be disrupted by fatigue than 
more intellectually demanding tasks. 
b. 
Behavioural  Lapses.    Periodic  lapses  in  performance  occur,  accompanied  by  changes 
in brain activity that indicate decreased alertness and receptiveness to stimuli. 
c. 
Attentional Effects.  Fatigue impairs the ability to pay particular attention to important aspects 
of the task.  This effect is the opposite of that of over-arousal, discussed in sub-para 21b. 
d. 
Loss  of  Speed  and  Accuracy.  Both  speed  and  accuracy  of  work  may  be  reduced  under 
fatigue. 
23.  Combinations  of  Stressors.    The  combined  effects  of  stressors  cannot  necessarily  be 
estimated  simply  by  summing  their  effects  in  isolation.    Stressors  that  decrease  arousal  tend  to 
counteract  the  effects  of  arousing  stressors.      For  example,  both  sleep  loss  and  noise  impair 
performance,  but  a  sleep-deprived  individual  may be more efficient  in a noisy environment than in a 
quiet one. 
Air Sickness 
24.  Air  sickness  is  considered  in  some  detail  in  Volume  6,  Chapter  6.    In  the  present  context,  it 
should be noted that high-speed, low-level flight creates powerful 'streaming' of ground-based features 
in peripheral vision, which, together with motion in the z axis, may provoke air sickness in individuals 
previously unaffected at medium level. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-9 - Physiological and Psychological Effects of Low Flying 
Summary 
25.  Modern  aircraft  technology  has  helped  to  alleviate  the  difficulties  associated  with  low  flying. 
Nevertheless, training and experience, together with careful pre-flight planning, are essential to permit 
aircrew to cope with the considerable demands that remain. 
26.  Even when flying in good weather, the instruments should be monitored for correct functioning; this 
will  mean  that  a  swift  and  assured  transition  to  instruments  can  be  made  if  bad  weather  is  then 
encountered.  Once the decision to abort from low level has been made safety altitude should be reached 
as quickly as possible, having established a robust instrument scan.  This means that actions such as 
frequency  changes  should  be  deferred  until  this  the  aircraft  is  safely  established  at  or  above  safety 
altitude and the pilot flying on instruments.. 
27.  Adherence to the correct abort procedures will minimise the risk of spatial disorientation during or 
after the manoeuvre. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
CHAPTER 10 - HELICOPTER ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  environmental  problems  encountered  by  the  helicopter  crew  are  not  new;  most  of  them are 
found to some degree in other aircraft types.  In the helicopter not only are all these problems present 
simultaneously  but  also  the  helicopter  frequently  has  to  be  flown  'hands  on'  for  long  periods  of  time.  
(Only  those  with  autostabilizers  or  autopilots  can  be  flown  hands  off  and  this  precludes  most  light 
helicopters.)  Accident risk is higher than in conventional aircraft, escape possibilities are limited and, in 
some helicopters, crash survivability is poor. 
Temperature 
2. 
Even within the European theatre, a helicopter may have to operate in ambient temperatures from 
−30 ºC to +45 ºC.  Even in the UK, the seasonal temperature change may exceed 30 ºC and extremes 
of temperature produce additional challenges for the crew. 
3. 
Cold Environments.   
a. 
Aircraft  Performance.    In  cold  environments,  cabin  conditioning,  which  consists  of 
strategically  placed  warm  air  vents,  may  be  inadequate  for  roles  which  require  the  frequent 
opening of doors. These vents derive their heat from hot air bled from the engines, which results 
in  reduced  aircraft  performance.    The  effect  may  be  insignificant  but  in  certain  conditions  that 
small  loss  of  power  can  be  important,  for  example  in  low  speed  flight  and  when  the  aircraft  is 
heavy.   
b. 
Comfort  and  Crew  Performance.    Cold  conditions  produce  similar  symptoms  and 
performance  decrements  for  aircrew  as  for  troops  on  the  ground.    However,  numb  fingers  and 
toes,  shivering  and  discomfort  are  likely  to  be  more  hazardous  in  the  flight  environment,  but 
aircrew are unable to move around sufficiently to keep warm.  These effects can be mitigated by 
insulated  clothing  but  this  can  produce  bulk  and  discomfort  that  can  also  affect  performance; 
insulated  gloves  can  significantly  reduce  the  manual  dexterity  needed  to  operate  an  aircraft,.  
Electrically heated socks and gloves may be used where appropriate power supplies are available, to 
augment the existing cabin conditioning system and cold weather flying clothing. 
4. 
Hot  Environments.    In  hot  environments  the  temperature  within  a  helicopter  can  be  higher  than 
ambient  due  to  the  greenhouse  effect  of  the  large  area  of  transparency.    Even  in  warm  conditions 
helicopter  crews  experience  significant  heat  loads.    This  is  exacerbated  by  the  requirement  to  wear  at 
least minimum clothing of 2 layers with long sleeves and underlayers (for flame protection in the event of 
an  accident),  a  helmet  and  load  carrying  equipment  or  body  armour  that  is  impervious  to  water  vapour 
and air flow. The result is that the ability of helicopter crew to lose heat through conduction, convection, 
evaporation (of sweat) and radiation is severely limited.  Consequently, helicopter crew are at risk of a rise 
in core temperature and a reduction in performance.  Personal conditioning systems, consisting of liquid 
filled tubed garments supplied from ice packs or thermoelectric devices, have been developed, proven in 
the  laboratory  and  trialled  successfully  by  helicopter  aircrews,  but  they  have  not  yet  been  brought  into 
mainstream  operations.    In  recent  operational  theatres  the  crews  have  dealt  with  the  heat  by  good 
acclimatisation,  excellent  hydration  and  various  means  of  reducing  heat  load  pre-flight  and  between 
sorties. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
Noise 
5. 
Sources of Noise.  Ambient noise levels of 115 dB inside a helicopter are quite common.  Some 
of  the  noise  is  aerodynamic  and  some  from  avionics  or  avionic  cooling,  but  most  comes  from  the 
power  train  i.e.  engine,  gearbox,  and  rotor  blades.    Another  important  source  of  noise  is  in  the 
communications  system.    As  the  majority  of the noise is of low frequency, conventional microphones 
are  frequently  unsuitable.    The  majority  of  helicopters  use  boom  microphones  and  these  can  cause 
considerable distortion of speech, although their signal/noise ratio is good.   
6. 
Effects  of  Noise.    Loud  noises  can  cause  numerous  problems.    In  the  short  term  there  can  be 
difficulty  in  communicating  and  over  a  period  of  hours  exposure  to  loud  noise  can  cause  additional 
fatigue.    In  the  medium  term,  loud  noise  can  cause  a  temporary  reduction  in  hearing,  a  temporary 
threshold  shift,  although  this  should  recover  over  several  hours  or  days.    In  the  long  term,  such 
exposures can cause a permanent threshold shift producing Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) with 
significant reduction in the ability to hear, especially in the speech frequencies.  Hence, it is important 
that helicopter aircrew are protected against noise for both their performance and their health. 
7.  Noise  Protection.    Under  European  and  UK  legislation,  employers  must  take  steps  to  protect 
workers from noise at a level of 80 dB(A) averaged over an 8 hour working day (LEP,d) and they must 
provide  additional  protection  if  the  level  exceeds  85  dB(A)  LEP,d.      Furthermore,  workers  must  not  be 
exposed  to  a  noise  level  exceeding  87  dB(A)  LEP,d.    A  hierarchy  of  protection  from  noise  exists  that 
commences  with  removal  of  the  noise  source,  replacement  of  the  source  with  quieter  equipment, 
shielding of the source, shielding from the source etc.  However, all of these are very difficult in aircraft 
so we are generally left with personal protective equipment as the solution. 
8. 
Personal  Protection  from  Noise.    In  recent  decades  the  main  protection  from  noise  has  been 
the  ear  cups  in  the  flying  helmet,  or  headset,  possibly  with  a  microphone  that  assists  in  reducing 
transmitted sound from the cockpit.  However, there are now other methods that involve either in-ear 
communication devices (IECD) or various forms of active noise reduction. 
a. 
Microphones.  A voice-operated electronic switch is employed in some systems to improve 
the overall signal/noise ratio and intelligibility by turning the microphone off when the wearer is not 
speaking.  Such a system should incorporate individual automatic level controls, so that the switch 
will  operate  at  a  given  point  above  the  local  noise  level.    However,  even  if  the  signal/noise  ratio 
from the microphone is good, it is not possible to produce an acceptable ratio at the ear simply by 
presenting the signal at a very high level; the ear becomes non-linear in its response at high level, 
and hearing loss can result.  It is therefore vitally important to maximize the attenuation provided 
by the helmet.   
b. 
Ear Cups.  The ear capsules provide a physical barrier against the passage of sound to the 
ear via the normal air conduction pathway.  These can be very effective, with some non-aviation 
types  producing  up  to  45  dB  attenuation.    Protection  is  derived  from  differing  aspects  of  the 
design:  the  shell  material  is  important  in  attenuation  at  frequency  ranges  of  400-2000  Hz;  the 
filling  material  protects  more  in  the  high  frequencies,  above  2  kHz;  whilst  the  cup  volume  is  the 
limiting  factor  at  low  frequencies  (below  400  Hz).    Consequently,  since  aviation  ear  cups  are 
limited  by  the  need  to  fit  beneath  the  helmet,  their  volume  is  limited  and  the  best  types  will 
currently only provide around 27 dB attenuation. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
c. 
In  Ear  Communication  Devices.    In  order  to  improve  hearing  protection  further,  some 
aircrew would wear expanded acoustic resin (EAR) ear plugs inside the ear cups of their helmet 
(‘double  protection’).    Whilst  this  increased  protection  against  external  noise,  it  also  reduced the 
level of communications volume from the intercom and radio, because the speaker was external 
to the ear plug.  This could be countered by increasing the audio volume but there was a loss in 
speech  intelligibility  even  though  overall  noise  exposure  was  reduced.    In  recent  years,  the 
principle  of  double  protection  has  been  used  but  with  miniature  speakers  feeding  the 
communications sound to the inside of the ear plug.  Such devices are termed in-ear commination 
devices (IECD) and they can provide excellent levels of hearing protection.  They have the benefit 
of double protection but also the audio is presented against a lower background noise level so the 
contribution  of  communications,  which  can  be  significant,  is  reduced.    There  are  a  variety  of 
designs with some using EAR type plugs and others using silicone or a resin material.   However, 
all will require connections to the audio system and they must integrate adequately with the other 
head worn items, as well as providing suitable levels of comfort. 
d. 
Active  Noise  Reduction.    Active  Noise  Reduction  (ANR)  uses  a  microphone  in  the  headphone 
which detects all ambient noise at the ear.  A processor then generates and introduces a sound signal 
that is 180 degrees out of phase which, when added to the signal sent to the earphone, cancels out the 
ambient noise.  In turn, this allows the input signal from the communications system to be heard more 
clearly.    Despite  great  promise,  early  analogue  ANR  suffered  from  considerable  limitations  from 
processing time and frequency limits, offering little protection against sounds above approximately 500 
Hz.  More recently, digital ANR has been able to expand the frequency range up to approximately 1000 
Hz. Currently, protection levels are around 15 dB which is adequate for some platforms in combination 
with  a  helmet  or  headset.    In  the  future,  it  is  likely  that  adaptive  digital  ANR  will  be  introduced.    This 
should  be  able  to  provide  protection  at  specific  frequencies,  tuned  to  each  aircraft  platform,  e.g.  the 
propeller frequencies of turboprop aircraft, and by targeting the highest peaks of exposure, it should be 
able to provide significant protection. 
Vibration 
9. 
Helicopter  aircrew  are  exposed  to  vibration  with  significant  linear  and  angular  acceleration 
components  in  the  three  orthogonal  axes.    Vibration  is  present  throughout  a  sortie  from  start  to  shut 
down, but it changes with phase of flight.  Vibration increases with airspeed, all up mass and transition to 
the hover.  It will also be exacerbated by turbulence.  The dominant vibration frequency is a function of 
rotor speed and the number of rotor blades, and ranges from 12 to 18 Hz (dependent on aircraft type).  
The magnitude of the linear vibration is usually greatest in the gz (vertical) axis and can be of the order of 
6 m/s2 (0.6g) in some aircraft during certain phases of flight.   
10.  Vibration can give rise to the following: 
a. 
Difficulty in reading aircraft instruments. 
b. 
Difficulty in reading hand-held maps and charts. 
c. 
Impaired ability to make fine positioning and control movements. 
d. 
Generalized discomfort and early onset of fatigue. 
e. 
Specific symptoms e.g. teeth chatter, flutter of facial muscles, and aggravation of backache. 
Thus,  vibration  may  impair  operational  effectiveness  of  helicopter  aircrew  by  degrading performance, 
increasing workload and engendering fatigue. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
Comfort and Controls 
11.  Helicopters are notorious for providing poor comfort for their crew.  Sources of discomfort include: 
a. 
Control Geometry.  By current convention, helicopters are controlled using a cyclic stick, for 
directional  and  speed  control;  a  collective  lever,  for  power  control;  and  yaw  pedals  for 
aerodynamic  balance  in  flight  plus  directional  control  in  the  hover.    The  cyclic  stick  is  situated 
between the pilot’s legs and operated using the right hand; the collective lever is to the left of the 
pilot’s  seat  and  operated  with  the  left  hand;  and  the  yaw  pedals  are  operated  by  the  feet  in  the 
same  way  as  rudder  pedals  in  fixed  wing  aircraft.    Unfortunately,  the  actual  positions  of  these 
controls,  plus  the  need  to  maintain  a  lookout  to  the  sides  and  rear,  mean  that  pilots  tend  to  sit 
leaning  forward  in  the  so-called  ‘helicopter  hunch’.    Consequently,  the  spine  is  forward  flexed  at 
best and at worst it also has some rotation and lateral flexion.  
b. 
Seat  Design  and  Adjustment.    Seat  design  varies  in  quality  but,  almost  invariably,  gives 
little  back  support.    Seat  pans  and  cushions  vary  from  flat  hard  cushions  to  contoured  shapes 
giving good support.  In general, the seat pan should be contoured, should be raked and should 
also  be  long  enough  to  support  the  thighs  when  the  hips  and  knees  are  flexed  to  operate  the 
controls.  This is essential to reduce the pressure on the buttocks and ischial tuberosities during 
longer sorties.  If armour is required for the crew, it should be designed into the seats rather than 
being  added  on  as  an  afterthought.    Retro-fitted  armour  can  encroach  on  the  space  for  the 
occupant and result in a limited ability to move in the seat to reduce pressure on affected areas. 
Seat  adjustment  varies  from  vertical  only,  to  horizontal  only,  or  a  combination  of  both,  with  or 
without yaw pedal adjustment.  However, the ranges of adjustment are often too little for those at 
the extremes of the anthropometric distribution. 
c. 
Aircrew Equipment Assemblies.  The clothing and equipment worn by aircrew (the aircrew 
equipment assembly (AEA)) can add to discomfort.  It is essential that clothing fits correctly and is 
designed  not  to  have  excessive  bulk  leading  to  folds  that  can  cause  pressure  on  the  tissue 
beneath.    Ideally  clothing  would  be  designed  to  fit  optimally  when  sitting  in  the  position  adopted 
during flight.  Equipment adds bulk and can also add large amounts of weight; these can reduce 
mobility and add pressure to the areas in contact with the seat.  Head mounted mass also adds to 
discomfort due to spinal loading especially when the spine is flexed forward.  This is a particular 
problem for rear crew who have to support the weight of helmet, NVG, counterbalance weight etc. 
whilst  leaning  over  the  tailgate,  looking  through  holes  in  the  floor  or  through  bubble  windows, 
where  the  additional  weight  is  support  by  the  musculature  rather  than  down  an  upright  spinal 
column. 
d. 
Flight Durations.  In the past, helicopters had limited fight durations and had to shut down 
for  refuel.    Consequently,  the  crew  had  the  ability  to  unstrap  and  exit  the  aircraft  periodically.  
Without internal or external ferry tanks, flight endurance is typically around 2 hours.  More modern 
aircraft  are  able  to  accept  running  refuels  so  they  can  re-fuel  with  rotors  stopped  but  engines 
running.    This  is  advantageous  in  reducing  time  on  the  ground  and  increasing  availability  of  the 
aircraft, but it means that aircrew cannot get out. Hence, crews can potentially spend 5 or 6 hours, 
or possibly more, strapped into the seat. 
e. 
Environmental Factors.  As mentioned in earlier sections, helicopters are frequently too hot, 
or too cold; they are always noisy and they always vibrate.  Such environmental factors add to the 
likelihood of discomfort and stresses on the crew. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
These  factors  result  in  complaints  of  discomfort  being common in helicopter crew.  Low back pain is 
most  common  in  front  seat  crew  but  complaints  of  pain  in  the  mid  or  upper  back,  or  neck  are  not 
unusual.    For  rear  crew  neck  pain  is  more  frequent.    Such  problems  can  be  mitigated  by  good 
equipment  design,  lumbar  supports  and  more  recently,  a  physiotherapy  led  aircrew  (physical) 
conditioning programme has commenced. 
12.  These ergonomic issues are exacerbated by the need, in most helicopters, to keep the hands and 
feet on the controls throughout flight.  In normal flight modes the forces on controls are very light due to 
hydraulic  assistance  systems.    However,  in  certain  emergency  situations  the  pilot  will  lose  hydraulic 
power, resulting in very heavy forces needing to be applied to the controls.  More modern helicopters 
have  been  equipped  with  flight  control  systems  previously  only  seen  in  large  multi-engine  fixed  wing 
aircraft.    They  now  have  flight  control  systems  and  autopilots  that  allow  pilots  to  remove  their  hands 
and feet from the controls periodically to reduce strain on the limbs and back. 
