This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Application to the Coastal Communities Fund – the 'Southwold Enterprise Hub''.




ECONOMIC PLAN 
 
 
 
 
 
March 2017 
 
 
 


link to page 4 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 13 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 25 link to page 29 link to page 29 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 31 link to page 32 link to page 33 link to page 34 link to page 35 link to page 36 link to page 37 link to page 38 link to page 39 link to page 41 link to page 42 link to page 43 link to page 44 link to page 46 link to page 52 link to page 52 link to page 52 link to page 53 link to page 53 link to page 54 link to page 54 link to page 54 link to page 54 Contents 
 
Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................. 4 
Background ............................................................................................................................................. 7 
1. Southwold Coastal Community Team ............................................................................................ 7 
2. Profiles of the local area, community, economy and services ....................................................... 8 
3. Strategic context ........................................................................................................................... 13 
CCT Plan ................................................................................................................................................ 22 
4. Evidence ........................................................................................................................................ 22 
5. Analysis ......................................................................................................................................... 23 
6.  Key challenges and needs of the community .............................................................................. 25 
Delivering the Economic Plan ............................................................................................................... 29 
7. Ambition ....................................................................................................................................... 29 
8. CCT Action Plan and resources required ...................................................................................... 29 
1a.  Revitalising the High Street ................................................................................................... 30 
1b. Promoting Southwold’s businesses ....................................................................................... 31 
2a. A Destination Management Plan for Southwold.................................................................... 32 
2b. Promoting Southwold outside the peak tourist season ......................................................... 33 
3. Training and apprenticeships ................................................................................................... 34 
4a. Expand community assets ...................................................................................................... 35 
4b.  Grow Southwold’s events  programme................................................................................. 36 
5a.  Edge-of-town car-parking ...................................................................................................... 37 
5b Expanding the Southwold and Reydon community shuttle bus service ................................. 38 
6a. Natural spaces Management Plan including a new Wildlife Garden and Visitor Centre ....... 39 
6b. New havens for wildlife .......................................................................................................... 41 
7a. Feasibility study for redevelopment of available premises in the town ................................ 42 
7b. Support for a knowledge-based business hub ....................................................................... 43 
8. Celebrating Southwold’s heritage ............................................................................................ 44 
9. Goals and timescales .................................................................................................................... 46 
Communications ................................................................................................................................... 52 
10. Consultation ................................................................................................................................ 52 
11. Collaboration .............................................................................................................................. 52 
12. Communication with community ............................................................................................... 53 
13. Communications Contact ........................................................................................................... 53 
CCT Logistics .......................................................................................................................................... 54 
14. Management and costs .............................................................................................................. 54 
15. Support structure ....................................................................................................................... 54 
16. Sustainability............................................................................................................................... 54 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 2 
 

link to page 55 link to page 55 link to page 73 link to page 75
Appendices ............................................................................................................................................ 55 
Appendix 1 – Summary Action Plan ............................................................................................. 55 
Appendix 2 – Southwold Coastal Community Team Terms of Reference ................................... 73 
Appendix 3 – Results from consultation ...................................................................................... 75 
 
 
This plan has been prepared by Nutt Consulting for the Economic Development team at Waveney 
District Council on behalf of the Southwold CCT Steering Group. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
Nutt Consulting 
5 Eaton Gate 
Mill Lane 
Keswick 
Norwich NR4 6TP 
T: 01603 503718   
M: 
 
@nuttconsulting.co.uk 
www.nuttconsulting.co.uk 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 3 
 

Executive Summary 
 
In January 2017, Southwold received confirmation from the Department for Communities and Local 
Government (DCLG) that its bid to become a Coastal Community Team had been accepted.  As defined 
by DCLG:  
 
“A Coastal Community Team (CCT) is a local partnership consisting of the local authority and a 
range of people and business interests from a coastal community who have an understanding of 
the issues facing that area and can develop an effective forward strategy for that place.” 

 
The main aims and objectives of a CCT are to boost the local economy by: 
 
•  encouraging greater local partnership working in coastal areas  
•  supporting the development of local solutions to economic issues facing coastal communities  
•  encouraging the sustainable use of heritage/cultural assets to provide a focus for community 
activities and enhanced economic opportunities  
•  creating links to support the growth and performance of the retail sector  
 
The key benefit of CCT status is the potential to access external funding that other areas cannot bid for.  
Southwold is now one of 146 CCTs, created all around the English coast, having that opportunity.  
Existing CCTs have benefited from over £3m of Coastal Revival Fund and £120m of Coastal Communities 
Fund. 
 
An essential requirement for all CCTs is the production of an Economic Plan as a framework for the 
CCT’s work and objectives in boosting the local economy.  Locally tailored, this Economic Plan for the 
Southwold CCT is output and evidence based and aims to: 
 
•  Address challenges and opportunities  
•  Enhance economic prosperity and well-being 
•  Set out a programme of actionable initiatives  
•  Attract future funding and deliver results 
•  Benefit all living and working in Southwold 
 
The Southold CCT is led by a Steering Group comprising representatives of Southwold Town Council, 
Reydon Parish Council, Southwold and Reydon Society, Southwold Chamber of Trade, Waveney District 
Council (accountable body) and other key business and community representatives. 
 
Vision  
 
For Southwold to be the successful, vibrant, attractive town on the East Anglian coast, where people 
want to live, work and visit.  To bring together various business, commercial and community interests to 
inspire and guide a co-ordinated approach to creating greater future economic prosperity for the town. 
 
Challenges 
 
Although it is a highly regarded tourist destination and an attractive place both to live and work, 
Southwold has a number of significant sustainability issues: 
 
  a declining and ageing population, fewer younger people and families   
  very high property values and lack of affordable housing 
  high commercial rents and an imminent dramatic increase in business rates (April 2017) 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 4 
 





Background 
 
1. Southwold Coastal Community Team 
 
 
 
Single Point of Contact:  
 
 
Economic Development Manager 
 
Waveney District Council 
Riverside, 4 Canning Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0EQ  
Tel: 
 
Email: 
@eastsuffolk.gov.uk   
 
 
Southwold CCT Steering Group: 
 
Cabinet Member Economic 
Cllr Michael Ladd 
Development and Tourism (also a 
Waveney District Council 
(Chairman of CCT) 
Southwold Town Councillor and 
Suffolk County Councillor) 
 
Waveney District Council 
Economic Development Manager 
 
Waveney District Council 
 
Economic Development Officer 
 (Secretary  Economic Development Programme 
Waveney District Council 
of CCT) 
Officer 
Southwold Town Council 
 
Clerk 
Southwold Town Council 
 
Mayor 
 
Reydon Parish Council 
Councillor 
(Vice-Chair of CCT) 
Southwold & Reydon 
   
Chairman 
Society 
Neighbourhood Plan 
  
Also Southwold Town Councillor 
Team 
Private sector: 
 
Durrants 
 
MD (and Chamber of Trade member) 
Adnams 
 
Head of HR 
Southwold Pier 
 
Manager 
Boating Lake 
 
Owner 
Chamber of Trade 
 
Chair (and local business owner) 
Co-op 
  
 
 
The Accountable Body is Waveney District Council and it is represented within the CCT membership.  
Contact name and details as above. 
 
The Terms and Reference of the CCT are given at Appendix 2. 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 7 
 

2. Profiles of the local area, community, economy and services   
 
2a. The local area 
 
Southwold sits within the district of Waveney on the east coast of Suffolk, approximately 13 miles south 
of Lowestoft and 18 miles along the coast north of Aldeburgh.  Ipswich lies about 35 miles away along 
the nearby A12.  There is just one road into the town, the A1095, which passes through the 
neighbouring village of Reydon. 
 
The nearest mainline train stations are at Darsham and at Halesworth, each about ten miles away and 
both being on the East Suffolk Line which serves London Liverpool Street to Lowestoft, via Ipswich 
(change at Ipswich). The rail service is operated by Greater Anglia. 
 
Southwold is located at the estuary of the River Blyth, with a small harbour serving a number of small 
businesses in the fishing and marine industry. The town is surrounded by its common, beach and denes, 
and by extensive marshes and mudflats which are an important habitat for birds and wildlife. It sits 
within the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) which extends from the 
Stour estuary in the south to the eastern fringe of Ipswich and to Kessingland in the north and covers 
some 403 square kilometres. 
 
As described in the Town Plan 20131:  
 
“Southwold is a unique place, much loved by residents and visitors alike for its beaches, pier, 
harbour, Common, greens, marshes, stylish architecture and idiosyncratic High Street.  It has 
been shaped by its long history.   
 
The town grew in the Middle Ages on the back of the herring industry; its market and fair date 
from the 15th century; its Common was the result of a bequest in 1509, and its characteristic 
greens were the consequence of an imaginative response to disastrous fire in the 17th century.   
 
The 19th century saw a resurgence in the herring industries and a new source of income – 
visitors to the seaside.  The town expanded with new cottages for the visitors and the pier for 
the steamers that brought them.   
 
Over the last century, the visitors have become the most important contributors to the 
economy, alongside the brewer, Adnams.  Today Southwold is thriving as one of the most 
popular seaside resorts in East Anglia and attracts visitors from all over the country and from 
abroad.” 
 
Southwold recently finished second in a list of the top 30 seaside towns in Britain complied by the 
Rough Guide2 book series: 
 
“Perched on the east coast of England, the small town of Southwold offers typical seaside 
merriment with its sandy beach, traditional pier and candy-coloured beach huts. A working 
lighthouse (open to visitors) stands sentinel, surveying the bay, and the Adnams Brewery, which 
still operates on the same site after 670 years, wafts early morning hops into the sea air. Plenty 
of excellent eating and accommodation options range from the smart Swan Hotel, situated on 
the picturesque market square, to a nearby campsite – all a pebble’s throw from the sea.” 
 
                                                           
1 Source: Southwold Town Plan, 2013 
2 Rough Guide to Britain 2017 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 8 
 

However while it is vital to the town’s economy, tourism has also had other consequences for 
Southwold which are expanded on below.  It has caused a fundamental shift in the balance of the local 
community with rising property values and growing numbers of second homes pricing out younger 
residents and reducing the number of permanent residents.   
 
Its location on a marshy estuary of the River Blyth at the edge of the North Sea means that Southwold, 
in common with other coastal communities, is under threat from pollution, coastal erosion and the 
consequences of climate change.  Some kinds of pollution pose immediate threats both to the town’s 
vital tourism industry and to residents, while coastal erosion impacts on the local environment, the 
estuary, and the future viability of the Harbour.   
 
The River Blyth opens out into a wide area of saltmarsh and mudflats leading up to Blythburgh. In recent 
years there has been controversial local debate over how best to manage the area and the river in order 
to balance the risks and costs of actual and predicted flooding against the costs and benefits of flood 
defence.  
 
