This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Application to the Coastal Communities Fund – the 'Southwold Enterprise Hub''.



Southwold Enterprise Hub  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business Plan   
 
January 2019 
 
 
 
 
 

link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 26 link to page 28 link to page 31 link to page 32 link to page 39 link to page 40 Table of Contents  
Executive Summary ..................................................................................................... 1 
1. 
Introduction ........................................................................................................ 3 
2. 
Organisation Summary ........................................................................................ 3 
3. 
Project Background ............................................................................................. 5 
Project development ...................................................................................................................5 
Economic backdrop .................................................................................................................... 6 
Strategic Response .................................................................................................................... 8 
4. 
Strategic Context ................................................................................................ 9 
Identified gaps ........................................................................................................................... 9 
Coastal Communities Fund Outcomes ....................................................................................... 10 
Target Beneficiaries .................................................................................................................. 10 
Options Considered - Station Yard ............................................................................................. 11 
Options Considered - Southwold Development Team ................................................................. 12 
5. 
Project Delivery ................................................................................................. 12 
Station Yard Site – Current Use & Ownership ............................................................................. 13 
Station Yard Development ........................................................................................................ 13 
Managed Workspace ................................................................................................................ 15 
Businesses Supported ............................................................................................................... 16 
Southwold Development Team ................................................................................................. 17 
Existing Provision ..................................................................................................................... 18 
Timetable ................................................................................................................................. 19 
6. 
Project Resources .............................................................................................. 19 
7. 
Project Costs ..................................................................................................... 20 
8. 
Financial Appraisal ............................................................................................. 21 
Operational Financials ........................................................................................................................... 22 
Market Analysis ..................................................................................................................................... 22 
9. 
Funding ............................................................................................................ 23 
10.  Marketing, Communications & Sales ................................................................... 23 
11.  Monitoring & Evaluation (Logic Model) ............................................................... 24 
12.  Risk Analysis ..................................................................................................... 26 
A. 
Reference Documents   
B. 
Job Descriptions   
C. 
Occupancy Rates      
D. 
Operating Costs     

 
Executive Summary  
Economic Background  
Southwold is a unique coastal town. Its attractive streets with elegant Georgian buildings, its 
sandy beaches, pier and characterful beach huts draw more than 1.5m visitors annually, 42% 
of them during June to September, with a peak overnight visitor population of 15,000.   Annual 
tourism spend is estimated at £50m.   
However, such a successful tourism industry has significant negative consequences for the 
town.  Demand for holiday homes has driven up property prices, and as a result, by 2011, 50% 
of Southwold’s houses had no permanent residents, the highest level of any coastal town in 
the country.  The resident population has halved since 1981, losing 12% since 2011 alone, and 
now stands at just 964.  It is close to unsustainable.  
Employment in the town is also dominated by the tourist economy; many jobs are low paid, 
seasonal and without career development prospects.  For businesses, the economy is equally 
challenging.  Demand from national retailers for space in the High Street has driven up rentals, 
with corresponding rises in business rates – up to 400% increases.  Many independent retailers 
struggle to survive, particularly in the low season with so few residents to support them.  For 
non-retailers, there are virtually no business premises in the town; those that do come on the 
market are in the High Street area, with rents comparable to central London rates. 
The Project  
In response to the crisis facing Southwold, the Town Council, working with the Southwold 
Coastal Community Team, has devised a project, the ‘Southwold Enterprise Hub’.  It consists 
of two elements:  
1.  Creation of new office space to attract knowledge/creative industry businesses to set up in 
the town, offering higher-value sustainable employment;  
2.  Establishment of a Southwold Development Team to extend the visitor economy beyond 
peak season and to support businesses across the town to become more productive.   
This  project  fits  well  with  the  overall  CCF  priority  focused  on  stimulating  regeneration  and 
economic growth, in this case regenerating a key site in Southwold. The hub provides a unique 
workspace, incorporating business support services to encourage business start-ups, growth, 
diversification as well as safeguarding and creating jobs. 
The Council reviewed its asset portfolio (the majority of which is held to support the 
community) and identified Station Yard, a 0.12ha brownfield site at the entrance to the town, 
for development.  The existing buildings will be demolished, and two new buildings will form 
the Southwold Enterprise Hub, providing a retail outlet (for use by a local independent) and  15 
offices of varying sizes rented as managed workspace.  At maximum occupancy, it is projected 
there will be 37 businesses of which 15 will be new; 76 people will work at the Hub, with up to 
36 new jobs created, the majority of which should be of higher value.   
Two of the largest offices will be established as co-working space, ready to move into with all 
services in place, and supporting up to 24 single-person businesses.  Evidence from other 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
1 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
coastal towns, particularly in Devon, show the enormous impact this can have on the self-
employed, creating opportunities for collaboration, inspiration and creating an 
entrepreneurial hub of activity.  Virtual tenancies will also be offered, allowing businesses to 
benefit from the cachet of the Southwold brand, and creating a pathway for those intending 
to move into the town in future.  
Business support will be provided to all tenants of the Hub, including virtual, plus those 
elsewhere in the town. This will include advice and guidance, networking events, training and 
knowledge sharing to help businesses become more stable, productive and sustainable.    
The Southwold Development Team will consist of a manager, a coordinator and an 
apprentice. The team will be embedded into the Hub with responsibility for leading the 
implementation of initiatives which improve the quality and economic viability of Southwold, 
including development of a new website.  They will lead business and marketing activity to 
promote the message that “Southwold is a place to do business”.    
In addition, the Southwold Development Team will create new events and work with tourism 
businesses to develop products that extend the tourist season into the ‘shoulder’ months, 
helping to dilute the seasonality of the current visitor economy.  This is intended initially to 
increase visitor footfall by just 4% in March – May and September – November by year three, 
bringing an additional 28,000 visitors and £1.125m into the town out-of-season.  
Timetable  
The development project is planned to begin in 1Q19, with the capital works to the Station 
Yard site starting in 4Q19 and completing 16 months later, in 2Q20.   The Development Team 
will be on board as early as 2Q19.   
Costs & Funding  
The overall project, including capital works, marketing, staff etc, is expected to cost £2.911m, 
of which the capital element is £2.725m.  
A grant of £995,000 is requested from the Coastal Communities Fund, 34% of the overall 
project budget.  Match funding from the Council of £1.916m will be made up of £895k from a 
property sale, and £1.021m from a Public Works Board loan over 30 years.   
In time, when the positive impact of the Development Team is evident, it is planned that these 
roles will become self-funded. The project has been informed by the success of Falmouth’s 
Town Manager in this respect.  Income from the managed workspace will initially help to fund 
the three Development Team roles, and in the longer term, as these become self-financing, 
will provide the scope for the Council to acquire further properties in the town for conversion 
to extend the Hub model.  
Conclusion  
The Southwold Enterprise Hub is  much greater than its physical footprint.   By providing not 
only space, but support and leadership for the business community, combined with  strategic 
development  to  help  extend  the  visitor  economy  outside  the  peak  season,  Southwold 
Enterprise Hub is the first key step in helping Southwold become a more balanced, vibrant and 
sustainable community.  
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
2 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
1.  Introduction    
This  document  has  been  prepared  for  Southwold  Town  Council’s  submission  to  the  Coastal 
Communities Fund.  It demonstrates a viable future for the Southwold Enterprise Hub through 
its  creation  of  new  business  space  in  the  town,  strategic  support  for  businesses  and 
development of the visitor economy beyond the peak months.  
2.  Organisation Summary 
Southwold  Town Council was formed in 1974  following  the local government reorganisation 
and was formerly known as Southwold Borough Council.  They received their Order of Charter 
from Henry VII in 1489. 
The  Council  currently  comprises  12  local  councillors  elected  to  provide  leadership  and 
direction  for the  people  of  Southwold  whilst  recognising  their  social  responsibilities  to  all  in 
the  community.    Their  vision  for  Southwold  is  for  it  to  be  ‘the  successful,  vibrant,  attractive 
town on the East Anglian coast, where people want to live, work and visit’

