This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
CHAPTER 1 - BASIC ELECTRICITY 
Electron Theory 
1. 
The smallest portion of any piece of matter which still retains the properties of the original substance is 
called a molecule.  Molecules are made up of atoms which in turn are composed of a mixture of negatively 
and positively charged particles (see Fig 1).  Normally there is an equal amount of each charge in an atom; 
the negatively charged particles (electrons) being balanced by the positively charge particles (protons) in the 
nucleus.  The neutrons which form part of the nucleus have no charge. 
14-1 Fig 1 An Atom 
Electrons, negative
charge (-)
Protons, positive
charge (+) and
neutrons (no
charge) in nucleus
Conductors and Insulators 
2. 
In some materials, the outer orbital electrons are loosely attached to the atom’s nucleus and are free to 
wander  within  the  body  of  the  material.    If  a  voltage  is  applied  across  the  material,  these  free  electrons 
experience a force and will move under its influence.  A bodily movement of electrons is called an electric 
current and substances in which appreciable amounts will flow are called conductors.  Insulators will pass 
only a very small number of electrons, even at high voltages. 
3. 
The  property  of  a  substance  which  tends  to  oppose  the  flow  of  electric  current  is  called  the 
resistance  of  the  substance.    Good  conductors  have  low  resistance  while  poor  conductors 
(insulators) have high resistance. 
Electric Units 
4. 
The fundamental unit of electricity is the electron, but this is far too small to be of any practical use 
for  measurement.    Consequently  the  practical  unit  of  electricity  or  electric  charge,  the  coulomb,  is 
much  larger.    The  coulomb  is  equal  to  the  charge  on  6.28 × 1018  electrons.    When  a  charge  of  one 
coulomb  flows  in  one  second  through  a  conductor,  it  constitutes  a  current  of  one  ampere  (usually 
shortened to 'amp'). 
coulombs (Q)
ie, amperes (A) =
seconds (t)
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
5. 
Current will only flow in a conductor if the conducting material is connected between the terminals of a 
power source such as a battery.  The battery is said to provide an electromotive force or emf.  The practical 
unit of emf is the volt.  The electromotive force may be thought of as driving electric current in the same way 
as pressure will drive a current of water through a pipe.  Water flows from a greater height to a lower point 
and similarly electric charge is said to flow from a higher to a lower potential.  The amount of water flowing 
per second will depend upon the diameter of the pipe.  Likewise, the electric current will depend upon the 
resistance of the conducting wire, which in turn will depend on its diameter. 
6. 
The direction of conventional current flow is taken as being from positive to negative, which is the 
opposite direction to that in which the electrons travel. 
Ohm’s Law and Resistance 
7. 
Ohm’s  law  states  that  under  constant  physical  conditions  the  current  flowing  in  a  conductor  is 
directly  proportional  to  the  potential  difference  between  its  ends  and  inversely  proportional  to  its 
resistance.  If the potential difference is increased then the current will increase by the same factor; if 
resistance increases then the current decreases.  Ohm’s law is expressed by the following formula: 
Voltage (V)
Current (I) = Resistance (R)
8. 
The unit of resistance is the Ohm, and a conductor is said to have a resistance of one ohm if it will 
allow a current of one ampere to flow when a potential difference of one volt is applied across it.  The 
symbol  for  ohms  is  the  Greek  capital  letter  omega  (Ω).    For  larger  values  of  resistance,  the  units 
Kilohm and Megohm are used (Kilohm (K Ω) = 1,000 Ω; Megohm (M Ω) = 1,000,000 Ω) 
EMF and Potential Difference 
9. 
It is important to distinguish between electromotive force (emf) and potential difference (pd), because, 
although they are both measured in volts, they differ considerably.  For any given power source the off-load 
voltage across the output terminals (pd) is equal to the driving force (emf) of the source.  However, once an 
external load is connected across the terminals pd is no longer equal to emf.  This is because all sources of 
power have internal resistance and voltage is dropped across this resistance once current flows in the circuit.  
To help distinguish between the two terms, emf is represented by the letter 'E' and pd by the letter 'V'.  The 
following example is intended to illustrate the difference. 
14-1 Fig 2 Circuit to show EMF and PD 
I
Source
E
(3V)
V
r
I
(1Ω)
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
Example 1.  In Fig 2, the emf of the battery (E) is 3V and an internal resistance (r) of 1Ω is assumed.  When 
the  switch  is  closed,  current  (I)  will  flow  through  the  external  load  (R)  and  the  internal  resistance  of  the 
battery, 
E
3
ie I =
=
= 1A
R + r
2 +1
and the voltage at the battery terminal 
  (V) = IR = 1×2 = 2V. 
Thus, it can be seen that although the battery emf is 3V, there is only a pd of 2V across the terminals. 
Resistivity 
10.  The longer a piece of wire is then the higher its resistance will be.  Similarly, the thicker the wire is 
the lower its resistance will be.  However, resistance is also determined by the nature of the material 
being  used.    This  is  referred  to  as  the  resistivity  of  the  material.    Resistivity  is  expressed  in  ohms 
metres  and  is  defined  as  being  the  resistance  per  metre  of  material  with  cross-sectional  area  of one 
square metre; it is represented by the Greek letter rho (ρ).  Therefore: 
Resistivity ( ρ)× Length ( l)
Resistance (R) =
Cross - sectional area ( a)
Temperature Coefficient of Resistance 
11.  In  the  statement  of  Ohm’s  law  the  words  "under  constant  physical  conditions"  are  used;  this  is 
because  the  resistance  of  most  materials  varies  with  temperature.    For  metallic  conductors,  resistance 
increases nearly uniformly with temperature, and each material is given a temperature coefficient.  This 
coefficient  is  defined  as  the  fractional  increase  in  resistance  per  degree  increase  in  temperature 
above 0 °C.    Temperature  coefficient  of  resistance  is  represented  by  the  Greek  letter  alpha  (α).    For 
practical purposes the following formula can be applied: 
R = R
+
t
0 (1
αt)
Where     Rt
=  resistance at t ºC 
R0
=  resistance at 0 ºC 
α =  temperature coefficient of resistance 
t
=  operating temperature 
12.  The  temperature  coefficients  of  alloys  are  generally  much  smaller  than  those  of  pure  metals,  and 
special  alloys  are  used  in  making  standard  resistors  which  vary  only  slightly  with  changes in temperature.  
The resistance of carbon and glass decreases with increases in temperature so these materials are given a 
negative temperature coefficient. 
Resistors in Series 
13.  When  resistors  are  connected  in  series,  their  resultant  resistance  is  equal  to  the  sum  of  their 
separate values.  In Fig 3, three resistors R1, R2, and R3 are connected in series. 
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
14-1 Fig 3 Resistors in Series 
R
R
R
1
2
3
V
V
V
1
2
3
I
V
The  voltages  across  the  resistors  are  V1,  V2,  and  V3  respectively.    Since  the  same  current  (I)  flows 
through each resistor, then by applying Ohm’s law: 
V1 = IR1        V2 = IR2        V3 = IR3
The total voltage across the three resistors is given by, 
VT = V1 + V2 + V3    or    IR1  + IR2 + IR3 
= I (R1 + R2 + R3) 
Therefore, the three resistors in series are equivalent to a single resistor RT of value, 
RT = R1 + R2 + R3
Example 2.  Three resistors of values 100 Ω, 220 Ω and 470 Ω, are connected in series.  Calculate the 
total resistance, and find the current flow if 50V is applied across the combination. 
RT = R1  + R2 + R3
     = 100 Ω + 220 Ω + 470 Ω 
     = 790 Ω 
Total resistance is 790 Ω 
V
   I =  RT
50V
     = 
= 0.063 A or 63 mA
790Ω
A current of 63 mA flows through the circuit. 
Resistors in Parallel 
14.  When resistors are connected in parallel, their total resistance is given by the equation: 
1
1
1
1
=
+
+
R T
R1
R 2
R 3
15.  In Fig 4 the three resistors are connected in parallel.  The same voltage appears across each resistor 
but the currents flowing through the resistors are not the same. 
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
14-1 Fig 4 Resistors in Parallel 
R1
I1
R2
I2
R3
I3
I
V
Referring to Fig 4, the currents flowing through the resistors are I1, I2 and I3, respectively.  Once again, by 
applying Ohm’s law: 
V
V
V
=
=
=
1
I
I2
I3
R1
R 2
R3
The total current flowing in the circuit is given by, 
I = I + I +
= V
I
+ V + V
1
2
3
R1
R 2
R 3
 1
1
1 
= V
+
+

 R1
R 2
R 3 
V
But,  I =
 where R is the equivalent of the three resistors.  Dividing throughout by V gives: 
R
1
1
1
1
=
+
+
R
R1
R 2
R 3
Example 3.  Three resistors, of values 100 Ω, 200 Ω, and 400 Ω, are connected in paral el.  Calculate the 
total resistance and find the current flow if 200V is applied across the combination. 
1
1
1
1
=
+
+
R
R
R
R
T
1
2
3
1
1
1
=
+
+
100Ω
200Ω
400Ω
4 + 2 + 1
7
=
=
400 Ω
400 Ω
400Ω
R
=
= 57.14 Ω
T
7
The total resistance is 57.14 Ω 
V
200V
I =
=
= 3.5 A
R
57.14Ω
T
The total current flowing in the circuit is 3.5 A. 
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
Kirchhoff’s Laws 
16.  In the preceding paragraphs on resistors in series and paral el, two important laws due to Kirchhoff have 
been assumed.  These are: 
a. 
The First Law (Current Law).  This law states that at any junction in an electric circuit, the total current 
flowing towards that junction is equal to the total current away from the junction.  For the circuit shown in 
Fig 5: 
I + I = I + I + I
1
2
3
4
5
or
I + I − I − I − I = 0
1
2
3
4
5
14-1 Fig 5 Kirchhoff’s First Law 
I
I
1
3
I
I
2
5
b. 
The Second Law (Voltage Law).  The second law states that in any closed loop in a network, the 
algebraic sum of the voltage drops (ie products of current and resistance) taken around the loop is 
equal to the resultant emf in that loop.  For the circuit shown in Fig 6: 
E −
=
+
+
1
E2
IR1 IR2 IR3
14-1 Fig 6 Kirchhoff's Second Law 
E1
R1
I
+
R3
R
E2
2
+
Rheostats and Potentiometers 
17.  A rheostat is a variable resistor which is placed in series with a circuit, as shown in Fig 7, in order 
to control the current. 
14-1 Fig 7 A Rheostat 
I
Rheostat
Increase
Decrease
Current
Current
+
Main
Circuit
18.  A  potentiometer  is  a  tapped resistor which is connected across a pd source and used to control 
the voltage applied to the main circuit (see Fig 8). 
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
14-1 Fig 8 A Potentiometer 
I
+
A
B
+
250 Volts
Potentiometer
  Supply
pd Variable from
0 to 250 Volts
C
19.  Since  the  potentiometer  is  connected  directly  across  the  supply,  its  resistance  must  be  large 
enough to prevent a heavy current being taken from the supply.  If the load on the potentiometer takes 
an appreciable amount of current then the ratio between the two pds (A-B and B-C) will not be quite the 
same as the ratio of the two resistances of the potentiometer. 
Energy and Power 
20.  When an electric current flows in a conductor, energy is expended, ie work is done.  The amount 
of energy expended is given by the product of the quantity of the charge moved and the difference in 
potential through which it moves.  The unit of energy is the joule, therefore: 
W (joules)
=  Q (coulombs) × V (volts) 
=  V (volts) × I (current) × t (time) 
Since Q
=  current × time 
Power (P) is measured in watts and is the rate of expenditure of energy, or work done per second. 
×
×
P (watts)
V (volts)
I (current)
t (time)
=
t (time)
V2
VI or I2
=
R or R
21.  A joule can therefore be called a watt-second, but for practical purposes the joule is far too small a unit 
to work with, and for this reason the Kilowatt-hour (3.6 × 106 joules) is used as the standard unit of energy. 
Heating Effect of a Current 
22.  The  energy  expended  in  a  purely  resistive  conductor  is  converted  into  heat.    The  unit  of  heat 
energy is the calorie, which is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one 
cubic  centimetre  of  water  through  one  degree  centigrade.    One  calorie  of  heat  is  produced  in  a 
conductor for every 4.2 joules of electrical energy expended.  The total heat produced in any conductor 
is given by: 
V (voltage) × I (current) × t (time) calories
4.2
The Maximum Power Transfer Theorem 
23.  The power transferred from a supply source to a load is at a maximum when the resistance of the load 
is equal to the internal resistance of the source.  Referring to the circuit shown in Fig 2, maximum power is 
delivered when the load is equal to 1 ohm.  This theorem is particularly important in the design of electronic 
equipment where maximum power transference is needed between circuit stages. 
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
Practical Resistors 
24.  There  are  several  different  types  of  resistor  in  common  use,  however,  the  three  main  types  are 
carbon, metal film and wire-wound.  General purpose resistors are more often of the carbon type; they 
are  inexpensive  and  perform  reasonably  well  in  circuits  where  the  design  requirements  are  not  too 
critical.  Where higher accuracy components are called for, carbon or metal film resistors (low power) 
and wire-wound resistors (high power) are used.  Resistors can overheat when overloaded and those 
installed in aircraft are therefore housed within a ceramic coating or tube.  Fig 9 shows the construction 
of a typical high power wire-wound resistor and Fig 10 shows the composition of two types of carbon 
resistor, and a colour coded exterior. 
14-1 Fig 9 Construction of a Wire-wound Resistor 
Nichrome Resistance
Wire
Ceramic
Tube
Vitreous Enamel
Protective Coating
Copper End Connectors
Welded to Wire
14-1 Fig 10 Two Types of Carbon Resistor 
Resistive Element
Ceramic Housing
(Carbon Rod)
Connecting
Wire
End Cap Forced on to
End-sealing Compound
Metal-sprayed End
Ceramic Tube
Connecting
Wire
Resistive Carbon
End Seal
Composition
Coloured Bands
(Resistance Code)
Carbon
Composition
Gn-Bl-Br-Si
(560 Ohm)
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
Preferred Values of Resistance 
25.  It  is  desirable  to  keep  the  number  of  resistance  values to be manufactured or held in stock to a 
reasonable  figure.    In  addition,  the  final  value  of  a  carbon  composition  resistor  is  rarely  exactly  the 
value that was originally intended.  Because of these factors a logarithmic series of preferred resistor 
values has been chosen.  For the ± 20% tolerance range, the ohmic values are 10, 12, 22, 33, 47, and 
68,  while  the  values  for  the  ± 10%  range  are  10,  12,  15,  18,  22,  27,  33,  39,  47,  56,  68,  and  82.  
Resistors  manufactured  to  these  values  (or  these  values  multiplied  by  factors  of  10)  are  termed 
'preferred value resistors'. 
The Resistor Colour Code 
26.  In order to identify the value of resistors and their tolerance range, methods of exterior markings 
have been devised.  One such method of identification is by means of coloured bands.  The bands are 
coloured according to a standard code; each colour representing a digit as indicated in Table 1. 
Table 1 Colour Code for Fixed Resistors 
Significant 
Colour 
Multiplier 
Tolerance 
Figures 
Silver 