Adjoining Southwold is the parish of Reydon.  With a larger rural hinterland, it covers an area about 4 
times the size of Southwold and its village is occupied by 2,582 residents (ONS Estimates, May 2014) – 
about 3 times the current number of permanent residents in Southwold.  Many people who work in 
Southwold live in Reydon and all visitors pass through Reydon on their way into the town. Although 
separated by only a few metres of Buss Creek, Reydon has a very different profile from Southwold.  The 
average age of the population is 49 compared to 60 for Southwold, with almost 3 times the number of 
residents of working age.  20% of households have dependant children compared to just 8% in 
Southwold.    
 
Comparison of town/village profiles for Southwold and Reydon, 2014 data3: 
 
Town/village profiles* 
Southwold 
Reydon 
Population 
1,098 
2,582 
Dwellings 
1,334 
1,457 
Area 
3 sq km 
12 sq km 
Average age 
60 
49 
Working age population 
487 
1,343 
Households with dependent 
8% 
20% 
children 
Socio-economic classification: 
 
 
Professional occupations  
22% 
9% 
 
Managers, directors and senior 
15% 
21% 
officials  
 
Skilled trades occupations  
14% 
12% 
Associate professional and 
14% 
16% 
technical occupations  
Elementary occupations  
10% 
8% 
Caring, leisure and other service 
8% 
14% 
occupations  
Administrative and secretarial 
6% 
12% 
occupations  
Sales and customer service 
6% 
3% 
                                                           
3 Source: Southwold Town Profile and Reydon Village Profile, Waveney District Council, May 2014 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 9 
 




holiday-lets, which now account for over 20% of all residential properties4. Meanwhile the proportion of 
residents’ homes has fallen to less than 50%.   
 
 
 
 
2nd 
 
Primary 
Homes 
 
Homes 
 
35% 
 
43% 
Holiday 
 
Lets 
 
22% 
Proportion of types of homes 
in Southwold (from research 
for Neighbourhood Plan) 
 
 
The effects of this are already noticeable in the fall in off-season trade for local businesses, falling 
numbers at the local primary school and in the increasing difficulty of finding volunteers for community 
activities.  Experience elsewhere suggests that if the proportion of residents falls much further, the 
community may become unsustainable.  While the underlying reasons for this may lie in national 
economic and social trends, steps need to be taken locally to mitigate the risks to a sustainable 
community. 
 
2c. The local economy 
 
Southwold’s thriving High Street, with its mix of hotels, pubs, restaurants and cafes and small shops now 
caters primarily for the main local industry, tourism.  However, its numerous independent businesses, 
which contribute much to the town’s individual appeal as a retail and visitor destination, have been 
joined in recent years by a growing number of national chains.  This has arguably diluted the 
distinctiveness of the High Street and has resulted in dramatic increases in commercial rents, giving rise 
more recently to disproportionate and potentially devastating hikes in business rates.    
 
For all the success of the town’s visitor economy an over-reliance on tourism has a number of 
downsides.  Its seasonality means that essential local businesses find it difficult to sustain trade all year 
round with local residents suffering the consequences when local shops and services close.  Tourism-
related jobs are also seasonal and often low-paid.  At peak periods the town can be congested and 
parking and infrastructure are put under strain. 
 
The biggest local employer is the successful brewer, wine merchant and hotelier, Adnams, which also 
owns many local pubs.  Adnams has had a strong influence on the evolution of the town over the past 
50 years and plays a large role in the local community as a sponsor of local events and as a highly 
regarded responsible employer.  Its brand - ‘Beer from the Coast’ brewed in its Sole Bay Brewery, is 
inextricably linked to Southwold. The company is enjoying a period of sustained growth and its supply 
chain requirements present a potential opportunity for the town’s economy. 
 
Fishing has been an important part of the history and heritage of Southwold and its harbour remains the 
traditional home of a small fishing industry with allied services such as fishmongers and smokehouses.  
It also provides a focus for marine services and boat repairs. 
 
                                                           
4 Source: Southwold and Reydon Society Housing Report, 2012 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 11 
 

Other small local industries include construction and building maintenance (partly driven by the strong 
second home market), and a variety of service businesses, including some dependent on IT and web-
based technologies, notably the digital communications agency, Spring. 
 
In neighbouring Reydon, the Reydon Business Park is home to 22 businesses of which the largest is the 
printing firm, Micropress.  The largest employer in Reydon is St Felix School, an independent co-
educational day and boarding school. 
 
2d.  Local services and transport 
 
The community in Southwold is well-served by health and social services, including some excellent 
voluntary organisations such as the Voluntary Help Centre.  It also has good amenities, including an 
active and extremely well-supported local library.   
 
However, the decline in the resident population and the growing proportion of those over 65 (over half 
the population), simultaneously challenge the provision of services and increase demand.  The 
Southwold surgery closed recently, although services (including some outpatient services previously 
provided by the recently closed Southwold Hospital) have been transferred to the new Sole Bay Health 
Centre in Reydon. 
 
It is part a measure of Southwold’s success that it suffers traffic congestion and parking problems.  
Shoppers from surrounding areas as well as visitors have increasing problems finding somewhere to 
park, as do many residents who often do not have off-road parking space.  The problem is especially 
acute in the summer season.   
 
Traffic congestion is also increasing in purely residential areas, in part as a consequence of over-parking 
and partly because of the difficulties caused by large vehicles.  The safety of pedestrians is a growing 
concern as is the safety of mobility vehicles.  Effective traffic management is seen as essential to the 
town’s future. 
 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 12 
 

3. Strategic context 
 
Waveney District 
 
Southwold sits in the district of Waveney, the most easterly in England, located in the north east corner 
of Suffolk.  With a population of 116,200 (2015 Census5), Waveney covers an area of 37,000 hectares 
and has 26km of shoreline.  
 
Lowestoft, situated in the north east of the District is the largest town, accommodating approximately 
half of the District’s population. Together with Beccles, Bungay, Halesworth and a number of villages 
and hamlets, Southwold is one of four historic market towns which give the rural part of the District its 
identity.  
 
The District is served by two train lines, the East Suffolk line which connects Lowestoft, Beccles and 
Halesworth to Ipswich and the Wherry Line which connects Lowestoft to Norwich. The A47 provides 
road connections to Great Yarmouth and the A12 south to Ipswich and onward to London. The A146 
provides links from Lowestoft to Beccles and onwards to Norwich. The A143 provides links to the west 
from Beccles to Bungay and onwards to Diss. 
 
The spatial vision for the District6 provides a direction for development in Waveney to 2021 and beyond. 
The following is an extract from the spatial vision for the District: 
 
Waveney will have a strong and diverse economy, based on a culture of enterprise. There will 
be a strong intellectual knowledge base, focused on all forms of energy from renewable 
sources. Economic prosperity will reflect our strategic European location and an integrated 
transport system with improved accessibility within the District, to other key centres in the 
Region, the rest of the country and abroad. Unemployment will be low and the highly skilled 
workforce will have well-paid and permanent jobs. More people will work from home, or close 
to home and a high percentage of the population will walk, cycle or use public transport to and 
from work.  
(….) 
The unique built and natural environments of the market towns will be enhanced and each 
town will be vibrant and largely self-contained in terms of access to services and facilities. 
(….) 
 
And specifically for Southwold: 
 
Southwold will prosper as a unique and historic market town and resort town, not least because 
of the quality of its coastal location and built and natural environment. These qualities will 
continue to be protected and enhanced. More effective traffic management will assist in 
reducing the impact of visitor traffic on the environment. Situated in the Suffolk Coast and 
Heaths AONB and Heritage Coast, only limited and small-scale housing development will have 
taken place within the built-up area. Development in the harbour area will have been managed 
so as to balance the needs of the fishing industry with the pressure for change, flood risk and 
the high quality of the environment. The adjacent village of Reydon will continue to function as 
part of a wider Southwold/Reydon area. Some employment development serving both 
communities will have taken place in Reydon. Likewise, some enhanced playing field provision 
will have been provided in Reydon to support local teams. The village will have experienced only 
small-scale housing development.  
                                                           
5 ONS estimate 
6 Waveney Core Strategy 2009 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 13 
 

 
Key Issues for Waveney7 
 
Social 
  Waveney’s population is growing and ageing. Between 2011 and 2036 it is expected that the 
population will grow by at least 8,000 people. However, the number of working age people in 
the District may have fallen. 
  Waveney suffers from low levels of participation in physical exercise and high rates of adult and 
childhood obesity.   
  Educational attainment at GCSE level is low compared to Suffolk and national averages.  
  Some parts of Lowestoft suffer from high levels of deprivation and average earnings in Waveney 
are below Suffolk averages 
  House prices on average are 6 times above average earnings and rural parts of the District are 
unaffordable for many.  
  Housing need and demand is increasing and may soon exceed supply.  
  Waveney benefits from low levels of crime and levels of unemployment have been decreasing 
recently  
 
Economy 
  Historically Waveney’s economy has been based on farming, printing, manufacturing, food 
processing and industries taking advantage of the coastal location, such as tourism and the 
offshore sector.  
  The number of jobs available in Waveney has been declining and productivity remains below 
East of England averages.  
  There is huge potential for jobs growth from the offshore wind sector and from initiatives such 
as the Great Yarmouth and Waveney Enterprise Zone. 
  Lowestoft Town Centre has suffered in recent years with increasing numbers of vacant units. 
However, the town centres in market towns have been performing better.    
 
Environment 
  Waveney has a rich but sensitive natural and built environment.  
  The southern coastal section of the District is part of the Suffolk Coast and Heaths Area of 
Outstanding Natural Beauty and to the north of the District is the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads.  
  Waveney has significant areas of sensitive wildlife habitats which support biodiversity of local, 
national and international importance.  
  The District has a rich historic environment which could be sensitive to pressures of new 
development.  
  Some parts of the District are at risk from flooding and coastal erosion which will increase with 
climate change.  
  Air quality is largely good but the water quality of some rivers and streams is decreasing.    
 
Waveney District Local Plan 
Currently being prepared for completion autumn 2017, the new Local Plan will cover the period to 2036 
and will set out the amount of growth that needs to be planned for the District, where the growth 
should go and how it should be delivered. It will contain planning policies that will protect the District’s 
valuable natural and built environment and ensure that new development is delivered in a sustainable 
way. The new Local Plan will take into account the emerging Neighbourhood Plan for Southwold and 
will provide a basis and identify the ‘Strategic Policies for the new Southwold Neighbourhood Plan to 
align with.  
                                                           
7 Waveney Core Strategy 2009 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 14 
 

 
Southwold Town Plan 
The Town Plan8 is focussed on Southwold’s future and seeks to address key issues like the decline in the 
resident population, the importance of the town’s special character and defences against coastal 
erosion and rising sea-levels.  Under the five headings of Economy, Housing, Services and Amenities, 
Environment and Transport, it sets out actions that the Southwold community considers necessary to 
protect the town’s assets and to secure its future development.   
 