Disorientation 
13.  Helicopter  aircrew  experience  illusory  sensations  of  aircraft  motion  and  attitude  which  are,  in 
general,  similar  to  those  reported  by  pilots  of  fixed  wing  aircraft.    However,  because  the  helicopter 
lacks inherent aerodynamic stability, recovery from an abnormal attitude or control error precipitated by 
disorientation,  must  be  actively  pursued  by  the  pilot.    In  addition,  because  flight  is  commonly  at  low 
altitude, there may be little time in which to make the necessary recovery action. 
14.  When in the hover, the pilot has to maintain attitude in pitch, yaw, and roll, as in a fixed wing aircraft, 
but  also  has  to  minimize  translational  motion  in  three  orthogonal  axes.    Without  reliable  visual  cues, 
particularly  at  night,  the  pilot  is  unable  to  maintain  accurate  and  stable  hover, because the angular and 
linear motion stimuli may be below the threshold for detection by his sensory system.  Thus, disorientation 
commonly  occurs  when  the  pilot  attempts  to  hover  in  conditions  where  external  visual  references  are 
degraded, or absent, as when flying at night, or in cloud, fog, snow, dust or smoke.  Some aircraft have 
instruments to assist in such conditions, but the scan can be disturbed and disorientation ensues when 
the  pilot  transfers  from  instrument  to  external  visual  reference  and  vice  versa.    Difficulties  can  be 
compounded by vibration which may impair visibility of the aircraft instruments.  Some modern helicopters 
provide automatic systems for take-off to hover to overcome these problems but in the majority of aircraft 
pilots must control a hover by visual reference to the external environment. 
15.  In  order  to  maintain  accurate  hover  without  using  instruments,  the  pilot  must  have  a  stable  and 
discernable  ground  reference.    At  night,  a  single  light  on  the  ground  is  inadequate  for  the  correct 
appreciation  of  height,  and  it  may  give  rise  to  a  false  perception  of  motion  due  to  the  'auto  kinetic 
illusion'.    Flight  near  moving  light  sources  (e.g.  on  a  motor  vehicle  or  on  another  aircraft)  can  also 
disorientate  because  of  error  in  the  appreciation  of  relative  motion.    Even  when  the  ground  is 
illuminated by lights on the helicopter, problems can arise if only a small area of ground is picked out 
by  a  narrow  beam  of light; furthermore, at heights, typically greater than 100 ft, ground texture is lost 
and other visual cues should be employed.  When hovering over the sea, the wave pattern generated 
by  rotor  downdraught  can,  by  its  relative  motion,  produce  an  illusory  sensation  of  backward  motion.  
Likewise, when at low altitude over water or snow, the movement of spray or snow downwards through 
the  rotor  can  be  interpreted  as  ascent  of  the  helicopter.    These  visual  problems  are  compounded  by 
the use of night vision goggles. 
16.  Blade flicker is more commonly a cause of distraction and irritation than disorientation, though at 
times the repetitively moving pattern of light within the cockpit does give rise to an illusory sensation of 
rotation  (vertigo)  in  the  opposite  direction  to  that  of  the  visual  stimulus.    A  more  frequently  reported 
cause  of  disorientation  and  distraction  when  flying  in  cloud,  fog,  rain,  snow  etc. is  the  backscatter  of 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
light from the helicopter’s anti-collision beacon into the cockpit.  In such flight conditions, the reflected 
light,  apart  from  giving  inappropriate  visual  motion  stimuli,  degrades  visibility  of  external  visual  cues 
and  may  necessitate  transfer  to  flight  instruments.    Under  these  conditions,  the  anti-collision  light 
should be switched off.  Flicker induced epilepsy is a very rare condition and susceptible individuals are 
not accepted for aircrew training. 
17.  Illusions  reported  by  helicopter  aircrew  attributable  to  physiological  limitations  of  inner  ear 
(vestibular)  mechanisms  are  similar  in  character  and  incidence  to  those  described  by  pilots  of  fixed 
wing  aircraft.    The  'leans'  (a  false  sensation  of  roll  attitude)  is  by  far  the  most  common,  though  an 
illusory sensation of turn on recovery from a sustained turn is also a frequent occurrence.  In addition, 
false  sensations  of  turn  and  attitude  change  are  evoked  when  a  head  movement  is  made  in  a 
helicopter which is turning or when the aviator is exposed to an abnormal force environment (i.e. linear 
acceleration  other  than  1g).    Typically,  these  varied  manifestations  of  vestibular  disorientation  are 
experienced only when flying on instruments or when flying by marginal external visual references as at 
night or in poor visibility conditions. 
18.  Whilst all of the disorientation phenomena listed above can, and do, occur, more recent data show 
that the bulk of helicopter disorientation accidents in recent years are due to very high crew workloads.  
As  aircraft  have  been  designed  with  greater  amounts  of  operational  equipment,  such  as  weapons, 
observation aids etc., the workload on crews has increased, despite the automation of many flight and 
engine  systems  previously  monitored  by  the  crew.  This  challenges  the  ability  to  appropriately  divide 
attention  and  can  detract  from  the  flying  task.    As  a  result,  the  typical  military  helicopter  spatial 
disorientation  accident  is  less  one  of  classical  vestibular  or  visual  illusions,  but  more  one  of  a  hard-
pressed  crew  flying  a  system  intensive  aircraft  (often  at  night  using  night  vision  devices)  failing  to 
detect a dangerous flight path.   
19.  Feelings  of  detachment,  isolation,  and  estrangement  (the  'Break-off'  phenomenon)  are 
experienced  by  helicopter  pilots,  typically,  during  the  more  monotonous  phase of a sortie when flying 
solo  in  conditions  where  external  visual  references  are  not  well  defined  (e.g.  smooth  sea,  hazy 
indistinct horizon) and there are few cues of relative motion.  The flight environment conducive to the 
induction  of  sensations  characteristic  of  the  'Break-off'  phenomenon  is  similar  to  that  found  in  fixed 
wing  aircraft,  though,  notably,  in  helicopters  'Break-off'  is  not  confined  to  high  altitude  flight  but  can 
occur  quite  low  (500  ft  agl).    The  commonest  sensation  is  one  of  being  'suspended  in  space'  or 
'balanced on a knife edge'; though the feeling of detachment can be more severe, and the aviator may 
even  feel  that  he  is  separated  from  the  aircraft.    Coupled  with  such  'dissociative'  sensations  there  is 
frequently  a  heightened  awareness  of  changes  in  aircraft  orientation,  though  frank  disorientation  with 
illusory sensations of attitude and motion are quite rare. 
Accidents 
20.  Accident  Risk.  Overall,  the  risk  of  fatalities  in  helicopter  accidents  is  higher  than  in  fixed  wing 
aircraft.  This is due to their flight environment and the characteristics of the aircraft.  Half of helicopter 
accidents  have  occurred  at  heights  of  less  than  100  ft  and  a  further  30%  between  100  ft  and  500  ft.  
Flying so close to the ground means that the risk of controlled flight into terrain (including obstructions 
such  as  trees,  telegraph  cables,  power  lines  and  other  wires)  is  high.    In  addition,  if  an  emergency 
occurs  there  may  be  very  little  time  to  respond  and  control  it  before  reaching  the  ground.    These 
heights  preclude  the  use  of  escape  systems  such  as  conventional  parachutes,  so  military  helicopter 
crews have to ride their aircraft to the ground Consequently, military helicopter crews spend much time 
learning to manage emergencies, control a descent in autorotation (without power to the rotor blades) 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-10 - Helicopter Environmental Effects 
and  then  land  it  safely.    Whilst  all  will  be  able  to  do  this  competently  in  a  training  situation,  they  all 
accept that operational circumstances will be likely to make it much more difficult. 
21.  Impact  Survivability.    Helicopters  have  tended  to  be  built  to  low  standards  of  crash  impact 
survivability, much lower than fixed wing aircraft.  In recent years much has been done to improve this 
situation.  The design aims have been to: 
a. 
De-lethalise the cockpit and cabin.  Aircraft fuselages are stronger to prevent deformation 
of  the  occupant  space  and  prevent  intrusion  of  components  such  a  gearboxes  and engines that 
will  cause  injury.    Structures  within  the  ‘strike  envelope’  of  flailing  limbs  can  also  be  removed  or 
modified to prevent injury.   
b. 
Improve  restraint.    Occupants  that  are  properly  restrained  will  be  less  likely  to  be  thrown 
around inside the fuselage, or ejected from it, and injuries will be reduced.  The fitting of effective 
harnesses, either 5 point or 4 point, has assisted. 
c. 
Attenuate  Energy.    Impact  energy  can  now  be  absorbed  by  energy  attenuating 
undercarriage and seating that absorbs energy, preventing its transmission to the occupants. 
d. 
Prevent fire.  The risk of post-crash fire can be reduced by, for example, using self-sealing 
fuel  tanks  and  fuel  lines  that  seal  when  disrupted;  inertially  operated  fire  extinguishers  that 
activate  when  exposed  to  impact  decelerations;  and  engines  mounted out board of the fuselage 
that will break clear in an accident. 
Although many modern aircraft incorporate some of these features, very few will have all of them.  For 
older  aircraft  the  situation  is  worse  due  to  the  cost  or  impossibility  of  retro-fitting  such  features.  
Consequently, many helicopter crew still fly aircraft with limited crashworthy features. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
CHAPTER 11 - SLEEP, WAKEFULNESS AND CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS 
Sleep 
1. 
Since  disturbed  sleep  is  frequently  experienced  by  aircrew,  some  knowledge  of  the  sleep-
wakefulness  continuum  is  helpful  in  understanding  the  changes  in sleep associated with air operations.  
Sleep can be classified into various stages (see Fig 1).  These stages may be used to indicate the depth 
and  continuity  of  sleep.  They are also used when considering the changes that take place when sleep 
occurs at unusual times or when an individual is exposed to a time zone transition. 
2. 
From Figure 1, there are four stages of sleep.  In addition, there is a stage, known as REM (rapid 
eye movement) sleep, in between 'Awake' and 'Stage 1'.  The numbered stages are known collectively 
as  'non-REM  sleep'  and  increase  in  depth  (or  intensity)  as  the  number  increases.    A  healthy  young 
adult  normally  passes  quickly  from  wakefulness  through  the  lighter  stages  (1  and  2)  into  the  deeper 
stages (3 and 4) in which the brain waves slow down.  Between 70 and 90 minutes after the onset of 
sleep, the first period of REM sleep occurs.  It is followed by further non-REM stages, and then another 
episode  of  REM  sleep.    These  cycles  of  non-REM  and  REM  sleep  last  about  100  minutes,  and their 
content alters as the night proceeds.  Later sleep cycles have less slow brain wave sleep, and periods 
of  REM  sleep  become  longer  towards  the  end  of  the  night.    The  sleep  pattern  of  a  young  adult  is 
shown in Figure 1.  Typically, about 50% of the night is occupied by stage 2 sleep, 20% by slow wave 
sleep,  25%  by  REM  sleep,  and  5%  by  stage  1  drowsy  sleep  and  minor  awakenings.    However,  the 
nightly  amounts  of  the  various  stages  of  sleep  are  related to age.  In middle age, there is much less 
slow  brain  wave  sleep  and  an  increase  in  wakefulness  during  the  night.    It  may,  therefore,  be  much 
more difficult for middle-aged individuals to achieve acceptable sleep when the normal pattern of sleep 
and wakefulness is altered. 
6-11 Fig 1 Sleep Pattern of a Young Adult 
Sleep Stages
4
3
p
e
2
le
S
f
o
1
th
p
e
D
REM
Awake
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Sleep Onset
Hours
Latency
Sleep Period Time
Circadian Rhythms 
3. 
Many biological processes vary with respect to time in a periodic and regular manner.  In humans, 
the commonly observed phenomena which oscillate once around the length of the solar day (24 hours) 
are  known  as  'Circadian  Rhythms'.    Such  rhythms are free-running, self-sustaining oscillations with a 
periodicity  between  23  and  26  hours,  but  they  are  normally  entrained  to  a  24  hour  cycle  by 
environmental synchronizers, known as 'zeitgebers'.  The principal zeitgebers are light and darkness, 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
though  others,  such  as  meals  and  social  activities  also  have  an  influence.  Many variables, including 
body  temperature  and  alertness,  demonstrate  circadian  periodicity,  though  the  timing  of  maximum 
(acrophase)  and  minimum  (nadir)  values  differs  between  rhythms.    With  the  increased  use  of  night 
vision enhancing technology, flying during hours of darkness is becoming almost the norm.  Therefore, 
consideration of disturbances in circadian rhythms is even more important than in the past. 
4. 
On most tasks, if not all, performance rises during the day to a peak or plateau around 1800 hours 
and falls to a minimum usually between 0300 and 0600 (Fig 2). 
6-11 Fig 2 Circadian Rhythm of Performance 
Circadian Rhythm
+
e
c
n
a
Midnight
rm
Midday
Midday
rfo
e
P
-
0500 hrs
Performance over long periods of time may also be influenced by an interaction with the circadian system.  
With increasing time on task, after an initial improvement, the level of performance falls (Fig 3). 
6-11 Fig 3 Change in Performance with Time on Task 
+
e
c
n
a
Time on Task (Hours)
rm
rfo
0
4
8
12
16
e
P
-
Performance
5. 
The  extent  of  this  degradation  may  depend  on  the  stage  of  the  circadian  cycle  with  which  it 
coincides.  For example, during a 16-hour period of duty commencing at 1400 hours, very low levels of 
performance  occur  during  the  latter  part  of  the  duty  period  coinciding  with  the  circadian  trough  in 
performance  (Fig  4).    On  the  other  hand,  if  duty  commences  around  0200  hours,  it  is  likely  that 
performance will be maintained due to the favourable influence of the circadian rhythm during the latter 
part of the duty period (Fig 5).  It would appear that increasing levels of alertness during the day partly 
compensate for the effect of prolonged work, whereas the natural increase in sleepiness at night may 
add to the problem. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
6-11 Fig 4 Resultant Performance Graph for Duty Commencing at 1400 Hours 
+
e
c
n
1400 hrs
a
Midnight
rm
rfo
Midday
Midday
e
P
-
0600 hrs
Resultant
6-11 Fig 5 Resultant Performance Graph for Duty Commencing at 0200 Hours 
+
e
c
n
a
Midnight
Midnight
rm
Midday
rfo
e
Resultant
P
-
1800 hrs
Disturbed Sleep 
6. 
Disturbed  sleep  over  a  day  or  two  may  arise  from  a  change  of  surroundings  or  from  difficulty  in 
coping  with  an  unusual  pattern  of  work.    It  is  in  this  context  that  aircrew  may  experience  sleep 
difficulties.  Changes in sleeping environment, and rest at unusual times, are part of day-to-day life for 
many  aircrew.    Even  limited  alterations  disturb  some  individuals,  particularly  if  they  occur  suddenly.  
Similarly,  work  by  day  and  rest  at  night  are  in  harmony  with  the  normal  pattern  of  sleep  and 
wakefulness.  Those who work unusual hours and have to cope with time zone changes are likely to be 
out of phase with this natural rhythm. 
7. 
Disturbed sleep is one of the major consequences of shift work.  The night worker is forced to rest 
during the day, not only out of phase with the normal rhythm of sleep and wakefulness, but also when 
environmental  factors  such  as  noise  and  light  do  not  favour  sleep.    There  are  also  higher  ambient 
temperatures  and  social  influences,  which  may  disturb  even  the  most  tired  morning  sleeper.    It  is 
estimated that 50% of shift workers suffer from sleep disturbance, whereas in day workers the figure is 
between 5% and 20%.  During operations in which sustained effort is required, especially during night 
operations, daytime sleep may be inadequate in quality and quantity to the point that serious sleep debt 
accrues.    In  these  circumstances,  any  measures  which  improve  the  quality  of  daytime  sleep  can  be 
crucial.  The measures outlined in para 17 should not be viewed as luxuries, but as measures which 
improve operational effectiveness and mitigate risk. 
8. 
Adaptation to night work takes several consecutive days and, during this time, sleep taken during 
the day may be shorter because the individual is unable to stay asleep.  Problems are also associated 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
with morning shift work.  Sleep before an early morning shift may be curtailed, and individuals may be 
unable  to  compensate  by  commencing  their  sleep  earlier.    Shift  workers  often  compensate  for  lost 
sleep by napping, and by extending sleep on days off. 
9. 
Some  irregularity  of  sleep  is  inherent  in  most  air  operations.    Duty  hours  may  encroach  on  the 
normal nocturnal sleep period, and some periods may be shortened.  The mean duration of sleep over 
several months may be around 8 hours, but the range may extend from as little as 5 hours to as many 
as  9  hours.    Prolongation  of  some  sleep  periods  is  the  essential  compensation  to  duty  hours  which 
encroach on early morning and late evening sleep. 
Fatigue 
10.  ICAO defines Fatigue as : 
“A  physiological  state  of  reduced mental or physical performance capability, resulting from sleep 
loss  or  extended  wakefulness,  circadian  phase  or  workload  (mental  and/or physical activity) that 
can impair alertness and ability to perform safety related duties”. 
11.  In simplistic terms fatigue is an experience of physical or mental weariness that results in reduced 
alertness. The major cause of fatigue is not having obtained adequate rest and recovery from previous 
activities. Fatigue largely results from inadequate quantity or quality of sleep. This is because both the 
quantities and quality of sleep are of equal importance to recover from fatigue and maintaining normal 
alertness  and  performance.  Furthermore,  the  effects  of  fatigue  can  be  exacerbated  by  exposure  to 
harsh environments (Operations) and prolonged mental or physical work. 