10-2 
± 10% 
Gold 

10-1 
± 5% 
Black 



Brown 

10 
± 1% 
Red 

102 
± 2% 
Orange 

103

Yellow 

104

Green 

105
± 0.5% 
Blue 

106
± 0.25% 
Violet 

107
± 0.1% 
Grey 

108

White 

109

None 


± 20% 
27.  The coloured bands are painted on the body of the resistor usually biased towards one end.  The colour 
of the band nearest the end indicates the first number.  For easy recognition, on some resistors this band 
may be wider than the others, especially if there is likely to be any doubt over choice of ends.  The colour of 
the second band gives the second number and the third band provides the multiplier (decimal place).  The 
fourth band indicates the resistor’s tolerance and will most often be either silver (10% tolerance) or gold (5% 
tolerance).  Neither of these colours is used for significant figures, so it will be clear that counting of the value 
should begin at the other end.  If there is no fourth band, the tolerance is 20%.  Fig 11 shows a selection of 
colour-coded  resistors  with  their  values  decoded  together  with  a  wire-wound  example  which  has  its  value 
printed on the body. 
Page 9 of 10 


AP3456 - 14-1 - Basic Electricity 
14-1 Fig 11 Examples of Resistors with their Values 
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
CHAPTER 2 - MAGNETISM 
Introduction 
1. 
Around  3000  BC  an  iron  ore  known  as  lodestone  was  discovered  in  the  Chinese  desert.    The 
ancient Chinese found that this ore possessed some unusual properties namely: 
a. 
The attraction or repulsion of other pieces of lodestone. 
b. 
The attraction of pieces of soft iron. 
c. 
Orientation in the direction of the Earth’s North and South poles when suspended freely. 
The ability of a piece of lodestone to align itself with the Earth’s North and South poles led to the piece 
ends being called 'poles’ and were labelled North (seeking) and South (seeking) poles.  Such a piece 
of lodestone was called a magnet and the force which it possessed referred to as magnetism. 
2. 
Magnetism  was  thought  of  as  a  force  in  its  own  right  until  Ampere  discovered  that  a  small  coil 
carrying an electric current behaves like a magnet.  It was suggested that electric and magnetic forces 
are  both  manifestations  of  the  same  electromagnetic  force.    Ampere’s  theory,  which  gave  a  natural 
explanation  of  the  fact  that  no  isolated  magnetic  pole  had  ever  been  observed,  is  essentially  similar  to 
modern day atomic theory.  Electric charges can either be positive or negative, and the forces act so as to 
repel like charges and attract unlike charges.  A moving electric charge produces a magnetic field.  The 
electric current flowing through a coil of wire produces a controllable magnetic field, while in the case of a 
normal bar magnet the moving charges are the electrons circulating inside the atoms. 
3. 
All  materials  exhibit magnetic properties, the degree to which they are exhibited depends on the 
distribution of electrons in the outer shells of the material’s atoms.  Materials can be placed in one of 
the following main magnetic categories: 
a. 
Diamagnets.    Materials  which  oppose  an  applied  magnetic  field.    Examples  of  such 
materials are copper, bismuth and hydrogen. 
b. 
Paramagnets.  Materials which slightly aid an applied magnetic field. 
c. 
Ferromagnets.    Materials  which  greatly  aid  an  applied  magnetic  field.    Examples  of  such 
materials are iron, steel, nickel and cobalt.  Ferromagnetism will be discussed in more detail later 
in this chapter. 
Magnetic Fields 
4. 
A  magnet  affects  the  space  around  it  in  such  a  way  that  other  materials  placed  in  this  space 
experience forces.  The space in which this occurs is known as a magnetic field, and its presence can 
be detected using iron filings or a compass needle.  The magnetic field pattern formed by iron filings 
around  a  bar  magnet  is  shown  in  Fig  1.    Michael  Faraday  referred  to  the  apparent  lines  as  lines  of 
magnetic flux, and although flux does not exist as separate lines the concept of flux is useful in order to 
explain the effects of magnetism.  Magnetic flux has the following properties: 
a. 
The direction of the apparent lines, outside the magnet, is from the North to the South pole. 
b. 
Lines of flux form complete closed paths, they cannot end in space.  Lines which do not close 
around the magnet join those of the Earth’s magnetic field. 
c. 
Lines of magnetic flux never intersect each other, although may become extremely distorted. 
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
d. 
Where the flux is more intense, then the lines are closer together. 
14-2 Fig 1 The Magnetic Field Around a Bar Magnet 
5. 
Magnetic  lines  of  force  associated  with  a  given  magnet  are  modified  in  the  presence  of  other 
magnets and magnetic materials.  Fig 2 illustrates the effective fields produced by: 
a. 
Two adjacent, unlike poles 
b. 
The insertion of an iron bar in the space between the poles. 
In the latter case, the flux lines appear to be concentrated in the vicinity of the iron.  This is because 
the iron becomes magnetized by the external field and produces flux lines of its own, which reinforces 
the original field.  This is referred to as induced magnetism. 
14-2 Fig 2 Modified Magnetic Field Patterns 

S

S
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
Flux and Magnetic Circuits 
6. 
Magnetic flux may be likened to an electric current, insomuch as it only exists in circuits.  The closed 
path in which the magnetic flux exists is known as a magnetic circuit.  An example of a magnetic circuit is 
shown in Fig 3.  The flux 'flows' through the iron ring and across the air gap, thus completing the magnetic 
circuit.  The symbol for magnetic flux is Φ (phi) and the unit is the Weber (Wb). 
14-2 Fig 3 The Magnetic Circuit 
Air Gap
Iron
7. 
The amount of Flux passing through a defined area, which is perpendicular to the direction of the 
flux,  is  referred  to  as  the  flux  density,  and  is  a  far  more  useful  quantity  to  work  with  than  the  total 
amount  of  flux.    The  symbol  for  flux  density  is  B  and  the  unit  is  the  tesla  (abbreviated  as  'T').  
Therefore: 
Total Magnetic Flux (
 
)
Φ
Flux Density (B) = 
Area (A)
 
1 weber
and 1 tesla = 
 or 1 T = 1 Wb/m2. 
1square metre
Magnetic Flux by an Electric Current 
8. 
When an electric current flows in a wire, a magnetic field is set up around the wire.  This field may 
be represented by lines of force, with the strongest force being experienced near the wire.  If the wire is 
bent to form a loop, the field will be strengthened at the centre of the loop (see Fig 4). 
14-2 Fig 4 Magnetic Fields produced by Straight and Looped Wires 
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
9. 
The  direction  of  the  magnetic  field  produced  by  a  current  carrying  wire  can  be  determined  by 
applying Maxwell’s corkscrew rule, which states: 
If a normal right-hand threaded corkscrew travels along a conductor in the direction of the current, 
then the direction of rotation of the corkscrew is in the direction of the magnetic field. 
The convention that is used to show the direction of the current in a conductor, in diagrammatic form, 
is  that  the  current  flowing  into  the  paper  is  shown  by  the  flight  of  an  arrow,  while  a  current  flowing 
outwards is shown by the arrow point.  This is illustrated by Fig 5. 
14-2 Fig 5 Current Flow Representation 
a  Inward Current Flow
b  Outward Current Flow
10.  If  a  wire  conductor  is  wound  in  the  shape  of  a  coil,  then  this  is  referred  to  as  a  solenoid.    The 
direction of the magnetic field associated with a solenoid can be established using either the corkscrew 
rule or the more popular right-hand grip rule.  The grip rule states: 
If a coil is gripped with the right hand, and with the fingers pointing in the direction of the current, 
then  the  thumb  outstretched  parallel  to  the  axis  of  the  solenoid,  points  in  the  direction  of  the 
magnetic field inside the solenoid (ie points in the direction of the North pole). 
The magnetic field associated with a solenoid and the grip is shown in Fig 6.  Fig 7 illustrates a simple 
method of determining the polarities of the solenoid ends. 
14-2 Fig 6 The Magnetic Field of a Solenoid and the Grip Rule 
I
I
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
14-2 Fig 7 The Polarity Rule 
Current
Direction
Direction
Current
Magnetomotive Force and Field Strength 
11.  In an electric circuit a current is established due to the existence of an electromotive force (emf).  
Similarly, in a magnetic circuit, a magnetic flux is established due to the existence of a magnetomotive 
force (mmf).  The mmf is produced by the current in the coil and its magnitude depends on the number 
of  turns  of  the  coil (n)  and  the  current  (I).    The  unit  of  mmf  is  the  ampere-turn  (At),  however,  as  the 
number of turns has no units, the alternative unit for mmf is the ampere (A).  Magnetomotive force is 
represented by the symbol 'Fm'.  Therefore: 
mmf = Fm = nI 
12.  An  alternative  quantity  to  express  the  magnetic  force  produced  by  a  current  is  magnetic  field 
strength.    This  is  the  magnetomotive  force  per  unit  length  of  the  magnetic  circuit  and  is  given by the 
symbol H.  In the magnetic circuit shown in Fig 8, where a coil of n turns is uniformly wound around a 
metal ring, and L is the length of the magnetic circuit, the magnetic field strength is given by: 
Fm
nI
    H = 
 = 
 amperes per metre (A/m) 
L
L
14-2 Fig 8 A Simple Magnetic Circuit 
I
Main Length ‘L’
Permeability 
13.  The magnetic flux density (B) inside a current carrying coil is related to the magnetic field strength 
(H), since one exists as a result of the other.  The ratio of these two quantities is known as permeability 
and  may  be  expressed  as  the  ease  with  which  a  magnetic  flux  is  set  up  within  a  magnetic  circuit.  
Permeability is represented by the symbol μ (mu) and the unit of measurement is the henry per metre 
(H/m).  The henry is the unit of inductance and is considered in Volume 14, Chapter 3. 
Permeability (μ) =  magnetic fl
d
ux  ensity (
  B)
magnetic field strengt (
h  H)
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
14.  The magnitude of the permeability is dependent on the material placed in the centre of the coil.  If 
the coil is placed in a vacuum the permeability is then referred to as the permeability of free space and 
is given the symbol μ0.  This is a constant and has the value: 
      μ0 = 4π ×10-7 H/m 
15.  If a bar of magnetic material is placed in the centre of the coil then the flux density for the same 
magnetic  field  strength  is  greatly  increased.    Under  these  conditions  the  ratio  of  the  flux  density 
produced by the material to the flux density in a vacuum (or air) is called the relative permeability.  This 
is a measure of the number of times the permeability of the material is greater than that of air.  Relative 
permeability has the symbol μr, and has no units, since it is a ratio of like quantities. 
Flux d
  ensity w t
i h m
  agnetic core
Relative Permeabil t
i y (
  μ ) =
r
Flux d
  ensity w t
i h a
  ir/vacuum core
The absolute permeability (μ) of the material is given by: 
   μ = μ
B
0 μr = 
H
Reluctance 
16.  The reluctance of a magnetic circuit is its opposition to the establishment of magnetic flux, and it 
may be linked, by analogy, to the resistance of an electrical circuit.  Reluctance has the symbol 'S' and 
is the ratio of mmf (Fm) to flux (Φ).  Reluctance has the unit ampere per weber (A/Wb). 
Reluctance (S) =  mmf (Fm)
flux (
 