The  Town  Council  meets  at  least  monthly  and  its  work  is  supported  by  a  number  of 
committees  and  working  groups  including  Planning,  Leisure  and  Environment,  Finance  and 
Governance, Highways, Landlords and Neighbourhood Plan.  There has also been a working 
group  established to support  the Station  Yard project  which consists of  all the Chairs of  the 
working  groups  above  as  well  as  the  town  mayor,  the  CCT  chair,  officers  from  Waveney 
District Council and professional advisers. 
The extensive work of the Town Council is supported as well as by those Councillors who work 
with other tiers of local government including the ward members for Waveney District Council 
and Suffolk Council who themselves are also Southwold town councillors.  This provides the 
opportunity for integrated project development across all tiers of local government. 
Individual Councillors also represent the Town Council on a variety of local organisations and 
charities  within  Southwold.    This  again  enables  integrated  project  development  and  also 
provides  the  other  voluntary  organisations  with  help  and  support  and  clear  lines  of 
communication with the Town Council. 
The Town Council is very active and has developed its expertise in a range of areas supporting 
the  local  community.  They  manage  the  weekly  street  market  along  with  several  parks  and 
gardens including play areas and unique diverse habitats including the marshes.  They under 
take beach cleaning and own and manage some local public conveniences and provide most of 
the town's bus shelters, memorial seats and litter bins. 
They  provide  support  and  coordination  for  local  events  throughout  the  year  including 
Christmas  Lights  and  civic  ceremonies  and  also  run the  town  shuttle-bus  service  linking  key 
town  centre  locations  with  the  beach,  pier,  harbour,  doctors  surgery  (in  Reydon).  They  also 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
3 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
directly support many initiatives around the town including the network of Visitor Information 
Points which were established following the closure of the local Tourist Information Centre. 
They  have  vast  experience  of  managing  a  wide  property  portfolio  consisting  of  varied 
properties  from  light  industrial  and  commercial  to  retail  and  residential.    Southwold  Town 
Council currently owns 28 properties and 13 additional land assets, all of which serve the local 
community,  with  the  residential  properties  providing  homes  for  local  families.    The 
commercial  portfolio  includes  retail  premises  providing  key  services  for  the  resident 
community  including  a  butcher’s  and  greengrocer’s,  both  of  which  support  the  local  supply 
chain within the town.   
The property portfolio entails extensive responsibilities/liabilities including statutory repairing 
obligations,  landlord  responsibilities,  monitoring  of  rent  collection  and  voids,  all  of  which 
provide a sound experience base for managing the Station Yard project.  
The Town Council has ambitious plans to maximise the benefits of localism and devolution for 
the  local  community  which  includes  the  plans  contained  within  this  application.    They  have 
developed  their  Town  Council  Strategy  which  focuses  on  projects  that  will  enable  them  to 
deliver their vision.  The actions from the strategy have also been linked to the key areas of 
the  Neighbourhood  Plan,  which  is  currently  being  developed,  and  this  will  be  one  of  the 
vehicles  for  delivery  of  the  overall  strategy  along  with  the  Coastal  Community  Team’s 
Economic Plan. 
The  Council  has  established  strong  relationships  with  prominent  town  and  district 
organisations working together to deliver an effective plan to safeguard and improve the local 
economy.  The  Council  was  also  instrumental  in  the  creation  of  Southwold  CCT  and  is  a  key 
partner within the steering group which brings together a range of business and community 
representatives,  spanning  both  the  public  and  private  sector.  They  were  instrumental  in 
supporting  a  town  centre  strategy  and  are  part  of  delivering  a  number  of  projects  involving 
tourism, arts and community assets. 
The Town Council works with a number of partnerships to support the community including 
Suffolk Police and fund a local PCSO full time for Southwold.   Although not the land owner, 
the Town Council is working in close partnership with the potential developers for other sites 
to  the  entrance  to  the  town  to  ensure  a  coordinated  and  aesthetically-inviting  overall 
approach  to  Southwold.    Hastoe  Housing  is  a  potential  interested  party  for  one  of  the  sites 
which  would  provide  affordable  housing  for  local  families  and  those  seeking  to  work  within 
the town.  This links to  the Station  Yard development  by providing close  access to business 
premises and sustainable employment opportunities. 
 Suffolk  Wildlife  Trust  is  working  with  the  Council  to  develop  a  management  plan  to 
sustainably support the marshes and the common, important natural habitats and assets for 
the town. 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
4 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
The Council was successful with a recent application to the Coastal Revival Fund to support a 
feasibility  study  and  sustainability  plan  on  how  to  restore  and  regenerate  the  Southwold 
Boating Lake and surrounding lagoons and wildlife area. The aim of this is to provide evidence 
in order to attract future investment opportunities and is a key objective for the CCT. 
The Town Council also has an established strong working relationship with Waveney District 
Council and, relevant to this application, with the Economic Development Team who were a 
key partner in the development of the CCT and the initiatives contained in the economic plan.   
Waveney  District  Council  has  an  excellent  track  record  in  managing  and  delivering  a  wide 
range  of  externally  funded  projects,  including  large  scale  regeneration  programmes  and 
smaller  scale  development  projects.  Recently,  this  has  included  the  CCF  funded  Lowestoft 
Ness Regeneration Programme and securing Heritage  Action Zone (Historic England) status 
for  Lowestoft.  Examples  of  EU-funded  capital  projects  include  the  EFF  £4  million  funded 
redevelopment  of  Southwold  Harbour  as  well  as  revenue-based  LEADER  tourism  projects. 
The Economic Development Team has strong links with business support providers, including 
New  Anglia’s  Growth  Hub  and  alongside  Suffolk  County  Council  were  partner  in  the 
development of managed workspace projects in Lowestoft. 
As  a  result  of  all  the  above  activity  the  Town  Council  has  developed  a  strong  team 
knowledgeable  in  project  development,  delivery  and  subsequent  management  and  very 
capable of delivering the Southwold Enterprise Hub project. Looking forward, the Council has 
committed  to  supporting  other  initiatives  in  the  CCT  Economic  Plan  by  acquiring  additional 
delivery capacity through their support of the two development posts within this application. 
The  town  council  operates  in  an  open  and  transparent  way,  all  committee  agendas  and 
minutes are published monthly on their website. All committee meetings and full council are 
open to the public.  The Town Council follow full public sector procurement rules. 
3.  Project Background  
Project development 
In  2014,  Southwold  Town  Council  instructed  Ingleton  Wood  LLP  to  explore  options  for  the 
potential  redevelopment  of  the  entrance  to  the  Town,  crossing  the  marshes  from  nearby 
Reydon. The area is an important  location, being the first  thing people see when they enter 
the town, and was a mixture of ad hoc development and redundant utility buildings. The Town 
Council was keen to build on the planning policies within Waveney District Council’s Adopted 
Development Plan, to provide a locally-specific guide to influence future developments within 
the area and promote high quality design in this sensitive location. 
The scheme overview developed by Ingleton Wood indicated how, in the fullness of time, the 
individual sites in the study area could be developed to provide a joined-up street pattern and, 
crucially, an appropriate entrance into Southwold. 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
5 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
Station Yard is a Town Council-owned site within the parcels of land included within the ‘Town 
Entrance’  and  identified  for  redevelopment.    An  options  appraisal  by  the  Council  concluded 
that  development  as  a  business  hub  would  meet  more  strategic  aims  and  have  greatest 
positive  impact  on  the  town.  Ingleton  Wood  recognised  that  such  redevelopment  would 
provide  an  opportunity  to  protect  the  existing  Victorian  frontage  on  Station  Road  which 
incorporates 
Town 
Council-owned 
residential 
properties 
and 
retail 
premises1.   
Redevelopment could also improve the pedestrian connection through the site by developing 
a  courtyard  area.    These  factors  have  been  incorporated  within  a  planning  application 
approved by Waveney District Council.  
The project was identified in the CCT Economic Plan as a key action to be delivered. 
Economic backdrop  
Southwold,  on  Suffolk’s  east  coast,  is  a  unique  place,  a  tourist  destination  of  international 
renown. Over 1.5m trips were made to the town in 20172, and annual visitor expenditure – on 
accommodation,  shopping,  food  &  drink  and  attractions  -  is  estimated  at  just  over  £50m3.   
Peak  visitor  season  is  from  June  to  September,  with  42%  of  day  trips  and  37%  of  overnight 
stays  taking  place  in  these  months4.  However,  research  undertaken  for  the  Coastal 
Communities  Team’s  Economic  Plan  during  2017  showed  that,  whilst  tourism  is  vital  to  the 
town’s economy, it has significant negative consequences too.   
Demand for holiday accommodation and second homes, coupled with the desirability of living 
in such an attractive location, have forced up house prices dramatically, with the house price 
to earnings ratio now twice that of London.  Many younger people have been driven out, with 
the  total  number  of  permanent  residents  in  steep  decline  for  the  last  three  decades  (from 
1,839 in 1981 to 1,098 in 20115). In 2017 the resident population was 964, of which 53% were 
over 65, with 41% of  working age6. Southwold’s resident population is rapidly shrinking to a 
level that could make the community unsustainable.   
Adjacent  to  Southwold  is  the  town  of  Reydon,  where  house  prices  are  slightly  lower.    Its 
population  is  larger  (2,573),  half  of  whom  are  of  working  age7.    Surrounding  Southwold  is  a 
rural hinterland, dotted with villages and hamlets, for which Southwold is the principal town.  
Over 50% of Southwold’s households had no ‘usual residents’ in 2011, the highest rate for any 
coastal  community  in  England  and  Wales,  compared  with  38%  in  20018.    A  more  recent 
consultation9,  conducted  by  the  Southwold  Neighbourhood  Plan  team,  found  8%  of 
                                                
1 Southwold Town Entrance Study, Ingleton Wood LLP  
2 Economic Impact of Tourism Report, 2017 – trips include day and overnight stays 
3 Economic Impact of Tourism Report, 2017 – figures net of travel expenditure 
4 Economic Impact of Tourism Report, 2017 
5 ONS Census 1981, 2011 
6 ONS estimate 2017 
7 ONS estimate 2017 
8 ONS (2014) 2011: Coastal Communities  
9 Southwold Neighbourhood Plan (2018) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
6 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
properties were held vacant, having been acquired for investment purposes, with only 43% of 
residential properties in town used as primary homes.   
As a consequence of the seasonality of the tourism trade, local independent services struggle 
to  maintain  their  businesses  in  the  off-peak  months,  due  to  the  drop-off  in  visitor  footfall 
which in turn increases reliance on a dwindling permanent resident population.  In the recent 
Town  Centre  Strategy  research,  35%  of  businesses  reported  that  securing  potential  local 
customers was a problem for them, compared to just 3% in small towns nationally10. 
Employment  opportunities  are  also  dominated  by  the  tourism  economy:  78%  of  jobs  in  the 
town  are  in  the  tourism  sector11.    Traditionally,  the  tourism  sector  offers  below  average 
earnings12,  and  Southwold  is  no  exception  to  this.    Although  the  town  is  a  year-round 
destination, almost half of its visitors come between May-August13, resulting in seasonality of 
employment, with a significant dip outside the peak months.  This over-reliance on seasonal 
trade creates capacity and sustainability issues at peak periods, and a corresponding reduction 
in employment/hours in the off-peak months.  Low wages and unreliable employment make 
Southwold a less attractive place with fewer opportunities for residents. 
For businesses in Southwold there are many challenges.  Retail businesses on the High Street 
have faced up to 400% increases in business rates, as demand from national chains, keen to 
engage with the tourist footfall, has driven up the rental value of properties.  This is seen as a 
significant negative by 89% of businesses surveyed in 201714.   
There is a significant gap regarding business leadership in Southwold as there  is currently no 
local chamber or business group operating in the town.  This results in businesses operating 
independently, missing opportunities to network and collaborate, or to share knowledge.  
For  non-tourism  non-retail  businesses,  there  is  an  overall  lack  of  suitable  premises,  and 
particularly  any  that  are  not  located  within  the  expensive  High  Street  area.  Premises  in  the 
vicinity  of  the  High  Street  often  have  suboptimal  space  in  converted  former  residential 
properties  with  restricted  access,  and,  as  they  mostly  have  A1/A2  permitted  use  as  well  as 
business use, are snapped up for retail or have rents that reflect the fierce demand for retail 
premises in this location.  In December 2018, a single office was on the market in Southwold, 
with  an  unserviced  rent  of  £32.44  per  square  foot  –  comparable  to  some  central  London 
prices15. This lack of suitable premises is considered a negative aspect by 51% businesses16.   
The shortage of business premises has been an issue for many years. In the Southwold Town 
Plan consultation in 2013, 62% of businesses said there was inadequate provision for them in 
                                                