12.  Inadequate sleep (quality and quantity) over a series of nights causes a sleep debt which results 
in increased fatigue that can sometimes be worse than a single night of inadequate sleep. Sleep debt 
can  only  be  recovered  with  adequate  recovery  and  sleep.  When  personnel  work  outside  the  normal 
routine Monday to Friday hours e.g.: 0800 to 1700, this can limit the opportunity for sleep and recovery 
in each twenty-four-hour period. This is partly due to the disruption of the circadian rhythms.  
13.  Fatigue-related  symptoms  can  be  divided  into  three  categories:  physical,  mental  and  emotional. 
Table 1 depicts examples of each of these types of fatigue. If a person is experiencing three or more of 
the  symptoms  outlined  below,  there  is  an  increased  chance  that  they  are  experiencing  some level of 
fatigue  or  reduced  alertness.  It  should  be  remembered  that  fatigue  may not be the only cause of the 
symptoms  presented  below  but  if  they  occur  together,  it  is  a  good  indication  that  an  individual  is 
fatigued.    Personnel  who  present  three  or  more  symptoms  in  a  short  period  of  time  are  likely  to  be 
experiencing fatigue-related impairment.  
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
Table 1 Categories of Sleep Related Symptoms 
Physical Symptoms 
Mental Symptoms 
Emotional Symptoms 
Yawning  
Irrational decision making  
Quieter or withdrawn than usual  
Heavy eyelids  
Irrational reactions  
Lacking energy  
Rubbing Eyes  
Illogical reactions  
Lacking  in  motivation  to  do  a 
Head drooping  
Difficulty concentrating on tasks  
task well  
Microsleeps  
Lapses in attention  
Irritable  or  grumpy  with  peers, 
Difficulty  remembering  what  they  are  family or friends  
doing  
Failure to communicate important info  
Failure to anticipate events or actions  
Accidently doing the wrong thing 
14. The result of fatigue is reduced alertness which may have a negative impact on performance. The 
fatigue associated with tiredness and reduced alertness is different from physical fatigue or weariness 
which  is  caused  by  long  hard  physical  work. In this case, fatigue may be more accurately defined as 
mental  fatigue  although  it  certainly  affects  physical  performance  as  well, especially tasks that require 
hand-eye  coordination,  rapid  reaction  times  and  fine  motor  skills.  Other  skills  that  are  impaired  by 
fatigue  include  attention,  vigilance,  concentration,  communication,  and  decision-making.  Impairment 
can lead to fatigue-related errors, which in turn can lead to incidents or accidents. 
15.  It  is  vital  that  supervisors  understand  their  shift  system,  in  which  our  personnel  should  be  given 
sufficient  time  to  sleep,  rest  and  to  have  family  and  social  time  away  from  work.  A  fatigue  friendly 
environment  equates  to  a  normal  routine  Monday  to  Friday  hours  eg:  0800  –  1700  shift.  Yet  even 
allowing  a  shift  pattern  to  finish  by  2200  would  still  provide satisfactory opportunity for sleep and rest 
without  having  to  waken  excessively  early  the  following  day.  However,  whilst  this  provides  sufficient 
time  for  sleep,  there  is  little  or  no  time  for  socialising  or  spending  time  with  families  or  friends  thus 
leading to social isolation and low mood, both of which can lead to fatigue. Therefore, providing ample 
opportunity for balancing sleep, social and family time should be taken into account when choosing a 
particular  shift  pattern.  Shifts  should  also  have  a  definitive  end  of  duty  time,  as  the  absence  of  a 
definitive end of duty time creates uncertainty which can act as a stressor within the body that may lead 
to mental fatigue. This is particularly key on some engineering night shifts where personnel commence 
duty  at  1630  and  have  no  definitive  end  of  duty  time.  DH’s  should  therefore  ensure  that  for  normal 
situations an end of duty time is defined. Furthermore, DH’s should ensure that their ADS/orders where 
fatigue  is  covered  includes  maximum  permissible  consecutive  duties  and  details  mandatory  rest 
periods. These duties should clearly articulate the process for deviation away from the norm, where an 
increased consecutive period is required for operational reasons.  
Time Zone Changes 
16.  The disturbance of sleep which occurs after a change of time zone is often referred to as jet lag 
and is of particular importance to aircrew.  Trans meridian flights lead to desynchronization of circadian 
rhythms from those of the environment.  Fatigue may occur at inappropriate times of the day, while the 
ensuing need to synchronize rhythms to a new time zone leads to sleep disturbance.  Individuals may 
have  difficulty  in  falling  asleep  when  it  is  the  local  time  for  rest,  and  there  may  be  spontaneous 
awakenings during the night or early awakening during the morning. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
17.  Circadian  rhythms  are  usually  entrained  by  cues  in  the  environment,  but  desynchronization  can 
arise in a number of ways.  The zeitgebers in the environment may change their period length, become 
weakened or disappear completely.  Conflict may also arise when rest and activity patterns are out of 
phase  with  the  environmental  synchronizers,  such  as  with  shift  work  or  after  a  trans  meridian  flight.  
Adaptation  of  sleep  and  wakefulness  after  a  change  in  the  work-rest  cycle,  or  after  a  time  zone 
change, may take several days. 
18.  In managing this there are a few considerations: 
a. 
Number of time zones crossed.  
b. 
The  adaptation  is  usually  faster  following  westward  travel  than  eastward  travel  across 
the  same  number  of  time  zones.  This  is  because  most  people  have  a  circadian  body  clock 
that  has  a  cycle  slightly  longer  than  24-hours,  therefore  it  is  easier  to  adapt  to  a  westward 
shift.    After  a  westward  flight,  aircrew  should  usually  fall  asleep  quickly  as  the  local  time  for 
rest is well into the 'night' of the individual’s natural rhythm for sleep and wakefulness.  
c. 
After eastward flights across 6 or more time zones, the circadian body clock may adapt 
by shifting in the opposite direction, i.e. shifting 18 time zones west rather than 6 time zones 
east.  When  this  occurs,  some  rhythms  shift  eastward  and  others  westward  and  overall 
adaptation  maybe  slowed.    After  an  eastward  flight,  the  onset  of  sleep  after  retiring  may  be 
delayed over several days as individuals attempt to sleep earlier in their previously established 
sleep-wakefulness  cycle.    However,  many  eastward  journeys  are  overnight,  and  the  loss  of 
sleep  during  the  flight  duty  period,  and  possibly  during  the  day  of  arrival,  may  combine  to 
overcome any difficulties in falling asleep on the first night in the new location. 
d. 
Adaptation is usually faster when the circadian body clock is more exposed to the time 
cues that it needs in the new time zone. Therefore, the earlier you can adopt the eating and 
sleeping cycle in the new time zone, the less effect jet lag will have upon you. 
e. 
Increased  fatigue  levels  are  likely  if  a  person  does  not  adopt  to  the  new  time  zone  and 
continues  to  eat  and  sleep  under  their  previous  time  zone.  This  may  result  in  degraded 
performance on mental and physical tasks and mood changes, and minor digestive system upset. 
19.  Operationally,  the  main  problem  posed  by  trans  meridian  flights  is  coping  with  the  effect  of  time 
zone changes rather than adapting to them.  Some aircrew are involved in repeated crossing of time 
zones,  or  in  North-South  operations,  which  involve  night  flights.    In  these  circumstances,  sleep 
becomes  irregular  over  an  extended  period  with  respect  to  both  duration  and  time  of  day.    With  24 
hours  stand-down  periods,  a  long  sleep  immediately  after  a  flight  could  mean  that  aircrew  are  then 
awake for too long before the next duty begins; so crews often split their sleep into two parts.  Sleep is 
restricted immediately after the flight, and a further sleep of 3 to 4 hours is taken shortly before the next 
duty.    During  long-range  flights,  which  extend  wakefulness  beyond  16  hours,  and  when  crew 
composition and duties permit, naps of up to one hour may be extremely helpful in reducing fatigue.  In 
addition,  they  probably  assist  in  the  adaptation  to  new  time  zones,  particularly  with  westward  flights 
when the day is lengthened. 
20.  Whilst  Jet  Lag  is  well  recognised  and  can  be  acclimatised  to;  Shift  Lag  is  less well appreciated. 
One  cannot  acclimatise  to  shift  lag  due  to  the  multiple  social  and  environmental  cues  that  affect  our 
circadian  rhythms.  Night  shifts  will  thus  remain  the  most  dangerous  working  environment  in  regards 
fatigues’ effect. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
Transport Operations 
21.  The management of aircrew coping with irregularity of work and rest is complex; the key is in the 
design of duty schedules.  Long-range operations, incompatible with acceptable sleep, could prejudice 
mission accomplishment as well as flight safety (as could intense short-range schedules).  Therefore, 
duty  hours  are  an  extremely  important  issue.    Normally,  workloads  must  allow  crews  to  achieve  an 
acceptable pattern and duration of sleep.  Practically, this means time off-duty of sufficient duration to 
allow eight hours for sleep, in addition to time for taking meals, bathing, transport to and from duty, and 
some  time  for  relaxation.  Nevertheless,  the  characteristics  of  a  particular  period  of  work  could  also 
lead to reduced effectiveness, especially when individuals are expected to be continuously on task for 
long  periods  of  time.    In  this  context,  the  scheduling  of  duty  should,  as  much  as  possible,  avoid  the 
marked falls in performance associated with prolonged periods of duty terminating in the early hours of 
the morning, since this superimposes a fatigued state on the circadian nadir (see Fig 4). 
22.  There is a cumulative effect of irregular work, and a critical factor in achieving adequate sleep is 
the  limit  to  duty hours over a number of days.  A small increase in hours may convert an acceptable 
schedule to an unacceptable one.  Conversely, a small reduction in the overall number of duty hours 
may  have  a  beneficial  effect,  allowing  an  additional  sleep  period,  or  greater  flexibility in the choice of 
time to sleep, in a particular rest period. 
23.  The available duty hours compatible with sleep do not increase linearly with the number of days of 
the schedule, due to the cumulative effect of the irregularity of sleep.  The duty hours which fully rested 
aircrew, operating worldwide routes, can cope with in the first 7 days of a complex schedule cannot be 
maintained in the next 7 days.  This effect must be considered in the scheduling of aircrew, as the rate 
of working is the basis for any system of flight time limitations. 
24.  The  European  Working  Time  Directive  (EWTD)  has  defined  the  scheduling  described  above 
based  upon  the  evidence  in  the  first  three  sections.    Whilst  not  exhaustive  the  following  provides  a 
broad summary of the requirements of the EWTD with respect to normal shift working.  
a. Shifts not exceeding 8 hours can work the shift pattern for 6 days followed by a day off.  
b. 10-hour shifts should not work more than 5 consecutive days and have 3 days off.  
c. 12-hour shift should not work more than 4 consecutive days and have 2 days off.  
d.  It  is  accepted  that  operational  pressures  may  necessitate  adoption  of  different  shift  patterns 
from those above. Such necessity falls within the ‘inevitable conflicts’ exemption to EWTD. 
25.  Risk  assessment  is  the  primary  tool  for  managing  fatigue  on  operations,  but  a  typical  ‘rule  of 
thumb’ risk level can be determined from the ratio of sleep to wake time in the previous 48-hour period. 
This is explored in more detail in AP8000 Leaflet 8213 - Fatigue Management. Mitigation action should 
be taken in proportion to how far the forced local conditions differ from the guidelines in this leaflet and 
2008DIN01-050.  
26.  In coping with irregularity of work, short periods of sleep seem to be very useful.  A period of sleep of 
around 4 hours duration, in the evening, leads to a sustained improvement in performance overnight.  On 
the  other  hand,  naps  of  about  an  hour,  while  they  may  reduce  the  tendency  to  fall  asleep,  have  a 
beneficial  but  limited  effect  on  performance  when  an  individual  has  already  become  tired.    This  would 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
suggest  that,  as  far  as  performance  is  concerned,  the  strategy  of  sleeping  for  a  few  hours  before 
overnight duty is more beneficial than attempting to overcome the effects of sleep loss by naps. 
Management of Sleep Disturbance 
27.  Some aircrew find it difficult to cope with irregularity of work and rest.  This is particularly likely in 
middle age when sleep begins to deteriorate (Para 2).  Sleep disturbance may be a reflection of illness 
or  personal  difficulties  and,  if  these  are  suspected,  then  medical  advice  should  be  sought.    In  the 
absence  of  such  causes,  there  is  much  that  individuals  can  do  themselves  to  optimize  their  sleep.  
Exercise,  avoiding  heavy  meals  and  limiting  the  consumption  of  alcohol  and  caffeine  may  help.    Any 
incremental improvement in sleeping conditions will enhance the quality of what sleep aircrew are able 
to obtain.  These enhancing factors include: 
a. 
Darkness. 
b. 
Quiet. 
c. 
Cool ambient temperature. 
d. 
Comfort (sleep in the reclining position with mattress, blankets and pillows). 
These factors are all the more important when sleep is required during day-time in preparation for night-
time duties, since obtaining quality sleep during the day is always more difficult than during the night. 
28.  In  the  event  of  persistent  difficulties  after  attention  to  sleep  habits,  then  hypnotic  medications 
(drugs  which  induce  sleep)  may  be  useful.    There  is  unequivocal  evidence  of  disturbed  sleep  in  air 
operations  and,  for  this  reason,  the  use  of  hypnotic  medications  at  specific  points  in  the  schedule  is 
warranted.    These  medications  are  most  useful  to  enhance  daytime  sleep,  or  to  promote  sleep  at 
appropriate times after trans meridian travel.  The medications should be tested 'on the ground', and a 
medical practitioner should help to identify when their use is likely to be most beneficial.  In the United 
Kingdom, Temazepam is the medication of choice for aircrew.  There should be an interval of 8 hours 
between ingestion and commencement of duty..  If hypnotic medications are used, then alcohol must 
be avoided. 
29.  Some  air forces have used stimulant medications to mitigate the effects of fatigue.  Their use is 
controversial.    They  are  not  currently  used  in  flying  operations  in  the  UK  armed  services.    The  UK 
approach has been to ensure adequate rest with the appropriate use of hypnotic medications to induce 
sleep if necessary, as described in paragraph 18. 
30.  Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant. Caffeine has the effect of perking you up by blocking 
adenosine  reception  in  the  brain.  Adenosine  can  suppress  nerve  cell  activity  and  may  be  involved  in 
the sleep/wake cycle. True caffeine effects require 9 days of caffeine abstinence prior to use. Caffeine 
from  drinks  (e.g.  coffee)  are  usually  absorbed  within  45  minutes  of  consumption  and  the  affects  can 
last for up to 6 hours. Therefore, caffeine consumption is not recommended close to periods of sleep. 
The  use  of  caffeine  needs  to  be  carefully  managed  as  taking  it  too  often  increases  the  body’s 
tolerance,  therefore  reducing  the  effect  from  the  same  quantity.  Caffeine  also  needs  to  be  used 
strategically to ensure maximum benefit: 
a. Avoid caffeinated drinks/food when not tired. 
b.  Avoid  caffeinated  drinks/food  in  the  morning,  as  the  body  is  waking  up  naturally  and  will  feel 
more awake as the morning progresses. Using caffeine to speed this process simply increases an 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-11 - Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythms 
individual’s tolerance. The exception to this is when required to rise earlier than normal or in need 
of an extra boost. 
c. Avoid caffeinated drinks/food within 3 hours of bedtime. 
d. Be aware of how long it takes for caffeine to take and how long the effect will last. 
e. Be aware how much caffeine you are consuming. 
f. Be aware that fatigue is symptomatic of caffeine withdrawal  
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
CHAPTER 12 - OXYGEN AND AIRCREW EQUIPMENT ASSEMBLIES 
Introduction 
1. 
Breathing  ambient  air  on  ascent  to  altitude  produces  a  progressive  fall  in  the  partial  pressure  of 
oxygen in the lungs PO  Above 8,000 ft the P  will be at levels which are insufficient to meet the body’s 
2
O2
requirements for oxygen and hypoxia will develop.  This most serious of hazards must be prevented in 
flight  and  one  method  of  so  doing  is  to  provide  an  artificial  pressure  environment,  ie  a  pressurized 
cabin.    The  alternative  method  is  to  provide  a  source  of  added  oxygen  so  as  to  maintain  the  PO   at 
2
ground  level  equivalent  at  all  altitudes.    In  most  military  flying  a  highly  pressurized  cabin  (High 
Differential  Cabin)  is  inappropriate  for  several  reasons  and  so  both  the  methods  are  combined.    The 
cabin is pressurized to a certain degree (Low Differential Cabin) and any shortfall in oxygen required is 
met by a supplementary source in the aircraft.  Oxygen systems in one form or another are fitted to all 
RAF aircraft which operate at actual or cabin altitudes in excess of 8,000 ft. 
2. 
The physiological and operational requirements for aircraft oxygen systems may be summarized thus: 
a. 
Oxygen Concentration.  Oxygen would be most simply and conveniently delivered as 100% 
oxygen at all altitudes.  This, however, has several disadvantages not least of which are those of 
cost, weight and bulk; particularly since 100% oxygen is not required physiologically until a cabin 
altitude  of  34,000  ft  is  reached.    Furthermore,  ear  discomfort  and  deafness  may  develop  as  a 
result  of  reabsorption  of  oxygen  from  the  middle  ear  cavity,  frequently  some  time  after  landing 
(Delayed Otitic Barotrauma or 'Oxygen Ear').  Difficulty in breathing, chest discomfort and cough 
may  occur  after  flights  in  high  performance  aircraft  during  which  high  g  manoeuvres  have  been 
performed  while  breathing  100% oxygen and wearing G-trousers.  Also, breathing 100% oxygen 
for long periods (12 to 16 hours) so irritates the respiratory tract that chest discomfort may result.  