)
Φ
17.  In Fig 9, a comparison is made between the magnetic circuit and the electric circuit.  This analogy 
is a useful one when performing calculations on magnetic circuits, but it should be noted that, although 
flux  may  be  compared  to  current,  it  does  not  flow.    It  simply  exists  as  a  result  of  the  mmf.    In  the 
electric  circuit,  the  emf  (E)  causes  the  current  (I)  to  flow  through  the  resistance  (R),  giving  the 
relationship of: 
E = IR 
In the magnetic circuit, it is the mmf (Fm) which causes the flux (Φ) to exist in the magnetic circuit of 
reluctance (S).  The relationship is: 
    Fm = ΦS 
14-2 Fig 9 Comparison between a Magnetic and an Electric Circuit 
S
n
R
E
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
Series and Parallel Magnetic Circuits 
18.  Fig  10  shows  a  simple  series  magnetic  circuit  consisting  of  a  metal  ring  with  an  air  gap.  
Neglecting losses, it can be assumed that the same flux (Φ) exists both in the iron ring and the air gap.  
The  air  gap  has  a  large  effect  on  the  magnitude  of  the  flux  that  exists  in  the  circuit.    If  S1  is  the 
reluctance  of  the  metal  ring  and  S2  the  reluctance  of  the  air  gap,  then  the  magneto-motive  force 
required to maintain the flux is given by: 
Fm = ΦS1 + ΦS2
This may be compared with the series electric circuit shown in the same figure. 
  E = IR1 + IR2
14-2 Fig 10 Series Magnetic Circuit
I
Φ
S1
I
S
R
2
1
n
Air Gap
E
R2
19.  Fig 11 shows a parallel magnetic circuit such as is used in a certain type of transformer.  The flux 
(Φ) which exists in the centre limb splits evenly between the two outer limbs so that each carries half of 
the flux, 0.5Φ.  If SC is the reluctance of the centre limb and SO the reluctance of each outer limb, then, 
by considering only one of the magnetic circuits, the mmf is given by: 
Fm = ΦSC + 0.5ΦSO
This equation can be compared with that of the parallel electrical circuit shown in the same figure.  This 
time applying Kirchhoff’s law and considering one loop: 
  E = IR1 + 0.5IR2
14-2 Fig 11 A Parallel Magnetic Circuit 
0.5Ι
0.5Ι
0.5Φ
0.5Φ
Φ
Ι
Ι
n
R
R
R
2
1
2
S
S
O
O
E
SC
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
Ferromagnetism 
20.  As  stated  earlier  in  this  chapter, certain materials when magnetized produce their own magnetic 
field  which  greatly  aids  the  applied  field.    These  materials  are  known  as  ferromagnetic  and  have  the 
ability to increase the magnetic flux density by as much as 1,000 times. 
21.  Ferromagnetic materials are classified as either hard or soft.  Hard materials, such as cobalt steel 
and certain alloys, have a low relative permeability and are difficult to magnetize and demagnetize.  On 
the  other  hand,  soft  materials,  such  as  silicon  and  soft  iron,  have  high  relative  permeability  and  are 
easily  magnetized  and  demagnetized.    Permanent  magnets  are  made  from  materials  with  hard 
ferromagnetic  properties,  and  areas  of  equipment  where  magnetic  influences  need  to  be  minimized 
are usually protected using soft materials.  This latter ferromagnetic feature is known as screening. 
Magnetic Hysteresis 
22.  The usefulness of a piece of ferromagnetic material depends on its particular magnetic properties, 
and these can be recorded on a magnetization curve.  This is a graph of flux density (B) plotted against 
magnetic field strength (H).  A typical magnetization curve for a ferromagnetic material is shown in Fig 
12; the curve for air is also shown for comparison. 
14-2 Fig 12 Magnetization Curves 
C
Iron Core
B
Air Core
A
H
23.  It is evident that the slope of the magnetization curve for the ferromagnet is not constant and, at 
the  point  C,  increasing  the  magnetizing  force  has  little  effect  on  flux  density;  this  is  known  as 
saturation.    If  the  magnetizing  force  is  now  reduced  to  zero  the  material  will  retain  some  of  its 
magnetization,  which  is  referred  to  as  the  remanent  flux  density,  or  remanence.    It  is  represented 
by OR in Fig 13. 
14-2 Fig 13 Magnetic Hysteresis Loop 
B
A
R
Remanent Flux
Density Value
C
H
O
H
B
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
24.  If  the  magnetic  field  strength  is  reversed  (–H),  then  the  flux  density  will  eventually  reach  zero.  
This field, represented by OC, is known as the coercive force or coercivity of the material.  Increasing 
the magnetic field strength still further, in the negative sense, magnetizes the material in the opposite 
direction. 
25.  When the magnetic field strength is increased and decreased, first in one direction and then 
in  the  other,  the  plotted  values  of  B  and  H  describe  a  loop  which is referred to as the hysteresis 
loop of the material.  The area under the curve is proportional to the work carried out in order to 
complete  the  cycle  and  as  such  represents  losses.    Fig  14  illustrates  the  differences  in  the 
hysteresis loops for hard and soft ferromagnetic materials. 
14-2 Fig 14 Hysteresis Loops for Hard and Soft Materials 
+B
Soft
Hard
+H
TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM 
Introduction 
26.  The  centre  of  the  Earth  is  made  up  of  a  core  of  magnetic  material  whose  magnetic  field  of 
influence extends beyond the surface of the planet.  The core is aligned in such a way that its magnetic 
poles  correspond  approximately  to  the  Earth’s  geographical  poles.    In  essence,  the  Earth  can  be 
regarded as being similar to a large bar magnet with its lines of force running from geographical South 
to geographical North.  This field is depicted in Fig 15. 
14-2 Fig 15 The Earth’s Magnetic Field 
N
North Magnetic Pole
South Magnetic Pole
S
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-2 - Magnetism 
Magnetic Field Components 
27.  At  any  point  on  the  Earth’s  surface,  the  magnetic  field  can  be  resolved  into  its  vertical  and 
horizontal  components.    The  horizontal  component  is  used  extensively  for  navigation  and  direction 
finding by means of a compass.  The angle formed between the horizontal and the actual force line is 
referred to as the angle of dip.  The angle of dip varies between 0º at the magnetic equator and 90º at 
the magnetic poles. 
Magnetic Variations and Anomalies 
28.  The Earth’s North and South magnetic poles are not coincident with the geographical poles; there is an 
angle between the true North and the magnetic North.  The angle between them, known as variation, is a 
variable  quantity  and  describes  a  circle  around  the  geographical  poles  roughly  every  1,000  years.    In 
England, the variation is seen as a swing from about 27º W to 27º E.  This long-term movement in magnetic 
variation  is  modulated  by  daily  changes  (Diurnal),  annual  fluctuations  (opposite  directions  in  northern  and 
southern hemispheres) and changes which coincide with 11-year sunspot cycle, (Periodic). 
29.  The Earth’s magnetic field can also be disturbed by metallic objects placed within its field.  In the 
same  way  that  an  iron  rod  distorts  the  magnetic  field  of  a  bar  magnet  due  to  induced  magnetism, 
underground  cables  and  shipwrecks  distort  the  Earth’s  magnetic  field.    These  disturbances,  or 
anomalies,  can  be  detected  using  an  instrument  known  as  a  magnetometer.    The  magnetometer 
principle is dealt with in Volume 14, Chapter 5. 
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 - 14-3 - Electromagnetic Induction and Inductance 
CHAPTER 3 - ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION AND INDUCTANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
The phenomenon of electromagnetic induction forms the basis of many electrical machines, such 
as the dc motor, dc generator, induction motor, synchronous motor and the transformer.  Since these 
are  the  most  frequently  used  machines  in  electrical  engineering,  it  is  important  that  the  laws  of 
magnetic induction and inductance are clearly understood. 
Magnetism as a Source of Electricity 
2. 
When  a  magnetic  field  is  moved  across  a  conductor,  or  conversely  when  a  conductor  is 
moved  across  a  stationary  magnetic  field,  an  emf  is  induced  in  the  conductor.    This  can  be 
demonstrated  by  moving  a  magnet  into  and  out  of  a  coil  connected  to  a  sensitive  ammeter  (a 
device to measure current), or by rotating a loop connected to an ammeter within a magnetic field 
so  as  to  cut  across  the  field  (Fig  1).    In  both  cases  relative  movement  of  the  conductor  and  the 
magnetic field will produce a reading on the ammeter, showing that a current has been created as 
a result of the induced emf. 
14-3 Fig 1 A Simple Generator 
3. 
It can be demonstrated that: 
a. 
The  emf  is  present  only  whilst  there  is  relative  motion  between  the  conductor  and  the 
magnetic field. 
b. 
The  greater  the  relative  motion,  the  greater  the  emf.    Thus  the  rate  at  which  the  flux  is 
changing relative to the conductor determines the magnitude of the induced emf. 
c. 
The stronger the magnetic field, the greater the induced emf. 
d. 
The relative motion must be such that the conductor cuts across the magnetic flux. 
e. 
Reversing the relative motion will reverse the direction of the induced emf. 
4. 
To obtain a large voltage, a coil with a large number of turns must be used, and the magnetic field 
must  be  a  strong  one  with  a  continuous  high  relative  motion.    One  way  to  obtain  rapid  continuous 
relative  motion    is    to  rotate  a  loop  in  the  magnetic  field,  as  in  Fig  1,  which  represents  a  simple 
electricity generator.  In practice many turns are used in place of a single loop. 
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 - 14-3 - Electromagnetic Induction and Inductance 
Electromagnetic Induction 
5. 
Two laws state the theory of electro-magnetic induction very concisely: 
a.
Faraday's Law.  When the magnetic flux through a circuit is changing an induced emf is set 
up in that circuit, and its magnitude is proportional to the rate of change of flux. 
b.
Lenz's  Law.    The  direction  of  an  induced  emf  is  such  that  its  effect  tends  to  oppose  the 
change producing it. 
6. 
Mutual  Induction.    Consider  the  two  coils,  A  and  B,  connected  as  shown  in  Fig  2.    When  no 
current  is  flowing  there  is  no  magnetic  field,  but  when  the  switch  is  closed  a  magnetic  field  expands 
outwards  from  the  primary  coil  (A)  and  cuts  the  secondary  coil  (B).    As  there  is  a  change  of  flux 
through  the  secondary  coil  an  emf  is  induced in it and the meter shows a deflection.  When the field 
stops growing there is no longer a change of flux through the secondary and no emf is induced.  When 
the switch is opened the primary field collapses and contracts, thus flux changes in the secondary and 
an emf is induced again, but in the opposite direction.  It is important to note that when the DC supply 
is steady no mutual induction occurs, but when the supply is AC induction occurs continuously. 
14-3 Fig 2 Mutual Induction 
a Induction Occurs
b No Induction
Switch
Closed
Meter
Closed
Shows
No
Deflection
Deflection
A
B
A
B
Current
Current Rises
Current Steady
Magnetic Field Changing Through 'B'
Flux Steady
c Induction Occurs
d No Induction
Switch
Open
Mete
e r
r  S
S h
h o
o w
wss
Open
Deflle
e c
cttiio
o n
n   
i in
n
No
othe
e r
r  
  D
Di irre
e c
ctiti
oo
n n
Deflection
A
B
A
B
Current
Current Falls
No Current
Magnetic Field Changing Through 'B'
No Magnetic Field
7. 
Mutual Inductance (M).  The size of the induced emf depends partly on the rate at which the flux 
is changing.  It also depends on various factors associated with the coils, these being the ratio of the 
number  of  turns  of  the  primary  and  secondary  coils,  the  relative  positions  of  the  coils,  and  the 
permeability  of  the  medium  through  which  the  flux  travels;  together  these  are  known  as  the  mutual 
inductance of the coils (M). 
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 - 14-3 - Electromagnetic Induction and Inductance 
8. 
Self-Induction.  In the circuit shown at Fig 3 a magnetic field is established around a coil.  When 
the switch is opened the field will start to collapse as the current reduces.  There is therefore a change 
of flux through the coil, and an emf will be induced in it.  The induced emf opposes the inducing emf 
(Lenz's Law), and thus is called the back emf.  No back emf is created by a steady DC supply except 
at switch on and switch off, whereas an AC supply causes self-induction continuously. 
14-3 Fig 3 Self-Induction 


Switch Closed
Switch Open
Possible Arcing
Self Induced
Steady Flux
Current and
Battery
Voltage
through Coil
Flux fall to zero
across Coil
Steady Current