Work undertaken for developing the Town Plan and for the subsequent Town Strategy has informed the 
development of this CCT Economic Plan and is liberally quoted in this document. 
  
Strategy for the Future of Southwold  
The Town Council’s strategy9 describes its plans for Southwold for the remaining three year duration of 
the present Council, taking into account the external factors that may impact on the town and the 
people who live there. 
 
Southwold Town Council’s vision: 
For Southwold to be the successful, vibrant, attractive town on the East Anglian coast, where 
people want to live, work and visit.  We intend to focus on projects that are truly important and 
meaningful for the Town and that will help us to achieve our objectives.   
 
STC’s generic strategy is to focus on projects that will enable it to deliver this vision, and differentiate 
Southwold from other coastal towns in East Anglia, and those with a similar profile country wide. In 
particular it wishes to: 
1.  Diversify the local economy by knowledge based businesses  
2.  Reverse decline in resident population and attract more families to live and work   
3.  Retain and enhance the natural and built environment  
4.  Protect, maintain and enhance community assets  
5.  Promote and maintain the independent character of the High Street  
6.  Improve access, parking and transport within the town 
 
Southwold Neighbourhood Plan  
With a view to helping shape future planning policies at local level, a Neighbourhood Plan10 for 
Southwold is in its final stages of consultation and review.  The finalised Plan is due to be published later 
in 2017. 
 
A series of focus group sessions were undertaken for the Neighbourhood Plan in early 2016 with: 
1.  Business Leaders  
 
2.  Young Families    
3.  The Loft Youth Club  
  
4.  Library Users    
 
The business focus group was attended by Spring (strategic communications & design agency), Two 
Magpies (artisan bakery), Spots & High Tide (Post Office and retail), Collen & Clare (retail clothing) and 
Suffolk Secrets (holiday letting agency).  Separate 1-2-1 interviews took place with Andy Wood, CEO of 
Adnams, Kate Adey, co-owner of The Sail Loft Restaurant, and George Mills, shareholder and co-
manager of local butchers, Mills & Sons Ltd. 
 
                                                           
8 Southwold Town Plan, October 2013 
9 Our Strategy for the Future of Southwold, Southwold Town Council, May 2016 
10 Southwold Neighbourhood Plan – due late 2017 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 15 
 

A questionnaire was circulated to all residents of Southwold, both full-time and part-time during the 
summer of 2016.  They were asked for views on housing (including the high % of second homes in the 
town), affordable housing, community facilities, land use, environment, urban design and the town’s 
future economy. 
 
A Neighbourhood Plan Update was circulated in late 2016 identifying specific policy areas relating to: 
  High quality design  
  In-fill and property extensions 
  Low cost housing and affordable business space 
  Protecting community assets 
  Protection of the natural environment 
  Second homes and holiday lets 
 
Reydon Village Plan  
Reflecting the views of Reydon residents, the aim of the Village Plan11 was to identify what is needed “to 
retain what is good in our village, improve what could be better and develop provision that is currently 
lacking.” 
 
1. Housing 
  Increase awareness and understanding of Planning Issues and Applications 
  Establish and maintain a dialogue with Waveney District Council on Planning Policy 
  Promote provision of small scale Business Units and/or shops 
 
2. Business and Employment 
  Ensure Planning, Housing and Transport policies and strategies support the needs of businesses 
and promote local employment. 
  Promote the Reydon Village Website as the first point of reference for the residents and 
businesses. 
 
3. Schools and Education 
  Increase community access to facilities at Reydon Primary School and St Felix 
  Seek ways of extending access (including transport) to youth provision, and sport and fitness 
facilities in Southwold 
  Maintain and extend nursery, childcare and play provision. 
 
4. Environment and Community 
  Provide additional litter/dog fouling bins and recycling point 
  Provide a village map at Reydon Corner and enhance Jubilee Green 
  Maintain, and enhance where possible, key amenities 
  Explore with the Police and Highways Authorities further steps to discourage speeding and 
vandalism 
  Ensure the Planning Authority (Waveney District Council) and Environment Agencies (Natural 
England and the Environment Agency) are aware of the extent of local concern for the 
environment 
  Continue to protect and enhance the local natural environment. 
  Hold a public event to explain the implications of the decision not to protect the Blyth Estuary 
river walls 
  Continue to promote voluntary activity to enhance village life 
 
                                                           
11 Reydon Village Plan 2014 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 16 
 

5. Traffic and Transport 
  Work with the Highways Authorities to develop proposals for traffic and parking improvements 
and carry out formal consultation 
  Conduct a condition survey of footpaths and cycle routes and develop plans for new paths/cycle 
routes in key areas 
  Improve enforcement of speed limits and parking controls. 
  Maintain and Improve public transport provision 
 
6. Emergency and Other Services 
  Maintain the recent improvements in street cleaning and broadband connectivity and work with 
providers to improve mobile telephone reception 
  Support any local initiatives to extend services available in Reydon 
  Discuss with Suffolk Police the findings on satisfaction with their service 
 
7. Health and Caring 
  Extend, where possible access to GP’s and other health services 
  Increase volunteering 
  Ensure Out-of-Hours GP Services are good 
 
Waveney Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment  
The relevant extract for Southwold from the Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment 12 reads as follows: 
“Although the smallest of the District’s market towns in terms of its total retail floor space, the 
centre has developed a strong and unique shopping, leisure and service offer due to its 
important role as a tourist and visitor destination.  Apart from the attractive seafront, the 
Adnams Brewery and associated uses are particular attractions.  
 
“The centre’s main offer is focussed along the linear High Street and Market Place where it forks 
into East Street and Queen Street, joining together on Pinkey’s Lane.  It has relatively strong 
comparison goods and fashion offer, including a number of national multiple retailers that 
would not normally be associated with a centre of its size; this again reflects its strong visitor 
and tourist economy.  Southwold’s food and convenience offer is characterised by smaller 
independent stores, ‘anchored’ by Tesco Express and Co-Op.  It has a good selection of cafés 
and restaurants, and the Electric Picture Palace on Blackmill Road is a unique and popular 
attraction, albeit separated from the High Street.  Vacancy levels across the centre are also low, 
at 5.3%.    
 
“Overall Southwold is a popular, attractive, vital and viable town centre.  The main issue 
appears to be a lack of parking during peak holiday periods which can lead to severe congestion 
around the town centre.  The identification of additional car parking and/or ‘park-and-ride’ 
provision to meet peak demand is a priority for the town centre, otherwise it could discourage 
visits to the town centre to the detriment of the local economy.”  
 
Carter Jonas’ economic capacity assessment forecasts the following potential need for new retail 
(convenience and comparison goods) floor space in the Town Centre up to 2032.  
 
 
 
                                                           
12 Waveney Retail and Leisure Needs Assessment, Carter Jonas 2016 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 17 
 

Southwold Town Centre – Retail Capacity Forecasts  
 
 
2021 
2026  2031  2032 
Comparison Goods Floor space  15 
154 
305 
335 
Capacity (m2 net): 
Convenience Goods Floor 

13 
17 
18 
space (m2 net)1: 
TOTAL RETAIL CAPACITY 
22 
167 
322 
353 
 
Carter Jonas are forecasting capacity for 167m2 net of new retail floor space by 2026, increasing to 
353m2 net by 2032, which is equivalent to 209m2 gross by 2026 and 441m2 gross by 2032.  They 
recognise that “there is limited scope for new retail floor space development in the town centre due to 
its historic nature.  As a result, meeting the identified needs will have to occur through the conversion 
and change of use of existing buildings in the primary shopping area, and/or through ‘infill’ 
development as has happened in the past.”  
 
However, the Carter Jonas report predates the current business rates crisis which may paint a very 
different picture of retail prospects going forward.  
 
Employment Land Needs Assessment - Ipswich and Waveney Economic Areas  
The authors of the Employment Land Needs Assessment for Ipswich and Waveney Economic Areas 13 
make the following observation about the potential for Waveney: 
“The Waveney Economic Area has become increasingly recognised for its growing potential to 
support the offshore energy sector. Employment has declined over the last four years indicating 
that Waveney’s economy has particularly suffered from the effects of the recession. Key sectors 
in employment terms include public administration, health and education, finance and business 
services, retail and manufacturing. Recent economic performance across a range of business, 
productivity and labour market indicators has been relatively poor.” 
 
“Sizewell C represents a significant economic development that is … likely to generate 
additional demand for B class space and land in Suffolk Coastal and surrounding authority areas 
over the period to 2031.” 
 
East Suffolk Business Plan  
The East Suffolk Business Plan14 sets out a vision for the delivery of services to the communities across 
the two districts.  
“Our objective is to achieve the right balance for our area, so that we attract the inward 
investment to take advantage of our economic opportunities (particularly from sustainable 
energy) and address the social challenges of our diverse area, while at the same time protecting 
and enhancing all that is best and unique about our natural and built environment, whether it is 
our coastline, our countryside, or our traditional villages and market towns. 
 
“Vision:  
Maintain and sustainably improve the quality of life for everyone growing up in, living in, 
working in and visiting East Suffolk. 
 
“Successfully delivering our Vision will significantly improve the economic, social and 
environmental wellbeing of our area. It will safeguard the prospects of current and future 
                                                           
13 Ipswich and Waveney Economic Areas - Employment Land Needs  Assessment, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners 
2016 
14 East Suffolk Business Plan (2015 – 2023) Suffolk Coastal & Waveney in Partnership 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 18 
 

generations and improve everyone’s quality of life.  To achieve the best possible quality of life 
for local people, this strategy will see the Councils, enabling communities, promoting economic 
growth and becoming financially self sufficient.” 
 
The Councils have identified 10 ‘critical success factors’ that support the delivery of their shared Vision 
and will show that the Business Plan is working. These include: 
  Economic Development & Tourism - A strong, sustainable, and dynamic local economy offering 
our communities more stable, high quality and high value jobs, with increased opportunities for 
all. 
  Communities - A diverse mix of resilient and supportive communities that value their rural and 
coastal heritage; which feel engaged, valued and empowered; and where people’s needs are 
met and where they can make a difference to their community. 
 
Enabling Communities Strategy 
The Enabling Communities Strategy15 is about how Suffolk Coastal District Council and Waveney District 
Council will work with other organisations in East Suffolk to enable local people to do more. 
 