Finally,  there  is  an  increased  risk  of  fire  if  100%  oxygen  is  used.    For  the  reasons  given  above 
aircraft oxygen systems aim to provide a progressive increase in oxygen concentration (Airmix) in 
the  inspired  gas  which  is  directly  proportional  to  the  fall  in  PO   experienced  during  ascent,  and 
2
which maintains the lung PO  at the ground level equivalent of approximately 100 mm Hg.  Fig 1 
2
illustrates the concentration of oxygen required to achieve this.  In practice, this aim is achieved by 
providing an increase in inspired oxygen concentration from ground level, until at about 30,000 ft 
most oxygen systems are delivering 100% oxygen.  The delivery of 100% at 30,000 ft, rather than 
at 33,700 ft as theoretically required, allows a safety margin.  l00% oxygen will continue to prevent 
hypoxia up to 40,000 ft but above this altitude, pressure breathing is required to provide continued 
protection. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
6-12 Fig 1 Relationship between Altitude and the Concentration of Oxygen Required to Maintain 
Ground Level Equivalent 
Lung P  = 100 mm Hg
02
100
80
)
(%
n
60
tio
tra
n
e
c
40
n
o
C
n
e
g
20
y
x
O
0
10
20
30
40
Altitude (ft × 1,000)
b. 
Adequate  Nitrogen  Concentration.    Nitrogen  must  be  present  in  sufficient  quantity  to 
prevent the occurrence of 'Oxygen Ear' or 'Oxygen Lung'.  Thus, 40% nitrogen or more is normally 
required in a breathing system until altitude/oxygen requirements dictate otherwise. 
c. 
Adequate Ventilation and Flow.  The system must be capable of delivering up to 60 litres 
per minute along with instantaneous peak inspiratory flows of 200 litres per minute. 
d. 
Minimal Resistance to Breathing.  Resistance due to valves and turbulent flow throughout 
the  system,  caused  by  uneven  surfaces,  branches  and  changes  in  internal  diameters  must  be 
minimized  to  prevent  disturbances  to  respiratory  rhythm.    Ideally,  the  flow  characteristics  should 
be such as to produce no noticeable resistance to breathing. 
e. 
Temperature.  The inspired gas should be within ±5 °C of cockpit ambient temperature. 
f. 
Safety Pressure.  Inward leaks around the facemask seal or from hose connections must be 
countered.  This is accomplished by providing a small positive overpressure in the mask to ensure 
that any leaks are outward. 
g. 
Protection against Toxic Fumes and Decompression Sickness.  A facility for selecting 100% 
oxygen at any time and at any altitude is necessary in the event of toxic fumes appearing in the cabin or 
when decompression sickness is liable to develop or has done so (cabin altitudes above 18,000 ft). 
h. 
Indication of Supply and Flow.  Indications of both supply and flow must be available to the 
user at all times as a check of correct function. 
i. 
Evaluation of Integrity.  Where possible fail-safe methods of operation should be used (eg 
the crew member should be unable to breathe through the mask until it is correctly connected to 
the rest of the system) together with the means to check emergency functions (eg manual test of 
mask seal and pressure breathing facilities). 
j. 
Convenience.    As  much  of  the  system  as  possible  should  be  automatic,  and  the  drills  to 
cope with a failure should be simple.  Failures must be immediately and clearly indicated. 
k. 
Duplication.    In  aircraft  with  low  differential  pressure  cabins,  there  should  be  a  back-up 
system  in  the  event  of  main  system  failure.    There  is  no  need  for  such  an  Emergency  Oxygen 
supply in aircraft with high differential cabins where the cabin itself provides the primary protection 
against hypoxia and the oxygen equipment is only used if cabin pressurization fails, or toxic fumes 
contaminate the cabin. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
l. 
Provision for High Altitude Escape.  A separate emergency oxygen supply is needed in aircraft 
fitted with ejection seats or from which bale-out is possible.  This supply, fitted either to the seat or to the 
personal parachute pack, is usually the same as the back-up supply referred to at k above. 
m.  Independence from Environment.  The environment extremes sustained in flight must not 
impair  the  performance  of  the  oxygen  equipment.    This  is  particularly  so  in  regard  to  low 
temperatures,  accelerations  (aircraft  manoeuvres  and  windblast  on  escape)  and  atmospheric 
pressure changes. 
3. 
Oxygen  systems  have  been  progressively  refined  over  the  years.    The  subject  has  become 
increasingly  complex  and  aircraft  specific.    Because  of  this,  the  following  account  is  necessarily  of  a 
general nature. 
4. 
In broad terms, any aircraft oxygen system consists of two parts: a supply or store of oxygen and 
a means of delivering it to the user (regulator, hose and face mask). 
AIRCRAFT OXYGEN SUPPLY/STORAGE 
General 
5. 
Oxygen is most usually obtained from an on-board store which is replenished whilst the aircraft is 
on  the  ground.    Some  systems  however,  use  the  on-board  generation  of  oxygen  by  molecular  sieve 
oxygen  concentrators  (MSOCs).    Usually  oxygen  is  stored  either  as  a  gas  at  high  pressure  or  as  a 
liquid at low temperature. 
6. 
Whatever the source, the gas supplied to the system must be of a certain high standard.  Thus, it 
must  contain  at  least  99.5%  oxygen,  be  odourless  and  virtually  free  of  any  toxic  substances  (eg  the 
carbon monoxide concentration must be less than 0.002%).  The maximum allowable levels for various 
hydrocarbons  are  specified  in  relation  to the type of storage system used since this will influence the 
potential  contamination  hazard.    To  avoid  the  risk  of  ice  formation  at  low  temperatures  the  water 
content must not exceed 0.005 mg per litre of oxygen at Standard Temperature and Pressure (STP), ie 
0 °C, 760 mm Hg (1013.2 mb). 
Gaseous Storage 
7. 
In gaseous storage systems, the oxygen is held in cylinders mounted outside the pressure cabin.  
Commonly  used  sizes  are  750  litre  and  2250  litre  cylinders  at  normal  ambient  temperature  and 
pressure (NTP), ie 15 °C and 760 mm Hg (1013.2 mb).  The cylinders are specially strengthened and 
may be wire wound to prevent fragmentation.  They are filled to a pressure of 1800 pounds per square 
inch (psi); the pressure is stepped down by reducing valves before entering the next part of the system 
and there is usually a duplication of pipework and non-return valves as protection against a single leak 
emptying the whole system.  A typical gaseous storage system is shown at Fig 2. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
6-12 Fig 2 A Typical Gaseous Oxygen Storage System 
Filter
Contents Gauge
Non-return
Valves
Cylinder Valve
Pressure Reducing
Valve
Charging
Filter
Valve
High Pressure
Pressure Cabin
Delivery
Oxygen Cylinder
Wall
8. 
There are three advantages of such a system.  It is relatively simple, oxygen is not lost by venting 
when  not  in  use,  and  it  can  be  used  immediately  after  filling.    However,  the  cylinders  are  bulky  and 
heavy and consequently, this system is unsuitable as a primary aircraft oxygen supply when weight and 
space are at a premium. 
Liquid Storage 
9. 
The  problems  of  weight  and  bulk  are  greatly  reduced  by  storing  oxygen  as  a  liquid  under  low 
pressure.    Liquid  Oxygen  (LOX)  vaporizes  at  –183  °C  at  normal  atmospheric  pressure,  each  litre  of 
liquid yielding 840 litres of gaseous oxygen (NTP).  This expansion ratio for LOX is almost seven times 
greater  than  that  for  gaseous  oxygen  stored  at  1800  psi.    Such  systems  therefore  occupy  about  half 
the space and are half as heavy as the high-pressure gaseous systems, as shown in the comparison 
at  Table  1.    Between  3.5  and  25  litres  of  LOX  can  be  carried  depending  on  aircraft  type  and  crew 
requirements. 
Table 1 Comparison of Gaseous and Liquid Storage Systems Each Yielding 3000 Litres (NTP) 
Oxygen 
Storage System 
Weight of Charged System (kg) 
Space Occupied by System (l) 
High 
Pressure 
Cylinder 
19 
52 
containing gas at 1800 psi 
Liquid  Oxygen  Converter 

25 
containing 3.5 litres 
10.  The  double-walled  insulated  container  -  essentially  a  stainless  steel  vacuum  flask  -  its  control 
valves,  and  connecting  pipework  are  collectively  known  as  a  LOX  Converter.    It  is  divided  into  two 
parts: one is insulated and contains the liquid; the other is uninsulated and contains the gas.  A typical 
LOX Converter is pictured at Fig 3.  The converter may be permanently mounted in the aircraft or be 
removable for rapid replacement. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 22 


AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
6-12 Fig 3 A Typical LOX Converter 
11.  The converter is charged from a ground LOX dispenser.  LOX entering container evaporates and 
eventually cools the internal walls to –183 °C.  The container then rapidly fills with LOX. 
12.  When the charging hose is disconnected the top and bottom of the container are connected by a 
length of uninsulated pipe which includes a pressure build-up coil and a pressure closing valve.  During 
the liquid phase, LOX from the bottom of the container vaporizes into the build-up coil and passes as 
gas back into the top.  The surface of the LOX is warmed by the gas so that its vapour pressure rises.  
When  the  operating  pressure  of  the  converter  is  reached  (between  70  and  300  psi)  the  pressure 
closing valve shuts and the flow of LOX into the build-up coil ceases. 
13.  The  heat  leak  into  the  container  raises  the  pressure  in  the  converter  until  the  pressure  opening 
valve  operates  to  allow  gas  to  be  fed  into  the  delivery  pipe.    During  this  phase  (the  gas  phase),  any 
demand by the user is met by a flow of gas from the top of the container in preference to a flow from 
the liquid phase.  A differential check valve allows the passage of liquid only when the pressure in the 
delivery line falls below the converter pressure by a pre-determined value. 
14.  The converter contents are monitored by electrical capacitance and displayed in the cockpit and at 
the charging point.  The pressure of gaseous oxygen being delivered is also displayed in the cockpit. 
15.  The  LOX  system  is  compact,  of  low  weight  and  the  container  will  not  explode  if  damaged.  
Unfortunately, evaporation and venting losses mean that the converter needs to be recharged at frequent 
intervals.  In addition, LOX takes a long time to stabilize once in the converter and it may be upset if the 
container is agitated, as for example, by aerobatics.  For this reason combat aircraft require the addition 
of a stabilizing chamber which ensures that on charging the liquid in the container is at a temperature at 
which its vapour pressure equals the normal operating pressure.  LOX is prone to contamination by toxic 
materials and great care must be taken to prevent the build-up of contaminants. 
Molecular Sieve Oxygen Concentrators (MSOC) 
16.  Most of the problems of LOX systems can be overcome by the onboard production of oxygen by the 
pressure  swing  adsorption  method,  using  a  molecular  sieve.    A  molecular  sieve  is  a  synthetically 
produced porous material and if the pores are of a suitable size gas molecules are able to pass through 
them.  Generally the adsorption of a molecule depends upon its polarity and its size; clearly if a molecule 
is larger than the pore size it cannot pass through the sieve.  Careful design ensures that if air is passed 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
through the sieve under pressure most of its nitrogen content will be adsorbed leaving behind an oxygen-
enriched product gas.  (Because the adsorption characteristics of argon are similar to those of oxygen the 
product gas will comprise 95% oxygen and 5% argon).  Over time, the sieve bed becomes saturated with 
nitrogen which needs to be purged to prevent it from appearing in the product gas.  Removal of nitrogen 
from the sieve is achieved by depressurizing the bed to ambient pressure followed by back-purging with a 
portion of the product gas, a process known as pressure-swing adsorption. 
17.  Functional MSOC System.  Fig 4 shows the operation of a simple two-bed MSOC.  The flow of 
gas into and out of the beds is controlled by valves which are cycled automatically.  Each bed in turn is 
pressurized with conditioned bleed air from the engine at a pressure of 138 to 414 kPa (20 to 60 psi) 
for a product gas flow of 10 to 30 litres (NTP) per minute.  Air consumption is typically of the order of 
200  to  300  litres  (NTP)  per  minute.    As  the  compressed  air  flows  through  one  bed,  nitrogen  is 
adsorbed  by  the  sieve material and the product gas, rich in oxygen, flows to the plenum.  Before the 
pressurized  bed  becomes  saturated  with  nitrogen,  the  valves  controlling  pressure  cycling  operate  to 
vent the front end of the bed to ambient.  Pressure within the bed falls rapidly and a large purge flow of 
gas  containing  a  high  concentration  of  oxygen  (from  the  product  gas  being  produced  from  the  other 
bed)  is  passed  back  through  the  bed  to  enhance  nitrogen  and  contaminant  desorption.    The 
combination  of  reduced  pressure  and  back-purging  results  in  complete  flushing  of  nitrogen  from  the 
bed so that the sieve material is ready once more to concentrate oxygen during its next pressurization 
cycle.    The  pressure  swing  cycle  can  be  explained  with  reference  to  Fig  4.    MSOC  bed  A  is 
pressurized, via line 3, and delivers oxygen-rich gas to the plenum.  A large bleed flow of product gas 
is diverged to purge nitrogen from bed B, via the purge orifice and line 1.  Bed B is now pressurized via 
line 2 when the control valve rotates.  Line 4 then becomes the purge route from bed A via the purge 
orifice. 
6-12 Fig 4 Simple Two-bed MSOC 
Control Valve
1
Molecular Sieve
Bed B
2
Purge Orifice
Conditioned
m
u
Oxygen-enriched
Bleed Air
n
Product Gas
le
3
P
Molecular Sieve
4
Bed A
Nitrogen-rich Exhaust Overboard
18.  Limitations  in  the  Use  of  MSOCs  in  Aircraft.    Extensive  in-flight  experience  has  shown  the 
MSOC  to  be  a  very  efficient  filter  of  contaminants,  including  engine  oil  and  hydraulic  fluid  molecules 
from  engine  bleed  air,  as  well  as  vapour,  allowing  oxygen  to  be  concentrated  in  suitable  quantities.  
However,  a  separate  gaseous  supply  is  still  required  in  case  of  engine  failure  or  crew  ejection.  
Moreover,  not  all  MSOCs  are  able  to  meet  the  requirement  to  provide  the  100%  oxygen  needed  to 
protect against hypoxia following a rapid decompression from a cabin altitude at or above 20,000 ft so 
that a backup supply of 100% oxygen must therefore be supplied. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
OXYGEN DELIVERY 
General 
19.  From whichever source the oxygen derives, the easiest way in which it can reach the aircrew is by a 
Continuous Flow System.  Since the flow does not vary with the demand of the user, such a system tends 
to  be  inefficient  and  wasteful.    However,  it  is  simple  and  was  used  to  provide  the  earliest  methods  of 
oxygen  delivery  -  indeed  continuous  flow  systems  are  still  sometimes  used  to  provide  a  bail-out  and 
emergency  oxygen  supply  (para  30).    Historically,  the  next  development  was  the  use  of  a  reservoir 
interposed between the regulating device and the face mask, and designed to prevent too much wastage 
of gas.  This disadvantage is more thoroughly overcome by Pressure Demand Systems in which the flow 
of  gas  from  the  regulator  varies  directly  with  the  inspiratory  demand  of  the  user.    In  addition,  the  extra 
facilities required (Airmix, Safety Pressure, Pressure Breathing etc) can be provided. 
20.  Most aircraft use pressure demand systems, and the principles underlying the design and function 
of  pressure  demand  regulators  are  essentially  the  same  whether  the  regulators  be  panel-mounted, 
man-mounted or seat-mounted. 
Panel-mounted Pressure Demand Regulators 
21.  The regulator consists of a demand valve, which incorporates a pressure-reducing valve, a breathing 
diaphragm, and a lever mechanism.  This is shown diagrammatically at Fig 5.  When the user breathes 
in,  a  fall  in  pressure  in  the  mask  is  transmitted  to  the  regulator  where  the  reduction  is  sensed  by  the 
breathing  diaphragm.    The  diaphragm  moves  inwards  and  causes  the  lever  mechanism  to  open  the 
demand valve.  When the user breathes out, pressure builds up in the regulator as oxygen continues to 
flow into it but is not demanded, the diaphragm moves back and the demand valve closes.  The regulator 
also includes refinements in the form of Automatic Functions and Manual Selections. 
6-12 Fig 5 Oxygen Pressure Demand Regulator 
Oxygen 
Source
Airmix
Aneroid
Demand
Valve
Passage
Venturi
Pivot
To User
Diaphragm
Pressure
Pressure
Safety
Safety
Breathing
Breathing
Pressure
Pressure
Aneroid
Spring
Spring
Aneroid
The Automatic Functions are: 
a. 
Airmix.    In  order  to  deliver  air  which  is  progressively  enriched  with  oxygen  on  ascent,  a 
venturi  tube  is  fitted  downstream  of  the  demand  valve.    Opening  into  the  venturi  is  a  passage 
linked  to  a  chamber  which  incorporates  an  aneroid  capsule  and  a  non-return  valve.    As  oxygen 
flows through the venturi at high velocity, a fall in pressure causes cabin air to be sucked through 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 7 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
the  chamber  and  passage.    Air,  mixed  with  oxygen,  is  thus  delivered  to  the  user  (Airmix).    As 
altitude  is  increased,  the  aneroid  capsule  expands,  gradually  closing  off  the  orifice  and  so 
reducing  the  amount  of  air  mixing  with  the  oxygen.    There  is  a  progressive  increase  in  the 
concentration  of  oxygen  reaching  the  user  until,  at  about  30,000  ft,  100%  oxygen  passes  to  the 
mask, the orifice being completely shut. 
b. 