10 Southwold Town Centre Strategy, People & Places (2018) 
11 NOMIS (2017) 
12 Eurostat: Structure of Earnings Survey (2014) 
13 Visit Suffolk/Destination Research Market Segmentation (2015)  
14 Southwold Business Confidence Survey (2017) 
15 Sources: Zoopla, Knight Frank (Jan 19) 
16 Southwold Business Confidence Survey (2017) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
7 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
the  town,  and,  in  the  same  consultation,  84%  of  residents  thought  it  important  or  very 
important  that  ‘small  flexible  use  premises  were  provided  for  small  and  start-up  businesses’ 
were  provided. Since  then, the King’s Head pub has been  converted into a retail outlet with 
three small offices at the rear, but otherwise, no new capacity has been delivered and there is 
none in the pipeline.   
Similarly acknowledging the issue, the East Suffolk councils included this deliverable in their 
joint  Economic  Growth  Plan:  “ensuring  that  market  and  coastal  towns  have  appropriate 
levels and types of small business provision, and grow-on space
, recognising that there are 
market  failures  in  this  context  and  that  a  positive  approach  to  enterprise  provision  will  be 
important.”17  
All research to date has reached four recurring conclusions:  
1.  There is a need to extend the tourism season outside the peak months, but in a managed 
fashion to avoid exacerbating the negative aspects of tourism on the town.   
2.  Southwold  must  attract  non-tourism  business  into  the  town  offering  higher  value 
employment  opportunities  to  help  balance  the  economy  and  attract  more  residents  to 
the build a sustainable population. 
3.  There is a scarcity of suitable accommodation for businesses within the town, despite the 
attraction of Southwold as a place to do business.  
4.  A united and proactive approach to galvanising the local business community is required. 
Strategic Response  
Southwold  Town  Council  strategic  planning  work,  undertaken  in  2016  and  2017,  identified 
several key priorities including:  
•  Diversify the local economy by establishing space for knowledge-based businesses 
•  Reverse  the  decline  in resident  population,  achieving  a  more  balanced age  range;  make 
the town a more attractive proposition for families to live and work 
•  Retain and enhance the natural and built environment    
•  Promote and maintain the independent character of the High Street18    
Recent development in the town has made inroads into the housing issue, with new market 
housing  being  delivered  alongside  a  substantial  tranche  of  affordable  homes,  such  that  the 
current registered needs have been met.   
Southwold’s  Coastal  Community  Team,  formally  established  in  January  2017  has  embedded 
Southwold Town Councils priorities into their Economic plan.   The CCT has as its vision: 
For  Southwold  to  be  the  successful,  vibrant,  attractive  town  on  the  East  Anglian  coast,  where 
people  want  to  live,  work  and  visit.  To  bring  together  various  business,  commercial  and 

                                                
17 East Suffolk Economic Growth Plan 2018 - 2023 
18 Southwold Town Council ‘Our Strategy for Southwold’ Apr 16, updated July 17 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
8 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
community  interests  to  inspire  and  guide  a  co-ordinated  approach  to  creating  greater  future 
economic prosperity for the town. 
  
4.  Strategic Context 
Identified gaps  
It is clear from the comprehensive research and extensive consultation conducted over the last 
five years, that there is a lack of strategic leadership and coordination to manage the economy 
of Southwold, beyond what the Town Council is able to do, and the District Council does on a 
wider East Suffolk basis.   
The  Chamber  of  Trade  disbanded  because  of  time  constraints  for  independent  business 
owners,  who  are  struggling  to  sustain  their  own  businesses  (given  the  economic  context 
within  the  town),  and,  as  is  seen  in  High  Streets  across  the  country,  national  chains  rarely 
participate.    This  is  particularly  so  in  Southwold  where  many  national  chains’  presence  is 
carried  as  a  loss  leader,  for  marketing  purposes  alone,  attracted  specifically  by  the  young, 
relatively affluent visitors who make up much of the tourist footfall.  
The  absence  of  a  Chamber  of  Trade  or  similar  body  means  that  businesses  in  Southwold 
largely  operate  independently.  There  is  little  networking,  and  no  support  or  development 
mechanism to help them improve their skills/knowledge and become more sustainable.  The 
lack of networking also means that opportunities to cross-sell, and to create a vibrant supply 
chain, are missed.  
Management of tourism is similarly lacking. There is 
‘A  passive  reliance  on  tourism  will  not  be 
no  clear  and  consistent  marketing  strategy  in  place 
enough  for  seaside  towns  to  fulfil  their 
specifically  for  Southwold,  and  tourism  –  albeit 
potential. 
What’s 
needed 
is 

transformation  in  the  way  seaside  towns 
hugely  successful  –  exists  without  any  official 
view  themselves,  as  well  as  how  they 
coordinating influence. This is thought to be a major 
educate  their  children  and  manage  their 
contributing  factor  in  the  continuing  seasonality  of 
infrastructure. 
tourism,  as  there  is  no  body  developing  visitor 
Seaside towns need entrepreneurs to bring 
‘products’ outside the peak months or working  with 
ideas,  jobs,  and  wealth  to  their 
communities;  but  entrepreneurs  need 

tourism  businesses  to  extend  the footfall  across  the 
talent,  infrastructure,  and  public  support 
year19.      The  Suffolk  Coast  DMO  covers  all  of  East 
to  help  them  lead  the  revitalisation  of 
Suffolk  but  does  not  offer  strategic  planning  and 
seaside towns.’  
product development for individual destinations. 
“From ebb to flow – how entrepreneurs 
can turn the tide for Britain’s seaside 
Looking at towns with similar challenges, Southwold 
towns”  
CCT  was  inspired  by  Falmouth,  and  the  successes 
Report  for  the  Centre  for  Entrepreneurs, 
that it  has  seen  as a result of  directly managing the 
2015 
town,  leading  businesses  and  driving  its  visitor 
 
economy.  
                                                
19 East Suffolk Tourism Strategy (2017 – 2022) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
9 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
Similar  strategic  leadership  for  Southwold,  as  a  visitor  destination  and  as  a  place  to  do 
business, is key.  
Coastal Communities Fund Outcomes 
The project supports CCF priorities: 
•  Delivering  economic  diversification/innovation  through  the  provision  of  flexible  start-up 
space, tailored business support to businesses; 
•  Addressing seasonality within the local economy through the  appointment of dedicated 
resources to work with and support the industry, developing new initiatives to extend the 
traditional tourist season and strengthen local supply chains; 
•  Provide support for SMEs through access to targeted business support from an accredited 
provider,  improvements  to  infrastructure  in  terms  of  business/office  facilities  and 
incubation support for new sole traders and micro businesses. 
This  project  fits  well  with  the  overall  CCF  priority  focused  on  stimulating  regeneration  and 
economic growth, in this case regenerating a key site in Southwold. The hub provides a unique 
workspace, incorporating business support services to encourage business start-ups, growth, 
diversification and safeguarding and creating jobs. 
The  project  is  fully  supported  by  Southwold  CCT  and  is  one  of  the  CCT’s  key  deliverables 
within its economic plan.  The project specifically supports the CCT’s priority to “Maintain and 
promote  the  vitality  of  the  High  Street”,  managing  the  visitor  economy  more  effectively, 
mitigating negative impacts in terms of an over-reliance on the visitor economy by delivering 
a marketing plan, extended events programme and initiatives to drive up out-of-season visits.   
The CCT Plan identified that a Town Centre strategy was required, so  People & Places were 
commissioned to develop a document which identified the need for a dedicated resource to 
not only deliver the strategy but also bring together a strategic approach to the development 
of  Southwold’s  economy  and  to  reposition  the  ‘Southwold  brand’  as  a  year-round  visitor 
destination and ‘a place to do business’.20  
Target Beneficiaries  
The project aims to support start-up businesses in the town, businesses that wish to expand, 
and,  importantly,  those  from  outside  the  area  that  want  to relocate  to the  town  or develop 
additional offices within the town.  There are already several businesses in the town that have 
created new branches in Southwold, but the absence of suitable presence is a barrier to more 
businesses  making  the  move  and  increasing  employment  in  the  town.  Repeatedly,  studies 
have  shown  that  local  businesses  employing  local  people  contribute  7x  more  to  the  local 
economy.   
                                                