Switch Closed
Flux rises and
induces a back
emf across
the Coil. 
This opposes the
Battery Current rises
rise in Battery Current
9. 
Self-Inductance (L).  Any circuit that has a voltage induced in it by a change of current through 
the  circuit  itself  has  self-inductance.    The  property  of  self-inductance  is  to  oppose  any  change  of 
current  by  the  creation  of  a  back  emf.    The  size  of  the  back  emf  depends  partly  upon  the  rate  of 
change of current.  If the circuit includes a coil, the size of the back emf depends also on the number of 
turns in the coil and the permeability of the medium around the coil, these factors associated with the 
coil being termed the self-inductance (L). 
10.  Units  of  Inductance. Both  mutual  and  self-inductance  are  measured  in  the  same  units  -  the 
henry (H).  The mutual inductance of two circuits is 1 henry when a current changing uniformly at the 
rate  of  1  ampere  per  second  in  one  circuit  produces  a  mutually  induced  emf  of  1  volt  in  the  other 
circuit.  The self-inductance of a closed circuit is 1 henry when an emf of one volt is produced when the 
current in the circuit is changing uniformly at the rate of one ampere per second. 
11.  Inductors. When a coil is used specifically to provide inductance and thus oppose any change in 
current in the circuit it is called an inductor or choke.  Typical inductance values of inductors in practical 
use range from about 100 H down to a few microhenrys according to the application. 
Inductive DC Series Circuits 
12.  When several inductors are connected in series (L1, L2 and L3 in Fig 4) circuit inductance is found 
by summing the individual values, provided that there is no mutual inductance between the coils. 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 - 14-3 - Electromagnetic Induction and Inductance 
14-3 Fig 4 Inductors in Series 
L1=1H
L2=0.5H
L3=4H
_
Internal
+
Resistance
L  =
L1 + L2 +L3  
 
=
1 + 0.5 + 4  
 
=
5.5 henrys 
13.  It  was  stated  earlier  in  this  chapter  that  the  back  emf  created  by  the  build-up  or  collapse  of  the 
magnetic field around an inductor opposes the change in current.  A plot of circuit current against time 
takes the form of an exponential curve, rising for current increase or switch-on (Fig 5a), and falling with 
current decrease or switch-off (Fig 5b).  It is impossible to create a purely inductive circuit because the 
conductor  must  have  some  resistance,  and  the  resistive  voltage,  V ,  rises  and  falls  as  the  circuit 
R
current  rises  and  falls  (Fig  5).    On  the  other  hand  the  voltage,  V ,  across  the  inductor,  falls  as  the 
L
current  rises  and  rises  as  the  current  falls  (Fig  5).    The  time  taken  for  the current to reach particular 
values is discussed in para 15. 
14-3 Fig 5 Growth and Decay of Current in an Inductive DC Circuit 
a
Current Growth
b
Current Decay
I and V
V
R
L
Current has reached 63.2% 
of Maximum Current
Current has decayed by 63.2%
of Maximum Current
VL
I and VR
L
2L
3L
L
2L
3L
Switch
4L
5L
Switch
4L
5L
Of
R
 R
 R
 R
 R
On
R
 R
 R
 R
 R
    Time
    Time
Time (Secs)
Time (Secs)
Constant
Constant
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 - 14-3 - Electromagnetic Induction and Inductance 
Inductive DC Parallel Circuits 
14.  When inductors are connected in parallel (Fig 6), providing alternative paths for the current flow, 
the total inductance of the circuit, provided that the coils are completely isolated from one another such 
that there is no mutual inductance, is given by: 
1
1
1
1
1
=
+
+
+ ......... ..........
L
1
L
L2
L3
Ln
Applying this formula to the example in Fig 6: 
1
1
1
1
= + +
L
4
6
12
6
= 12
∴L = 2H
14-3 Fig 6 Inductors in Parallel 
4H
6H
12H
Inductive-Resistive Circuits, Time Constants 
15.  The  exponential  rise  and  fall  of  current  in  an  inductive-resistive  DC  circuit  was  discussed  in 
para 13.  In theory the current in an inductive circuit can never reach a maximum or fall completely to 
L
zero.  However, for all practical purposes the growth or decay of current is complete in  5
 seconds, 
R
L
where L is the inductance in henrys and R the resistance in ohms.  
seconds is known as the time 
R
constant of an inductive-resistive circuit.  The time constant is defined as the time taken for the current 
through an inductive circuit to rise to 63.2% of its maximum value when connected to a supply, or to fall 
by  63.2%  of  its maximum value when disconnected from a supply.  The time constant is indicated in 
Figs 5a and 5b. 
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
CHAPTER 4 - ELECTROSTATICS AND CAPACITANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
This chapter opens with a brief mention of electrostatics, which, as the name implies, is primarily the 
science of electric charges at rest.  It then goes on to discuss a related phenomenon known as 'capacitance', 
and  describes  the  construction  and  properties  of  devices  used  to  introduce  capacitance  into  the  circuit 
('capacitors'). 
ELECTROSTATICS 
General 
2. 
Electrification by friction is a common phenomenon: a comb passed through dry hair attracts the 
individual hairs, which then tend to stand on end, repelling one another.  If a glass rod is rubbed with a 
piece  of  silk,  the  silk  is  attracted  towards  the  rod.    In  this  case,  the  silk  removes  electrons  from  the 
glass  which  is  thus  left  with  a  positive  charge;  the  electrons  acquired  by  the  silk  give  it  an  equal 
negative charge.  If two freely suspended glass rods are treated in this way, and then brought near to 
each  other,  a  mutual  repulsion  is  evident.    From  these  facts,  the  first  law  of  electrostatics  can  be 
stated: like charges repel each other; unlike charges attract. 
Coulomb’s Law 
3. 
It  can  be  shown  that  the  size  of  the  force  of  attraction  (or  repulsion)  is  greater  between  large 
charges  than  between small charges, and is greater when the charges are close together than when 
they  are  more  distant.    Coulomb’s  law  states  that  the  force  (F)  between  two  quantities  of  electricity 
(Q1 and Q2), placed a distance apart (d), is proportional to the product Q1Q2 and inversely proportional 
to d2, ie F ∝ Q1Q2/d2
The Electric Field 
4. 
If an insulated metal sphere (A) is positively charged, it will repel another positively charged body 
(B) brought near to it; the nearer the two approach, the greater the repulsion.  Work has to be done to 
overcome this repulsion; if the force drawing the bodies together is removed, the repulsion will force B 
away  towards its original position (assuming A to be fixed).  The system possesses potential energy, 
and a potential is said to exist at any point in the vicinity of Athe nearer to A, the higher the potential.  
A positive charge placed in the vicinity of A will tend to move away, ie from a position of higher to lower 
potential.  The change of potential per unit distance is known as potential gradient. 
Page 1 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
5. 
The region around a charged body is described as an electric field.  Electric lines of force (akin to 
lines  of  magnetic  flux)  are  used  to  show  the  distribution  of  an  electric  field,  each  line  showing  the 
direction  in  which  a  free  positive  charge  would  tend  to  move  if  placed  in  that  field.    Fig  1  shows  a 
typical  field pattern of two oppositely charged spheres.  The unit of electric flux, or charge (Q), is the 
coulomb, and the flux density (D) is the charge per unit area: 
Charge (coulombs)
Flux D
  ensity = Area (squaremetres)
Q
o D