Safety Pressure.  At cabin altitudes above 8,000 ft, the risk of hypoxia as a result of inward 
leaks  in  the  system  (especially  with  an  ill-fitting  mask)  is  prevented  by  Safety  Pressure.    This  is 
produced  by  applying  a  spring  force  of  2  mm  Hg  to  the  underside  of  the  breathing  diaphragm.  
This opens the demand valve until an equal pressure is built up within the system to overcome the 
spring.    The  pressure  within  the  mask  is  thus  kept  above  ambient  throughout  inspiration.    The 
spring is prevented from acting on the breathing diaphragm by an aneroid until the cabin altitude 
exceeds safety pressure height, a height which varies from regulator to regulator. 
c. 
Pressure  Breathing.    Positive  pressure  breathing  above  a  cabin  altitude  of  40,000  ft  is 
achieved  by  applying  a  further  spring  force  to  the  underside  of  the  breathing  diaphragm.    It  is 
prevented from acting below 40,000 ft by a pressure breathing aneroid which encloses the safety 
pressure  capsule.    At  40,000  ft,  the  pressure  breathing  aneroid  allows  further  expansion  of  the 
inner  aneroid  and  so  a  large  force  is  applied  to  the  diaphragm.    This  force  is  related  to  cabin 
altitude by further gradual expansion of the pressure breathing aneroid.  The regulator will provide 
protection to an altitude of 50,000 ft at which time it will be delivering 30 mm Hg positive pressure 
to the user. 
22.  The indications of flow and contents are: 
a. 
Flow Indication.  Tappings taken from both sides of the venturi (upstream and downstream) 
allow the variations in pressure to operate a flow indicator. 
b. 
Contents Indication.  A remote oxygen contents gauge is connected to the output line of the 
cylinders  or  LOX  container.    The  gauge  is  operated  by  oxygen  pressure  but  is  calibrated  in 
quantities expressed as a fraction of FULL. 
23.  The switches on the regulator are: 
a. 
ON/OFF Lever.  The ON/OFF lever is normally wire-locked in the 'ON' position. 
b. 
Normal/100%  Lever.    The  Normal/100%  lever  allows  100%  oxygen  to  be  delivered  at  all 
altitudes by blanking off the air entry port of the Airmix facility. 
c. 
Emergency/Press  to  Test  Mask  Toggle.    The  Emergency/Press  to  Test  Mask  Toggle  when 
deflected to right or left allows delivery of an additional 4 mm Hg pressure at all altitudes, thus providing 
safety pressure (eg when toxic fumes are present in the cabin) or a low-pressure test of the mask seal 
(mask toggle up).  When pressed in, it delivers oxygen under a pressure of approximately 30 mm Hg 
and so provides a high-pressure test of connections and mask seal (mask toggle down).  This facility 
can also be used in flight to attempt to blow debris off the mask inlet valve. 
Man-mounted Pressure Demand Regulators 
24.  Man-mounted  regulators  are  made  possible  by  the  miniaturization  of  regulator  design.    These 
regulators  function  on  pneumatic  principles  whereby  the  link  between  the  demand  valve  and 
diaphragm is pneumatic rather than mechanical. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 8 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
25.  Man-mounted  regulators  are  mounted  on  the  chest  of  the  life  preserver.    There  are  slight 
differences between regulator types in the altitudes at which the various functions are available but all 
provide  automatic  airmix,  with  100%  oxygen  supplied  above  approximately  30,000  ft  and  with  safety 
pressure  operating  above  15,000  ft.    Pressure  breathing  is  available  to  50,000 ft.  Contents and flow 
indicators are remotely situated in the cockpit. 
26.  Man-mounted regulators require an automatic air inlet shut-off (anti-drowning) assembly in case of 
immersion after ejection.  This is incorporated within the air inlet and shuts automatically under a spring 
load  should  the  oxygen  supply  cease.    Inspiration  is  then  only  possible  through  the  mask  anti-
suffocation  valve  and  requires  a  greater  effort  than  usual;  thus  serving  to  warn  the  user  of  failure 
should it occur at altitude. 
27.  Mask seal checks and regulator failure procedures are particular to regulator types and therefore 
vary.    Mask  seal  tests  are  conducted  by  increasing  delivery  pressure  to  the  mask.    Regulator  failure 
procedures call for either a change-over to a different (emergency) regulator or selection of a separate 
metered continuous flow oxygen supply. 
Seat-mounted Pressure Demand Regulators 
28.  Seat-mounted  regulators  offer  several  advantages  over  regulators  mounted  at  other  sites 
including: 
a. 
Less Susceptibility to Damage.  Man-mounted regulators are vulnerable to damage during 
doffing and donning and during cockpit entry and exit. 
b. 
Reduction  in  the  Amount  of  Equipment  Carried  on  the  Man.    Aircrew  assemblies  are 
bulky and there is less space available on the man than on the seat. 
c. 
Larger Regulators are Possible.  Since more space is available on the seat, miniaturization 
is  no  longer  of  such  importance  and  more  comprehensive  protection  can  be  provided  against 
component failures. 
d. 
Duplication  of  Regulators.    Duplication  of  regulators  increases  the  flexibility  and  operational 
capability of the system.  Main or emergency oxygen supplies can be used through either of the 
regulators. 
e. 
Fewer Regulators Required.  The total number of regulators required for an aircraft fleet is 
considerably  less  than  the  number  required  when  demand  regulators  are  issued  personally  to 
aircrew. 
29.  Seat-mounted regulators have the normal 100%/Airmix facility, a press-to-test button for checking 
mask fit and the delivery system for leaks, safety pressure above 15,000 ft and pressure breathing to 
50,000  ft.    There  is  also  a  facility  for  automatic  closure  of  the  air  inlet  in  the  event  of  oxygen  supply 
failure or if the supply pressure drops below a pre-determined level.  Contents and flow indications are 
placed remotely from the regulator at convenient places in the cockpit. 
Emergency Oxygen Systems 
30.  A supply of emergency oxygen (EO) is available to each crew member should the main supply fail 
(the  EO  is  operated  manually)  or  should  ejection  or  bail-out  be  necessary  (the  EO  is  operated 
automatically).  Two principal forms of EO assembly in current service are briefly described: 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 9 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
a. 
Continuous  Flow  Emergency  Oxygen  Assemblies.    In  Continuous  Flow  EO  Assemblies, 
oxygen is stored as a gas in a cylinder mounted on the ejection seat.  It is connected to the user 
via an oxygen flow regulator mounted on the cylinder head and a soft rubber delivery tube.  Once 
operated,  the  oxygen  is  supplied  continuously  at  a  rate  of  approximately  12  litres  (NTP)  per 
minute  initially  (thereafter  declining  exponentially)  and  provides  a  useful  duration  of  about  10 
minutes.    The  flow  is  modified  by  an  Inlet  Warning  Connector,  which  is  fitted  to  the  end  of  the 
mask hose, and serves to warn the user of a disconnect in the main oxygen supply line. 
b. 
Demand  Emergency  Oxygen  Assemblies.  Oxygen for Demand EO Assemblies is stored 
as a gas in cylinders mounted either on the ejection seat or, when for use by aircrew without such 
seats, in the parachute pack.  It has a contents gauge which is usually connected directly to the 
cylinder,  but  in  some  cases,  it  is  mounted  elsewhere  on  the  seat  in  a  position  where  it  is  more 
easily seen by the occupant.  Once initiated by the release mechanism, the oxygen flows through 
a pressure-reducing head on the top of the cylinder and thence, at a nominal pressure of 50 psi to 
a regulator.  In the case of aircraft which use man-mounted or seat-mounted primary regulators, 
the  EO  passes  to  the  seat  portion  of  the  PEC  and  thence  to  the  primary  regulator.    This  then 
controls  a  flow  to  the  user  with  its  own  delivery  characteristics,  including  Safety  Pressure  and 
Pressure Breathing.  The duration of demand EO systems depends upon rate of the user; usually 
its duration is of the order of 10 minutes. 
Walk-around Oxygen Sets 
31.  Walk-around sets provide a controlled oxygen supply for aircrew whose duties may require them 
to move about the aircraft during flight at cabin altitudes above 10,000 ft. 
32.  The least sophisticated set, the Mk 8, has a 120 litre (NTP) capacity stored at 1,800 psi.  This is a 
continuous  flow  set  giving  2  litres  (NTP)  per  minute  at  medium  flow  and  4  litres  (NTP)  per  minute at 
high flow.  Medium flow is for use below 18,000 ft. 
33.  The more sophisticated Mk 4 set has 150 litres (NTP) capacity and a demand regulator.  Oxygen 
is delivered at 4 mm Hg at 30,000 ft and 11 mm Hg at 42,000 ft.  There is also an emergency selection 
which provides a flow at 24 mm Hg. 
34.  The  Mk  9  set  gives  protection  to  the  user  in  a  non-respirable  atmosphere.    This  set  will  provide 
100%  oxygen  on  demand,  and  also  protects  against  smoke,  fumes,  and  decompression  up  to  an 
altitude  of  30,000  ft.    The  mask  has  a  moulded  rubber  face  piece  with  an  inner  mask  assembly, 
perspex visor, a speech transmitter in an expiratory valve and a demand regulator.  A good face seal is 
essential and this is provided by a cushion filled with a glycerine and water mixture. 
Passenger Oxygen Systems 
35.  The Ring Main System.  In passenger-carrying aircraft, the primary protection against hypoxia is 
cabin pressurization.  The oxygen systems installed in such aircraft are designed to provide emergency 
oxygen for the passengers and crew in the event of pressurization failure, or for therapeutic purposes.  
Oxygen for these systems is usually stored as gas although liquid oxygen is used in some aircraft.  The 
high-pressure supply is reduced by valves in the normal way before passing to a ring main circuit for 
passenger supply or to the pressure-demand systems usually fitted on the flight deck for crew use.  A 
Ring  Main  system  is  shown  diagrammatically  at  Fig  6.    During  normal  flight,  oxygen  is  supplied from 
the  aircraft  storage  system  to  the  passenger  oxygen  regulator.    In  the  event  of  cabin  pressurization 
failure, and when the cabin altitude exceeds a pre-set level (usually 10,000 to 14,000 ft) the regulator 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 10 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
automatically  raises  the  supply  pressure  to  approximately  80  psi  (Emergency).    This  increased 
pressure activates a warning horn and its delivery to the ring main operates an actuator in each mask 
presentation unit, causing the masks to 'drop down' in front of the passengers to a position from which 
they can be applied to the face.  A continuous flow of oxygen at emergency pressure emanates from 
each mask, once its check valve is released, and is maintained as long as the cabin altitude remains 
above 17,000 ft.  When the aircraft has descended to a cabin altitude of less than 17,000 ft, the control 
unit  reduces  the  delivery  pressure  to  Normal.    Flow  is  maintained  at  a  reduced  level  and each mask 
then functions as a demand type. 
6-12 Fig 6 Passenger Ring Main System 
Presentation
Therapeutic Supply
Control
Ring Main
Control Valve
Supply Pressure
Pressure Gauge
Presentation
Gauge
Stowages
Quick Don
Demand
LOX Converter
Crew Masks
Regulators
Installation
OXYGEN HOSES AND PERSONAL EQUIPMENT CONNECTORS 
Routeing of Oxygen Delivery Systems 
36.  From  the  oxygen  source  the  delivery  pipework  is  routed,  via  the  regulator  where  this  is  panel-
mounted,  onto  the  seat.    Here  the  hoses  may  be  guide-mounted  directly  onto  the  seat  side,  or  may 
pass  to  the  seat-mounted  regulator  where  fitted,  or  may  plug  into  the  seat  portion  of  a  Personal 
Equipment Connector (PEC).  In the first situation (panel-mounted regulator), the inlet hose then plugs 
directly into the mask hose.  In the second situation (seat-mounted regulator), the oxygen hose passes 
to the mask hose via the man portion of a PEC.  In the third situation the man portion of the PEC may 
connect directly to the mask hose or, in the case of man-mounted devices, it must first pass through 
the regulator to which the mask hose is directly attached.  The possible routeings are summarized at 
Fig 7. 
37.  Wide-bore  oxygen  hoses  are  only  used  after  the  regulator  has  stepped  down  the  gas  delivery 
pressure.    They  are  made  of  extruded  liners  of  natural  or  vulcanized  rubber,  reinforced  by  spirally-
wound galvanized steel wire, and covered with rubberized gauze or stockinette.  They are anti-kink and 
incorporate various end-connectors to suit different aircraft oxygen systems. 
38.  The  high-pressure  hoses  (70  psi)  used  in  conjunction  with  the  servo-controlled  regulators  are 
made of narrow-bore anti-kink reinforced rubber. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 11 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
6-12 Fig 7 Routes of Delivery Systems 
Reg
Non-Ejection Seat
Source
P-M
Mask
Reg
Source
P-M
PEC
Mask
Reg
Ejection Seats
Source
PEC
S-M
PEC
Mask
Reg
Source
PEC
M-M
Mask
P-M = Panel-mounted   S-M = Seat-mounted  M-M = Man-mounted
Personal Equipment Connector (PEC) 
39.  A PEC is the usual means by which a user is connected to his services in an ejection seat aircraft.  
It is designed to couple and uncouple these services by a single action.  In addition to the main oxygen 
supply the PEC provides the channel by which the emergency oxygen supply, the G-trousers supply (if 
worn), the air ventilated suit supply (if worn), the filtered air supply to the aircrew respirator (if worn) and 
the  mic-tel  are  connected.    On  ejection,  all  service  lines,  except  the  emergency  oxygen,  are 
disconnected  and  sealed  off  automatically.    A  PEC  consists  of  three  interlocking  main  parts:  the 
aircraft, seat, and man portions. 
a. 
Aircraft Portion.  The aircraft portion is attached to the supply services from the airframe by anti-
kink hose and remains in the aircraft at all times.  All services in this portion are provided with valves 
which  close  automatically  on  disconnection,  so  preventing  wastage  of  air  and  oxygen  supplies.    On 
ejection, a short static line unlocks the operating lever to allow the aircraft portion to fall away. 
b. 
Seat Portion.  The seat portion is bolted to the side of the ejection seat.  Most services are 
provided  with  inner  and  outer  connecting  valves  which  close  when  either  the  aircraft  or the man 
portion is removed.  Mic-tel contacts are set beneath the surface to minimize the risk of damage 
to them when the man portion is connected or disconnected.  A dust cover is provided to prevent 
damage to the valves and contacts when the seat is unoccupied. 
c. 
Man Portion.  The man portion forms part of the Oxygen Mask Hose Assembly which is issued 
as flying clothing to the individual.  It is connected to the seat portion prior to flight.  The G-trouser 
and air-ventilated suit connectors are detachable should these services not be required during flight.  
Dressing  is  also  facilitated  by  their  detachment.    After  flight,  the  man  portion  is  disconnected 
manually by use of the operating handle.  On ejection, the man portion remains attached to the seat 
until  man-seat  separation  when  it  is  unlocked  automatically  either  by  the  seat  mechanics  or  by 
means of a pre-adjusted pull-off lanyard connecting the PEC to the user’s life preserver. 
In  aircraft,  which  use  panel-mounted  or  seat-mounted  regulators,  the  oxygen  hose  connected  to  the 
man portion of the PEC is of wide bore (ie low pressure).  In those aircraft which may require the use of 
a  pressure  jerkin,  the  oxygen  hose  incorporates  a  chest  connector  for  attachment  to  the  jerkin.    In 
aircraft which use man-mounted regulators, the overall dimensions of the PEC are smaller, because of 
the cockpit configuration, and high-pressure oxygen hose is used for connection to the regulators.  In 
addition, the use of high-pressure emergency oxygen in these systems has necessitated a change in 
the position of various valves and connections.  Service ports not required are blanked off. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 12 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
P/Q Series Pressure Demand Masks and Hoses 
40.  Pressure demand oxygen systems require an oxygen mask which will maintain a face seal under 
raised  breathing  pressures.    The  P/Q  series  masks,  for  use  with  panel-mounted  or  seat-mounted 
regulators are identical except for size, the latter being smaller.  Numerical suffixes (eg P2/Q2) serve to 
distinguish  masks  used  with  different  aircraft  systems.    The  mask  consists  of  a  hard  fibreglass 
exoskeleton containing a soft silicone/non dermatitic rubber moulded face-piece with a reflected edge 
which provides the self-sealing property; as pressure builds up in the mask, the seal is pressed harder 
onto the face.  Moulded into the bridge of the nose is a strip of malleable metal which can be shaped to 
improve the fit.  A typical oxygen mask of the types P and Q series is illustrated at Fig 8.  The mask 
incorporates several features: 
a. 
Chain Toggle Harness and Toggle Lever.  A chain type harness is mounted on the front of the 
exoskeleton.  On each side, it then runs over a shaped metal bow (also mounted on the exoskeleton) 
which ensures correct routeing.  At each free end the chain has an oval link by which it can be attached 
to the aircrew protective helmet, thus securing the mask to the wearer’s face.  The chain may be further 
tensioned  by  rotation  of  the  mask  toggle  lever;  under  normal  conditions,  the  toggle  is  said  to  be  'up' 
(wide-ribbed extension uppermost) with the two chains bearing on the arms of the bow.  When pressure 
breathing is undertaken the wearer rotates the toggle downwards so tightening the chains over the bow 
and clamping the mask against the face.  It may also be used in this way to enhance the seal if toxic 
fumes are present in the cockpit although this is strictly unnecessary provided that safety pressure is 
being delivered.  Post Mod 171 the chains are replaced by an anti-kinking Mask Quick Release (MQR) 
adjustable wire harness. 
b. 