20 Town Centre Strategy, People & Places (2018) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
10 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
The many assets of Southwold that attract visitors also have the potential to attract business 
owners  making  quality  of  life  changes,  particularly  those  from  London  and  the  South  East 
(where  property  prices  are  even  higher  than  Southwold,  meaning  that  a  major  barrier  is 
removed).   
The East Suffolk councils’ Economic Growth Plan and accompanying Delivery Plan recognise 
the  importance  of  micro  and  SME’s  to  the  coastal  economy,  highlighting  their  potential 
growth,  and  the  attraction  of  East  Suffolk’s  unique  location.    It  stresses  the  importance  of 
having appropriate workspaces and premises for businesses, as well as the need to equip small 
business owners/managers with the skills they need to gain the confidence to invest and grow.  
Research into the needs of small and micro-business beneficiaries included looking at projects 
in  other  coastal  towns.    The  Devon  Work  Hubs  programme,  instigated  by  Devon  County 
Council, has been particularly inspirational, leading to changes in the specifications for office 
space to be created in Southwold.  Devon Work Hubs offer co-working space for individuals to 
use on  a short-term hire  basis. The positive  impact  and substantial benefits delivered to the 
individuals,  to  their  businesses’  viability,  and  to  the  towns  that  host  them,  are  clear  to  see.  
The project has been so successful that new sites are springing up across the county21. 
The local workforce, including those in Reydon and the rural hinterland, are key beneficiaries.  
Low-value seasonal work predominates in Southwold, with 40% of jobs in the town directly in 
tourism-related  or  retail  businesses22.    Meanwhile,  45%  of  workers  resident  in  Southwold 
leave  the  town  for  work23.    More  businesses  in  the  town,  providing  year-round  higher-value 
employment  will  help  attract  and  retain  workers  for  the  town,  improve  social  mobility  and 
strengthen the local economy.   
The  residents  of  Southwold  are  the  third  beneficiary  grouping.    Addressing  the  dwindling 
population  is  critical  to  ensuring  the  continuation  of  the  community.    Older  people  in 
particular  need  local  services;  without  a  critical  mass  of  residents,  services  disappear  and 
without services, fewer people wish or are able to live there. The predominance of second and 
holiday  homes  also  has  a  negative  impact  on  community,  creating  unexpected  pockets  of 
isolation in a bustling town.  Local people living and/or working in the town contribute much 
more than just financially, by helping to run community activities.   
Options Considered - Station Yard  
The  Station  Yard  site  was  highlighted  as  a  development  priority  in  Ingleton  Wood’s 
masterplan  for  the  Town  Gateway.    Councillors  considered  a  shortlist  of  nine  alternative, 
viable, uses for the site against a list of weighted criteria developed from the priorities within 
their strategic plan:  
                                                
21 www.devonworkhubs.co.uk  
22 ONS Business Register & Employment Survey (2017) 
23 Southwold Neighbourhood Plan (2018) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
11 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
•  Economic  diversification  (broadens  the  local  economy,  creates  higher  value  jobs, 
addresses seasonality/creates new patterns of tourism) 
•  Business growth (creates opportunities for business and job, generates/supports business 
growth) 
•  Strengthens  community  (attracts  and  retains  young  people,  helps  to  address  decline  in 
resident population) 
•  Meets an identified need (does not replicate something already provided) 
•  Enhances the built environment (maintains local character, delivers an exciting/attractive 
gateway to the town) 
•  Sustainability/flexibility  (sustainable  financially  &  organisationally  without  undue  burden 
on Council staff, flexibility to respond to future economic changes and shifting community 
needs)  
By assessing the proposals against  these  criteria, developing  Station Yard as a business hub 
with support for small businesses emerged as the most appropriate use for the site.  
Other  suitable  locations  for  a  business  hub  do  not  exist  either  within  the  Council’s  property 
portfolio or in the town to be developed; there are no greenfield sites allocated.  
Options Considered - Southwold Development Team  
Three options were considered as ways to create a strategic leadership for the town:  
•  Create a new team, hiring specifically for the role  
•  Reinstate the Chamber of Trade  
•  Undertake the work with existing Council staff  
Reinstatement of the Chamber of Trade has already been attempted in the past, but with the 
pressures on local businesses (documented previously) this was not considered viable.  
The existing Council staff do not have any capacity to take on further work, and certainly not 
on the full-time basis that is expected to be required to deliver results.   
The only  viable solution, therefore, is to create  the roles as new positions, hiring  individuals 
with the specific skills needed to succeed in the role.  
5.  Project Delivery  
Southwold Enterprise Hub will deliver new office space for small and micro businesses on the 
Station  Yard  site,  provide  business  support  onsite  and  across  the town,  and develop  further 
the  tourism  economy  to  extend  it  beyond  the  peak  months.    The  Southwold  Development 
Team will provide a strategic business leadership, to make Southwold a place to do business, 
strengthen the business community.  The project will directly create up to 36 higher value jobs 
and safeguard a further 40 as well as support existing businesses within the town.  
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
12 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 



 
Station Yard Site – Current Use & Ownership  
Southwold  Town  Council  owns 
Station  Yard,  a  site  located  to  the 
north-west  edge  of  Southwold. 
Station Road is the main entry point 
to  the  town  and  continues  on  to 
form the main High Street.  
Station  Yard  is  close  to  good 
existing  sustainable  transport  links 
and is in close proximity to the main 
Southwold High Street to the south, 
with its range of services and shops.  
The site was first partially developed 
around 
1903, 
with 
additional 
buildings appearing some time after 
1947.    Southwold  railway  station 
originally  occupied  the  site  immediately  across  the  road,  which  is  also  targeted  for 
redevelopment.   
 Today,  Station  Yard  consists  of 
three  main  buildings  leased  to 
separate businesses.  On its Station 
Road 
frontage 
there 
is 

convenience  shopping  outlet  (an 
independent  general  store)  and 
behind it are two buildings currently 
used as garages.   
All  the  buildings  are  of  poor  design 
and  constructed  with  low-grade 
materials;  although  the  services 
themselves  are  important  to  local  people,  the  buildings  do  nothing  to  enhance  the  initial 
appearance of Southwold as a town.  
Station Yard Development  
The existing site will be demolished, and two new buildings will provide just less than 600m2 of 
usable  space,  forming  the  Southwold  Enterprise  Hub,  a  “Gateway”  development  at  the 
entrance to the town.   
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
13 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 


 
The 
development 
has 
been 
designed by Ingleton Wood LLP.  It 
includes one retail unit on the main 
Station Road frontage, plus up to 15 
flexible  business  units,  with  access 
to  shared  facilities  including  a 
meeting  room,  kitchen,  accessible 
toilets  and  shower.    The  current 
designs, 
on 
which 
planning 
permission has been granted, show 
two  upstairs  residential  units. 
However, 
with 
market 
and 
affordable  housing  delivered  and  bringing  younger  people  into  the  town,  there  is  no 
immediate need for these, and it has been decided to apply for change of use. This is in line 
with government policy and should not be an issue. 
Half the units and all shared facilities are on the ground floor and are fully accessible to all. The 
design  of  the  buildings  utilises  a  steel  framework  to  minimise  the  number  of  load-bearing 
walls, so that the buildings are future proofed against emerging needs and changing demands 
for space.  
The units will range in sizes from 14m2 (for 1 – 2 people) to 107m2 (accommodating up to 15 
people)24,  and  therefore  can  support  start-up  businesses  as  well  as  offering  ‘move  on’ 
accommodation  for  businesses  as  they  grow.    To  increase  further  the  provision  for  start-up 
businesses,  two  of  the  larger  units  will  be  deployed  as  co-working  space  for  up  to  24 
individuals offering a first step for their new businesses. Dependent on the success of these, 
other office units in the Hub could readily convert to provide more space.    
Units,  with  the  exception  of  the  co-working  ones,  will  be  developed  as  ‘shell  plus’,  meaning 
that  they  will  have  all  infrastructure,  cabling,  lighting,  carpeting  etc  in  place,  but  no 
furnishings.  Each unit has CCTV and a security alarm and is separately metered for utilities so 
that  individual  businesses  can  establish  their  own  contracts;  this  is  especially  important  for 
established  or  ‘move  on’  businesses  with  existing  preferred  suppliers.    In  contrast,  the  co-
working (shared space) units will be  fitted out with  office  furniture, and will have  a range  of 
services  available,  from  broadband  to  printing,  making  it  straightforward  for  start-ups  to 
move in.  
The  meeting  room  will  have  full  AV  support  for  presentations  with  adaptable  conference 
furniture  enabling  a  variety  of  meeting  layouts  up  to  boardroom  style  for  16  people.  
                                                
24 Note that occupancy rates vary significantly dependent on the type of business occupying space, and the way 
in which they operate.  Design agencies, architects etc tend to have lower density due to the equipment needed 
to be housed, and some businesses prefer an informal layout with breakout spaces too. All these can be 
accommodated within the current design.  
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
14 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 