“We want East Suffolk communities to be vibrant, resilient and able to help themselves. What 
we will do is build the skills and knowledge of communities so that they can do more for 
themselves, rather having things done ‘for’ or ‘to’ them. This ensures that skills stay in the 
community and can be used for future community projects.” 
 
East Suffolk Partnership 
The East Suffolk Partnership16 has identified five key priority areas that represent their primary business 
although many of the underlying issues are interconnected and demand a collaborative approach to 
address them successfully: 
1.  Build on economic prosperity, growth and infrastructure development 
2.  Ensure people have the skills to meet employment opportunities 
3.  Encourage a growing, ageing population to be healthy and live well 
4.  Build strong communities & reduce inequalities in health, housing & crime 
5.  Improve lives through environmental action 
 
Priority area 1 - Relevant Priorities for Southwold:  
  Support Business Associations in East Suffolk to have sufficient operational capacity to realise 
their plans for growth.  
  Support Business Associations in East Suffolk to develop and promote a wider network of 
businesses, local government and specialist organisations to encourage beneficial partnerships.  
  Contribute to the sustainability of our market towns by supporting existing grass roots activity, 
encouraging new ways of thinking and stimulating collaborative work to build strong and 
distinctive places. 
 
Priority area 4  - Relevant priority for Southwold:  
  Support place-based initiatives in East Suffolk that bring partners from across the public, private 
and voluntary sectors together to achieve common priorities by testing new delivery models 
and ways of working. 
 
                                                           
15 Enabling Communities Strategy 
16 The East Suffolk Partnership (ESP) is a non-statutory, non-executive organisation that covers Suffolk Coastal and 
Waveney and attracts organisations from the public, business, community and 
voluntary sectors to achieve joined up services and redesign of the system for the long term benefit of residents 
and business in East Suffolk. 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 19 
 

New Anglia Strategic Economic Plan 
The LEP’s Plan17 identifies four underpinning sectors which are the largest employers in our economy 
and which we will continue to support in order to improve their productivity and competitiveness.  One 
of the most significant of these is tourism, worth approximately £1.3bn in GVA to the New Anglia area 
and almost 68,000 jobs (10% of employment) plus many more indirect jobs. 
 
All of the key sectors have an important role to play, providing jobs and growth throughout the wider 
New Anglia economy. They make important contributions to our growth locations. They will continue to 
be actively supported by the LEP - through business growth, skills and infrastructure developments in 
particular. These sectors will actively be encouraged to develop synergy with our high impact sectors; 
for instance, the excellent existing cultural and tourism offer can benefit from the major developments 
in ICT and Digital Creative; and the Ports and Logistics sector benefits from Energy sector developments. 
 
Suffolk Coast Tourism Strategy 
The purpose of the Suffolk Coast Tourism Strategy18 is to set the overall framework for developing and 
promoting sustainable tourism between 2013 and 2023. 
 
Vision: 
In 2023, the Suffolk Coast is a tourism destination with a strong reputation for its positive 
environmental values. The Suffolk Coast is known for high quality, varied, ‘easy to access’ and 
enjoyable visitor experiences throughout the year. Visitors, communities and tourism 
enterprises work together to balance environment, heritage, economy and community through 
effective partnership working. 
 
The strategy is built upon seven key objectives, each supported by a series of proposals and key tasks:  
 
1.  Maximise the appeal, quality and popularity of the countryside, and the market and coastal 
towns to encourage more ‘off’ and ‘shoulder’ season visits for a range of activities.  
2.  Strengthen the range and provision of activities available within the Suffolk Coast to broaden 
market appeal and to encourage visits to the destination throughout the year.  
3.  Strengthen key themes within the Suffolk Coast, especially those that present unique stories, 
accentuate key characteristics of the area, and have clearly defined visitor markets.  
4.  Improve the quality of visitor facilities and services across the Suffolk Coast, including 
developing new provision where there are clear gaps or a defined market need.  
5.  Ensure good quality and relevant visitor information is available in a range of ways and is 
accessible both within and beyond the Suffolk Coast.  
6.  Develop a clear marketing and promotional plan to deliver sustainable tourism throughout the 
seasons.  
7.  Ensure that tourism activity and visitor behaviour is truly sustainable by seeking mutual benefits 
for all stakeholders involved in the visitor economy, environmental conservation and 
community welfare. 
 
 
Specific references to Southwold in the Strategy: 
 
“The coastal towns of Aldeburgh, Southwold, Kessingland and Felixstowe also have their own 
sense of place, with Aldeburgh and Southwold representing ‘market towns by the sea’. The 
towns and villages of Felixstowe, Woodbridge, Aldeburgh, Southwold, Kessingland, 
                                                           
17 New Anglia Strategic Economic Plan 
18 Suffolk Coast Tourism Strategy 2013-23 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 20 
 

Framlingham and Halesworth each have different characteristics, with some already having 
their own strong tourism identities. 
 
“Tourism Character Areas (TCAs) North - Southwold, Kessingland and Halesworth – the pier, 
lighthouse and beach huts of Southwold harks back to a bygone age of traditional family 
holidays.  Geographically and spatially speaking, the North TCA is the smallest and has the least 
in terms of stand-alone tourism products when compared to the other areas. However, this 
belies the fact that the coastal town of Southwold and the coastal resort/village of Kessingland 
are strong destinations in their own right, and that they also have connections with Lowestoft 
to the north.  Identified Woodbridge, Southwold and Framlingham as the ‘gateway’ towns to 
the Suffolk Coast and their respective tourism character areas.”    
 
Relevant key activities: 
  Develop initiatives that encourage discovery of the area’s different heritage sites and features in 
the landscape  - Coastal defence heritage: Raise the profile of the Battle of Sole Bay of 1672 
where an Anglo-French fleet repelled a surprise attack by a Dutch fleet close to Southwold 
during the third Anglo-Dutch War. 
  Support the further development, promotion and packaging of all cultural event programmes, 
especially those that can motivate overnight visitor trips to the Suffolk Coast - A key function of 
events should be to drive new business during out of peak season periods. 
  Encourage more integrated public transportation services across the Suffolk Coast, with key 
visitor sites such as Southwold to be supported where possible. 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 21 
 



 
As a relative assessment of how the town presents itself to visitors and shoppers, Southwold was one of 
the four Waveney Market Towns – with Beccles, Bungay, and Halesworth – that were the subject of a 
Town Mystery Shopper Audit21 commissioned by WDC in the summer of 2016.  The Audit looked at: 
  General features - Signage, parking, open spaces & floral displays, street furniture, cleanliness 
  Market - Location, range and presentation 
  Toilets - Availability, Maintenance and cleanliness 
  Retail and Catering – Facilities, presentation and external physical condition 
  Information Provision - Information boards, Visitor Information Points 
 
Southwold out-performed all the other towns overall and in most individual aspects. However it scored 
least well in the group in terms of General Features (signage, parking, open spaces & floral displays, 
street furniture, cleanliness) and Information Provision. It came second to Halesworth for the Market 
and for Retail and Catering. 
 
Aspect  
Beccles  
Bungay  
Halesworth   Southwold  
General  
91%  
89%  
90%  
85%  
Market  
78%  
80%  
86%  
83%  
Toilets  
61%  
49%  
54%  
83%  
Retail and Catering  
87%  
83%  
93%  
90%  
Information Provision  
80%  
74%  
75%  
70%  
Total Overall Average Score  
79%  
75%  
80%  
82% 
 
These suggest areas that Southwold needs to improve on to maintain its appeal and reputation as a 
shopping and visitor destination. 
 
 
5. Analysis 
 
 
The following analysis, expanded from previous work for the Southwold Town Strategy, identifies the 
town’s strengths and weaknesses, the real and potential threats it faces and the opportunities that 
might mitigate them. 
 
Strengths   
Weaknesses  
High profile of the town and the Southwold ‘brand’. 
Diminishing and ageing resident population. 
The architecture and style of the town. 
Loss of young people at age 11 as no secondary 
Active community engaged through many 
school.  
organisations. 
Imbalanced economy too dependent on tourism.  
Local people take pride in town and have strong 
High property prices  
views.  
Lack of affordable homes 
Traditional values where people feel safe.  
Not enough social housing allocated to key workers. 
The High Street and its mix of numerous independent 
Lack of available workforce making recruitment 
traders and high street chains providing a strong  
difficult for local businesses. 
retail destination  
Lack of reliable transport links  
Popular independent pubs, cafes and restaurants. 
Lack of available space for local businesses wishing to 
Strong appeal as a traditional family destination. 
expand 
The continuing success and reputation of Adnams and  Management of parking and traffic flow.  
its investment to the town. 
Not enough high quality arts and other events (like 
                                                           
21 Town Mystery Shopper Audit – Waveney Market Towns 2016, Destination Research Ltd for WDC 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 23 
 

The Harbour and its businesses. 
Aldeburgh). 
Seafront and Blue Flag beach. 
Local eating places at capacity during the summer 
Southwold’s ‘authenticity’ –Adnams beer, beach huts,  months 
pier, local produce, great fish and chips. 
Limited hotel accommodation and no glamping 
The Common providing free access to open space in 
Limited number of people available to volunteer 
the heart of town. 
especially for one off events. 
Natural environment including the marshes and 
Size of parish. 
denes  
Public toilets – not enough and not state of art. 
Free parking in some areas 
Some new build is poor quality and threatens 
Very proactive, well-managed and supported local 
architectural merit of town. 
library 
Town landscape a bit shabby and suffers in peak 
100 social housing units in town and impetus to 
times. 
develop more 
Management of natural environment locally 
Some resistance or reluctance to change. 
 
Opportunities 
Threats  
Sizewell C and economic potential. 
Increase in business rates threat to local traders 
Offshore wind developments in Lowestoft.  
diminishing differentiation and local services. 
Our high profile enables us to punch above our 
High rents and threat to independent traders.  
weight and have influence within/on the District and 
Too many chains diminishing differentiation of town.  
in media. 
Sizewell C bottle neck – accessibility to Southwold 
Development of new business types , new ways of 
and potential environmental threat. 
working 
Any change in legislation that might adversely impact 
Potential for more digi-tech/knowledge based 
on the town’s asset base. 
businesses. 
Change in legislation that makes investment in 
Opportunity to grow the visitor economy by 
domestic and business property more attractive.  
extending the tourism season outside peak periods. 
Increase in number of holiday homes. 
Opportunity for visitor economy to tap into boom in 
High profile makes Southwold desirable but level of 
health and well-being and take advantage of 
congestion particularly during peak times makes it 
Southwold’s exceptional natural environment. 
inaccessible or appears to be inaccessible.  
Opportunity to attract visits from the burgeoning UK 
Re-organisation of health and care services could 
cruise market. 
adversely impact on quality of life (and death). 
Potential redevelopment of sites within the town, 
Future of library and other community services. 
including old Hospital, Station Road site, Kings Head 
WDC divestment of assets including threat to close all 
and former police and fire station. 
Southwold’s public toilets. 
Growth in business for Adnams and potential to bring 
Ongoing liability for maintenance of harbour and river 
its supply chain businesses to the town. 
banks with risk of inundation if they are breached by 
Proposed new wildlife visitor centre and perimeter 
tidal surge. 
parking on site opposite Millennium Hall. 
Diminishing school roll at Southwold primary school a 
Potential Town Council acquisition of High Street 
threat to its long term viability 
premises to rent to local businesses. 
 