Inspiratory  Valve.    An  inspiratory  valve  is  mounted  in  the  left-hand  side  of  the  mask.    It  is 
made of soft rubber and acts as a simple non-return valve, allowing oxygen to be breathed in but 
preventing  expired  gas  from  passing  back  down  the  oxygen  inlet  hose.  A plastic mesh cover is 
fitted over the valve inside the mask as an ice-guard.  This prevents any accumulation of moisture 
from coming into direct contact with the valve and so any ice formation does not compromise the 
function of the valve.  In addition, the guard encourages formation of hoar frost, through which it is 
still possible to breathe, rather than solid ice. 
c. 
Expiratory Valve.  The expiratory valve is mounted in the base of the mask to allow drainage 
of  any  moisture  collecting  within  the  mask  cavity.  It is protected by a thermal insulating, flexible 
rubber outlet snout.  The valve plate itself is metal and is held onto a metal seating by a very light 
spring  which  is  overcome  on  expiration.    In  fact,  this  spring  is  too  weak  to  hold  the  valve  shut 
against  even  the  small  rise  in  mask  cavity  pressure  generated  by  safety  pressure  from  the 
regulator.  It is therefore assisted by a compensating tube which feeds gas pressure from the inlet 
port to a diaphragm and piston on the reverse side of the expiratory valve. 
Such an arrangement is termed a compensated expiratory valve and it ensures that the valve remains 
shut until expiration.  However, should pressure in the inlet port be reduced for any reason, the valve in 
this configuration would once again tend to open.  For this reason, the valve plate above is separated 
from  the  piston  below  by  a  second  spring:  this  final  arrangement  is  termed  a  split  compensated 
expiratory  valve.    The  system  of  the  valves  is  shown  diagrammatically  at  Fig  9.    Clearly,  correct 
functioning  of  a  compensated  expiratory  valve  is  dependent  upon  the  presence  of  a  functioning 
inspiratory  valve  since  if  the  latter  was  absent  or  was  to  become  wedged  open  by  debris  from  within 
the mask cavity, expiratory effort by the user would be transmitted back down the inlet port and along 
the  compensating  tube  to  the  back  of  the  expiratory  valve.    Thus,  the expiratory valve would be held 
shut and expiration would be impossible. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 13 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
6-12 Fig 8 Typical P/Q Oxygen Mask Assembly 
Exoskeleton
Chain Toggle Harness
Anti-Suffocation Aperture
Microphone
Mask Tube
Coupling
Toggle Lever
and Switch
Helmet
Connector
Expiratory
Outlet
Mask Tube
6-12 Fig 9 Valve System of a Pressure Demand Mask 
Iceguard
Facepiece of Mask
Inlet
Valve
Valve Seat
Compensation
Tube
Valve Plate
Spring
Inlet Port
Piston
Diaphragm
Outlet Snout
d. 
Anti-Suffocation Valve.  An anti-suffocation valve is mounted in the right-hand side of those P/Q 
series masks which are used with a personal hose assembly incorporating a self-sealing 'prop' valve in 
the man portion of the PEC (such masks are distinguished by the additional suffix 'C').  A 'prop' valve is 
a  device  which  closes  the  oxygen  entry  of  the  personal  hose  assembly  automatically  when  the 
assembly is detached from the seat.  The wearer then breathes air through the anti-suffocation valve.  
Closure of the 'prop' valve prevents water entering the breathing hose should ejection be followed by 
immersion.    The  anti-suffocation  valve  itself is an inward relief valve which opens when the pressure 
within the mask cavity falls to 9 to 13 mm Hg below ambient pressure. 
e. 
Microphone  and  Microphone  Switch.    A  miniature  dynamic  microphone  and  switch 
assembly is mounted above the expiratory valve in the front centre of the mask.  An electrical cord 
assembly  is  attached  to  the  microphone  and  connects  to  a  pocket  on  the  left-hand  side  of  the 
aircrew helmet. 
41.  The  mask  hose  is  secured  at  one  end  to  the  inlet connector of the mask and has at its distal end 
either a Mark 7 Bayonet Connector or an Inlet Warning Connector.  It is made of soft corrugated rubber 
tubing  to  allow  for  maximum  movement.    Some  types  are  available  in  both  standard  and  longer  length 
versions; the latter are distinguished by the suffix 'A'.  Additionally, in those aircraft from which high-speed 
ejection is a possibility, the hose is strengthened by a straining cord passing through the mask tube from 
the  bayonet  connector  to  a  ring  located  in  the  inlet  connector  (the  cord  also  reduces  volume  changes 
within  the  hose  and  hence  minimizes  pressure  swings  at  the  inlet  port,  which  might  otherwise  cause 
difficulty in breathing out).  The oxygen mask for these aircraft is further strengthened by replacing the link 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 14 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
chain with a pin-type chain harness: kinking is prevented by locating a sleeve of rubber tubing over each 
chain.  Such chains are being superseded by the MQR adjustable wire harness. 
V/T Series Pressure Demand Masks and Hoses 
42.  The V/T series masks are used with miniature man-mounted regulators.  They are available in large 
and small sizes and are essentially the same in design and construction as the P/Q series illustrated in 
Fig 8.  Its features are similar to those described for the P/Q series masks except for the following: 
a. 
Chain Toggle Harness Assembly.  Since high-speed ejection is a possibility from aircraft in 
which the V mask is worn, the chain is of the bicycle pin-type (Peripin) for increased strength.  A 
rubber sleeve over the chain prevents kinking. 
b. 
Mask Quick Release (MQR) Wire Harness.  Like the P/Q series, the chain assembly is also 
being  superseded  by  a  MQR  non-kinking,  adjustable  wire  harness  designed  to  withstand  high-
speed ejection. 
c. 
Anti-Suffocation Valve.  The anti-suffocation valve in V masks works in conjunction with the 
anti-drowning facility incorporated in the man-mounted regulators, allowing the wearer to breathe 
when  the  latter  operates  (eg  on  water  entry  following  man-seat  separation  after  ejection,  or  if 
oxygen delivery pressure falls). 
43.  The V/T series mask hose is designed to attenuate regulator or cabin noise which might otherwise 
be transmitted to the microphone.  It is made of an inner layer of Terylene fabric and an outer layer of 
silicone  rubber  with  a  layer  of  foam  between.    An  integral  wire  coil  supports  the  hose  which  is  non-
extendible and incompressible.  At its distal end a mask hose coupling is attached which is designed to 
mate with the outlet of the regulator.  Two connections must be made; one is the main breathing supply 
and the other is the compensation pressure supply from the reference chamber of the regulator to the 
expiratory  valve.    Located  within  the  main  coupling  is  another smaller coupling from which extends a 
pipe  connector.    A  narrow-bore  silicone-rubber  tube  (the  Compensation  Tube)  connects  this  inner 
coupling  with  the  back  of  the  compensated  expiratory  valve.    Thus,  compensation  of  the  expiratory 
valve is accomplished, via a closed system, by the regulator rather than by direct exposure of the valve 
to  inlet  pressure  as  in  masks  of  the  P/Q  series,  thereby  reducing  the  risk  of  pressure-induced 
expiratory difficulties. 
44.  The  system  employs  two  separate  pneumatic  connections  between  the  regulator  and  the  mask 
and works well when the distance between the two is relatively short.  It is colloquially called the 'Two 
Tube' system.  It should be noted that, in a type Vl mask, a broken or badly connected compensation 
tube  (so  called  'two  tube  failure')  will  only  be  revealed  by  correct  pre-flight  checks.    The  V2  mask  is 
identical to the V1 mask except for the following: 
a. 
An inspiratory valve is not fitted.  The presence of a compensation tube renders the need for 
a non-return inspiratory valve redundant since expired gas cannot affect the compensation of 
the expiratory valve by applying back pressure to it (compare with para 40c).  However, this 
is  only  the  case  as  long  as  the  compensating  tube  is  intact.    If  it  is  broken  or  connected 
wrongly, then expired gas can be applied through the leak to the back of the expiratory valve, 
and  so  make  expiration  impossible.    Two-tube  failure  in  the  V2  mask  is  therefore  instantly 
recognized  by  the  user  (compare  with  Two-tube  failure  in  the  V1  mask  which  may  go 
unnoticed  in  flight).    In  fact,  the  presence  of  an  inspiratory  valve  in  the  V1  mask  is 
unnecessary.    Its  retention  is  a  legacy  of  the  original  high  altitude  requirement  of  the  mask 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 15 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
which, when combined with the use of a pressure jerkin, did require such a valve to ensure 
that re-breathing could not occur. 
b. 
A  bayonet  type  mask  hose  coupling  is  fitted  for  connection  to  the  type  417A  regulator.    It 
incorporates a smaller coupling for the compensation tube. 
45.  The  T1  mask  is  used  with  the  type  417  miniature  man-mounted  regulator  and  is  worn  in 
conjunction  with  a  headset.    The  mask  is  available  in  a  large  and  small  size,  and  its  design  and 
function are similar to those of the V2 mask described above.  Thus, the normal exoskeleton and face-
piece mount a toggle harness, a compensated expiratory valve, and a microphone assembly.  There is 
no inspiratory valve and expiratory compensation is from the reference chamber of the regulator via a 
two  tube  mask  hose.    The  chain  toggle  harness  incorporates  adjusting  nuts  which  adjust  the  length 
and tension of the harness.  Unlike the P, Q, and V masks, the chain assembly is not being replaced 
by a MQR assembly.  The chains are prevented from twisting whilst being tensioned by swivel links. 
Faults and Corrective Drills 
46.  Malfunctions in the oxygen system are best understood and dealt with in the air by dividing them 
into modes of presentation to the user and then providing a table or flow chart detailing the corrective 
action  to  be  taken.    Such  tables  or charts form part of the Flight Reference Cards (FRCs) carried by 
each crew member. 
47.  In  flight,  the  precise  cause  of  failure  is  of  much  less  importance  to  the  user,  who  may  be  in 
considerable  danger,  than  the  need  for  a  rapid  and  accurate  response.    Thus,  any  failure  must  be 
immediately and clearly obvious either as an objective indication in the cockpit or as a subjective effect on 
the user.  The mode of presentation is then identified in the FRC and the required action taken. 
48.  Although  an  FRC  drill  makes  no  mention  of  the  causes  of  faults,  or  of  the  reasons  for  the 
indicated  actions,  these  may  be  worked  out  from  a  knowledge  of  the  system.    The  following  in 
particular should be noted: 
a. 
The first priority is to re-establish an oxygen supply (NB a rapid descent to below 10,000 ft is 
not  the  way  to  combat  hypoxia).    The  card  drill  always  leads  to  operation  of  the  Emergency 
Oxygen  (EO)  knob  if  the  problem  is  not  resolved  very  quickly.    However,  even  the  EO  will  be 
useless  unless  the  hose  connections  are  correctly  made,  and  hence  the  instruction  to  check 
connections comes before all else. 
b. 
Since  the  EO  has  a  finite  duration,  the  aircraft is committed to a descent to 10,000 ft cabin 
altitude or below as soon as possible once the EO system has been operated. 
c. 
The  commonest  cause  of  a  persistent  black  magnetic  indicator  (no  flow)  is  an  electrical 
failure  of  the  indicator  itself,  whilst  that  of  a  persistent  white  indicator  is  a  leak  in  the  system, 
usually from around the facemask seal. 
d. 
A  restriction  on  breathing  out  is  an  indication  of  inspiratory  valve  malfunctions:  the  valve  is 
held open by mask debris so that expired gas pressure acts on the expiratory valve from behind, 
via the compensating tube, and prevents it opening. 
e. 
Selection  of  100%  oxygen  is  used  as  a  diagnostic  test  in  that  normal  breathing  thereafter 
indicates that the system is functioning, providing that all connections are intact and the mask is 
sealed. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 16 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
AIRCREW EQUIPMENT ASSEMBLIES 
Requirements 
49.  In  general  terms,  the  main  aim  of  any  clothing  has  always  been  to  protect  the  body  from  the 
unfavourable  effects  of  man’s  environment.    Furthermore,  the  working  conditions  of  a  particular 
occupation have sometimes led to the development of specialized clothing best suited to the rigours of 
that  occupation  and  its  associated  workspace.    Flying  clothing,  or  in  preferred  terms,  Aircrew 
Equipment Assemblies (AEA), has evolved in just such a way. 
50.  Any AEA is a collection of specialized items of clothing and equipment integrated into a functional 
unit compatible with the aircrew shape and size, the cockpit workspace and the flying task. 
51.  The purpose of an AEA is to provide the necessary physiological support and protection required 
by aircrew to combat the various factors of the aviation environment, and thus allow them to carry out 
the flying task.  The AEA must also provide aircrew with whatever specialized facilities are needed in 
case  of  in-flight  emergency,  escape  from  aircraft  in  flight,  and  subsequent  survival  on  land  or  in  the 
water.  It is essential that these latter requirements of an AEA should not impede the normal flying task 
unduly,  nor  create  an  unacceptable  workload  on  aircrew.    Consequently,  any  AEA  is  always  a 
compromise  between  that  required  to  sustain  normal  flight,  and  that  required  to  give  adequate 
protection during any emergency situation. 
52.  When  aircrew  have  been  issued  with  the  AEA,  the  training  aspects  should  not  be  forgotten.  
Aircrew  need  to  know,  and  to  be  instructed  on,  the  capabilities  and  limitations  of  the  various  items 
comprising an AEA, and to undergo practice sessions using the equipment.  The AEA cannot function 
properly if it is ill-fitting and not of the correct size.  Therefore, it is necessary to ensure that the correct 
combination of garments is worn for the aircraft type, role, and area of operation, and that the clothing 
and equipment is a good fit and comfortable.  Ground support personnel need to ensure that the AEA 
is fully maintained in serviceable condition so that it will function as designed when required. 
53.  Properly  authorized  items  and  combinations  of  aircrew  clothing  and  equipment  for  each  aircraft 
type in operation with the RAF and other services (both fixed wing and rotary wing) can be found in the 
AEA schedules issued and updated regularly in AP 108B-0001-1. 
General Clothing 
54.  Underwear, socks, shirts, and jersey are provided to be used in the most suitable combination for 
the variety of aircraft, types, roles and flying environments. 
55.  Cotton  underwear  prevents  chafing  of  the  skin  by  the  coarser  fabrics  of  outer  layers  of  clothing 
and  also  'wicks'  away  sweat  from  areas  of  excessive  heat  production.    Socks  are  generally  of  the 
Terryloop variety but specialized cold weather and immersion socks are also available.  Where a shirt 
is required as an extra layer between underwear and coverall, a long-sleeved fine-weave 'T' shirt with 
roll neck is provided.  If a substantially warmer layer is required, a long sleeved woollen pullover can be 
worn in conjunction with the 'T' shirt or any combination of aircrew clothing. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 17 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
Anti-g Protection 
56.  Anti-g  trousers  are  worn  by  aircrew  operating  high  performance  aircraft  in  order  to  reduce  the 
effects  of  positive  accelerations  to  which  they  may  be  exposed  by  various  flight  manoeuvres.    The 
counter pressure applied to the abdomen and lower limbs when the bladders of the anti-g trousers are 
inflated on exposure to positive acceleration helps to maintain the blood pressure in the upper part of 
the  body  and  to  prevent  the  pooling  of  blood  in  the  lower  extremities.    These  physiological  effects 
compliment  the  various  manoeuvres  which  increase  tolerance.    The  use  of  anti-g  trousers  also 
reduces  the  fatigue  produced  by  repeated  exposure  to  high  g  levels.    The  bladders  of  the  anti-g 
trousers are connected through a flexible hose and connector system to the outlet of the anti-g valve.  
The anti-g valve automatically inflates and deflates the bladders with air or oxygen to the appropriate 
pressure when positive accelerations are applied to the aircraft. 
57.  Anti-g  trousers  are  provided  for  internal  or  external  wear  because  internal  wear  trousers  impose  a 
heat  load  which  has  proved  to  cause  discomfort  to  some  wearers  especially  during  'stand  by'  in  hot 
conditions.  External anti-g trousers are worn outside all other clothing when summer aircrew equipment 
assemblies  are  worn,  and  can  be  donned  immediately  before  take-off  and  doffed  immediately  after 
landing, thereby relieving the wearer of an unnecessary encumbrance when not flying. 
Coveralls 
58.  Coveralls, Aircrew, Mks 14 and 15.  The Coverall Mk 14 is a slim fitting garment which can be 
used  in  summer  and  winter.    The  flame  resistant  properties  of  the  Nomex  material  used  in  its 
manufacture are of advantage to aircrew.  The Mk 14A is designated for aircrew who do not wear anti-
g trousers, and has greater leg girth and reinforced stitching to the pockets.  The Mk 14B has no thigh 
pockets  as  it  is  used  in  conjunction  with  external  anti-g  trousers.    The  Coverall  Mk  15  is  also  made 
from  Nomex  material,  but  is  larger  in  girth  than  the  Mk  14A/B,  to  enable  it  to  be  fitted  over  an  inner 
immersion coverall.  It has pockets for equipment and personal items on the upper torso, thighs, lower 
legs, and upper arms, as determined by the relevant design standard. 
59.  Cold  Weather  Flying  Suit  Mk  3.    The  Cold  Weather  Flying  Suit  Mk  3  is  a  two-piece  garment 
designed to give protection to aircrew under medium to severe cold weather conditions.  It is suitable to 
use in winter land AEA combinations only and should not be used when extensive sorties over water 
are undertaken.  The suit comprises separate jacket and trousers made of a showerproofed gaberdine 
outer and ventile inner lining.  Both garments are interlined throughout with nylon mesh.  The front of 
the  jacket  is  closed  by  a  sliding  fastener  which,  when  closed,  can  be  covered  by  a  button-over  flap.  