 
Immediately  adjacent  is  the  kitchen,  so  that  refreshments  for  meetings  can  be  stored  and 
delivered into the room as required.  
Shared  kitchen  and  shower  facilities  supplement  the  more  basic  services  within  each  unit. 
Showering  facilities  are  included  to  encourage  cycling  to  work  as  part  of  the  green  travel 
policy for the town - currently only 2% of Southwold’s working population cycle to work25. 
Green technology will play an important role in the Hub.  Photovoltaic panels are planned for 
two of the south-facing roofs; air source heat pumps are being investigated to support climate 
control  for  some  of  the  units.  Sedum  will  be  planted  on  the  flat  roof  of  the  meeting  room, 
providing a more pleasant outlook for nearby buildings, improve air quality and provide nectar 
through their long flowering months.  
There is no parking onsite, with the central courtyard landscaped to provide outside space for 
workers.  Parking will be available in the new Millennium Foundation Car Park on the former 
police station site.  A green travel plan will be embedded into the project. The Millennium site 
will  also  include  a  visitor  centre  and  aims  to  improve  access  to  the  town  by  diverting  traffic 
onto foot, and signposting different routes that can be taken.   
The  retail  unit  on  the  Station  Road 
frontage 
replaces 
the 
existing 
independent  convenience  store,  with 
significantly  upgraded  facilities.    It  is 
intended  that  the  tenant  of  the 
current  store  will  move  into  these 
new 
premises, 
continuing 
an 
important  service  for  local  residents.  
The introduction of a large number of 
office  workers  immediately  behind  the  store  should  deliver  additional  footfall  to  the  shop  – 
and the wider vicinity - helping to improve its year-round sustainability.  
Because  of  the  Enterprise  Hub’s  location  outside  the  designated  High  Street  zone  but 
adjacent to  it, it will be more affordable for business start-ups, with lower rent and rateable 
values.  However,  its  proximity  to  the  High  Street  means  that  the  commercial  area  is 
effectively  extended  to  include  the  Enterprise  Hub,  benefiting  both  hub  tenants  and  the 
businesses in between.  
Managed Workspace 
The  Enterprise  Hub  will  be  run  as  managed  workspace,  with  support  from  an  experienced 
provider to coordinate all aspects of securing tenants, including legal and financial processes, 
as  well  as  managing  the  facility  day  to  day.    The  Town  Council  intends  to  take  on  an 
                                                
25 Southwold Neighbourhood Plan, 2018-2038 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
15 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
apprentice for the project, to support the administration of the hub, as well as working within 
the wider Southwold Development and marketing roles.   
Virtual  tenancies  will  be  offered,  where  remote  businesses  use  the  address  and  a  central 
Southwold  phone  number,  although  located  elsewhere.  This  capitalises  on  the  cachet  of  a 
Southwold address26 but will also enable businesses intending to relocate or expand into the 
Enterprise  Hub  to  begin  that  process  in  advance.    An  additional  higher-level  virtual  tenancy 
option  will  include  access  to  business  support  services  and  networking  (see  below)  and  it  is 
anticipated that this will help to develop a ‘pipeline’ of businesses to move into the Enterprise 
Hub as vacancies arise, particularly since virtual tenants will be given priority.    
Tenants (including virtual) can hire  the meeting room at  a discounted rate.   Use  of  all other 
facilities  and  services  –  bins,  cleaning  etc  -  is  included  in  their  monthly  rental  and  service 
charge.  
The meeting room will also be available for public hire; there is a significant shortage of quality 
business space for meetings in Southwold and this will be an important support for businesses 
across the town.  Bookings will be managed by the workspace  management team, with any 
additional  catering  requirements  delivered  by  local  providers.    Use  of  the  meeting  room  by 
businesses will bring clients into the town, who in turn may become visitors to the town too.  
To ensure the benefits of the Hub are extended further in the town, the managed workspace 
provider will be  required to use local suppliers for most  services  –  such as cleaning, grounds 
maintenance, minor refurbishments and repairs.   
Business support services, including informal and formal networking, training, masterclasses 
and advice and guidance, will be provided by a part-time adviser, working with the Southwold 
Development team (see below).  The support will cover not only tenants and virtual tenants of 
the  hub,  but  businesses  across  Southwold.    This  advisor  will  come  on  board  prior  to  the 
completion of the construction project and will run through the first three years of occupation, 
by which time it is expected that the Southwold Development team will take over.  
Businesses Supported  
In designing the centre, consideration was given to creating spaces to meet the varying needs 
of the small and micro businesses likely to choose  Southwold as their base.  It is anticipated 
that the occupants of the Enterprise Hub will be a blend of:  
•  self-employed  single-person  businesses  looking  to  move  out  of  home-offices,  either  for 
better, more professional looking space in which to meet clients, or to improve their life-
work balance by creating a gap between home and workplace 
•  start-ups (single or multi person) businesses requiring premises, perhaps even as new joint 
ventures with shared admin staff  
                                                
26 Local businesses up to eight miles distant bring Southwold into their location details to benefit from the 
perceived value of the Southwold brand 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
16 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
•  ‘moving on’ micro and small businesses that are expanding, taking on new staff, increasing 
their capacity or looking for more or better space 
•  a  small  number  of  established  businesses  that  may  expand  marginally  in  new 
accommodation.   
It is difficult, with so little business accommodation provision in the town currently to use as a 
basis, to be certain about the new jobs likely to be created from the above, but using the four 
groupings,  and  looking  at  other  business  hubs  around  the  country,  it  is  predicted  that  job 
creation will arise as follows:  
Individuals using the co-working space – 60% of occupancy will be new jobs 
Start-ups renting business units – 50%  
Moving on businesses – 30%  
Established businesses – 10%  
Mapping these figures to the spaces provided and likely occupants, it is predicted there will be 
15 new businesses and around 36 full time new jobs created at the Hub, the vast majority of 
which are expected to be higher value roles, and, importantly, not directly reliant on the visitor 
economy.  See Appendix C for the occupancy model.    
Southwold Development Team   
Alongside  the  provision  of  office  space,  the  project  will  directly  appoint  two  dedicated 
management staff, a Southwold  Development Manager and a Development Coordinator, as 
well  as  an  apprentice  to  work  part-time  (50%)  with  this  development  team27.    These  3  full-
time resources 
will bring a strategic approach to the development of Southwold’s economy, 
filling gaps that might otherwise be covered by a Chamber of Trade. They will be embedded 
into  the  Hub  with responsibility  for  leading  the  implementation  of  initiatives  which  improve 
the  quality  and  economic  viability  of  Southwold,  including  development  of  a  new  website.  
They will lead business and marketing activity to promote the message that “Southwold is a 
place to do business”.   See Appendix B for the draft job descriptions. 
The  Development  team  will  work  alongside  the  business  support  adviser,  to  help  improve 
skills and expertise within local businesses around the town – this will include tourism-sector 
businesses, as they too will benefit from additional support.  In time, the Development team 
will take over this role, working with local colleges and East Suffolk Council to utilise skills and 
expertise available there.  
Evidence  from  the  Devon  Work  Hubs  shows  that  new  businesses  brought  together  into  a 
workspace will begin to cooperate with each other, participate in joint ventures, and use each 
other’s services as well as those in the town as a whole.  The Southwold Development team 
will  be  tasked  with  enabling  this  leveraging  to  happen  as  quickly  as  possible,  through 
organised networking events.  
                                                
27 The apprentice will also work on day-to-day support of the Enterprise Hub including virtual tenancies. 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
17 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
In  addition  to  helping  strengthen  and  diversify  the  local  business  economy,  the  Southwold 
Development  Management  team  will  focus  on  the  visitor  economy  to  address  some  of  the 
challenges  the  hugely  successful  tourism  business  presents  for  the  town.    A  key  deliverable 
will  be  the  extension  of  the  tourism  season  into  the  ‘shoulder’  months,  by  developing  new 
products,  themed  trails,  experiences  and  events,  using  Southwold’s  key  assets,  so  that  the 
seasonality  of  that  trade  is  reduced,  which  in  turn  will  help  local  services  become  more 
sustainable.  
Development  of  ‘shoulder’  month  tourism  (March  –  May  and  September  -  November)  is 
expected to increase visitor footfall by 4% in these months by 2023.  This will result in 28,106 
additional  visitors  (day  =  27271,  overnight  =  835);  related  visitor  spend  will  bring  in  an 
additional £1.125m from day visitors, with an estimated £143,820 from overnight stays28.  
They team will look to galvanise local businesses to become engaged and involved with town 
events  in  a  coordinated  manner.    This  will  assist  with  the  sustainability  of  the  project  by 
encouraging options for income  generation by building on what currently exists and seeking 
new opportunities too. 
The  Southwold  Development  roles  will  be  funded  for  the  first  two  years  by  the  project,  but 
over  time  they  are  required  to  generate  their  own  income  to  cover  their  costs.  This  will  be 
achieved for the first few years from events income, membership fees and sponsorships, and 
supplemented  by  rental  income  from  the  Enterprise  Hub,  but  as  the  role  becomes  more 
successful,  and  the  business  community  is  convinced  of  the  benefit  of  having  the  team,  a 
percentage of  the rateable value of  a property  will become  the fee  payable. This model has 
been pioneered by the Falmouth Town Manager role, with considerable success.  However, it 
is not expected that that position will be achieved for at least six years29.   
Existing Provision  
As  noted  above,  business  premises  in  Southwold  are  in  short  supply.  The  units  within  the 
Enterprise Hub will boost the supply, providing alternative accommodation for businesses that 
do not need to be close to the High Street (and leaving premises around the High Street for 
those who do want to be there, such as estate agents and other professional services).  
A  separate  initiative  is  underway,  part  of  the  overall  CCT  economic  plan,  to  redevelop  the 
former Southwold Hospital in the town as the ‘SouthGen community hub’.  As well as a library, 
nursery  and  other  community  and  food-related  facilities  there  will  be  space  for  new 
community businesses to use on a hot-desk basis. The Enterprise Hub will therefore provide 
complementary ‘move on’ accommodation for these individuals/social enterprises when they 
are ready to occupy more permanent premises, rather than lose them from the town.   
                                                