Local Chamber of Trade galvanised by the business 
rates issue and seeking to revitalise the High Street 
Potential to maximise the local food and drink offer 
Scope to build on Southwold’s unique location and 
offer  
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 24 
 

Based on work by the Town Council for its recent Town Strategy, the following PESTLE analysis identifies 
external factors potentially impacting on the town and plans for the future:  
 
Political   
  Impact of the devolution agenda. 
  Localism Act – more responsibilities on STC without sufficient supporting funding. 
  ‘Austerity’ agenda - Police resources become more limited. No foot patrols; no regulation of 
parking by police from April 2017. But as the powers are being transferred to local authority this 
may not be such an issue. 
  Education – All schools to achieve academy status. Impact on Southwold Primary School?   
  Low educational attainment in Suffolk 
  Availability of reliable and accessible transport links that will enable people to live and work in 
Southwold. 
  Council Tax/Business Rates – potentially severe impact on local businesses of disproportionately 
high increases.  
 
Economic 
  Southwold’s seasonal employment base (too reliant on tourism), with resultant low wages and 
temporary contracts.  
  Tourism is vulnerable to fads and fashions. Demand might change although it is likely to 
strengthen post-Brexit. 
  Over supply of holiday homes. 
  Oil/energy crisis. 
  Low interest rates but for how long? 
 
Social 
  Number and age profile of those on the electoral roll. 
 
Technological 
  Growth in digital, creative and knowledge-based industries 
  Growing number of people home-working 
  Demand for super-fast broadband 
 
Legal  
  Legislative constraints and regulations imposed on councils.  
  Increased legal compliance for landlords. 
 
Environmental  
  Climate Change – impact of variable weather and flood surges etc especially on tourism, the 
natural environment and working harbour. 
 
 
 
6.  Key challenges and needs of the community 
 
Although it is a highly regarded tourist destination and an attractive place both to live and work, it is 
clear therefore that Southwold has a number of significant sustainability issues.  Some of these have 
been identified in earlier work by the Town Council while others have emerged through the course of 
preparing this CCT Economic Plan.   
 
Southwold’s thriving High Street is a vital part of the town’s appeal to visitors and a key driver for the 
main local industry, tourism.   However, its unique mix of independent businesses, already hit by 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 25 
 

dramatic increases in commercial rent caused by an influx of national chains over recent years, is now 
seriously under threat because of the potential devastating impact of disproportionate hikes in business 
rates22.  The average increase is 177% but some small local businesses are facing rates increase of up to 
400%, in many cases requiring them to increase turnover by several thousands of pounds a year – an 
unachievable goal for small businesses like greengrocers and bakers whose margins are so very small. 
 
The popularity of Southwold as a tourism destination is in many ways to be celebrated and has 
contributed greatly to the success of the town.  However it also brings with it a number of disbenefits, 
including an over-reliance on very seasonal trade, capacity and sustainability issues at peak periods, 
low-paid and seasonal employment, lack of year-round business for local traders, and the impact of 
second-homers and holiday home owners on property prices and the sustainability of local services.  
 
One potential avenue for diversifying the local economy is to attract more knowledge based businesses 
to the town.  As part of it plans to acquire and develop a range of new uses for the former Southwold 
community hospital site, the community group, Save Our Southwold has commissioned a study from 
Tech East23 investigating the feasibility of the site as a creative hub for digital businesses, from which 
the following is an extract: 
 
Attracting digital tech and creative digital companies is a high priority for the wider region 
because they offer high value, sustainable jobs. Most sectors are underpinned by digital tech. 
The Southwold offer should be about attracting digital tech SME businesses and SME businesses 
in non-traditional tech sectors such as Marketing, Education (EdTech)and Financial services 
(FinTech) that wish to grow their businesses using digital tech. A viable Tech Hub in Southwold 
fits into the wider strategy for the region. 
 
Given Southwold’s overall attractiveness as a place to live, work and vacation the analysis in this 
report would suggest it is feasible to attract between 5 – 10 businesses to tenant the available 
space assuming the right facilities at the right price. A per use or membership offer to take 
advantage of the high-quality facilities will also be attractive to wealthy visitors that are 
attracted to Southwold. Bookable high quality meeting rooms and a studio would be a welcome 
additional option for the town and the District’s businesses and community. 
 
The key to success for Southwold is to market its strengths to a well-defined target set of 
potential members. How to attract the numbers required should not be under estimated. There 
are facilities offering similar services relatively close by. It will require a strong marketing plan to 
position the offer.  But for a number of business owners particularly in London the chance to 
‘live their dream ‘of working and living in a place like Southwold is attractive.  
 
As described above, holiday-lets now account for over 20% of all residential properties24 while the 
proportion of residents’ homes has fallen to less than 50%.  As well as the fall in off-season trade for 
local businesses, this results in falling numbers at the local primary school and the increasing difficulty of 
finding volunteers for community activities. If the proportion of residents falls much further, the 
community may become unsustainable.   
 
                                                           
22 A revaluation of property in Britain will result in changes to the cost of business rates for small businesses across 
the country. Some will see their rates bill fall, others will see it increase and in some cases dramatically.  Because 
of the exceptional rise in property and commercial rental values in the town, and has been widely reported in the 
national press, Southwold is the worst affected of any town in the country.  At the time of writing, businesses in 
the High Street are facing average rates rises of 177% with some as high as 400%.   
23 Southwold TechHub Feasibility Report, Ian Buxton, Tech East, December 2016 
24 Source: Southwold and Reydon Society Housing Report, 2012 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 26 
 

The decline in the resident population and the growing proportion of those over 65 (over half the 
population), simultaneously challenge the provision of services and increase demand.  While the 
services of Southwold surgery have recently been transferred to the new Sole Bay Health Centre in 
Reydon, Southwold Hospital has been closed and there is a fear over the future of the local library 
whose lease is due to expire soon. 
 
It is part a measure of Southwold’s success that it suffers traffic congestion and parking problems.  
Shoppers from surrounding areas as well as visitors have increasing problems finding somewhere to 
park, as do many residents who often do not have off-road parking space.  The problem is especially 
acute in the summer season.  . 
 
In common with other coastal towns, Southwold faces the long-term issues of pollution, coastal erosion 
and the management of the consequences of climate change.  In some cases the action required to 
mitigate the risks to Southwold goes beyond the reach of local authorities.  Some kinds of pollution 
pose immediate threats to the town’s vital tourism industry as well as to residents.  Other problems, 
such as coastal erosion, have a long history in the town, impacting on the local environment, the 
estuary, and the future viability of the Harbour.  The Blyth Estuary Group is a taking a lead role in 
addressing these concerns. 
 
 In summary the key issues for Southwold are: 
 
  a declining and ageing population, fewer younger people and families   
  very high property values and lack of affordable housing 
  high commercial rents and an imminent dramatic increase in business rates 
  majority of jobs and local economy dependent on tourism 
  majority of housing stock as second homes and holiday lets 
  risk to community facilities such as library and school 
  risks posed by flooding and coastal erosion to the local environment, estuary and the Harbour 
 
At the same time, the town has many strengths, in particular its commitment to, and a strong sense of, 
community; as well as the assets that make it so popular both as a visitor destination and as a place to 
live and work.  
 
When asked in 2013, what were the key issues that need to be addressed by the proposed 
Neighbourhood Plan25, local residents prioritised these as follows: 
 
1.  Protect community assets 
2.  Encourage local employment 
3.  Support local business 
4.  Preserve and promote the town’s unique character 
5.  Reduce the risk of flooding 
6.  Protect the environment 
7.  List buildings for historical or architectural reasons 
8.  Protect neighbours’ amenities (light, privacy, etc) 
                                                           
25 Source: Southwold Town Plan, 2013 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 27 
 

9.  Restrict infill (I.e. building in the ground of existing houses) 
10. A local design policy 
11. A policy on energy conservation 
 
From previous work and the consultation undertaken for this Plan, it is clear there are number of major 
issues are of particular concern to local residents.  In particular the current business rates issue, the 
implementation of the Neighbourhood Plan, and the management of the local environment and the 
threat posed to it of coastal erosion and tidal surge. 
 
These must not be forgotten. However, for this Economic Plan, we have focused on the issues that have 
a direct bearing on the Town’s future economic success and which the Plan can directly address.  We 
have accordingly distilled the strategic priorities for the CCT Economic Plan as follows: 
 
Strategic priorities for the CCT Economic Plan 
1.  Maintain and promote the vitality of the High Street  
2.  Make our visitor economy more sustainable 
3.  Balance the community 
4.  Secure and enhance our community and cultural assets 
5.  Address access, parking and transport issues 
6.  Preserve our natural environment 
7.  Diversify the local economy 
8.  Preserve and promote our local heritage 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 28 
 

Delivering the Economic Plan 
 
7. Ambition   
 
The Economic Plan needs to deliver the following vision for Southwold CCT: 
 
For Southwold to be the successful, vibrant, attractive town on the East Anglian coast, where 
people want to live, work and visit.  
  
To bring together various business, commercial and community interests to inspire and guide 
a coordinated approach to creating greater future economic prosperity for the town. 

 
As stated above the strategic priorities for this Economic Plan are to: 
 
1.  Maintain and promote the vitality of the High Street  
2.  Make our visitor economy more sustainable 
3.  Balance the community 
4.  Secure and enhance our community and cultural assets 
5.  Address access, parking and transport issues 
6.  Preserve our natural environment 
7.  Diversify the local economy 
8.  Preserve and promote our local heritage 
 
The Plan sets out a suite of initiatives to achieve the vison and which are designed collectively to 
address the needs of the community and key issues identified for Southwold.  In many cases 
complementing other parallel schemes, they take into account the particular opportunities and threats 
the town faces and focus on those things that people see as important or which indirectly support the 
key strategic priorities.   
 
 
8. CCT Action Plan and resources required 

 
 
Listed below is a programme of 14 actionable initiatives listed under the eight strategic priorities.  These 
are not stand-alone projects but a suite of complementary initiatives which collectively can go a long 
way towards addressing many of the key challenges that Southwold faces. 
 