There are two breast pockets.  A large 'let-down' flap is located on the inside of the jacket.  The flap, 
for use under survival conditions is worn outside the trousers to give additional protection to the lumbar 
and seat areas.  Provision is made, inside the collar, for the stowage of a scarf which is intended for 
use  under  survival  conditions  only.    At  the  base  of  the  collar  a  sliding  fastener  gives  access  to  the 
protective  hood  which,  when  worn  (under  survival  conditions  only),  is  secured  across  the  front  of  the 
neck by buttoned tabs.  A draw cord arrangement allows the hood to be fitted close around the face if 
necessary.    The  trousers  are  constructed  of  similar  materials  to  those  of  the  jacket.    To  facilitate 
donning the lower ends of the trouser legs are gusseted and fitted with sliding fasteners. 
60.  Combat Flying Suit Mk 2A.  The Combat Flying Suit Mk 2A is a five-piece garment designed to 
give  protection  to  aircrew  under  temperate  climatic  conditions,  and  is  particularly  suited  to  'off-base' 
operations for both fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft.  The suit consists of jacket, trousers, waistcoat, 
rainproof jacket, and trousers.  The jacket is made from a disruptive pattern gaberdine material which 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 18 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
is lined only across the shoulders, upper chest and down the sleeves.  The jacket is closed by a central 
open-ended sliding fastener which, when closed, can be covered by a button-over flap.  There are two 
breast pockets and two waist pockets.  A large Velcro-closed flap is located inside the lower back part 
of the jacket for use under survival conditions.  At the base of the collar a sliding fastener gives access 
to the protective hood which when worn (survival conditions only), is secured by button down tabs and 
a draw cord.  The trousers are of the same material as the jacket and are loose lined from waist to mid 
calf  level.    The  lower  ends  of  the  trouser  legs  are  gusseted  and  fitted  with  sliding  fasteners.    The 
waistcoat is a sleeveless quilted garment closed at the front by three buttons.  It is intended to be worn 
under the jacket if extra thermal insulation is needed.  The rainproof jacket and trousers are intended 
for use on the ground only or in survival conditions. 
61.  Coverall,  Immersion,  Mk  10/10A.    The  Immersion  Coverall,  Mk  10/10A  has  been  designed  to 
provide  aircrew  with  part  of  the  protection  needed  to  combat  the  effects  of  immersion  in  cold  water 
whilst  at  the  same  time  minimizing  the  thermal  stress  involved  in  wearing  a  bulky  garment  under 
normal  conditions.    Full  protection  against  hypothermia  can  only  be  provided  by  thermal  insulative 
clothing worn beneath the immersion coverall since the insulation afforded by the coverall itself is low.  
The  principle  function  of  the  immersion  coverall  is  to  preserve  the  insulation  afforded  by  the  clothing 
worn  underneath  by  keeping  these  garments  dry  in  the  event  of  immersion  in  water.    A  survivor, 
wearing only normal clothing and immersed in water at 5 °C for approximately 30 minutes, would have 
only a 50% chance of surviving.  Water temperatures around the coasts of the UK range from 5 °C in 
the winter to 15 °C in the summer.  For flights over the sea when water temperatures are at or below 
10  °C,  aircrew  should  wear  'winter'  combination  AEA  comprising  the  Mk  10/10A  coverall  and  the 
Coverall,  Inner,  Knitted,  Mk 1  (see  para  64).    The  Mk  10/10A  coverall  is  a  one-piece  garment 
constructed from two layers of ventile fabric comprising a thick outer layer and a thinner lining.  When 
dry  the  fabric  is  permeable  to  water  vapour  and  therefore  aids  body  comfort.    The  fabric  becomes 
waterproof  when  wet.    Butyl  rubber  waterproof  seals  which  fit  firmly  against  the  wearer’s  skin  are 
provided  at  the  wrists  and  at  the  neck.    The  seals  may  be  trimmed  to  fit  the  individual  wearer.    The 
coverall is supplied with the trousers legs open so that the correct size of waterproof immersion sock 
may  be  attached.    The  usual  range  of  pockets  is  provided.    The  Mk  10A  varies  in  having  a  blast 
resistant collar and other changes suited to specific aircraft types. 
62.  Coverall, Aircrew, Immersion, Inner, Mk 1.  The Immersion Coverall, Inner, Mk 1 is a one-piece 
garment which is designed to be worn under the Mk 15 aircrew coverall.  It is fully cut and shaped at 
the  knees,  seat,  and  arms.    It  is  made  from  cotton  ventile  fabric  which  has  the  ability  to  allow  body 
vapours  to  permeate  through  the  suit  under  normal  conditions.    Upon  immersion  in  water,  the  fibres 
expand to close the fabric pores and the fabric becomes waterproof. 
63.  Coverall, Immersion, Winchman, Mk 2.  The helicopter winchman’s Immersion Coverall, Mk 2 is 
similar  in  principle  and  design  to  the  Immersion  Coverall,  Mk  10.    The  suit  is  a  one-piece  garment 
made  from  heavy-duty  nylon/terylene  fabric  proofed  with  neoprene.    It  is  traffic  yellow  in colour.  The 
front entry sliding fastener, wrist, and neck seals are similar to those fitted to the Immersion Coverall, 
Mk 10.  The garment is intended for use with the aircrew rubber Immersion Boot, Mk 3/4, the correct 
size of boot being fitted for the individual wearer.  There is a pencil pocket on the upper left sleeve and 
envelope pockets attached to each lower leg. 
64.  Coverall, Inner, Knitted, Mk 1.  The Coverall, Inner, Knitted, Mk 1 is a one-piece garment knitted 
from 100% wool, worn under an immersion coverall, to provide the necessary thermal insulative layer 
in event of cold sea immersion. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 19 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
65.  Quick-don Immersion Coveralls.  In some aircraft which operate regularly over the sea, it may be 
impractical  for  the  crew  or  passengers  to  wear  the  normal  type  of  immersion  coverall  -  they  require  a 
garment which gives an adequate degree of protection and can be donned quickly in an emergency.  It 
should be easy to don by individuals who are unfamiliar with it or may be suffering from minor injuries. 
a. 
Coverall, Aircrew, Immersion, Quick-don, Mk 1.  The requirements above led to the adoption 
by  the  RAF  and  RN  of  the  Mk  1,  Quick-don,  Immersion  Coverall.    This  coverall  is  a  simple,  red 
coloured, one-piece garment constructed with an integral hood and overboots.  It is of a universal sizing 
and stowed in a valise.  It is recommended that aircrew adopt and practise a donning method suitable 
to their crew station and having due regard for the conditions likely to prevail in an emergency.  Should 
circumstances  dictate  that  passengers  use  this  coverall,  they  should,  if  possible,  be  supervised  and 
assisted during donning.  This garment is being replaced by the Coverall, Passenger, Immersion, Mk 1 
(see next sub-para), which will be used by aircrew and passengers alike. 
b. 
Coverall,  Passenger,  Immersion,  Mk  1.    The  Coverall,  Passenger,  Immersion,  Mk  1  is 
designed  to  meet  the  requirement  for  easy  donning  by  wearers  unused  to  complex  aircrew 
equipment.    The  coverall  is  a  simple  dayglow  coloured,  one-piece  garment  constructed  with  an 
integral hood, overboots and protective mitts (see Fig 10).  Rubber seals are fitted at the neck and 
wrist apertures.  It is available in small, medium, and large sizes.  The large size is also available 
as a Mk 1G in NATO Green.  The coverall is stored in a valise in the aircraft. 
6-12 Fig 10 Coverall, Passenger, Immersion, Mk 1 
Aircrew Body Armour 
66.  Body  armour  is  provided  to  protect  aircrew  members  of  helicopters  and  other  slow,  low  flying 
aircraft operating in forward combat areas.  There are two types of armour in use; contoured front and 
back panels of specially processed fibreglass, and a torso plate made from a sandwich construction of 
aluminium oxide tiles mounted on a backing of glass fibre reinforced plastic.  The fibrous nature of the 
materials  used  allows  fragments  to  be  absorbed  and  reduces  ricochets.    The  torso  plate  is  held  in 
position by a support jerkin. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 20 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
Pressure Garments 
67.  Pressure Jerkin Mk 6.  Above 40,000 ft, pressure breathing with 100% oxygen is required to prevent 
hypoxia.  The magnitude of the pressure breathing required above 50,000 ft is such that counter pressure 
must  be  applied  to  the  trunk  and  lower  limbs.    The  Pressure  Jerkin  Mk  6  is  a  sleeveless  garment  which 
covers the trunk and upper thighs.  It has an internal bladder which, when inflated by oxygen, provides this 
necessary counter pressure (the anti-g trousers can be used to apply the counter pressure to the lower limbs 
during  pressure  breathing).  The jerkin connector contains a valve which isolates the jerkin from the main 
breathing  line  during  normal  breathing  and  at  all  altitudes  where  pressure  breathing  is  not  required.    The 
valve opens quickly and fully during pressure breathing to allow rapid inflation of the jerkin. 
Aircrew Lifepreservers 
68.  The main purpose of a lifepreserver is to provide sufficient additional buoyancy so distributed that 
the  survivor  will  achieve  a  satisfactory  flotation  attitude  with  the  airway  clear  of  the  water  under  all 
circumstances ie landing face down in the water irrespective of the clothing assembly worn, and in the 
event of injury.  The buoyancy stole of the current lifepreservers is constructed of a strong butyl fabric 
bladder  inflated  by  a  carbon  dioxide  cylinder  and  operating  head.    The  assembly  is  arranged  as  a 
horseshoe collar and attached to a waistcoat which also contains pockets for the stowage of survival 
and location aids and lifting beckets for the attachment of a Grabbit hook. 
69.  Lifepreserver Design Requirements.  A disadvantage of using carbon dioxide for filling the stole 
is  that  the  rate  of  inflation  is  markedly  slowed  at  low  temperatures  as  a  proportion  of  the  gas 
condenses as snow and only slowly re-evaporates and fills the stole.  It can take 30 to 60 seconds to 
inflate  the  stole  at  a  sea  temperature  of  5  °C.    The  ideal  flotation  attitude  is  only  achieved  when 
wearing  lightweight  minimum  bulk  clothing  assemblies.    Some  assemblies  ie  inner  coverall  and 
immersion coverall, trap air so that inherent buoyancy leads to adverse flotation attitudes with minimal 
self-righting.  It is therefore important that aircrew should take positive action to expel the trapped air 
from  within  the  immersion  coverall  as  soon  as  possible  after  water  entry.  All lifepreservers are fitted 
with  a  Personal  Locator  Beacon  and  a  selection  of  other  survival  and  location  aids  depending  on 
aircraft  role  and  the  amount  of  space  available.    Lifepreservers  are  designed  to  be  suitable  for 
particular  types  of  aircraft,  and  although  there  are  numerous  small  differences  across  the  range  of 
lifepreservers they all perform the same task and are all of the same basic design. 
Helmets 
70.  The  Mechanisms  of  Head  Injury.    In  general  terms,  the  mechanisms  of  head  injury  can  be 
summarized as being due to: 
a. 
Direct impact (soft tissue and bony injury). 
b. 
Linear acceleration (concussion). 
c. 
Angular acceleration (concussion). 
In the absence of head impact, forces transmitted through the neck may cause fractures to the base of 
the skull, or concussion by initiating high angular accelerations of the head (see Volume 6, Chapter 14). 
71.  Protective Helmets.  Ideally, protection against these effects can be afforded by the provision of a 
hard,  rigid  shell  around  the  head  to  minimize  direct  impact  damage,  and  a  means  of  increasing  the 
distance  through  which the head travels after impact before stopping, thereby reducing the accelerative 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 21 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-12 - Oxygen and Aircrew Equipment Assemblies 
forces involved.  RAF aircrew protective helmets employ a frangible fibreglass shell which breaks up on 
impact, dissipating some of the energy.  The impact load is transmitted to the head and distributed over a 
wide area by means of a webbing suspension harness which provides an initial air gap of about one inch 
to maximize the stopping distance.  Energy is absorbed by the shell inelastically each time a glass fibre 
ruptures, or is pulled out of the resin matrix.  Peripherally, energy is absorbed by crushable foams.  Use of 
this technique implies a compromise with the requirement for a strong rigid shell. 
72.  Helmet  Functional  Requirements.    The  aircrew  helmet  must  also  serve  several  secondary 
functions: 
a. 
Intercommunication facility. 
b. 
Noise attenuation. 
c. 
Oxygen mask suspension mechanism. 
d. 
Eye protection against birdstrike, solar glare, and air blast. 
e. 
Mounting platform for vision enhancement devices. 
The  end  design  of  a  protective  helmet for aircrew use must inevitably be a compromise between the 
extent  of  the  protection  provided  against  impact,  the  overall  weight  (to  allow  good  head  and  neck 
mobility),  size  (not  too  unwieldy)  and  noise  attenuation.    With  the  development  of  aircraft  able  to 
perform  repeated  high-g  air  combat  manoeuvres,  has  come  the  requirement  to  reduce  the  weight  of 
the standard RAF aircrew helmet/mask combination. 
Boots 
73.  The standard pattern flying boot provides aircrew with a rugged item of footwear suitable for use in 
flight  and  in  any  survival  situation.    The  boot  consists  of  black  leather  uppers  which  are  lined  and 
bonded  to  a  tough  composite  sole.   The uppers are extended high on the ankle and are fitted with a 
foam-padded rim for comfort.  Fastening is by eyelet and laces.  The underside of the sole is moulded 
into a non-skid, anti-FOD pattern.  The leather is proofed to provide the maximum degree of protection 
in a land survival situation.  A lightweight version is also available. 
Gloves 
74.  The  general-purpose  aircrew  glove  is  the  cape  leather  glove.    The  glove  is  constructed  from 
strong,  supple  close  fitting  leather  which  provides  protection  against  abrasion  and  from  fire  without 
detriment to tactility and dexterity.  There is a water resistant version of similar construction but having 
slightly thicker leather and a coating of waterproof solution on the inside.  Wrist seals are provided to 
complete the waterproof integrity. 
75.  Helicopter  winchmen  are  provided  with  gloves  constructed  of  stout  rough  leather  with  metallic 
reinforcement to the index finger and thumb in order to withstand chafing from the moving wire strop of 
the helicopter winch. 
Summary 
76.  Although individual items have been described in this chapter it should be remembered that each 
AEA is designed as a carefully integrated functional system which ensures that the appropriate degree 
of  protection  is  afforded  to  aircrew  and  is,  at  the  same  time,  fully  compatible  with  the  aircrewman’s 
ability  to  perform  the  flying  task  with  a  minimum  of  restriction.    Aircrew  should  always  wear  the 
recommended AEA as defined by the relevant operating authority. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 22 of 22 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
CHAPTER 13 - AIRCREW HEALTH 
Introduction 
1. 
This  chapter  will  briefly  cover  the  function  of  the  RAF  Medical  Services  and  also  give  some 
general advice on health care. 
The RAF Medical Branch 
2. 
The  RAF  Medical  Branch  was  originally  formed  in  the  early  days  of  aviation  because  of  medical 
problems which were encountered as a result of flying. It was decided that these problems could best be 
tackled by doctors who were part of the same organisation as the aircrew and whose first duty would be to 
look  after  the  health  and  effectiveness  of  flying  personnel.  Today,  the  Medical  Officer’s  (MO)  first  duty 
remains  the  medical  care  of  aircrew.  Over  the  years  the  MOs  role  has  expanded  to  not  only  treat  the 
problems encountered as a result of flying, but also to ensure that aircrew are medically fit to be able to fly 
safely. 
Self-medication 
3. 
In general, aircrew should  not  take any  pills or  potions from chemists, supermarkets, herbalists, 
etc. The main reasons for this are: 
a. 
If  aircrew  feel  sufficiently  unwell  to  want  to  take  a  drug  of  any  kind,  they  should  almost 
certainly not be flying. 
b. 
Many  drugs  are  dangerous  to  take  when  flying;  they  can  impair  performance  and  increase 
susceptibility  to  both  hypoxia  and  disorientation.  Particular  culprits  in  this  respect  are  headache 
remedies, cold 'cures', drugs for hay fever, and drugs for motion sickness. 
Medical Care from Civilian Doctors 
4. 
All RAF Medical Officers undertake training and qualify as a Military Aircrew Medical Examiner. It 
is  unreasonable  to  expect  civilian  doctors  to  be  aware  of  the  special  factors  which  have  to  be  taken 
into  account  when  treating  aircrew.  Therefore,  if  civilian  doctors  have  to  be  consulted,  for  whatever 
reason,  they  must  be  made  aware  that  the  patient  is military  aircrew.  Furthermore,  the  RAF  Medical 
Officer must be informed of any such treatment, particularly if medication was prescribed. 
Annual Medicals 
5. 
Aircrew are required to undergo periodic medical examinations throughout their careers to ensure 
that  they  are  fit  to  maintain  their  flying  category.    These  medical  examinations  occur  annually  in  the 
subject’s birth month and will involve blood tests on the following occasions: 
a. 
On entry. 
b. 
Age 25 and 30. 
c. 
Two-yearly from age 32 to age 40. 
d. 
Annually, after the age of 40. 
The  annual  medical  is  an  exercise  in  preventative  medicine,  giving  the  Medical  Officer  a  chance  to 
pick  up  potential  problems  at  an  early  stage,  when  they  can  often  be  easily  resolved.    It  also  gives 
individuals a chance to raise any medical topics which may concern them. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
Exercise and Physical Fitness 
6. 