28 Base data from  Economic Impact of Tourism Report (Destination  Research) 2017 
29 Note that in the operating cost model, there is no switchover to a percentage of rateable value system, as 
further work is required to determine the rate required and the likely number of contributors. Falmouth’s 
assistance will be sought in this.  
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
18 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 


 
In terms of managed workspace, the closest to Southwold are in Lowestoft (13 miles), Leiston 
(16 miles), Framlingham (21 miles) and Norwich (32 miles).   
Timetable  
 
6.  Project Resources  
A Southwold Enterprise Hub project team will be established to deliver the capital project and 
the related revenue activities for the first two years.  The team will be led by Southwold Town 
Council  (Town  Clerk),  but,  in  recognition  of  the  other  demands  of  her  role,  an  experienced 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
19 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 



 
freelance  project  manager  will  be  hired  to  oversee  the  project,  managing  progress, 
representing the client’s requirements day to day, resolving issues, managing risks, reporting 
progress and ensuring that expenditure is correctly recorded and grant reclaims processed, in 
a timely fashion.   
All project finances will be managed by the Town Clerk who is the RFO for the Town Council. 
Councillors  have  formed  a  steering 
group  overseeing  the  project;  it  will 
meet monthly.  
An  architect  will  lead  the  design  team, 
which will include a structural engineer, 
M&E  engineers,  CDM  and  others  as 
required.    The  main  construction 
contract,  which  will  be  let  on  a 
traditional  basis,  will  be  managed  by  a 
Quantity 
Surveyor 
as 
contract 
administrator.  The QS will report to the 
client  project  manager,  rather  than  to 
the design team leader.    
 All contracts for freelance staff will be procured according to the Council’s regulations, which 
at  the  lowest  level  will  require  competitive  quotes,  and  at  the  highest,  competitive  tenders. 
The council will implement its policies and 
procedures  associated  with  the  project 
such as health and safety. 
Staff  resources  on  the  project  will  include 
the  two  new  Southwold  Development 
roles – the Development Manager and the 
Development  Coordinator.  They  will  be 
recruited  early  in  the  project  and  will 
report  to  the  Town  Clerk.  It  is  intended 
that  they  should  be  in  position  by  early 
summer  2019.    An  apprentice  will  work 
with the Development team. 
7.  Project Costs  
Project  costs  have  increased  by  about  £400k  since  the  stage  one  application,  with  the 
inclusion of professional fees and higher contingency on the capital build.  Specific provisional 
sums as well as a general contingency within the capital cost plan are to cover events such as 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
20 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 


 
contamination and asbestos, which, if present, are likely to be expensive. It is felt that this is a 
more prudent approach than simply an all-purpose contingency.  
Inflation has been calculated at 2.5% for the construction phase, as advised by the Quantity 
Surveyor. For the operational phase, it is again 2.5% per annum, although clearly it is difficult 
to predict far ahead, given the uncertainty of the current economic/political climate.   
The total project cost is £2,911,458. 
  .  
 
 
8.  Financial Appraisal 
The  total  capital  cost  of  the  project  is  calculated  as  £2,725,458.  The  cost  plan  has  been 
developed by Richard Utting Associates, a leading Cost Consultancy in Norwich, and based on 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
21 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
the detailed specifications from Ingleton Wood.  It is included as a separate attachment to this 
business plan.  
Revenue costs, prior to opening of the Southwold Enterprise Hub itself, are £186,000.  These 
have been estimated by the project team based on their extensive experience of other similar 
projects.  
Operational Financials  
The operating budget is shown at Appendix D.   It is split into two sections, one covering the 
cost  and  income  for  the  Southwold  Enterprise  Hub  buildings,  and  the  second  covering  the 
Southwold  Development  Team  costs  and  income.  This  allows  Southwold  Town  Council  and 
other  stakeholders  to  see  clearly  the  financial  positions  of  each  stream  of  the  project 
separately, and to understand the impact of the 30 year PWB loan.  
The Hub (office units, with business support and virtual tenancy), will make a loss of just over 
£38k in year one (ie 2021/22). This is mostly due to the high level of business rates for vacant 
properties.    As  tenancy  rates  ramp  up,  this  amount  will  drop  either  because  the  tenant  is 
paying them or because small business rate relief exempts them.   
The Hub is projected to begin making a profit in its second year, provided tenancies come on 
board  at  the  predicted  rate.    The  number  of  businesses  occupying  the  centre  has  been 
estimated  very  conservatively  in  the  first  few  years,  but  it  is  expected  that  the  demand  will 
outstrip these projections by some margin.  
In terms of the Southwold Development Team, costs will be covered by the project in the first 
two years.  In year three, the operational loss is projected to be £46k, as it is not expected that 
there will be sufficient income generated from the various sources identified to cover the full 
costs  by  that  time.  The  loss  will  be  covered  by  Southwold  Town  Council  in  expectation  of 
payback in subsequent years.  
By year 3 of operation, the surplus generated by the Hub (£50k) will go towards offsetting the 
costs  of  the  Development  Team.  This  will  continue  to  be  the  case  until  year  five  when  the 
Development Team’s income is expected to cover all its costs.   
The  whole  operational  project  (both  streams  combined)  is  anticipated  to  have  covered  the 
initial  cumulative  losses  by  year  four,  (ie  2023/24  on  current  schedule).    This  means  that,  in 
time, the Council would be able to seek a further property in town for conversion to extend the 
Hub model further.  
Market Analysis 
As will be seen, charges to tenants or users of workspace are based on a per sq foot calculation 
that  covers  both  rental  and  service  charges.    Market  analysis  of  the  rates  was  undertaken 
looking  at  all  rental  property  available  on  the  market  within  a  30-mile  radius.    Specific 
professional advice was also received from Durrant’s, Southwold’s leading estate agent with 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
22 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
offices  around  Suffolk  and  Norfolk,  and  NWes,  a  leading  managed  workspace  provider  with 
experience of running multiple sites around the East of England and in London.   
The fees to be charged to co-workers using the shared space are broadly comparable to those 
using the Devon Work Hubs.   
With  regard  to  income  to  sustain  the  Southwold  Development  Team,  at  this  stage  only 
assumptions have been made on how this might be made up.  However, the Council already 
receives income from events in the town (fees from stallholders, and charges for use of land, 
for example), and this gives clear indications of what could be expected in future.  The option 
of  sponsorship  will  also  be  explored  with  the  high  profile  companies  associated  with 
Southwold. 
As noted above, it is intended that the Development Team will become sufficiently successful 
that businesses will be willing to pay a percentage of their rateable value towards the cost.  In 
Falmouth this is 1%; with rateable values as high as they are in Southwold, it is likely that the 
fee would be a fraction of this.   
The cost model to year 3 of operation (2023/24 financial year) is shown at Appendix D. 
9.  Funding 
Match funding for the project will come solely from the Council.  
The Council has sold an asset for £895,000, which had become vacant due to the death of a 
long-standing  tenant.    This  income  will  go  towards  the  project.    However,  the  Council  is 
unable to sell any further assets as these are all occupied properties serving the needs of the 
community, including providing key services and essential accommodation.   
Therefore, the balance of £1.021m will be funded by the Council via a Public Works Board loan 
taken over a 30-year period from 3Q20 (with a total repayment of £1.44m).  This will generate 
loan repayments of £61k annually, which the Council will service for the first three years.  By 
the end of the third year of operation of the Hub, income from it should be sufficient to service 
the loan repayments directly.  
10.  Marketing, Communications & Sales 
Marketing of the Enterprise Hub’s offices is scheduled to begin in year 2 of the capital project, 
in  readiness  for  opening.  The  intention  is  to  have  several  businesses  in  the  pipeline  prior  to 
offices becoming ready.  The marketing activity has several elements:  
•  Development of a new website for Southwold (a priority of the Southwold Development 
team) 
•  Advertising in key locations regionally  
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
23 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
•  A  social  media  campaign  around  #Southwold;  this  will  also  be  linked  to  the  Southwold 
Development  Team’s  efforts  to  promote  the  Southwold  brand  further,  particularly  on 
Instagram 
•  Marketing  by  the  chosen  managed  workspace  provider  to  their  existing  client  base 
(particularly for those looking to open a Southwold branch or relocate to the town) 
•  Informal networking and business sessions in the town that begin to develop the pipeline 
of new and young businesses ready to move in 
•  Promotion of virtual tenancies as a first step towards a physical tenancy – some will never 
do so, but some will move.  
11. 
Monitoring & Evaluation (Logic Model) 
The project will embed evaluation from its inception through a robust monitoring approach. 
Our  logic  model  clearly  identifies  the  contextual  conditions  in  Southwold,  and  maps  the 
difference our project will make, how outputs have been identified and how these deliver the 
outcomes. This is provided as a separate document.   
Baseline  measurements  will  be  captured  as  a  specific  task  in  the  first  three  months  of  the 
development project, to allow repeated reflection and measurement against those baselines 
in subsequent years.  
An evaluation report, containing measures against targets and an independent assessment of 
the  successes  and  failures  to  date,  will  be  produced  at  the  end  of  the  development  project 
(4Q20)  and  will  be  repeated  bi-annually  thereafter.  This  will  also  include  some  elements  of 
market research to establish attitudes and opinions both of business leaders and visitors.  
Indicator 
Measure  By When (financial 
Monitoring Approach  
year)  
Direct FTEs 
39 
2Q19 – 2 FTE 
• Town Council put in place quarterly review 
created 
3Q19 – 1FTE 
of  occupation  rates  and  new  jobs  created 
 
4Q22 – 28 FTE  
(apprentice  created  3Q19  will  take  on  this 
role) 
2Q24  - 8 FTE 
Total = 39 by 2Q24 
Indirect FTEs 