Under each initiative are identified the relevant lead body and partners, indicative timescale, potential 
funding source(s) and estimated funding requirement.   
 
The Action Plan is summarised in tabular format at Appendix 1. 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 29 
 



















Lead body/partners: 
Southwold Town Council, Reydon Parish Council, Adnams 
 
Timescale: 
Under 6 months and ongoing 
 
Potential funding source(s): 
Southwold Town Council, Reydon Parish Council, Adnams, Suffolk County Council sustainable transport 
budgets, community funding (Lottery, smaller charitable grant givers) 
 
Estimated funding requirement: 
Cost of replacement bus - £30,000 
Cost of driver for 3 years - £10,000 p.a. 
 
Strategic fit: 
Priorities 2 and 5 
 
Barriers to delivery:  
Assuming funding from STC, RPC and Adnams, no significant barriers identified. 
 
 
PRIORITY 6 - PRESERVE OUR NATURAL ENVIRONMENT 
 
Note:  This Plan recognises the issues of coastal erosion and the potential impact of tidal surges and the 
CCT will seek to ensure that coastal protection measures are delivered in harmony with CCT vision and 
objectives.  
 
6a. Natural spaces Management Plan including a new Wildlife Garden and Visitor Centre 
 
Description: 
The creation of a Management Plan for the Marshes and Common and other open spaces to improve 
maintenance and management of those open spaces and natural areas.   
 
This will provide an integrated environmental and visitor strategy for those natural spaces including 
Reydon Marsh and the land along the estuary up to the Hen Reedbeds. This will require work with the 
landowner and other stakeholders. Harbouring exceptional wildlife and habitats, these spaces will 
appeal both to dedicated ornithologists and enthusiasts as well as to the casual visitor. Virtual 
interpretation points will describe the local environment and its wildlife.  
 
The Management Plan will also involve the creation of a self-guided trail leaflet, a network of virtual 
interpretation points accessible by smartphone and a series of natural public art works.   
The trail leaflet (also downloadable from the Southwold website – see above) will promote walks from 
the visitor centre to new wildlife lakes by the Boating Lake (see below) and to the Harbour as well as 
explaining the special qualities of the natural environment.   
 
The virtual interpretation points will describe the local environment and its wildlife.  
The natural public art works or willow sculptures will be commissioned from local artists and will be 
placed at strategic points in the Wildlife Garden and on the trails encouraging people to explore and 
discover them. 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 39 
 











 
 More local people and visitors appreciate and value the town’s heritage 
 
 Information provided to visitors to enhance the enjoyment of their stay and encourage 
repeat visits 
 
 A new way of experiencing and enjoying the place which will increase visits outside the 
peak tourism season 
 
 Local businesses benefited as more people encouraged to explore the town and go 
beyond the High Street and beach. 
 
 
Lead body/partners: 
Southwold and Reydon Society, Southwold Town Council, Southwold & Reydon Chamber of Trade, 
Reydon Town Council, Waveney District Council,  Southwold Film Society, Southwold Museums, 
Southwold Arts Trust 
 
Timescale: 
6 to 18 months 
 
Potential funding source(s): 
HLF, LEADER,  STC, Chamber of Trade, potential LEADER linked into other projects, Arts Council 
 
Estimated funding requirement: 
Heritage trail leaflet/town map – research, design and print £5,000 
Virtual reality Interpretation points – costs to be identified 
 
Strategic fit: 
Priorities 2 and 8 
 
Barriers to delivery:  
No significant barriers identified 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 45 
 



2a. A Destination 
• Creation of an essential 
• The visitor economy managed 
Management Plan for 
framework for all the work and 
more effectively, and its negative 
Southwold 
collaborative effort that is needed 
impacts mitigated, by developing 
 
to promote Southwold, extend its 
the Southwold visitor proposition 
tourism season and enhance its 
outside the main tourist season 
visitor experience 
 
• Bringing together with a common 
set of goals all local businesses and 
other relevant organisations 
involved in the visitor economy 
• Identification of relevant trends 
and opportunities to ensure 
Southwold’s continuing success as a 
destination. 
• Identification of  what is needed 
to improve Southwold’s visitor offer 
and consolidate the brand 
5b.  Expanding the 
• Procurement of new liveried 
• More visitors using the bus and 
Southwold Reydon 
shuttle bus  
reducing traffic impact.  
Community Shuttle 
• The continuing operation of an 
• More visitors encouraged to 
Bus service 
essential service for local residents 
discover other parts of the town 
 
secured and improved 
and its local businesses including 
• Shuttle bus service extended and 
the harbour. 
improved  
 
 
6a. (part) Natural 
• The creation of a Management 
 
spaces Management 
Plan for the Marshes and Common 
Plan  
and other open spaces.  
 
 
 
7a. Feasibility study 
• Production of sector analysis and 
• Regeneration, and best use for 
for redevelopment of 
a feasibility study/options appraisal 
development of the town’s 
available premises in 
 
economy, of disused sites within 
the town 
the town. 
• Dedicated facilities provided for 
new businesses which will help 
diversify the local economy. 
• New jobs created. 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 47 
 







points at all car parks 
• Traffic congestion reduced with 
new signage helping visitors find 
suitable car-parking more easily 
7b. Support for a 
• Creation of a hub for small 
 
knowledge-based 
business in the digital/creative tech 
business hub  
sector which will help diversify the 
local economy and help rebalance 
the community 
• Provision of a Farm-to-Fork Café 
showcasing local produce and 
supporting local supply chains 
• Learning opportunities created by 
the Farm-to-Fork Café for the local 
community in nutrition and 
associated health benefits, linked  
• Creation of up to 60 jobs 
• Provision of a new nursery 
• Provision of accommodation for 
an expanded library  
• A building of important historic 
value to the town regenerated and 
restored  
 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 51 
 

Communications 
 
10. Consultation 
 
 
 
In the preparation of this plan a series of 1-2-1 meetings were held with key stakeholders, a public 
consultation event for the local community was held at the Buckenham Art Gallery in the High Street on 
Saturday 18th February, a briefing and consultation for local businesses at the Southwold Chamber of 
Trade AGM on Monday 20th February, and an online survey was made available to local residents and 
businesses. 
 
Key stakeholders interviewed: 
Cabinet Member for Tourism 
 
& Economic Development  
Waveney District Council 
(Chairman of CCT) 
(also Cllr rep Southwold on 
SCC and Town Councillor) 
 
Economic Development 
Waveney District Council 
(Treasurer of CCT) 
Manager 
Economic Development 
Waveney District Council 
 
Officer 
 
Economic Development 
Waveney District Council 
(secretary of CCT) 
Programme Officer 
Southwold Town Council 
 
Town Clerk 
Southwold Town Council 
 
Town Mayor 
 
Southwold & Reydon Society 
Chairman 
 
Owner (and Chamber of 
Two Magpies Bakery 
 
Trade) 
Durrants 
 
MD (and Chamber of Trade) 
Adnams 
 
Chief Exective 
Save Our Southwold 
 
Project lead (and Southwold 
(Hospital project) 
 
Town Councillor) 
Suffolk Secrets 
 
CEO 
Spring 
 
CEO 
My Southwold 
 
Fancy Pants 
 
Feedback from the community and business consultation recently undertaken for the Southwold 
Neighbourhood Plan has also been taken into account. 
 
A summary of the feedback from the CCT Consultation and online survey is given at Appendix 3. 
 
 
11. Collaboration 
 
 
 
The success of delivering this plan rests in securing the endorsement and active engagement of relevant 
third parties, many of whom will in any case be directly responsible for some of the initiatives identified. 
 
A number of these key organisations (including the accountable body, Waveney District Council) will 
also be directly involved in the delivery of the Economic Plan through their place on the Steering Group.   
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 52 
 

Suitable reporting arrangements will be put in place to communicate with DCLG and the Coastal 
Communities Alliance.  
 
 
12. Communication with community 
 
 
Consultations undertaken to date are just the starting point for communicating the progress of the CCT.   
We have identified a number of communication channels and tools to accompany our short, medium 
and longer term approaches to engagement, communication and participation and these include: 
 
  Making the Economic Plan available through local websites, including those members of the 
steering group 
  Regular project and activity updates within local parish and community newsletters as well as 
through the Town Council and Waveney District Council communication channels 
  A press release for local print and broadcast media when key milestones or project activity is 
achieved 
  Updates via social media through members of the steering group 
  Minutes of the steering group meetings will be made available upon request 
  Dedicated area on either the Town Council website or new town website (as per action 6b) 
 
A launch event is being planned for June which is designed to be a celebration of the natural 
environment surrounding Southwold and Reydon as well as recognise the key role that the CCT plays 
within the future sustainable development of the town.  However, the CCT steering group see the Plan 
as very much a living document, to be reviewed and added to over time as part of a continuous 
improvement programme  
 
 
13. Communications Contact 
 
As per section 1.0 , the CCT lead officer Marie Webster-Fitch is available to be contacted for any 
updates.  
 
 
 
Economic Development Manager 
 
Waveney District Council 
Riverside, 4 Canning Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0EQ  
Tel:
 
Email: 
@eastsuffolk.gov.uk   
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 53 
 

CCT Logistics 
 
14. Management and costs   
 
The work of the CCT and delivery of identified projects will be overseen by the Southwold CCT steering 
group which includes representatives from Waveney DC and Southwold Town Council as well as various 
other key stakeholders in the town. 
 
When necessary, smaller working groups will be formed for specific initiatives.  For example the 
Chamber of Trade will take the lead with support from the other partners when the focus is around 
retail marketing.  
 
The secretariat function currently sits with WDC but the aim is that this will go over to the Town Council 
once the group is more established and starts to coordinate and directly oversee/deliver 
projects.   Initially the WDC ED Team will take a key support role in delivery of the Economic Plan but 
that function will reduce over time as the projects become more self-sustaining. 
 
It is envisaged that the Steering Group will initially meet every other month.  Meetings will be held at 
the Town Hall with overhead costs met by the Town Council where feasible. 
 
Apart from the costs of hosting meetings, there are no significant running costs for the CCT beyond the 
individual project costs as identified as most stakeholder support for the team will be provided ‘in kind’.  
 
 
15. Support structure 
 
 
The delivery of the projects set out in this plan depends on the active cooperation and engagement of 
various third party organisations as identified in the Action Plan.  Some of these bodies are represented 
on the Steering Group, others will be co-opted for appropriate project working groups as need arises. 
 
The proposed Southwold Development Manager will be a vital resource in the delivery of a number of 
projects and helping to coordinate others. 
 