= A
14-4 Fig 1 Typical Electric Field Pattern 
6. 
Electric  Field  Strength.    Two  plates  (M  and  N),  separated  by  a  gap  (d),  are  connected  to  a 
battery as shown in Fig 2.  Electrons begin to move from plate M towards the positive terminal of the 
battery,  leaving  the  plate  M  positively  charged.    At  the  same  time,  electrons  move  from  the  negative 
plate of the battery to the plate N, which acquires a negative charge.  A difference of potential will exist 
between  the  plates, and the space between them is an electric field.  The intensity (E) of the electric 
field will depend on the PD and the distance between the plates: 
Potential Difference(volts)
Intensity =
Distance Apar (
t  metres)
V
or E
  = d
Page 2 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
14-4 Fig 2 The Electric Field Between Two Plates 
Q Coulombs
-
+
Vacuum
-
+
-
+
-
+
-
+
-
+
-
+
-
+
N
M
d
V
7. 
Permittivity of Free Space.  The ratio of flux density (D) to the electric field strength (E) in free 
space is termed the 'permittivity of free space' (ε0).  Thus: 
D
Q
V
Qd
ε =
=
÷
=
0
E
A
d
VA
Q
But,
= C  (see para 11). 
V
d
A
∴ε = C
and C = ε
farads
0
A
0 d
The value of the constant ε0 is 8.85 × 10-12 F/m.  (F/m: Farad per metre) 
CAPACITANCE 
The Simple Capacitor 
8. 
To  charge  a  conductor  negatively,  electrons  are  added  to  it.    Initially,  the  electrons  move  easily 
but, as the conductor becomes more and more negatively charged, so the electrons on the conductor 
repel those which try to add to their number.  Eventually, the repelling force equals the charging force 
and no further movement of electrons takes place.  The conductor is then said to be fully charged. 
9. 
The charging process is due to the applied voltage.  The charge can be increased by increasing 
the applied voltage, but the conductor will oppose the change because of the repulsion by the electrons 
it already possesses.  Similar remarks apply when a conductor is positively charged. 
10.  It  has  already  been  shown  that  if,  instead  of  a  single  conductor,  a  pair  of  plates,  as  in  Fig  2,  is 
considered, a difference of potential will exist between the plates if connected to a battery.  The charge 
held  by  the  combination  of  plates  for  a  given  applied  voltage  can  be  made  greater  by  sandwiching  a 
suitable insulator (a 'dielectric') between them. 
Page 3 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
11.  For a given pair of plates, increasing the charge increases the voltage between the plates, but the 
ratio of charge to applied voltage remains constant.  This ratio is known as the 'capacitance' (C) of the 
capacitor.    The  unit  of  capacitance  is  the  farad;  a  capacitor  having  a  capacitance  of  one  farad  if  a 
charge of one coulomb (i.e. a charging current of one ampere flowing for one second) causes a charge 
of one volt in the potential difference between the plates, i.e.: 
Charge (coulombs)
Capacitan e
c (farads) = PotentialDifference(volts)
Because the farad is a very large unit, capacitances are usual y given in microfarads (μF - a mil ionth of 
a farad, ie 10−6 F) or picofarads (pF - a million-millionths of a farad, ie 10−12 F). 
Factors Affecting Capacitance 
12.  The capacitance of a capacitor depends on the following factors: 
a.
The  Area  of  the  Plates.    Capacitance  increases  with  increase  in  area  (A)  of  the  opposed 
surfaces. 
b.
The Distance Apart of the Plates.  Capacitance increases as the distance (d) between the 
plates  decreases  (ie  by  using  a  thinner  dielectric),  because  the  field  then  becomes  more 
concentrated. 
c.
The  Material  of  the  Dielectric.    Different  dielectrics  produce  different  capacitances  in 
capacitors  where  other  factors  (plate  area  and  distance  between  the  plates)  are  equal.    For 
example,  substituting  waxed  paper  for  air  increases  the  capacitance  by  a  factor  of  about  three.  
The  ratio  of  the  capacitance  of  a  capacitor  having  a  certain  material  as  dielectric  to  the 
capacitance  of  the  same  capacitor  having  a  vacuum  as  dielectric,  is  known  as  the  'dielectric 
constant', or 'relative permittivity' (εr) of the dielectric material. 
13.  It follows that the capacitance of a capacitor is given by: 
A
C = ε ε
(farads)
0
r d
Page 4 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
A comparison of dielectric materials is given in Table 1.  For practical purposes, air can be considered 
to have a dielectric constant of unity, as for free space. 
Table 1 Dielectric Constants 
Dielectric Material 
Relative Permittivity 
Dry air  
1.00 
Polypropylene 
2.25 
Polystyrene 
2.50 
Polycarbonate 
2.80 
Polyester  
3.20 
Impregnated paper 
4 to 5 
Mica 
6.00 
Aluminium oxide 
7.50 
Tantalum oxide 
25.00 
High-permittivity ceramic 
10,000.00 
Safe Working Voltage 
14.  The  safe  working  voltage  is  the  maximum  DC  voltage  that  can  safely  be  applied  to  a  capacitor 
without  causing  the  dielectric  to  break  down;  if  this  voltage  is  exceeded  the  electric  field  becomes 
strong  enough  to  break  down  the  insulation  of  the  dielectric,  a  spark  occurs,  and  the  capacitor  is 
usually  ruined.    Increasing  the  thickness  of  the  dielectric  enables  the  capacitor  to  withstand  higher 
voltages,  but,  to  compensate  for  the  greater  distance  between  the  plates,  a  larger  plate  area  is 
necessary  to  maintain  the  capacitance  value.    Hence,  capacitors  with  high  voltage  ratings  are  larger 
than  similar  types  of  capacitor  of  low  rating.    Note  that  a  charged  capacitor  (especially  one  of  large 
capacitance) can be dangerous; capacitors must be discharged before touching them. 
Factors Determining the Construction of Capacitors 
15.  Capacitors  are  used  for  a  wide  variety  of  purposes  in  electronics.    In  their  construction,  three 
factors associated with the dielectric are important: 
a. 
The dielectric constant, discussed in paras 12 and 13. 
b. 
The dielectric strength. 
c. 
Dielectric losses. 
16.  The Dielectric Strength.  Dielectric strength is a measure of the PD required to break down the 
dielectric  and  is  normally  given  as  kilovolts  per  millimetre  thickness.    For  a  given  material,  the 
breakdown voltage will depend on: 
a. 
Thickness of the Dielectric.  Although not directly proportional, the thicker the dielectric, the 
greater the breakdown voltage. 
b. 
Temperature.    An  increase  in  temperature  of  the  dielectric  produces  a  decrease  in  the 
breakdown voltage. 
c. 
Frequency.  If the applied voltage is AC, the higher the frequency the lower the breakdown 
voltage due to the higher temperature produced. 
Page 5 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
The  safe  working  voltage  of  a  capacitor  is  usually  given  as  a  DC  voltage  at  a  given  temperature, 
eg "350V DC working, 71 ºC".  When used in an AC circuit, the rms voltage applied should not exceed 
0.707 of the safe working DC voltage. 
17.  Dielectric  Losses.    A  certain  proportion  of  the  energy  applied  to  a  capacitor  on  charging  is  not 
available as energy on discharging.  Some energy is expended in the dielectric, being lost as heating, 
leakage current, and through other effects.  The ratio of energy applied on charging to energy available 
on discharge is a measure of the capacitor efficiency. 
Fixed Capacitors 
18.  Paper Type.  Capacitors with paper dielectrics are the commonest and cheapest fixed capacitors.  
The two plates are long strips of aluminium foil, separated by similar strips of waxed paper acting as 
the  dielectric  (Fig 3).    This  assembly  is  rolled  up  into  a  tube,  which  is  then  wax-sealed  into  an  outer 
container of cardboard or metal. 
14-4 Fig 3 Paper Capacitor 
Aluminium
Foil Plates
Waxed Paper
Dielectric
19.  Mica  Type.    Mica  Capacitors  are  high  quality  capacitors  with    several  plates  of  metal  foil 
interleaved  with layers of mica acting as the dielectric (Fig 4).  Alternate foils are joined together and 
connected to the two terminals.  The assembly is placed inside a moulded plastic or metal case. 
14-4 Fig 4 Mica Capacitor 
To Circuit
Clip
Moulded Case
To Circuit
Metal Foil
Mica Strips
20.  Ceramic Type.  Ceramic capacitors can give very small values of capacitance.  They use a ceramic 
disc or rod as the dielectric.  Two films of silver, deposited on the ceramic, act as the plates (Fig 5). 
Page 6 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
14-4 Fig 5 Ceramic Capacitor 
Outer 
Ceramic Tube
Silvered
Electrodes
Ceramic Rod
Metal End Cap
21.  Electrolytic Type.  For large values of capacitance, electrolytic capacitors are used, paper and mica 
types being too bulky.  The large capacitance value is due to the very thin dielectric used.  The electrodes are 
two long strips of aluminium foil.  During manufacture, the dielectric film is formed on the positive electrode.  
The electrodes are separated by strips of cotton gauze impregnated with electrolyte.  The whole assembly is 
tightly  rolled  (Fig  6)  and  mounted  in  a  metal  case.    One  of  the  aluminium  electrodes  provides  a  contact 
between the case and the electrolyte paste, which acts as the negative plate.  The dielectric film can only be 
maintained if the capacitor has a DC component of voltage applied to it.  The capacitor must be connected 
the right way round in the circuit, and any AC component must be less than the polarizing DC component. 
14-4 Fig 6 Electrolytic Capacitor 
Case
Cotton Gauze
Aluminium Electrode in
impregnated with
contact with Case
Electrolyte
+
Aluminium Electrode
connected to Positive
Insulator
Variable and Trimmer Capacitors 
22.  In  electronic  circuits,  it  is  often  necessary  to  be  able  to  vary  the  capacitance.    Variation  of 
capacitance can be achieved by: 
a.
Varying the Effective Area of the Plates.  One set of plates (the rotors) can be moved into and 
out of mesh with the other set (the stators), so that the effective area of overlap is changed (Fig 7a). 
b. 
Varying the Distance between the Plates.  The distance between the plates can be varied by 
a screw adjustment which squeezes the plates together (Fig 7b). 
c.
Changing the Dielectric.  If two (or more) metal plates are set at a fixed distance apart in a 
container,  then,  when  the  container  is  empty,  the  dielectric  is  air.    If  a  fluid  which  has  dielectric 
properties  is  pumped  into  the  container,  then  the  capacitance  will  change  as  the  level  of  fluid 
changes (Fig 7c).  This principle is applied in measuring the contents of storage tanks. 
Page 7 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
The  types  described  in  sub-paras  a  and  b  are  normally  referred  to  as  variable  capacitors;  a  smaller 
version  of  that  in  sub-para  a,  and  the  type  at  sub-para  b  are  used to make small variations of circuit 
capacitance, and are referred to as trimmer capacitors.  The main properties and uses of the various 
forms of capacitor are summarized at Table 2. 
14-4 Fig 7 Variable and Trimmer Capacitors 
Rotors
Connections
Stators
Connections
a
b
c
Table 2 Capacitor Summary 
Capacitance 
DC Working 
Type 
Remarks 
Values 
Voltage (max) 
Used  in  circuits  where  dielectric  losses  are 
Paper 
100 pF to 12 μF 
150 kV 
unimportant.  Cheap. 
Mica 
50 pF to 0.25 μF 
2 kV 
Used in low-loss circuits.  Expensive. 
Used  in  low-loss  precision  circuits  where  micro-
Ceramic 
0.5 pF to 0.005 μF 
500 V 
miniaturization  is  important or where temperature 
compensation is required. 
Used  where  losses  are  not  important  - 
2 μF to 32 μF 
600 V 
smoothing circuits. 
Electrolytic 
A  polarizing  DC  voltage  must  be  operative  in 
32 μF to 3000 μF 
50 V 
the circuit to prevent reverse electrolytic action. 
Variable from 
Variable 
2 kV 
Used for circuit tuning. 
50 pF to 500 pF 
Variable from 
Trimmer 
350 V 
Used for circuit alignment. 
2 pF to 50 pF 
Page 8 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
Energy Stored in a Charged Capacitor 
23.  When  an  initially  uncharged  capacitor  is  charged  at  a constant rate of I amps for t seconds, the 
charge  (Q)  equals  (I  ×  t)  coulombs.    During  the  charge,  the  PD  across  the  capacitor  will  have  risen 
V
from  zero  to  V  volts  at  a  constant  rate.    Thus,  the  average  PD  during  the  charge  is 
  volts.    The 
2
V
average power is the product of average PD and the current, i.e.  P =
× I  watts.  The energy used to 
2
charge the capacitor is stored in the charged capacitor and is given by: 
V
Energy = P × t =
× I× t
2
V
=
×Q
2
1 CV2
=
joules
2
Capacitive DC Series Circuits 
24.  When  capacitors  are  connected  in  series  (Fig  8),  the  inverse  individual  values  are  summed  and  the 
reciprocal found to determine the total capacitance of the circuit, i.e.: 
1
1
1
1
1
=
+
+
+
C
C
C
C
C
1
2
3
4
Substituting the values from Fig 8, 
1
1
1
1
1
10
5
4
2
21
= + + +
=
+
+
+
=
C
2
4
5
10
20
20
20
20
20
∴C ≈ 1μF
The  effect  of  the  series  connections  is  to  create  a  'total  capacitor'  of  large  effective  distance  (d) 
between its plates.  In Fig 8, the resistor represents the circuit resistance. 
14-4 Fig 8 Capacitors in Series 
2µF
4 F
µ
5 F
µ
10µF
S
C
C
C
C
1
2
3
4
+