There  are  two  main  reasons  for  getting  and  staying  physically  fit.    The  first  reason  is  fitness  for 
the job.   A physically fit person  will be less prone to  many of the hazards of flying.   Remember that, 
when in a survival situation, the living and the dead can be separated, not only by their knowledge or 
skills, but also by their physical fitness.  The second reason for being fit is that it produces a benefit in 
terms  of  general  health  and  well-being.    A  fit  body  is  an  efficient  body,  and  a  fit  person  uses  less 
energy to perform the same job than an unfit one.  Fit people, therefore, have more energy left over to 
enjoy  recreational  pursuits,  feel  less  tired  at  the  end  of  the  day  and  can  lead  much  fuller  lives.  
Cardiovascular disease is much less common in people who take regular exercise.  Doctors are often 
asked what is the best way of keeping fit.  Unfortunately, there is no easy or quick way; the only way is 
to  take  regular  exercise.    It  does  not  matter  what  form  the  exercise  takes,  as  long  as  it  causes  a 
moderate rise in the pulse and current recommendations are for 30 minutes, five times a week. 
Cardiovascular Disease 
7. 
In England and Wales, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the biggest causes of death and 
disability,  for  both  men  and  women,  accounting  for  over  150,000  deaths  annually.    Sitting  under  the 
CVD umbrella is Heart Disease  which  usually takes the form of deposits on the walls of the arteries, 
which supply oxygenated blood to the heart muscle.  These deposits increase with age in most people 
in  Western  Europe  and  North  America,  and  eventually  result  in  inadequate  oxygen  supplies  to  the 
heart  muscle.    The  effects  resulting  from  this  form  of  heart  disease  may  include  limitation  of  activity 
due to chest pain on exertion, and death due to 'heart attack'.  Doctors are often asked about how to 
reduce the risk of suffering from CVD.  There are a number of risk factors that are recognised as being 
important and these are: 
a. 
Family History.  The fact that CVD runs in some families is well known.  Unfortunately, this 
is  as  a  result  of  our  genetic make-up  and  nothing  can  currently  be  done  to  alter  this  risk  factor.  
However,  the  altered  metabolic  activity  which  leads  to  disease  symptoms  can  often  be  treated, 
lessening the likelihood of having serious symptoms. 
b. 
Smoking.    The  death  rate  from  CVD  in  smokers  is  roughly  double  that  of  non-smokers.  
Smoking  is  also  a  potent  risk  factor  for  other  diseases  such  as  lung  cancer,  bronchitis  and 
emphysema,  stroke,  high  blood  pressure,  peptic  ulcers  and  stomach  and  bladder  cancers.    On 
stopping  smoking,  however,  the  risk  of  developing  these  diseases  gradually  reduces  to  almost 
the same level as in people who have never smoked. 
c. 
High  Blood  Pressure.    Studies  have  shown  that  even  mildly  elevated  blood  pressure  is  a 
risk  factor  for  heart  disease.    It  is,  therefore,  vitally  important  that  blood  pressure  is  measured 
regularly. 
d. 
High  Cholesterol.    Population  studies  have  shown  a  good  correlation  between  average 
blood  cholesterol  and  the  incidence  of  heart  disease  in  Western  Europe  and  North  America.  
Lowering blood cholesterol by diet and/or drugs can result in significant reduction in the chances 
of an individual developing symptomatic CVD. 
e. 
Obesity.  Obesity in itself is a highly significant risk factor.  It is almost invariably associated 
with raised blood fats, and other risk factors such as high blood pressure, which greatly increase 
the risk.  Obesity  is also highly correlated  with the development of adult onset diabetes Type II; 
this is another major risk factor for CVD. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
f. 
Diet.    There  is  suggestive  evidence  that  a  diet  with  a  higher  proportion  of  polyunsaturated 
fats than saturated fats may reduce risk of CVD.  The aim should be to reduce the proportion of 
total calorific intake derived from fat of whatever source. 
8. 
The  risk  factors  discussed  in  the  previous  paragraph  were  determined  from  population  studies 
and should not  be rigidly applied  to individuals.  However, they are cumulative,  and  it is important to 
work at reducing those that it is possible to alter.  Measures which constitute a healthy lifestyle can be 
taken to reduce the risk of CVD include: 
a. 
Body weight control. 
b. 
A sensible diet, low in saturated fats (avoid animal fat). 
c. 
Regular exercise. 
d. 
Stop smoking. 
RAF annual medicals include both blood pressure measurements and periodic blood cholesterol tests. 
Diabetes 
9. 
Diabetes is a condition where the amount of glucose in your blood is too high because the body 
cannot  break  it  down  for  use  as  fuel.    The  hormone  called  insulin  is  responsible  for  breaking  down 
glucose (sugar) and insulin is produced by the pancreas.  Diabetes develops when the pancreas does 
not produce any insulin at all (Type 1) or when the insulin produced does not work properly (Type 2).  
The result is a build up of sugar in the blood stream which damages the lining of blood vessels in the 
brain,  heart,  eyes,  kidneys  and  other  organs.    Diabetes  can  therefore  lead  to  a  stroke,  heart  attack, 
blindness and kidney failure.  There are two main types of diabetes:   
a. 
Type 1:   This happens  when there  is no  insulin to break down sugar.  It typically  occurs in 
younger  persons.    The  risk  of  developing  this  type  of  diabetes  is  usually  related  to  one’s  genes 
and  ethnicity,  which  are  factors  that  cannot  be  controlled.    Type  1  diabetics  will  usually  require 
insulin injections.  
b. 
Type 2:  This happens when the insulin produced by the pancreas does not work properly.  It 
typically  occurs  in  persons  over  the  age  of  40.    The  risk  of  developing  this  type  of  diabetes 
increases with a lack of regular exercise, weight gain and a poor diet amongst other factors such 
as  genetics.    Up  to  80  per  cent  of  cases  of  Type  2  diabetes  can  be  delayed  or  prevented  by 
making  simple  changes  in  one’s  lifestyle  including  adopting  a  healthy  diet,  undertaking  regular 
exercise and controlling one’s weight. Medication may become necessary if lifestyle changes fail 
to take effect.  
Alcohol 
10.  Alcohol  has  been  used  and  abused  by  people  since  time  immemorial.    It  is  a  central  nervous 
system  depressant  and  produces  its  pleasurable  effects  by  interfering  with  some  of  the  inhibitory 
mechanisms  in  the  brain,  as  well  as  reducing  feelings  of  anxiety.    In  sensible  amounts,  it  probably 
does more good than harm.  Chronic alcohol abuse, however, is a major cause of death and disability 
in the UK.  Even small amounts have been shown to impair judgement and increase reaction time and 
make  aviators  more  prone  to  spatial  disorientation.    How  much  alcohol  is  safe?    It  must  be 
remembered  that  different  individuals  react  differently  to  drinking  alcohol.    The  actual  rate  of  uptake 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
and elimination by an individual will depend on many factors, for example, the proportion of fat, body 
size  and  gender.    The  figures  given  in  the  following  sub-paras  give  some  guidance  with  regard  to 
alcohol uptake and elimination from the body. 
a. 
The current recommended safe alcohol consumption levels are 21 units per week for males, 
and 14 units per week for females.  Where one unit of alcohol equals 10 ml of ethanol, the alcohol 
content of a drink can vary significantly, particularly in the case of beer. 
b. 
One  unit  of  alcohol  raises  the  blood  alcohol  concentration  by  approximately  15  mg  per 
100 ml. Six units therefore raises blood alcohol level by 90 mg per 100 ml, which is over the legal 
limit  for  driving.    This  does  not  imply  that  by  drinking  fewer  than  6  units  of  alcohol  that  an 
individual  will  be  under  the  legal  limit  for  driving.    As  has  been  emphasised  above,  different 
individuals  react  differently  to  alcohol  and  some  individuals  will  be  above  the  drink  drive  limit 
having  ingested  considerably  fewer  than  6  units.    Current  advice  is  that  no  alcohol  should  be 
taken before driving. 
c. 
Blood  alcohol  concentration  can  fall  at  a  rate  of  approximately  10  mg  per  100  ml  per  hour, 
and therefore, it may take up to nine hours to eliminate six units of alcohol from the body.  Again, 
these figures will vary with the individual. 
11.  A  new  law,  introduced  on  1  Nov  2013,  permits  the  power  to  test  for  alcohol  and  drugs,  when  a 
commanding  officer  of  a  person  subject  to  service  law  has  reasonable  cause  to  believe  that  that 
person’s ability to perform safety-critical duty is impaired because of alcohol or drugs.  Full details can 
be  found  in  2013  DIN  01-212  and  further  guidance  in  chapter  6  of  JSP  835  (Alcohol  and  Substance 
Misuse and Testing).  A safety-critical duty is statutorily defined as one where the performance of duty 
while  impaired,  through  drugs  or  alcohol,  would  result  in  a  risk  of  death,  serious  injury,  serious 
damage to property or serious environmental harm.  Guidance on what is considered to be a safety-
critical duty is contained within the DIN and JSP.  Within the RAF the most notable prescribed duties 
are  aircrew,  Remotely  Piloted  Air  Systems  (RPAS)  operators,  air  traffic  controllers  (this  includes  any 
person controlling the direction of flight of an aircraft such as aerospace battle managers and forward 
air  controllers),  aircraft  maintenance  technicians  and  their  supervisors,  flight  authorising  officers,  live 
armed personnel and drivers.  This list is not exhaustive and there is provision for a CO to designate a 
duty as safety-critical as described in the DIN. 
Alcohol Limits for Safety-critical Duties 
12.  The  alcohol  limits  for  prescribed  safety-critical  duties  have  been  set  at  two  levels;  Higher  and 
Lower alcohol levels. 
a. 
Higher Alcohol Levels
The  majority  of  safety-critical  duties  fall  into  the  higher  alcohol 
limit for testing of breath, blood and urine.  The higher limits are: 
Blood 

80 mgs of alcohol in 100 mls (England & Wales) 
50 mgs of alcohol in 100 mls (Scotland) 
b. 
Lower Alcohol Levels. Some safety-critical duties require a heightened speed of reaction in 
an emergency situation and therefore are subject to a lower alcohol limit.  The lower limits are: 
Blood 

20 mgs of alcohol in 100 mls 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
The higher level is the same as the current UK road drink/drive limit.  The lower level is the same as 
that  stated  in  the  Railways  and  Transport  Safety  Act  2003,  which  has  applied  to  civilian  pilots  (and 
others  performing  an  ‘aviation  function’)  in  the  UK  for  a  number  of  years.    All  personnel  involved  in 
safety-critical  duties,  including  supporting  flying  operations,  should  ensure  that  they  are  not  suffering 
the effects or after effects of alcohol when reporting for duty.  Current advice is that personnel should 
not consume alcohol within 24 hours of their flying duties. 
HIV, AIDS and other Sexually Transmitted Diseases 
13.  In  1981,  in  the  USA,  there  was  an  outbreak  of  a  rare  type  of  pneumonia  in  apparently  healthy 
homosexual  men.    Investigation  of  this  outbreak  lead  to  the  recognition  of  the  Acquired  Immune 
Deficiency  Syndrome  (AIDS),  an  apparently  new  disease.    Two  years  later,  the  infectious  agent 
causing this disease was identified as a previously unknown virus, which was subsequently named the 
Human  Immuno-Deficiency  Virus  (HIV).    Infection  with  HIV  leads  to  damage  of  the  immune  system, 
rendering the individual susceptible to a wide variety of infections.  It can also lead to the development 
of various cancers.  The HIV virus also attacks cells in the central nervous system causing dementia.  
The most common way of getting HIV in the UK is by anal or vaginal sex without a condom. 95% of 
those diagnosed with HIV in the UK in 2013 acquired HIV as a result of sexual contact. HIV may also 
be acquired by inoculation via a contaminated needle, injecting instrument, unscreened blood or blood 
products through direct exposure of mucous membranes or an open wound to infected bodily fluids; or 
by  a  human  bite  that  breaks  the  skin.  There  is  a  risk  of  transmission  from  mother  to  baby  during 
pregnancy, birth or breastfeeding.  
The  initial  infection  with  HIV  is  usually  symptomless  and  is  followed  by  an  incubation  period  during 
which  the  patient  appears  normal.    The  incubation  period  is  very  variable  but  can  range  from  5  to  7 
years.    The  diagnosis  of  HIV  infection  is  confirmed  by  a  blood  test,  which  detects  antibodies  to  the 
virus.  There is no cure for this disease and no vaccine available to provide protection from infection.  .  
Prevention  of  transmission  of  HIV  infection,  as  well  as  several  other  sexually  transmitted  diseases, 
depends entirely on those at risk modifying their behaviour.  The adoption of safe sex practices is very 
much  an  individual  matter.    Discussion  of  specific  measures  is  not  appropriate  in  this  document; 
information  is  available  from  a  variety  of  sources  (including  the  internet),  but  these  matters  should 
ideally be discussed with a doctor, or other medical professionals. 
14.  The RAF’s policy towards AIDS is briefly explained by the following points, which should answer 
most questions: 
a. 
HIV infection may be compatible with Service employment.  
b. 
HIV infection may be compatible with flying duties in a restricted capacity, due to the effects 
of the virus on the brain. 
c. 
The  RAF  does  not  currently  test  for  HIV  routinely.    No  HIV  testing  is  carried  out  on  blood 
tests done at annual aircrew medicals. 
15.  In  recent  years,  there  has  been  a  significant  increase  in  other  sexually  transmitted  diseases, 
specifically  gonorrhoea  and  syphilis.  The  important  point  is  that  safe  sex  practices  can  protect  a 
person from a multiplicity of sexually transmitted diseases. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
Travel Advice 
16.  Aircrew  can  expect  to  travel  widely  during  their  careers.    Fast  jet  aircrew  are  now  deployed  to 
many  corners  of  the  globe,  while  transport  crews  regularly  route  through  remote  areas.    In  addition, 
leisure travel to exotic locations is now easily available and more affordable.   
17.  Some countries, realising the economic importance of travel, may devote more importance to the 
Ministry  of  Tourism  than  to  the  Ministry  of  Health  and  not  spend  adequate  money  on  public  health 
measures.    It  is,  therefore,  imperative  to  be  aware  of  the  measures  that  can  be  taken  to  reduce  the 
risk of contracting disease while abroad. 
18.  General  Advice.  Only 5% of travel illness can be prevented by immunisation.  However, many 
problems  can  be  avoided  by  observing  a  strict  personal  hygiene  routine  and  taking  a  few  basic 
precautions.  These measures should be observed in all parts of the world.  They are: 
a. 
Never  drink  tap  water  unless  it  is  declared  fit  for  drinking  by  a  reliable  authority,  preferably 
military Public Health representatives.  Remember that even cleaning teeth in contaminated water 
can be enough to cause illness. 
b. 
Avoid ice in drinks, unless you are certain that the ice is made from treated water. 
c. 
Peel  all  fruit  and  vegetables.    The  skin  may  have  been  contaminated  by  someone  with  a 
communicable disease.  In addition, the use of human fertilizer is widespread, and contributes to 
the spread of infectious diseases. 
d. 
Avoid salad stuffs and other raw foods which may have been washed in contaminated water.  
A major outbreak of food poisoning occurred in 1992 after the passengers on a 216 Sqn Tristar, 
en-route  to  the  Falkland  Islands,  had  to  divert  to  Dakar  where  they  ate  salad  which  had  been 
washed  in  contaminated  water.    Nearly  150  people  suffered  a  particularly  vicious  episode  of 
prolonged diarrhoea. 
e. 
Avoid dehydration.  Increase fluid intake considerably in hot climates.  Remember that thirst 
is not an adequate indicator of hydration.  A light-yellow urine colour, as opposed to dark yellow 
or orange, is more reliable. 
f. 
Beware  of  the  sun.    Remember  sunburn  can  be  a  debilitating  illness,  and  that  heat  stroke 
can be fatal. 
g. 
Wear  appropriate  clothing.    Long-sleeved  shirts  and  long  trousers  are  a  must  in  malaria 
zones.    Exposed  skin  should  be  protected  with  insect  repellents;  the  head  and  neck  must  be 
protected from direct exposure to the sun. 
h. 
When  planning  a  journey,  account  must  be  taken  of  the  entire  trip,  not  just  the  final 
destination.    A  stopover  may  occur  in  an  area  where  certain  diseases  are  prevalent  and 
appropriate precautions therefore need to be addressed. 
i. 
Any  illness  developing  on  return  from  foreign  travel  must  be  reported  to  the  MO,  with  full 
details  of  locations  and  dates.    The  onset  of  malaria,  for  example,  may  take  place  up  to  a  year 
after exposure. 
Reviewed Nov 15 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 6-13 - Aircrew Health 
Common Travel-acquired Diseases 
19.  Malaria.    The WHO  estimates  that  in  2010  there  were  219  million  cases  of  malaria  resulting  in 
660,000  deaths.  Malaria  is  presently  endemic  in  a  broad  band  around  the  equator,  in  areas  of  the 
Americas, many parts of Asia, and much of Africa; in Sub-Saharan Africa, 85–90% of malaria fatalities 
occur.    Every  year,  125  million  international  travelers  visit  these  countries,  and  more  than  30,000 
contract the disease. Deaths in Britain from the disease average seven to ten per year, with over 1000 
cases being reported.  As resistance to chemoprophylactic drugs increases, simple measures to avoid 
being bitten by the carrier mosquitoes take on added importance. 
a. 
Measures to reduce the risk of contracting malaria are: 
(1)  Be  aware  of  the  risk.    Find  out  if  the  countries  to  be  travelled  to,  or  through,  are 
malarious areas.  Local medical authorities should be able to provide this information.  If not, 
Service infectious disease consultants are available to advise them. 
(2)  Sleep  in  properly  screened  rooms  and  use  a  knockdown  insecticide  spray  to  kill  any 
mosquitoes that may have entered the room during the day. 
(3)  Use mosquito nets round the bed at night, checking