 
16. Sustainability 
 
 
The CCT Steering Group may become a permanent Project Board, with suitable representatives from 
the private sector and relevant third party organisations recruited on an ongoing basis to oversee and 
help deliver projects that benefit the town’s economy in the longer term.  
 
 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 54 
 

Appendices 
 
Appendix 1 – Summary Action Plan 
 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 55 
 





1b. 
Build on the previous work done by the 
Chamber 
• Development of a web 
Under 6 
Website 
Chamber 

Promoting 
Chamber of Trade to promote independent 
of Trade, 
platform and mobile app to 
months 
£2,000. 
of Trade, 
and 
Southwold’s 
businesses in the town, including the My 
Waveney 
promote the town to residents, 
mobile app 
Local 
2  
businesses 
Southwold campaign, and provide a robust 
District 
shoppers and visitors 
£10,000 
business 
vehicle to encourage partnership working 
Council, 
• Revitalisation of a strong 
Design and 
partners 
amongst the business community.   
STC 
brand for a known and easily 
print of new 
The project will include a complete review of 
recognised consumer campaign  
My Southwold 
the existing  Southwold websites and look to 
• More repeat visits to the 
guide £4,000 
provide one consumer-facing website and 
town by shoppers and visitors 
mobile app promoting Southwold to residents, 
• Support for independent 
visitors and shoppers bringing together all town 
businesses increased and the 
information on a user friendly platform.   
message of ‘buy local’ 
This could include a relaunch and redesign of 
reinforced 
the My Southwold leaflet and related voucher 
• Trade increased to local 
scheme providing more information about 
businesses with increased 
services and facilities for visitors and residents 
benefit to the local economy 
on the merits of buy local. 
• Refreshment and extension of 
the My Southwold guide as an 
inclusive and effective guide to 
the town with reference to 
other CCT initiatives (e.g. the 
heritage and outdoor trails) 
• A united and proactive 
approach to galvanising the 
local business community 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 58 
 



2b. 
Put in place a marketing plan for extending the 
STC, 
• The visitor economy managed 
6 to 18 
Marketing 
STC, 
1, 2 
Promoting 
season including the promotion of events and 
Chamber 
more effectively, and its negative 
months 
budget for 
Chamber 
and 
Southwold 
initiatives to attract visitors outside the peak 
of Trade, 
impacts mitigated, by developing 
delivery of 
of 
4  
outside the 
tourist season, in order to help create a more 
WDC, 
the Southwold visitor proposition 
plan 
Trade/loc
peak tourist 
sustainable visitor destination and a more 
Suffolk 
outside the main tourist season 
(excluding 
al 
season 
positive visitor experience. 
Coast 
• More visits and more support for 
partner 
tourism 
The Marketing Plan will involve promoting off-
DMO, Visit 
local businesses out of season 
contribution
businesse
season breaks and day visits built around 
Suffolk 
through the creation of a year-
s) - £50,000 

events and itineraries related to physical and 
round tourism market  
p.a. for 3 
mental well-being as well as those with a retail 
• Creation of a new website with 
years 
or food and drink focus (see Projects 5b and 6a 
current and salient information 
Cost of 
above).   
that helps to catalyse both planned 
website 
The potential for recreation and well-being of 
and impulse day visits 
covered 
the natural aspects of the Harbour area as well 
• UK cruise passengers attracted to 
above in 1b  
as the Common and Marshes will form part of 
experience the harbour and the 
Installation 
the visitor proposition. 
town, and patronise local 
of webcams 
The project will include the creation of a new 
businesses 
– say 3 
website for Southwold with live webcams and 
• More visitors enjoying a more 
(seafront, 
real-time weather feeds, events information, 
rounded experience of Southwold 
Harbour, 
heritage and wildlife trails, etc. The Harbour, 
through effective promotion of less 
High 
together with its fishing industry, will be 
well-known aspects of the 
Street/Light
promoted as a key part of the visitor offer for 
Southwold visitor offer, e.g. local 
house) - 
Southwold and as a port of call for visiting 
food and drink, natural 
£1,000 
cruise ships.  
environment, etc. 
(Note - 
The Marketing Plan will also involve closer work 
• More people drawn to sample 
existing 
with the Suffolk Coast Destination 
what Southold can offer in well-
Suffolk 
Management Organisation and will be 
being and health and fitness. 
Secrets 
delivered by the new Town Centre Coordinator. 
webcam on 
top of water 
tower 
available for 
use.  There 
is also a 
webcam at 
the Pier.) 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 60 
 





 4b.  Grow 
Building on the town’s existing assets and 
Southwold 
• Celebration and leverage of 
6 to 18 
Seed 
Sponsors
1,2 
Southwold’s 
successful events like the Southwold Arts 
Arts 
Southwold’s particular strengths 
months 
funding of 
hip, BIG 
and 
events  
Festival, Way With Words, Adnams 10k run and 
Festival, 
and assets, e.g. local produce and 
£30,000 
Lottery 

programme 
Aviva Women’s Cycle Tour, this project will 
Southwold 
seafood, local artists and creativity 
Events 
develop new events outside the main tourist 
Arts 
• Provision of learning and 
Program
season that will embrace food and drink, 
Centre, 
enrichening experiences for local 
me if re-
culture, heritage and sport.  The aim of the 
Adnams 
people and visitors 
launched 
project is to attract more visitors and shoppers 
(?), WDC, 
• Enhancement in the mental 
for 17/18. 
to the town around the year, particularly 
Southwold 
health and well-being of the local 
Awards 
outside peak tourist periods.   
& District 
community 
for All. 
It will involve working with relevant 
Chamber 
• Increase in visitors and business 
Arts 
organisations to enhance community assets 
of Trade, 
for the town outside the main 
Council 
and experiences such as the Southwold Arts 
Suffolk 
tourist season, boosting visitor 
grants 
Festival, Southwold Arts Centre at St Edmunds 
Coast 
spend and the local economy 
Hall, the sports pavilion on The Common and 
DMO, 
• Increase in Southwold’s profile 
the Stella Peskett Millennium Hall.  
Southwold 
and enhancement of its individual 
A specific proposal is the creation of a new 
Town 
character 
Southwold Seafood and Drink Festival in the 
Council,  
autumn which would not only attract visitors to 
local 
the town out of season but would involve and 
leisure 
support local businesses and local supply 
groups? 
chains.  As well as the town itself, it would also 
provide a focus for Southwold Harbour, its 
fishing industry and allied traders. 
Other ideas include revival of the Flying Egg 
Festival held successfully in the town until quite 
recently and perhaps the popular crabbing 
competition at the Harbour.  
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 63 
 



5b. 
The existing shuttle bus service operates daily 
Southwold 
• Procurement of new liveried 
Under 6 
Cost of 
Southwol
2 ,5 
Expanding 
between Reydon and Southwold and provides a  Town 
shuttle bus  
months 
replacement 
d Town 
the 
valuable service to both local people and to 
Council, 
• The continuing operation of an 
and 
bus - 
Council, 
Southwold 
visitors.   
Reydon 
essential service for local residents 
ongoing 
£30,000.  
Reydon 
and Reydon 
It is funded by the Town Council with 
Parish 
secured and improved 
Cost of 
Parish 
community 
sponsorship of £10,000 pa from Adnams, who 
Council, 
• Shuttle bus service extended and 
driver for 3 
Council, 
shuttle bus 
have branded the bus with their Ghost Ship 
Adnams 
improved  
years - 
Adnams, 
service 
livery.  Strengthening the partnership with 
• More visitors using the bus and 
£10,000 p.a. 
Suffolk 
Reydon Parish Council as well as securing new 
reducing traffic impact.  
County 
sponsorship will be essential to the aim of 
• More visitors encouraged to 
Council 
maintaining and extending the service. 
discover other parts of the town 
sustainab
However existing shuttle bus can’t meet 
and its local businesses including 
le 
current demand because the vehicle is too 
the harbour. 
transport 
small and the service is too irregular.  The 
budgets, 
current vehicle also needs replacing. 
communi
The service will be promoted through the 
ty 
enhanced Southwold website and will be 
funding 
featured on new editions of the My Southwold 
(Lottery, 
town map. Relevant publications and platforms 
smaller 
where the service can be promoted will be 
charitable 
explored including coach companies and local 
grant 
bus companies to ensure connectivity between 
givers) 
the services. 
Both Southwold Town Council and Reydon 
Parish Council are willing to invest in improving 
the service. 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 65 
 



6a. Natural 
The creation of a Management Plan for the 
The 
• The creation of a Management 
Under 6 
Managemen
HLF,  

spaces 
Marshes and Common and other open spaces 
Common 
Plan for the Marshes and Common 
months for  t Plan 
LEADER, 
and 
Managemen
to improve maintenance and management of 
Trust, 
.  
Managem
£20,000. 
Suffolk 

t Plan 
those open spaces and natural areas.  This will 
Southwold 
• Creation and ongoing 
ent Plan. 
Managemen
Wildlife 
including a 
provide an integrated environmental and 
Millenniu
maintenance of a Wildlife Garden 
18 months 
t Plan 
Trust, 
new Wildlife  visitor strategy for those natural spaces 

and Visitor Centre 
to 2 years 
outcomes 
Natural 
Garden and 
including Reydon Marsh and the land along the 
Foundatio
• Preservation of an important 
for wider 
£250,000 
England, 
Visitor 
estuary up to the Hen Reedbeds. This will 
n, Greener 
piece of wartime heritage. 
project 
including; 
Big 
Centre  
require work with the landowner and other 
Growth, 
• More local people and visitors 
Site 
Lottery 
stakeholders. Harbouring exceptional wildlife 
Southwold 
understand and appreciate the 
clearance 
Awards 
and habitats, these spaces will appeal both to 
Town 
natural environment and wildlife of 
and 
for All, 
dedicated ornithologists and enthusiasts as well  Council, 
the locality. 
preparation 
LEADER, 
as to the casual visitor. Virtual interpretation 
Reydon 
• Provision of interesting and 
£10,000 
WREN 
points will describe the local environment and 
Parish 
rewarding volunteering 
Infrastructur
Communi
its wildlife.  
Council, 
opportunities for local people 
e including 
ty Action 
 