25.  When  only  the  resistance  of  connectors  is  present,  the  time  taken  to  charge  the  capacitors  is 
negligible, but becomes significant if a large resistor is connected in series.  This is discussed further in 
Page 9 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
para 27.  Fig 9a shows a plot of the PD (Vc) across the capacitor against time; the equivalent current 
curve shown at Fig 9b is inverted with respect to the voltage curve. 
14-4 Fig 9 Voltage and Current during Charges in a Capacitive DC Circuit 
24
120
Vc
)
t=CR
PD across Capacitor has
16
A
)
80
risen to 63.2% of Supply
(m
(V
t
Voltage
n
lts
o
rre
V
u
8
40
C
t=CR
t
2t
3t
4t
5t
0
0
t
2t
3t
4t
5t
20
40
Tim
T
e (
  sec
e s)
20
40
Time (secs)
a  Variation of V  (120V Supply)
c
b  Variation of Current
Capacitive DC Parallel Circuits 
26.  The total capacitance of several capacitors in parallel (Fig 10) is the sum of their individual values, ie C
= C1 + C2.... + Cn.  Substituting the values from Fig 10: 
C = 0.001 + 1 + 0.1 = 1.101 μF 
14-4 Fig 10 Capacitors in Parallel 
1000 pF
C1
1 µF
C2
0.1  F
µ
C3
E
The capacitance is increased because the effective plate area is increased. 
Capacitive-Resistive Circuits, Time Constants 
27.  The  time  required  to  charge  a  capacitor  depends  upon  both  its  capacitance  and  the  circuit 
resistance.  The time (t) is equal to CR seconds (where C is in farads and R in ohms) and is known as the 
'time constant' of a capacitive-resistive circuit.  The time constant is defined as the time taken for the PD 
across a capacitor to rise to 63.2% of the maximum value of the supply voltage on charge, or to fall by 
63.2% of its fully charged PD when on discharge.  The time constant (t) is indicated in Figs 9a and 9b.  In 
theory, a capacitor would take an infinitely long time to completely charge or discharge, but after a time of 
5t seconds (ie 5CR) the charge or discharge is complete for all practical purposes. 
Page 10 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
The Oscillatory Circuit 
28.  In the electrical circuit shown in Fig 11, a charged capacitor is connected in series with an inductor 
of  inductance  L  and  resistance  R.  Closing  the  switch  causes  the  capacitor  to  discharge  and  current 
flows in the circuit.  This current flow generates a magnetic field within the coils of the inductor, and the 
electrostatic energy stored in the capacitor is transferred to the inductor in the form of electromagnetic 
energy. 
14-4 Fig 11 The Oscillatory Circuit 
R
+
C
_
L
29.  Once the capacitor is completely discharged, the magnetic field within the inductor starts to collapse 
and  the  collapsing  (changing)  flux  tends  to  keep  the  current  flowing.    The  capacitor  finally  charges  up 
once again, but this time with the reverse polarity to the original charge.  When the current has fallen to 
zero,  the  capacitor  begins  to  discharge  again  and  the  same  sequence  of  events  is  repeated.    This 
exchange  of  energy  between  two  parts  of  the  circuit  is  called  'oscillation',  and  the  period  between  two 
successive instants at which the conditions in the circuit are similar is called a 'cycle'. 
30.  Since the circuit contains resistance, a small amount of energy is dissipated in the form of heat during 
each  cycle.    Therefore,  each  successive  charge  across  the  capacitor  is  smaller  in  magnitude  than  the 
previous  one.    This  effect  is  known  as  'damping'  and  the  decay  in  amplitude  due  to  damping  follows  an 
exponential curve.  This is depicted graphically in Fig 12. 
14-4 Fig 12 Oscillatory Damping due to Circuit Resistance 
Exponential
Curve
Time
PD Across
Capacitor
Page 11 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-4 - Electrostatics and Capacitance 
31.  For any given oscillatory circuit, there is a value of resistance which will prevent oscillations taking 
place.  This resistance, known as 'critical damping resistance', is given by the following equation: 
Critical Damping (R) = 
L
2 C
If R equals or exceeds this value, then the nature of the discharge of the capacitor is that of a simple 
CR  combination  referred  to  in  para  26.    If  R  is  much  lower  than  the  critical  damping  value,  then  the 
frequency of oscillation is approximately: 
1
 Resonant Frequency (fr) =  2π LC
Page 12 of 12 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
CHAPTER 5 - MEASURING INSTRUMENTS 
Introduction 
1. 
In all fields of science and engineering instruments are required in order to measure the quantities 
being used; electrical engineering is no exception to this.  Associated with most electrical circuits are 
the basic quantities of voltage, current, power and resistance.  The instruments which measure these 
are the voltmeter, ammeter, wattmeter, and ohmmeter respectively. 
CURRENT AND VOLTAGE 
Ammeters and Voltmeters 
2. 
An ammeter is used to measure current flow through a circuit and therefore the instrument must 
be  connected  in  series  with  the  circuit,  as  shown  in  Fig  1.    It  is  important  that  the  current  being 
measured  is  unaffected  by  the  instrument’s  internal  resistance,  and  for  this  reason  ammeters  are 
designed  to  have  a  low  electrical  resistance.    This  being  the  case,  an  ammeter  should  never  be 
connected  across  a  supply  voltage,  since  there  would  be  nothing  to  limit  the  current  flow  and  the 
instrument would be damaged. 
3. 
A  voltmeter  is  designed  to  measure  electromotive  force  and  potential  difference.    The  potential 
difference across a resistor is measured by connecting the meter as shown in Fig 1. In order to ensure 
the minimum disturbance in any circuit voltmeters are required to pass very little current and therefore 
have a high internal resistance. 
4. 
There  are  a  number  of  ways  that  an  electric  current  or  voltage  can  cause  the  needle  of  a 
measuring  instrument  to  be  deflected.    The  most  common  method  utilizes  the  magnetic  field  of  an 
electric  current  to  produce  the  deflection.    In  this  case  it  is  important to realize that regardless of the 
units  being  measured  the  principle  of  operation  remains  the  same;  ie  current  through  the  instrument 
causes  needle  deflection.    The  internal  resistance,  high  or  low  relative  to  the  circuit  under  test, 
determines whether the device is a voltmeter or an ammeter. 
14-5 Fig 1 Ammeter and Voltmeter Connections in a Circuit 
A
R
V
E
Moving Coil Instruments 
5. 
The  operation  of  a  moving  coil  instrument  depends  on  the  reaction  between  the  current  in  a 
moveable coil and the field of a fixed permanent magnet.  This reaction is discussed in more detail in 
Volume 14, Chapter 6, under the topic of DC motors. 
6. 
The moving coil is wound around an aluminium former and suspended between the curved poles 
of a magnet, as shown in Fig 2.  The current to be measured is fed through the moveable coil via two 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
coiled  springs.    A  magnetic  field  is  set  up  around  the  moveable  coil  which  reacts  with  that  of  the 
magnet and produces a turning force (torque).  The coil will turn and apply tension to the coiled springs 
until  the  restoring  torque  of  the  springs  is  equal  to  the  force  produced  by  the  coil.    The  amount  of 
angular movement is proportional to the applied current and is indicated by a pointer on a scale. 
14-5 Fig 2 A Simple Moving Coil Instrument 
Current In
Control Spring
Uniformly Divided
Scale
Balance Mass
Pointer
Pole
S
Piece
N
Fixed Armature
Moving Coil
Control
Spring
Current Out
Pivot
7. 
In order to prevent the pointer overshooting and then oscillating before settling down at the correct 
reading,  damping  of  the  movement  must  be  provided.    This  is  achieved  through  the  aluminium  former 
supporting  the  coil.    When  the  coil  moves  through  the  magnetic  field,  small  circulating  currents  (eddy 
currents) are set up in the former which produce a restraining torque while the coil is in motion and thus 
damp out oscillation. 
8. 
The main features of a moving coil instrument are: 
a. 
It measures DC only. 
b. 
A linear scale. 
c. 
High sensitivity. 
d. 
It may be used as a DC ammeter with a shunt (para 11). 
e. 
It may be used as a DC voltmeter with a multiplier (para 12). 
Moving Iron Instruments 
9. 
The repulsion moving iron instrument is basically two pieces of iron placed inside a coil, as shown 
in Fig 3a.  One of the pieces is fixed while the other is attached to a pointer and free to move.  When 
current  is  passed  through  the  coil,  a  magnetic  field  is  produced  which  magnetizes  both  irons  in  the 
same sense.  Since like poles repel each other, the free iron is forced away from the fixed iron.  As in 
the  case  of  the  moving  coil  instrument,  a  coiled  spring  at  the  pivot  point  of  the  pointer  provides  the 
restoring torque. 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
14-5 Fig 3 A Moving Iron Instrument 
a. Schematic  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
b. Practical 
Pointer
N on-uniformly
D ivided Scale
Non- linear
Scale
Air Dashpot
Pointer
Vane
Coil
Mo ving
Coil
Fixed Iron
Iron
Terminal
Term inal
Fixed Iron
Moving Iron
Pivot
10.  In the practical instrument, Fig 3b, the moving iron is rectangular in shape, while the fixed iron is in 
the shape of a tapered scroll.  This is done to improve the scale linearity due to the non-linear forces 
between  two  irons  of  similar  shape.    Instrument  damping  is  achieved  by  means  of  a  vane  and  air 
dashpot.  The main features of this type of instrument are: 
a. 
It measures DC and AC. 
b. 
A non-linear scale. 
c. 
It may be used as an ammeter, but shunts should not be used, due to their non-linearity. 
d. 
It may be used as a voltmeter, directly or with multipliers. 
e. 
It is accurate only for frequencies below about 200 Hz. 
Shunts and Multipliers 
11.  In  general,  meters  are  constructed  to  have  a  high  sensitivity  and  therefore  give  full-scale 
deflection  (fsd)  of  the  pointer  with  small  currents  of  the  order  of  a  few  micro-amps.    In  order  to 
measure currents of a higher magnitude, resistors, known as shunts, are connected across the meter 
in  order  to  by-pass  the  excess  current.    The  meter  may  now  be  calibrated  to  read  an  apparent  fsd 
which is equal to the inherent fsd plus the excess current through the resistor. 
12.  If a meter is required to read voltages then a resistor has to be connected in series with the instrument 
across which most of the applied voltage is developed.  The voltage across the instrument itself is small and 
the current flowing through it is still only of the order of micro-amps.  This type of resistor is referred to as a 
multiplier. 
Rectification for AC Measurements 
13.  A rectifier is a device which allows current to flow in one direction only, very much like a non-return 
valve in a fluid system.  When such a device is connected in series with a moving coil instrument, as 
shown  in  Fig  4,  a  rectifier allows the instrument to be used for the measurement of AC voltages and 
currents. 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
14-5 Fig 4 Rectifier and Moving Coil Instrument 
Rectifier
Moving-coil
  Diode
Instrument
Terminals
14.  The  instrument  indicates  the  average  value  of  the  current  flowing  through  it,  and  thus  gives  a 
reading proportional to the average value of the half-wave rectified waveform.  Meters of this type give 
accurate readings for AC voltages and currents up to about 20 kHz, but at low frequencies the pointer 
tends to fluctuate. 
RESISTANCE 
Volt-amp Method 
15.  The  value  of  a  resistor  (R)  may  be  determined  by  voltage  (V)  and  current  (I)  measurements  using 
instruments arranged as shown in Fig 1. By applying Ohm’s law to the values obtained the resistance may 
be calculated. 
V
R =
ohms
I
The Ohmmeter 
16.  The disadvantage of the volt-amp method of determining resistance is the need for two meters, a 
voltmeter and an ammeter.  This problem is overcome with the introduction of a single meter known as 
the ohmmeter.  Basically, the ohmmeter uses the same movement as the voltmeter and the ammeter, 
but the zero reading is at the opposite end of the scale. 
17.  The circuit of a basic ohmmeter is shown in Fig 5. It comprises a moving coil ammeter (M), a variable 
resistor (R) and a battery.  Prior to any measurement being taken the terminals X and Y are shorted together 
and  the  variable  resistor  adjusted  to  give  full-scale  deflection  of  the  needle;  this  corresponds  to  zero 
resistance.  Any resistance placed between the two terminals will cause less current to flow in the circuit and 
result  in  less  deflection  of  the  needle.    The  amount  of  deflection  is  therefore  inversely  proportional  to  the 
value of the resistance. 
14-5 Fig 5 A Simple Ohmmeter 
M
R
X
Y
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
The Wheatstone Bridge Method 
18.  Bridge methods of measuring component values are used where high accuracy is most important.  
The  most  straightforward  bridge  circuit  is  the  Wheatstone  bridge.    It  is  less  convenient  than  an 
ohmmeter, but far more accurate. 
19.  The  basic  configuration  consists  of  a  four  limb  resistance  bridge,  as  shown  in  Fig  6, where R is 
the resistance to be measured, and resistors P, Q and S are variable standard resistors. 
20.  The  variable  resistors  (P,  Q  and  S)  are  adjusted  until  no  current  is  registered  in  the 
galvanometer connected between points A and B (a galvanometer is a very sensitive DC current 
measuring  instrument  using  the  same  principle  as  the  moving  coil  instrument).    Under  these 
conditions the bridge is said to be in balance and the ratio of P to Q will then equal that of R to S. 
P
R
Therefore,
=
Q
S
P
R =
×S
Q
14-5 Fig 6 A Wheatstone Bridge 
R
P
A
B
G
S
Q
POWER 
Volt-amp Method 
21.  Referring back to the circuit shown in Fig 1, power in the resistor may be found by measuring the 
voltage across the resistor and the current through it.  The power (P) is then given by the equation: 
P = VI 
22.  This method may be used to give accurate measurement of power in a resistive load in AC and 
DC  circuits.    Where  loads  are  not  purely  resistive,  ie  they  contain  inductance  and  capacitance,  the 
foregoing  method  of  determining  power  gives  incorrect  results;  this  is  due  to  the  phase  differences 
between voltage and current.  Under these conditions a wattmeter is used. 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
Wattmeters 
23.  The  moving  coil  meters  discussed  in  the  earlier  paragraphs  of  this  chapter  rely  on  permanent 
magnets to provide the fixed magnetic field.  However, this magnetic field can be created by passing 
current through fixed current coils.  These additional coils are the basis of wattmeter design. 
24.  A  wattmeter  consists  of  two  fixed  low  resistance  current  coils  and  a  high  resistance  voltage  coil 
which is free to move as shown in Fig 7.  The amount of pointer deflection will be proportional to the 
current flowing through the load and the voltage across it; ie power. 
14-5 Fig 7 A Wattmeter 
Current in
Control
to Voltage Coil
Springs
Scale
Pointer
Current Out
of Voltage Coil
Current Coil
Balance Mass
In
Current Coil
Out
Voltage Coil
Vane
Air
Dashpot
OTHER COMMON INSTRUMENTS 
The Electrostatic Voltmeter 
25.  The electrostatic voltmeter is essentially a variable capacitor whose moving plates are suspended by a 
spring  or  wire  and  are  free  to move, as shown in Fig 8.  When a voltage is applied, the mutual attraction 
between  the fixed and moving plates causes the latter to turn until restrained by the restoring force of the 
spring.  Since no current flows after the initial charging of the plates, the electrostatic voltmeter consumes no 
power and has a very high internal resistance-ideal for voltage measurement.  The chief disadvantage of this 
type of meter is its insensitivity over the low voltage ranges. 
14-5 Fig 8 The Electrostatic Voltmeter 
Moving
Vanes (M)
Terminal
M
A
B
Terminal
Fixed Vanes (F)
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
The Thermo-ammeter 
26.  When  two  dissimilar  metals  are  in  contact  with  each  other  an  electromotive  force  (emf)  is 
produced  at  the  point  of  contact.    The  magnitude  of  this  emf  depends  on  the  metals  used  and  the 
temperature of the junction.  This principle is used in the thermo-ammeter, an instrument which can be 
used for AC measurement at both low and high frequencies. 
27.  In  the  simplified  diagram,  shown  in  Fig  9,  current  passing  through  the  wire  heats  the  junction of 
the thermo-couple.  The resulting emf can then be measured using a standard moving coil instrument.  
In  addition  to  being  a  most  useful  instrument  for  high  frequency  current  measurements,  the  thermo-
ammeter principle is used extensively in engine temperature monitoring. 
14-5 Fig 9 The Thermo-ammeter (Principle of Operation) 
Sensitive Moving
Coil Meter
Constantan
Copper
Thermo Junction
Current to be
Measured
Heater Wire
A
B
Digital Measuring Instruments 
28.  The instruments discussed so far indicate their readings by the movement of a pointer over a scale and 
are known as 'analogue' instruments.  An alternative form of display presents the reading as a sequence of 
digits,  and  instruments  with  this  form  of  display  are  referred  to  as  'digital'  instruments.    Digital  measuring 
instruments  have  the  advantage  that  the  measured  quantity  is  displayed  in  numerical  form  and,  in 
comparison  to  the  moving pointer type of instrument, they are quicker and easier to read.  When used to 
measure voltages, digital instruments are usually referred to as DVMs (digital voltmeters). 
29.  The reading is produced by a voltage measuring analogue-to-digital converter.  The binary output 
from the circuit is applied to a decoder which drives the meter display.  When the input voltage is of the 
order of millivolts, it is normally amplified before being measured.  For varying voltages, a latch circuit 
is  included  to  hold  the  display  steady  at  the  last  value  while  further  samples  of  the  input  are  taken.  
With  some  extra  internal  components,  currents  and  resistances  can  be  measured,  thus  allowing  the 
various multimeter tasks to be undertaken. 
Flux Meters 
30.  The  need  to  measure  the strength of magnetic fields in science and industry has resulted in the 
production  of  magnetometers  of  many  different  types.    Early  magnetometers  consisted  of  spring-
loaded  magnets  in  which  field  strength  was  measured  by  the  extension  of  the  spring.    These  were 
soon superseded by electronic systems, one of the more common being the fluxgate magnetometer. 
31.  The fluxgate magnetometer depends for its operation on the rapid AC magnetization of a pair of 
saturable  cores.    Exciter  coils  are  wound  round  each  of  the  cores  and  are  in  phase  opposition.  The 
output sum is taken via a secondary winding which is wound round the outside of both cores.  This is 
depicted in Fig 10. 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-5 - Measuring Instruments 
14-5 Fig 10 Fluxgate Core Windings 
Primary Windings
A
AC
individually about 
Supply
Cores A and B
B
Secondary Windings
about Cores A and 
B simultaneously
32.  Under  external  flux  free  conditions,  the  magnetic  flux  induced  by  the  AC  excitation  in  one  core 
cancels out the flux induced in the other; the resultant being a zero output.  The introduction of an external 
magnetic field has the effect of introducing magnetic bias into the system and causes one of the cores, 
depending on sense, to saturate.  Core saturation results in the flux in one core having a greater influence 
than  that  in  the  other.    The  summing  effect  of  the  output  coil  produces  AC  current,  of  twice  the  input 
frequency, which is proportional in magnitude to the external magnetic field.  This may be measured using 
a moving coil meter and rectification. 
33.  Fluxgate magnetometers are capable of detecting rapidly varying magnetic fields, and are ideally 
suited to the detection of submarines, and sunken objects such as ships or mines. 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
CHAPTER 6 - DC MACHINES
Introduction 
1.
While  a  conductor  is  moving  in  a  magnetic  field  in  such  a  way  that  the  magnetic  flux  linkage  is 
changing,  there  is  in  that  conductor  an  induced  emf  which  at  any  instant  is  proportional  to  the  rate  of 
change of flux linkage (Volume 14, Chapter 3).  If this emf is applied to a closed circuit an electric current 
will  be  established.    Any  machine  which  produces  such  an  emf  is  known  as  a  generator.    The  DC 
generator (or dynamo) is a mechanically driven machine in which conductors rotating in a magnetic field 
generate a DC output voltage. 
2. 
An electric motor converts electrical energy into mechanical energy, its action being the reverse of 
that  of  the  generator.    There  is  little  difference  in  the  design  of  generators  and  motors;  providing  the 
connections are suitable a DC machine can be used as either a generator or a motor. 
The Simple Generator 
3. 
The simplest form of generator consists of a single loop of wire which can be rotated freely in the space 
between the poles of a permanent magnet.  Connection is made to the external circuit (or 'load') by brushes 
pressing on two slip rings connected to the ends of the loop (Fig 1). 
4. 
While  the  loop  is  rotating  the  magnetic  flux  linkage  is  changing,  and  an  emf  will  be  induced  in 
each  of  the  straight  sides  A  –  A1  and  B  –  B1.    The  direction  of  the  induced  emfs  given  by  Fleming’s 
Right-hand Rule (see para 8) is such that the two emfs in series are additive and combine to establish 
a current when the load is connected. 
14-6 Fig 1 The Simple Generator 
Permanent Magnet
B1
B
A1
Slip Rings
A
Loop
Output
Load
Brushes
5. 
The  magnitude  of  the  induced  emf  is  proportional  to  the  rate  of  change  of  flux  linkage;  thus, 
assuming  the  speed  of  rotation  to  be  constant,  the  induced  emf  will  at  any  instant  depend  on  the 
position of the loop in the magnetic field.  This is illustrated in Fig 2, which represents the view from the 
slip rings end of the loop. 
Page 1 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
14-6 Fig 2 Values of Induced Voltage for One Revolution of the Coil 
a
b
c
d
e
A
B
A
A
B
N
S N +
S N
S N +
S N
S
B
A
B
A
B
b
Max +
ls
a
in
rm
e
T
r
to
ra
a
c
e
e
0
n
e
0O
O
90
180O
270O
360O
G
t
a
e
g
lta
o
V
d
Max -
a. 
In position 'a' Fig 2, the conductors A and B are moving parallel to the lines of magnetic flux.  
In a very smal  period of time dt about the instant shown in 'a', the change of flux linkage (dΦ) is 