4Q22 – 2.5 FTE 
• Quarterly survey of new businesses in the 
2Q24 – 2.5 FTE  
Hub re use of local suppliers and services 

Total = 5 by 2Q24 
 Annual  check  of  workspace  provider’s 
supplier list   
Safeguarded 
50* 
4Q20- 26 FTE 
• Annual check of NOMIS (ONS) data – used 
number of FTEs 
(*40 at 
4Q22 – 6 FTE (supply 
as baseline data  
Hub and 
chain) 
 
10 in the 
2Q24 – 14FTE 
town/ 
2Q24 – 4 FTE (supply 
supply 
chain) 
chain) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
24 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
Indicator 
Measure  By When (financial 
Monitoring Approach  
year)  
Construction 
18 
4Q20 – 18FTE 
• Review  &  confirmation  with  main 
jobs FTE 
contractor  
 
Private 
80 
4Q20 – 50 
• Register  of  businesses  participating  in 
businesses 
(business  4Q22 – 30 
support events & networking 

supported - 
support 
Total = 80 by 4Q22 
 Register of businesses receiving advice and 
guidance  
direct 
package) 
• Businesses  signing  up  to  the  new 
Southwold business group  
Private 
120 
4Q20 – 20 
• Hits on website and engagement on social 
businesses 
media (increases annually) 

supported - 
 Business confidence increase 
• Increase in visitor figures outside the main 
indirect 
season  
Increase in 
3% 
4Q22 – 3% 
• Baseline  takings  measured  on  specific 
sales 
nominated  days  with  a  series  of  retail 
outlets  in  the  town,  repeated  at  annual 
intervals  (RPI  and  economic  factors  taken 
into account) 
New businesses 
15 
4Q20– 15 
• Occupancy  data  from  Hub  and  survey 
started 
tenant businesses  
Social 

4Q20 - 7 
• Social enterprises participating in business 
enterprises 
support services and networking 
started  
Increase in 
28,106  
4Q20 – 2% (in a 
• Baseline from Destination Research, report 
visitor numbers 
shoulder month) 
recommissioned after two years,  

4Q22 – 4% (shoulder 
 4%  increase  in  visitors  in  the  shoulder  
months (Mar – May & Sep – Nov), both day 
month) 
trips and overnights (27271 + 835) 
 
New visitor 
2% 
4Q20 – 1% 
• Destination  Research  baseline,  report 
expenditure 
4Q22 – 1% 
recommissioned after two years 
• £41.26  average  spend  per  day  visitor 
(£1.125m) (Visit Suffolk data) 
New tourism 

4Q20 – 4 
• No of events staged  
events 
4Q22 – 3 
supported 
7 in total 
Apprenticeship 

2Q19 – 1 
• Apprentice started  
started 
2Q21 - 1 
2Q23 – 1 
Brownfield land 
0.12ha 
4Q20 – 0.12ha 
• Completion  of  build  on  Station  Yard  site 
developed 
(Hub opens) 
New floorspace 
587m2 
4Q20 – 587m2 
• Completion  of  build  on  Station  Yard  site 
(Hub opens) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
25 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
Indicator 
Measure  By When (financial 
Monitoring Approach  
year)  
Physical 

4Q20 – 1 
• Completion  of  build  on  Station  Yard  site 
projects 
(Hub opens) 
supported 
Individuals 
160 
4Q20 – 100 
• Count  of  individual  small  business  owners 
Supported 
4Q22 – 60 
and staff participating in support services  
160 total 
Organisations 
80 
4Q20 – 50 
• Register  of  businesses  participating  in 
supported – 
(business  4Q22 – 30 
support events & networking 

private 
support 
Total = 80 by 4Q22 
 Register of businesses receiving advice and 
guidance  
businesses 
package) 
• Businesses  signing  up  to  the  new 
Southwold business group  
Public sector 
£1.916m 
4Q20 - £1.916m spent 
• Southwold  Town  Council’s  expenditure 
funding 
records for the project  
 
12. 
Risk Analysis 
Risk assessment in this section is focused on two areas: the capital project risk and operational 
risk.  Risks  will  be  managed  by  the  project  manager  and  reported  regularly  to  the  working 
group.  
Risk 
Prob.  Impact  Existing Controls/Action required/Who  
Development project risks  
Tenders come back 


-  A value engineering exercise will be undertaken with 
higher than budget 
the lowest tender looking at ways to source cheaper 
alternative  materials,  sub-contractors  etc.  This  will 
cause a delay to the start of the project.  
Capital costs overrun 


-  Costs developed by QS, reviewed by architect and by 
the budget 
experienced capital project manager 
-  7.5%  contingency  on  capital  budget,  plus  specific 
contingencies  for  high  cost  individual  risks  (eg 
contamination)  
-  QS  will  have  tight  control  of  costs,  and  report 
monthly,  so  early  warnings  will  be  given.  This  will 
enable  decisions  to  be  taken  on  changing  scope  or 
reducing spend on certain items.  
Construction project 


-  Experienced  project  manager,  design  team  and  QS 
takes longer than 
on board to identify issues early and resolve them 
planned 
-  Consider using one building prior to completion of the 
other (has downsides) 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
26 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
Risk 
Prob.  Impact  Existing Controls/Action required/Who  
Site issues, eg 

M/H 
-  Provision  in  capital  budget  to  cover  each  of  these 
archaeology, 
individual risks 
contaminated land, 
-  Major  impact  would  be  a  delay  to  the  project,  with 
asbestos 
archaeology having the highest impact but lowest risk 
given the known history of the site and finds records 
locally  
VAT becomes liable on 


-  Appropriate  advice  will  be  sought  to  confirm  the 
some/all of the project 
assumption that zero VAT will be payable  
-  In the unlikely event that VAT is incurred, the Council 
will have to fund the gap 
Unable to recruit 


-  Most likely to occur because salary offered is too low 
suitable staff 
or job is considered too challenging  
-  Southwold  Town  Council  consider  hiring  a  freelance 
person instead to cover the interim until a permanent 
employee can be found 
-  Southwold Town Council to seek advice from HR and 
recruitment firms locally & in Norwich to understand 
how best to position (and reward) the roles.   
Consultation/ 


-  Town  Council  working  group  established  and  will 
engagement – key 
continue if funding secured 
stakeholders/ 
-  Steering  Group  to  be  established  to  oversee 
community not 
Development Team 
supportive 
-  Communication plan to be developed further 
-  Consultation events in plan  
-  Open days organised 
Operational project risks  
Business climate 


-  All  research  to  date  indicates  a  strong  demand  for 
changes and demand 
office  space,  with  the  Southwold  brand  helping  to 
for office space falls 
support this 
away, resulting in 
-  The Station Yard development has been designed for 
vacant units. Most 
maximum  flexibility  and  can  be  adapted  so  suit 
likely due to major 
changed needs (more co-working etc) 
recession. 
-  There  is  flexibility  in  the  operating  costs  model  to 
reduce  rental  rates  to  increase  attractiveness  to 
market 
-  All  units  could  be  repurposed  as  retail  or  creative 
spaces, although this could reduce the number of new 
jobs created but may see  more individual businesses 
supported 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
27 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
Risk 
Prob.  Impact  Existing Controls/Action required/Who  
Operating income is 


-  Most likely to occur from slow uptake of units due to 
lower than anticipated 
changed  market  circumstances  or  simply  longer 
notice  periods  for  existing  premises  for  established 
businesses 
-  Increase  marketing  effort  and  consider  special 
offers/free trials etc  
Operating costs are 


-  Most  likely  linked  to  slower  take-up  (with  Council 
higher than projected 
having  to  cover  the  business  rates  on  vacant 
properties). 
-  Southwold Town Council to approach business rates 
authority  for  discretionary  rate  relief  to  help  reduce 
outgoings, whilst bearing the costs for longer  
Insufficient income is 


-  Southwold  TC  subsidise  for  further/longer  until  the 
generated through 
role is generating enough income  
events, sponsorship etc 
-  In the long term consider the roles becoming Council 
to sustain the 
staff resources, covered by the precept.  
Southwold 
Development team 
Hub is occupied by 


-  Managed workspace policy will be to give priority to 
existing businesses 
new  businesses  or  existing  businesses  intending  to 
relocating to better 
expand significantly, thus creating new jobs  
premises, but with very 
 
low job creation. 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
28 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
A.  Reference Documents 
The  following  documents  and  research  have  been  key  to  the  development  of  this  plan.  
Footnotes  in  the  main  text  provide  details  where  specific  evidence  has  been  referenced. 
Copies are available on request where they have not been submitted with this plan.  
Document 
Submitted 
Devon Works Hub press article, Public Sector Executive magazine  
 
East Suffolk Economic Growth Plan 2018 - 2023 
 
Economic Impact of Tourism - Southwold (Destination Research), 2017 
 
From Ebb to Flow – how entrepreneurs can turn the tide for Britain’s seaside 
 
towns.  A report for the Centre for Entrepreneurs 2015 
Project Logic Model 
 
Southwold Business Confidence Survey Winter 2017 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team – Economic Plan 2017 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team – Terms of Reference 
 
Southwold Neighbourhood Plan 2019 – 2038 (draft 2018) 
 
Southwold Town Centre Strategy – a Forward Framework (People & Places), 
 
Summary 2018 
Southwold Town Council Strategy for Southwold 2016  
 
Southwold Town Entrance Study (Ingleton Wood LLP) 2014 
 
Southwold Town Plan 2013 
 
Southwold Visitor Survey Winter 2017 
 
Visit Suffolk Market Segmentation 2015 
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 

 
B.  Job Descriptions  
SOUTHWOLD DEVELOPMENT MANAGER 
 
 
Organisation: Southwold Coastal Community Team  
 
 
Place of work: Southwold 
 
 
Salary details: £40,000 pro rata 
 
 
Job term / Working Hours: to be determined  
 
  
 
Appointment: Fixed Term for 2 years 
   
Main Purpose of Job: 
 

 
To lead and coordinate the implementation of initiatives which improve the quality and economic 
viability of Southwold by seeking to develop new products and events, leading business and marketing 
 
activity and repositioning the Southwold brand. 
   