Suffolk 
together with suitable training. 
carpark and 
Fund, 
The  Management Plan will also involve the 
Wildlife 
• A programme of courses and 
planting, 
STC, 
creation of a self-guided trail leaflet, a network 
Trust 
classes  providing learning 
Visitor 
Southwol
of virtual interpretation points accessible by 
opportunities for local community 
centre and 

smartphone and a series of natural public art 
• Health benefits for people 
green 
Milleniu
works.   
exploring self-guided trails through 
classroom 

 
the open spaces and natural 
approx 
Foundati
The trail leaflet  will promote walks from the 
environment around the town  
£150,000 
on, Big 
visitor centre to new wildlife lakes by the 
• Improved mental health and 
Volunteer 
Lottery 
Boating Lake  and to the Harbour as well as 
well-being  
training - 
Reaching 
explaining the special qualities of the natural 
• Links created between points of 
£1,000 
Communi
environment.   
interest such as the Harbour, the 
Directional 
ties 
 
denes and new wildlife havens by 
signage - 
The virtual interpretation points will describe 
the Boating Lakes. 
£3,000 
the local environment and its wildlife.  
• The work of local artists 
Outdoor trail 
The natural public art works or willow 
supported and showcased in aiding 
leaflet – 
sculptures will be commissioned from local 
interpretation and discovery 
research, 
artists and will be placed at strategic points in 
design and 
the Wildlife Garden and on the trails 
print £4,000 
encouraging people to explore and discover 
Virtual 
them. 
reality 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 67 
 

 
Interpretatio
The project will include supporting the 
n points – 
Southwold Millennium Foundation in creating a 
costs to be 
Wildlife Garden and Visitor Centre with car 
identified 
park, on the vacant site adjoining the 
Public 
allotments opposite Stella Peskett Millennium 
artworks – 
Hall on Mights Road Marsh.   
say 6 
The  Management Plan will create  wide-
installations 
ranging community assets that complements 
at £5,000 
other related proposals for enhancing and 
each - 
raising awareness of the town’s natural 
£30,000 
environment.  
Key components could include: 
• New, volunteer-run visitor centre/green 
classroom to interpret the marshes and their 
wildlife, and provide courses on market-
gardening etc throughout the year.   
• A sales outlet for market garden produce 
from the adjacent allotment  
• Planting of a Wildlife Garden and orchard 
with a wildlife path, seating, decking, shelter 
and information panels. 
• A World War 1 pillbox on the site will be 
preserved and interpreted  
• A Man-Shed created to provide a meeting 
place for males to socialise and share skills that 
will aid mental health and well-being.  
• Improved footpaths, Information Boards, Trail 
leaflets.  
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 68 
 

6b. New 
This project will be linked to the Management 
Boating 
• Water levels in the Boating Lakes 
1 to 2 
Approx 
LEADER 

havens for 
Plan in 6a to cover all open spaces and natural 
Lake, 
managed to ensure  future 
years 
£50,000 
program
and 
wildlife 
areas around the town.  One example is to 
Southwold 
sustainability  
me, 

support the sustainability and continuing 
Town 
• Enhancement of the natural 
WREN 
viability of the Boating Lake and surrounding 
Council, 
environment and creation of new 
Communi
natural environment as a key asset for the 
WDC 
havens for wildlife 
ty Action 
town’s visitor economy.   
• More local people and visitors 
Fund, 
Operators of the Boating Lake are seeking to 
understand and appreciate the 
Private 
create new lakes and wildlife havens beside the 
natural environment and wildlife of 
business 
existing Boating Lake.  There are number of 
the lakes and marshes 
and 
phases to this project. 
• Other?? 
communi
Phase 1 : In order for operations at the Boating 
ty 
Lake to continue, the most immediate and 
contributi
urgent action to be addressed is the need to 
ons. 
sustain consistent water levels within the lake 
by laying new underground pipes to bring sea 
water into the lake.  This will not only rectify 
falling water levels but also restore the salinity 
to the lakes and return them to their original 
brackish condition. 
Phase 2: Once this is achieved, new lakes can 
be created together with interpretation of their 
wildlife and habitats  
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 69 
 



7b. Support 
It is widely believed that Southwold has the 
Southwold 
• A building of important historic 
1 to 2 
Purchase 
Hastoe 
3, 4 
for a 
potential to attract micro-businesses in the 
and 
value to the town regenerated and 
years NB 
and 
Housing 
and 
knowledge-
creative digi-tech/knowledge sector. 
Waveney 
restored  
Decision 
developmen
Associati
7  
based 
At the time of writing, the nascent Southwold 
Valley 
• Creation of a hub for small 
on SWRS 
t approx 
on 
business 
and Waveney Regeneration Society (SWRS) 
Regenerati
business in the digital/creative tech  bid and 
£1.5 million 
(develop
hub on the 
have well-developed plans to convert the 
on Society 
sector which will help diversify the 
proposals 
estimate 
ment 
Southwold 
former Southwold Hospital site site in to an 
(SWVRS), 
local economy and rebalance the 
for site 
revenues)
Hospital site 
energy–efficient exemplar building with 
Hastoe 
community 
expected 
, Princes 
community and business space on the ground 
Housing 
• Provision of a Farm-to-Fork Café 
by end of 
Regenera
floor.  Their plans include the creation of a 
Associatio
showcasing local produce and 
May 2017.   
tion 
Creative Digital Tech Hub, a Farm-to-Fork Café 

supporting local supply chains 
If 
Trust, 
and a nursery, generating up to 60 jobs. 
• Learning opportunities created by  unsuccessf
LEP’s 
Their plans are informed by a comprehensive 
the Farm-to-Fork Café for the local 
ul, review 
‘Growing 
feasibility study by Tech East  assessing the 
community in nutrition and 
of 
Places’ 
demand from and potential for knowledge-
associated health benefits, linked  
alternative
grant 
based businesses relocating to the site.  The 
• Creation of up to 60 jobs 
s to follow 
money, 
study suggests that the proposed Creative 
• Provision of a new nursery 
thereafter. 
HLF, Big 
Digital Tech Hub could successfully tap into the 
• Provision of accommodation for 
Lottery 
fastest growing sector in East Anglia, bringing 
an expanded library. 
Reaching 
new businesses and younger people into the 
Communi
town, and increasing year round footfall for 
ties 
High Street.  
Assuming the SWRS is successful in its bid 
(decision expected end of May 2017), the CCT 
will provide support for the realisation of these 
plans which will bring significant benefits to the 
town. 
If they are not successful, it is hoped that 
elements of their plans can be transferred to 
other potential sites within the town.  
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 71 
 



Appendix 2 – Southwold Coastal Community Team Terms of Reference 
 
OVERVIEW 
The Southwold Coastal Community Team (CCT) is a local partnership consisting of a range of 
business and community representatives who have an understanding of the issues facing the town 
and can work towards developing an effective plan to improve the economy of the town.  
 
The entire administrative area of Southwold is included within the CCT with an emphasis on the core 
commercial and tourism areas, plus taking into consideration the neighbouring parish of Reydon.  
 
VISION 
For Southwold to be the successful, vibrant and attractive town on the East Coast, where people 
want to live, work and visit.   
 
To bring together various business, commercial and community interests to inspire and guide a 
coordinated approach to creating greater future economic prosperity for the town. 
 
MAIN AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 
Coastal Community Teams across the country have been established to:  
  encourage greater local partnership working in coastal areas; 
  support the development of local solutions to economic issues facing coastal communities; 
  encourage the sustainable use of heritage/cultural assets to provide both a focus for 
community activities and enhanced economic opportunities; and 
  create links to support the growth and performance of the retail sector. 
 
In addition, the Southwold CCT will: 
  work with other CCTs across England and with the Government to share knowledge on how 
tackle issues facing coastal communities; 
  provide strategic direction and coordination of resources to enable the town to grow and 
thrive in a sustainable manner; 
  undertake research and consult with the local residents, businesses and visitors to 
understand the barriers and issues that face the local economy; 
  produce an economic plan focusing on the core commercial and tourism areas which 
outlines the vision and key priorities to support the development of initiatives and funding 
submissions; 
  create and monitor an action plan with short, medium and long term actions/projects, and 
set up or support delivery/project groups where appropriate; and 
  promote and communicate the work of the CCT in partnership with the local press and 
through social media. 
 
MEMBERSHIP  
  Waveney District Council – including representatives from Economic Development, Funding 
and Community Development 
  Southwold Town Council 
  Reydon Parish Council 
  Southwold and Reydon Society 
  Southwold Chamber of Trade 
  Other key business and community representatives 
 

Membership will be restricted to a maximum of 10 organisations at any one time. Members that fail 
to attend three or more meetings without sending their apologies will cease to be members.  New 
members can be adopted by consensus vote. There is no time limit on membership. 
 
The CCT will always have representatives from Waveney District Council, as the accountable body. 
 
STEERING GROUP STRUCTURE & MANAGEMENT  
The Steering Group will consist of: 
  Chair - 
 Waveney District Council 
  Vice Chair – 
, Reydon Parish Council 
  Secretary – 
, Waveney District Council  
  Treasurer – 
, Waveney District Council  
  Members with no position 
 
Additional members may be invited to join the Coastal Community Team, subject to the approval of 
core members. These may be permanent or co-opted for a specific purpose or project, as and when 
appropriate.   
 
The Steering Group will meet at least six times a year with additional meetings as and when 
required. 
 
The nominated Secretary will be responsible for the agenda and minutes of each meeting and 
ensure an accurate record of activity is kept. 
 
DECISION MAKING AND ACCOUNTABILITY  
At least half of the CCT steering group must be present for any decisions (including financial) to be 
made. 
 
All decisions will be agreed by a vote from those present (subject to quorum rules – see above). In 
the event of an equal vote the Chair has the casting vote.   
 
The Southwold CCT will be open and transparent in its decision making.  Information about the work 
of  team  will  be  posted  on  the  East  Suffolk  Council  website  as  well  as  via  the  Southwold  Town 
website (administered by the Town Council). 
 
Anyone attending a CCT meeting with a personal, business or financial interest in any matter being 
discussed or voted on must  declare  such  interest  at  the  beginning  of each meeting, or  as  soon as 
possible thereafter. 
 
FINANCIAL MATTERS 
Waveney  District  Council  will  act  as  the  CCT’s  accountable  body.    The  nominated  Treasurer  will 
ensure  an  auditable  record  of  all  financial  transactions  including  income,  funding  and  expenditure 
will be kept. 
 
DISSOLUTION 
The CCT may be dissolved by a resolution passed by a two-thirds of the members. 
 
 
Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 74 
 

Appendix 3 – Results from consultation 
 
 
 

Southwold Coastal Community Team Economic Plan 
 
page 75 
 















Develop a Southwold App which includes visitor 

  

 


 

2.96 
information, events, heritage and wildlife trails, etc 
Other suggestions: 
  
“Beach erosion – 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
management of beach” 
  
  
“Only get cruise ships to 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
visit out of peak periods” 
  
  
“Local produce ordering 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
service for staying visitors 
rather than Tesco 
deliveries” 

 
 
 

Southwold CCT Economic Plan DRAFT March 2017  
 
page 83