zero.    Thus  the  rate  of  change  of  flux  linkage 
  is zero,  and  since  E  (the  back  emf)  = 
dt


volts, the emf induced in the loop at this instant is zero. 
dt
b. 
Position 'b' shows the conductors cutting the flux at right angles.  The rate at which the flux 
linkage  is  changing  is  now  a  maximum  and  the  emf  induced  in  the  loop  is  a  maximum,  the 
direction being given by Fleming’s Right-hand Rule.  At this position the emf is arbitrarily assumed 
to be maximum in a positive direction. 
c. 
Position 'c' represents a position where the rate of change of flux linkage is again zero and no 
emf is induced in the loop. 
d. 
Position  'd'  is  similar  to  position  'b'  except  that  the  side  of  the  loop  which  was  previously 
moving  downwards  (side  A)  is  now  moving  upwards  and  vice  versa.   The rate of change of flux 
linkage is again a maximum and Fleming’s Right-hand Rule will confirm that in relation to 'b' the 
emf is now a maximum in a negative direction. 
e. 
Position 'e' is identical with position 'a'. 
6. 
At other positions of the loop, the rate of change of flux linkage is intermediate between zero and 
maximum and so, therefore, is the emf.  Thus during one complete revolution of the loop the voltage at 
the  terminals  of  the  generator  will  vary  in  the  manner  shown  in  the  graph  of  Fig  2.    This  shows  one 
cycle of alternating voltage. 
Page 2 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
7. 
The frequency of the alternating voltage in cycles per second, or hertz, at the generator terminals 
depends  on  the  speed  of  rotation  and  on  the  number  of  pairs  of  poles  in  the  field  magnet  system.  
Thus: 
pN
frequency f = 
(Hz)
60
where p = number of pairs of poles and N = revolutions per minute 
Hence the frequency of an alternating voltage produced by a 4-pole AC generator running at 1,500 rpm 
is: 
pN
2 ×1,500
f =
=
= 50 Hz
60
60
DC GENERATORS 
Fleming’s Right-hand Rule 
8. 
The  right-hand  rule  for  generators  is  a  method  of  remembering  the  direction  of  the  voltage 
induced in a conductor moving in a magnetic field.  The 'direction of voltage' indicates the direction in 
which conventional current would flow in a closed circuit as a result of this voltage.  The right-hand rule 
(Fig 3), sometimes called 'the geneRIGHTer rule', requires the thumb, the first finger and the second 
finger  of  the  RIGHT  hand  to  be  held  at  right  angles  to  each  other.    With  the  thuMb  pointing  in  the 
direction in which the conductor has been Moved, and the First finger in the direction of the magnetic 
Field (N to S), the seCond finger indicates the direction in which conventional Current would flow in the 
conductor; this in turn gives the direction of the induced voltage. 
14-6 Fig 3 Fleming’s Right-hand Rule 
Motion
Motion
S
N
ThuMb Motion
First Finger
Field
SeCond
Finger
Current
Page 3 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
Production of DC 
9. 
The alternating voltage produced in the loop reverses its polarity every time the loop goes through 
the  0º  and  180º  positions,  because  at  these  points  the  conductors  forming  the  loop  reverse  their 
direction of travel across the magnetic field.  To obtain DC from the generator, the AC produced by the 
rotating loop must be converted to DC.  A possible method is to have a switch connected across the 
output in such a way that the connections to the load are reversed every time the polarity of the voltage 
in the loop changes.  The commutator is a device which does this, switching automatically as the loop 
rotates, thus maintaining the same direction of current in the load. 
10.  The Commutator.  A simple commutator for a single-loop generator consists of the two halves of 
a slip ring insulated from each other and from the shaft which carries them and the loop.  Each end of 
the  loop  is  connected  to  a  segment  of  the  commutator,  and  the  load  is  connected  to  the  loop  by 
brushes  bearing  on  opposite  sides  of  the  commutator  as  shown  in  Fig  4.    As  the  loop  rotates,  an 
alternating  voltage  is  induced  in  it;  a  fluctuating  DC  output  is  derived  from  this  alternating  voltage  by 
using  a  commutator.    Since  the  commutator  rotates  with  the  loop,  the  brushes  bear  on  opposite 
segments during each half cycle (compare B and D of Fig 4).  The left-hand brush is always in contact 
with that segment which is negative, and the right-hand brush with that segment which is positive.  The 
changeover from one segment to the other takes place at the instants when the voltage induced in the 
loop is zero, at A, C and E.  The current in the external circuit is therefore always in the same direction, 
it is a unidirectional current, and this is the first step towards obtaining a true DC output such as we get 
from  a  battery.    The  variations  in  brush  voltage  and  external  circuit  current  during  one  complete 
revolution  of  the  loop  are  also  shown  in  Fig  4.    Note  that  within  the  rotating  loop  itself  an  alternating 
voltage  is  produced;  the  commutator  is  merely  a  switch  that  reverses  the  direction  of  alternate  half-
cycles in the output leads. 
14-6 Fig 4 Production of DC by Commutator Action 
A
B
C
D
E
N
S
N
S
N
S
N
S
N
S
Current
Current
d
n
a
t
n
e
g
rre
lta
u
o
C
V
d
h
a
o
s
o
o
180
o
L
0
90o
o
270
360
ru
B
A
B
C
D
E
Degrees of Rotation
Page 4 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
Improving the DC Output 
11.  The voltage at the brushes and the current in the external circuit of a single-loop DC generator fall 
to zero twice during each revolution.  The voltage wave-form is improved, so that it becomes smoother 
and of greater amplitude, by: 
a. 
Increasing  the  numbers  of  loops,  which  necessitates  additional  segments  on  the 
commutator. 
b. 
Creating stronger magnetic fields. 
14-6 Fig 5 A Two-loop Generator 
N
S
Output
12.  Use of More Than One Loop.  When just one loop is added, thus giving two loops at right angles to 
each other (as shown in Fig 5), the output voltage using a commutator with four segments becomes that 
shown in Fig 6.  The ripple that remains may be made smoother by the use of additional symmetrically 
placed loops, and the use of a commutator with a correspondingly large number of segments. 
14-6 Fig 6 Two-loop Generator Output 
Generator
Terminal
Voltage
Loop
Voltages
e
g
lta
o
V
o
o
o
o
0
90
180
270
360
Angle
13.  The Creation of Stronger Magnetic Fields.  Greater effective strength of the magnetic fields is 
obtained by: 
a. 
Using electromagnets instead of permanent magnets.  The pole pieces are made of soft iron 
and are magnetized by a current flowing through the coils wound round them.  These are known 
as the field windings. 
b. 
Winding the rotating loops, which should be made of many turns of wire, on a soft iron core 
to  concentrate  the  magnetic  field  through  the  loops.    This  assembly  is  known  as  the  armature.  
The coils, are, of course, insulated from the iron core. 
c. 
Decreasing the air gap between the poles and armature by shaping them to fit each other. 
d. 
Increasing the number of poles.  Four pole generators are quite usual; heavy duty and larger 
machines use more. 
Page 5 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
Variation of the Magnitude of the Induced EMF 
14.  From Faraday’s and Lenz’s laws the emf induced in a conductor moving through a magnetic field 
is given by: 

E = −n
  volts
dt

where 
 represents the rate of change of flux, and n the number of turns of the coil.  The emf of a 
dt
generator therefore depends on: 
a. 
The number of conductors connected in series between the brushes. 
b. 
The speed of rotation. 
c. 
The magnetic flux density. 
15.  In practice the number of conductors is fixed and the speed is nominally constant, so control of the emf 
must  be  obtained  by  variation  of  the  magnetic  flux  density.    Using  permanent  magnets  the  flux  density  is 
constant, but by substituting electromagnets the emf can be controlled by varying the current in the magnet 
windings. 
Practical DC Generator 
16.  A  small  DC  generator  is  illustrated  in  Fig  7.    The  mainframe  or  yoke  is  the  main  chassis  of  the 
generator  and  it  also  serves  to  complete  the  magnetic  circuit  between  the  pole  pieces.    The  pole 
pieces are laminated to reduce eddy current losses (see para 25), and the field windings are mounted 
on the pole pieces as shown.  The end housings contain the bearings for the armature which rotates at 
high speed. 
14-6 Fig 7 A Typical DC Generator 
Carbon Brush picks
off Output.  Held in Contact 
Yoke or Frame
with Armature by a Spring
Drive Shaft
Field Winding
forms Field
Armature
Commutator
at the Poles
laminated
comprising Copper
and carrying
segments insulated
many Coils in
from each other by Mica
Slots
Page 6 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
17.  The armature is made up of a shaft, armature core, armature windings and the commutator.  The 
armature core is laminated to reduce eddy current losses, the armature winding resting in slots cut in 
the  core but insulated from it.  The commutator is made up of copper segments insulated from each 
other,  and  from  the  shaft,  by  mica.    The  ends  of  the  armature  windings  are  soldered  to  their 
appropriate commutator segments. 
18.  The Brush Assembly.  The output emf is picked off from the commutator by the brushes.  They 
are  made  of  some  form  of  carbon  which  is  self-lubricating  and  which  causes  very  little  wear  of  the 
commutator.  In addition their relatively high resistance minimizes a tendency for sparking to occur as 
the brushes pass from one commutator segment to the next.  The carbon pieces are mounted in brush 
holders and are held against the commutator by tensioned springs.  The holders are bolted to brush-
rockers  which  can  be  adjusted  to  move  a  few  degrees  in  either  direction  so  that  the  tendency  for 
sparking to occur may be further reduced.  The brushes are connected to the external circuit by copper 
wires. 
Classification of DC Generators 
19.  DC generators are usually classified according to the method by which the magnetic circuit of the 
machine is energized.  The recognized classes are: 
a. 
Permanent magnet generators. 
b. 
Separately-excited generators. 
c. 
Self-excited generators. 
20.  Permanent  Magnet Generators.  The permanent magnet type of generator is usually a simple, 
small  machine  because  of  the  low  strength  of  the  magnetic  field.    The  PD  across  the  terminals 
decreases  slightly  as  the  loading  increases,  the  generator  having  what  is  termed  a  falling  external 
voltage characteristic. 
21.  Separately-excited Generators.  The magnetic field for the separately-excited type of generator is 
obtained  from  electromagnets  which  are  excited  by  an  external  DC  source.    The  exciter  supply  can  be 
regulated,  varying  the  magnetic  field  strength,  and  thus  the  terminal  PD.    The terminal PD falls with an 
increase in loading. 
22.  Self-excited  Generators.    The  power  required  to  excite  the  electromagnets  in  the  self-excited 
type of generator is generated by the machine itself.  This type of generator may be further classified 
as follows: 
a. 
The  shunt-wound  type,  where  the  field  winding  is  connected  directly  across  the  armature.  
Provision is made for regulating the exciting current by a variable resistor connected in series with the 
field winding as shown in Fig 8a.  Thus control over the terminal PD is obtained.  In a shunt generator, 
as the load draws more current from the armature, the terminal voltage decreases because there is a 
greater potential drop in the armature and hence a lower terminal PD, and thus field current decreases.  
The characteristic curve for a shunt generator thus starts at a maximum and then falls as shown in Fig 
8b.  Note that the generator is excited even with the load disconnected. 
Page 7 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
14-6 Fig 8 Shunt Generator 
a. Circuit Diagram 
 