Key Responsibilities: 
 

 
1.  Develop a new marketing strategy (to include social media) with products and opportunities 
created linked to key themes and places of interest including products, history and landscape 
 
helping to extend the visitor season. 
 
 
2.  Work with the Southwold Coastal Community Team (CCT) and the Station Yard Enterprise Hub 
 
project team to create and then promote the message that ‘Southwold is a place to do 
business’ 
 
 
3.  To establish a mechanism for coordinating relationships and partnerships amongst the business   
community to develop and improve business to business connectivity and relationships through 
networking and access to advice and guidance 
 
 
4.  Work with the relevant organisations to enhance the existing events calendar and develop new 
 
events that celebrate Southwold’s particular strengths and assets e.g. food and drink, natural 
environment, heritage to increase the footfall and spend in the Town particularly focused on 
 
out of season activity. 
 
 
5.  Engage a wider audience with the Southwold brand by strengthening links with neighbouring 
Destination Management Organisations including The Suffolk Coast, Visit Suffolk and The 
 
Broads. 
 
 
6.  To plan, coordinate and lead in implementing a programme of improvements, actions and 
 
innovations to boost community engagement and cement local community partnership in line 
with recommendations made in the Southwold Town Centre Strategy. 
 
 
7.  To coordinate and implement the relevant aspects of the Southwold CCT economic plan around   
facilitating visitor economy and event initiatives in order to increase and vary visitation, length 
of stay and occupancy rates in Southwold. 
 
 
8.  To be aware of potential funding sources and prepare funding bids for particular projects as 
 
appropriate opportunities arise.  
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

 
1.  To monitor and review town centre management activities and produce performance reports 
on a regular basis for the management group. 
 
2.  To prepare and deliver a three year business and marketing strategy with targets which will 
include a sustainability plan for the project including resources. 
 
3.  To develop opportunities for the town to learn from other areas or work with other coastal 
community teams where there are commonalities. 
 
4.  To establish and promote links with local and national media to ensure Southwold has a 
positive image. 
 
Reporting Structure:   
 
Responsible For: Southwold Development Coordinator and Apprentice 
Manages a budget of: £45,000 over two years 
 
 

Southwold Coastal 
Community Team 
STEERING GROUP 
 
•  Southwold Town Council Clerk 
•  Waveney District Council 
Officer 
•  ‘Business’ representative 
•  ‘Community’ representative 
Development 
Manager 
EMPLOYER 
Southwold Town 
Apprentice 
Council 
Development 
Coordinator 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

 
Personal Specification 
 
 
Essential 
Desirable 
Knowledge and 
•  Computer literate 
•  An understanding of the role 
Experience 
•  Proven experience in 
of national and local 
developing and maintaining 
government in the 
effective business 
development of tourism 
relationships between 
 
internal stakeholders, 
industry, other levels of 
government and the 
community. 
•  Knowledge of the local area 
and its strengths, 
weaknesses, opportunities 
and threats  
•  Understanding of business 
and strategic marketing 
Skills and Abilities: 
•  Able to work independently 
•  An understanding of social 
 
and use initiative   
media tools and how to use 
•  Ability to accept changing 
them effectively  
priorities 
 
•  Ability to work under 
pressure 
•  Ability to work to and meet 
deadlines 
•  Be self-motivated and 
flexible with the ability to 
multi-task 
Education and 
 
•  Possess a degree or 
Training 
qualification in a tourism, 
Events, Marketing or related 
field or have relevant 
experience in working with 
tourism businesses at a local, 
regional or national level.  
 
Other 
•  Ability to be able to adapt to 
 
Requirements 
changing and seasonal 
patterns of demand of the 
role 
•  An ability to relate effectively 
with other officials, external 
agencies, elected members 
and the public 
•  Present a professional 
appearance – as dealing with 
the public. 
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

 
SOUTHWOLD DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR 
 
Organisation: Southwold  Coastal Community Team  
 
Place of work:  Southwold 
 
Salary details: £25,000 pro rata 
 
Job term / Working Hours:  to be determined 
  
Appointment:  Fixed Term for 2 years 
 
 
Main Purpose of Job: 
 
To support the coordination  and delivery of initiatives which improve  the quality and economic 
viability of Southwold  by seeking to develop new products  and events, leading business and marketing 
activity and repositioning the Southwold  brand. 
 
Key Responsibilities: 
 

1.  To support the Southwold  Development  Manager on the delivery of projects as assigned within 
Southwold  Coastal Community Team Economic Plan. 
 
2.  To assist in delivering marketing activities to promote  Southwold  as a visitor destination and as 
a ‘location to do business’. 
 
3.  To establish and maintain a Visit Southwold  website and other suitable technologies to 
encourage visitor engagement and increase interaction.  
 
4.  To create social media pages generating news, discussions and engagement from both 
businesses and visitors from the town. 
 
5.  To liaise closely with all Visitor Information  Points (VIPs) in the Town and ensure there is a 
consistent approach to ‘Southwold’  information  (both  hard copy and electronic) across all. 
 
6.  To market the Town through  appropriate  media opportunities  including local, national press 
and social media. 
 
7.  To establish and maintain information  on local events. 
 
8.  To support the organisation of a number  of events and professional marketing initiatives in 
order  to increase the footfall in the Towns particularly focused on out of season activity. 
 
9.  To liaise with tour operators  to promote  Southwold  as a destination. 
 
10. To assist the Development Manager to coordinate meetings and activity. 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

 
Personal Specification 
 
 
Essential 
Desirable 
Knowledge and 
•  Computer  literate 
•  An understanding of the role 
Experience 
•  Knowledge of the local area 
of national and local 
and its strengths, 
government  in the 
weaknesses, opportunities 
development  of tourism 
and threats  
•  Experience in developing and 
maintaining effective 
business relationships 
between internal 
stakeholders, industry, other 
levels of government  and the 
community. 
•  Understanding of business 
and strategic marketing 
Skills and Abilities: 
•  Able to work  independently 
•   
 
and use initiative   
•  Ability to accept changing 
priorities 
•  Ability to work  under 
pressure 
•  Ability to work  to and meet 
deadlines 
•  Be self-motivated and 
flexible with the ability to 
multi-task 
•  An understanding of social 
media tools and how to use 
them effectively  
Education and 
 
•  Possess a degree or 
Training 
qualification in a tourism, 
Events, Marketing or related 
field or have relevant 
experience in working with 
tourism businesses at a local, 
regional or national level.  
Other 
•  Ability to be able to adapt to 
 
Requirements 
changing and seasonal 
patterns of demand of the 
role 
•  An ability to relate effectively 
with other officials, external 
agencies, elected members 
and the public 
•  Present a professional 
appearance – as dealing with 
the public. 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

 
SOUTHWOLD DEVELOPMENT APPRENTICE 
 
Organisation: Southwold  Development Team  
 
Place of work:  Southwold 
 
Salary detail:  
 
Job term / Working Hours:  to be determined 
  
Appointment:  to be determined 
 
 
Main Purpose of Job: 
 
To support the  coordination  and delivery of the Southwold  Enterprise Hub project. 
 
Key Responsibilities: 
 
The type of activities you will be expected to undertake  might include:  
 
•  Assisting with the delivery of projects to deadlines, effectively prioritising work  that you are 
responsible for.  
•  Assisting with the planning, organisation and delivery of communications  about projects and 
initiatives.  
•  Organising and attending project meetings, team meetings, working groups and forums   
•  Producing agenda’s and facilitating meetings including producing action lists, etc  
•  Developing or helping to develop reports and briefing papers  
•  Developing marketing and promotional  materials both hard copy and electronic  
•  The development  and organisation of community  engagement events or other events related 
to the placement.  
•  Contributing to the wider work of the development  team as appropriate,  this might include 
getting involved in some of the day to day activities the team deliver, helping out with other 
projects, etc  
 
This list is not exhaustive and main tasks, objectives and performance measu rements may change 
upon recruitment. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

 
Personal Specification 
 
 
Essential 
Desirable 
Knowledge and 
•  Computer  literate 
•  An understanding of the role 
Experience 
•  Knowledge of the local area  
of national and local 
government  in the 
development  of tourism 
 
Skills and Abilities: 
•  Able to work  well as part of a  •   
 
team as well as use own 
initiative   
•  Ability to work  to and meet 
deadlines 
•  Be self-motivated and 
flexible with the ability to 
multi-task 
•  An understanding of social 
media tools and how to use 
them effectively  
•  Good working knowledge of 
basic office products 
Education and 
 
•   
Training 
Other 
•  Ability to be able to adapt to 
 
Requirements 
changing and seasonal 
patterns of demand of the 
role 
•  Present a professional 
appearance – as dealing with 
the public. 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 


 
C.  Occupancy Rates  
The following model was developed to understand how different businesses would occupy the available spaces, and to calculate the likely 
number of occupants, new businesses and new jobs created.  
 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 
 


 
D.  Operating Costs  
Operating Costs for the Southwold Enterprise Hub (Managed Workspace; Development Team; loan repayments) to project year 5 (4Q23/4) 
 
Southwold Enterprise Hub - Business Plan  
 
MKAL Limited for Southwold Town Council, 2019 

Document Outline