 
 
 
 
 
b. Characteristics 
e
g
lta
o
al V
in
Shunt Field
Load
rm
e
Armatur e
T
Field
Regulator
Load Current
b. 
The series-wound type where the field winding is connected in series with the armature and 
the  load.    The  terminal  PD  may  be  controlled  by  a  diverter  (a  variable  resistor  connected  in 
parallel with the field winding so as to adjust the current in the field coils).  The circuit is shown at 
Fig  9a.    If  the  load  is  disconnected  no  current  flows  through  the  field  coils;  the  only  voltage 
induced is that due to residual magnetism.  With a load connected, current flows in the armature, 
the field strength increases and the terminal voltage rises.  This continues as the load draws more 
current until the magnetic field reaches saturation.  The characteristic curve for a series generator 
is shown at Fig 9b. 
14-6 Fig 9 Series Generator 
a. Circuit Diagram 
 
 
 
 
 
 
b. Characteristics 
e
g
lta
Ser ies Field
o
l V
Diver ter
a
in
Load
rm
e
T
Armature
Load Current
c. 
The  compound-wound  type,  which  is  a  combination  of  the  types  in  sub-paras  a  and  b,  and 
may be constructed so as to give an almost constant voltage output under all loads. 
Page 8 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
Generator Losses and Efficiencies 
23.  There are four types of losses associated with DC generators: copper losses (para 24), hysteresis 
loss (see Volume 14, Chapter 2, para 23), eddy current loss (para 25), and friction losses (which are 
self-explanatory). 
24.  Copper Losses.  Another name for copper losses is electrical losses.  They are a power loss (I2R 
watts), caused by the resistance of the conductors.  Usually they increase with loading. 
25.  Eddy  Current  Losses.    If  the  armature  core  were  made  of  solid  iron,  as  shown  in  Fig  10  for  a 
two-pole  machine,  and  rotated,  eddy  currents  would  be  set  up  in  the  core.    The  eddy  currents  are 
caused  by  emfs  which  are  generated  in  the  iron  in  exactly  the  same  way  as  emfs  generated  in 
conductors wound on the iron core (Fleming’s Right-hand Rule will give the current direction).  These 
currents cause two losses: one through the heat generated, and the other by creating magnetic fields 
which oppose the pole magnetic fields.  The losses are minimised by splitting up the solid iron core, ie 
by  laminating  it,  so  that  the  eddy  currents  are  split  also  (see  Fig 11).    A  five-lamination  core  suffers 
about 1/25th the loss of a solid core (loss ∝ I2). 
14-6 Fig 10 Production of Eddy Currents 
N
S
14-6 Fig 11 Splitting Eddy Currents by Laminations 
N
S
Page 9 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
26.  Efficiencies.    Due  to  the  losses  mentioned  in  the  previous  paragraph  the  efficiency  of  a  DC 
generator  in  converting  mechanical  energy  into  electrical  energy  varies  with  the  type  of  machine.  
Three definitions of efficiency follow: 
a.
Mechanical  Efficiency.    The  electrical  power  in  the  armature  is  equal  to  the  applied 
mechanical power less the hysteresis, eddy current and friction losses.  Thus: 
mechanical efficiency (%) =  power i
  n a
  rmature ×100
power su
  pplied
b.
Electrical Efficiency.  The electrical power output is equal to the power in the armature less 
the copper losses.  Thus: 
power output
electrical power output efficiency (%) = 
×100
power in armature
c.
Commercial  Efficiency.    The  commercial  efficiency  is  the  one  most  commonly  used  to 
describe the overall efficiency of a machine and: 
electrical power output
commercial efficiency (%) = 
× 100
mechanical power input
A graph of losses and efficiency for a compound generator is shown at Fig 12. 
14-6 Fig 12 Losses and Efficiency of a Compound Generato 
Full Load
100%
Efficiency
y
c
n
re
ie
atu
tts
Loss
ffic
a
E
rm
A
er
W
opp
C
Iron Losses
Friction & Windage Loss
Shunt Field Loss
Series Field Loss
Load Current
THE DC MOTOR 
General Principles 
27.  An electric motor is a machine for converting electrical energy into mechanical energy, its function 
being  the  reverse  of  that  of  the  generator.    The  conversion  of  the  electrical  energy  relies  on  the  fact 
that an electric current flowing through a conductor placed in a magnetic field causes the wire to move 
(if free to do so).  The lines of flux of the two fields interact as shown in Fig 13 and, in this case, a force 
is created downward on the conductor. 
Page 10 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
14-6 Fig 13 Force on a Current Carrying Conductor 
N
S
a
+
b
N
+
S
Force
c
Fleming’s Left-hand Rule 
28.  The direction in which a current carrying conductor will move when placed in a magnetic field can be 
determined  from  Fleming’s  Left-hand  Rule  (see  Fig  14).    If  the  first  finger,  the  second  finger,  and  the 
thumb of the LEFT hand are held at right angles to each other, then with the First finger pointing in the 
direction of the Field (N to S), and the seCond finger in the direction of the Current in the conductor, the 
thuMb will indicate the direction in which the conductor tends to Move. 
14-6 Fig 14 Fleming’s Left-hand Rule 
First
Finger
Field
ThuMb
Motion
SeCond
Direction
Finger
of Force
Current
Current
The Simple Motor 
29.  A motor depends for its operation on the force exerted upon current-bearing conductors situated in a 
magnetic field.  Consider a simple permanent magnet motor connected to a battery as shown in Fig 15.  
By  applying  Fleming’s  Left-hand  Rule  it will be seen that side A of the loop (under the N pole) tends to 
move upwards, while side B of the loop tends to move downwards.  The forces acting on the two sides of 
the loop are thus cumulative in their effect, and tend to turn the loop in a clockwise direction. 
Page 11 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
30.  As the sides of the loop pass through the neutral position, the commutator reverses the connections 
of  the  supply  to  the  loop, and the current in the loop is consequently reversed.  It follows that the force 
acting on side A will now be downwards, and on side B upwards.  The mechanical force on the loop is 
thus continued in the original direction, and rotation continues so long as the supply is connected. 
14-6 Fig 15 DC Motor Principle 
B
A
Thumb
N
A
IO
E
T
1st Finger
O
ID
S
M
FIELD
CURRENT
2nd Finger
The Practical Motor 
31.  A  single-loop  motor  is  of  little  use  and  improvements  like  those  made  to  a  simple  generator 
described  in  paras  11,  12  and  13  are  incorporated.    The  direction  of  rotation  of  the  motor  depends 
upon the direction of the current in the armature coils and also upon the direction of the magnetic field.  
If one of these is reversed the direction of rotation is reversed; reversing both together has no effect. 
The Speed of a Motor 
32.  The Back emf.  When the armature in the motor rotates an emf is induced in the conductors by 
generator action.  The direction of the emf is such as to oppose the motion or other cause producing it 
(Lenz’s law), that is it opposes the supply voltage.  This emf (called the back emf) is proportional to the 
field strength and the speed of rotation of the armature, but can never be as great as the supply input 
voltage. 
33.  Speed  with  Variable  Load.    The  back  emf  developed  in  the  armature  of  a  DC  motor  when  it  is 
running  determines  the  current  in  the  armature,  and  makes  the  motor  a  self  regulating  machine  in  which 
speed and armature current are automatically adjusted to the mechanical load.  At small values of load the 
shaft torque exceeds the load torque; the armature therefore accelerates and gives rise to a large back emf.  
The  back  emf  cuts  down  the  armature  current,  thus  reducing  the  shaft  torque,  until  eventually  a  state  of 
balance  between  the  two  torques  is  obtained  and  the  speed  is  stabilized.    With  increasing  load  the  load 
torque is increased, exceeding the shaft torque and causing a fall in armature speed.  Reduced armature 
speed  results  in  reduced  back  emf  and  increased  armature  current;  the  increase  in  armature  current 
produces an increase in shaft torque restoring torque balance and stabilizing the speed again.  The variation 
of speed with armature current (ie with mechanical load) is known as the speed characteristic of the motor. 
Page 12 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
34.  Control  of  Motor  Speed.    Assuming  constant  load,  there  are  two  methods  commonly  used  to 
vary the speed of a DC motor: 
a. 
Field  Control  (Fig  16).    By  weakening  the  main  flux  of  a  motor  the  back  emf  is  reduced, 
increasing the effective voltage and the armature current.  The increased armature current gives rise 
to an increased shaft torque, causing the motor to accelerate until the back emf, rising with increased 
speed,  restricts  the  armature  current  and  shaft  torque  to  restore  the  balance  of  shaft  and  load 
torques.  At this point the speed of the motor will stabilize.  Conversely, an increase in field strength 
will  cause  a  reduction in speed.  The minimum speed will be obtained with full field excitation, this 
being known as the normal speed of the machine. 
14-6 Fig 16 Speed Varied by Controlling Field Strength 
As Resistance is
Increased Motor
Speeds Up
Supply
M
b.
Armature  Control (Fig  17).    By  reducing  the  voltage  across  the  armature  of  a  motor  the 
effective voltage is reduced, with a corresponding reduction in armature current and shaft torque.  
The excess of load torque over shaft torque causes the motor to slow down to a point where the 
reduced back emf permits sufficient armature current to produce a state of balance between the 
two torques.  At this point the speed of the motor will stabilize. 
14-6 Fig 17 Speed Varied by Controlling Armature Current
As Resistance is
Increased Motor
Slows Down
Supply
M
Page 13 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
Types of Motors 
35.  DC motors are classified according to the method by which the field is excited: 
a. 
The  majority  of  motors  are  comparable  to  self-excited  generators,  ie  the  armature  winding 
and field winding are supplied from a common source.  Their speed and load characteristics vary 
according to the method of connecting the field winding to the armature, and as a class, they are 
capable of fulfilling most requirements. 
b. 
Separately-excited motors are used only for special purposes where the more normal types 
are unsuitable. 
c. 
Permanent  magnet  motors  are  employed  for  certain  special  purposes,  eg  in  small  control 
systems. 
Only the self-excited types will be described in detail. 
36.  Shunt-wound Motors.  The field winding of the shunt-wound motor is connected in parallel with 
the armature (Fig 18); it is thus directly across the supply and must be of relatively high resistance to 
restrict the current through it.  The speed of the motor drops only slightly as the load increases and can 
be  considered  constant  for  many  applications.    The  torque  develops  proportionally  with  armature 
current.  The initial torque is small because of the restricted armature current, and shunt motors should 
be  started  on  light  load  or  no  load.    Its  constant  speed  makes  this  type  of  motor  suitable  for  lathes, 
drills, and light machine tools. 
14-6 Fig 18 A Shunt-wound Motor 
Shunt
Field
Supply
Armature
Field
Regulator
37.  Series-wound  Motors.    The  armature  and  the  field  winding  of  the  series-wound  motor  are  in 
series with each other across the supply (Fig 19).  Thus the currents in each of them are the same or 
(as  in  Fig  19)  proportional  to  each  other.    The  speed  decreases  with  increase  in  load,  and  these 
motors  should  always  be  started  under  load  to  prevent  over-speeding  at  start-up.    The  torque 
increases  rapidly  as  the  load  is  increased,  the  starting  torque  being  high.    Due  to  its  high  starting 
torque a series-wound motor is used for engine starting and traction work. 
38.  Compound-wound  Motors.    By  arranging  for  part  of  the  field  winding  to  be  in  series  with  the 
armature  and  part  in  parallel  with  it,  the  large  starting  torque  of  the  series  motor  and  the  almost 
constant speed of the shunt can be reproduced in the compound-wound motor. 
Page 14 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-6 - DC Machines 
14-6 Fig 19 A Series-wound Motor 
Diverter
Series Field
Supply
Armature
Motor Starters 
39.  Due  to  the  low  resistance  of  the  armature,  extremely  high  currents  would  be  experienced  in  the 
armature until its movement caused sufficient back emf to limit the current to an acceptable level.  To 
prevent  the  high  current  burning  out  the  armature  windings,  a  starter  resistance  is  inserted  in  series 
with them.  The resistance is then progressively reduced as the back emf increases.  Starter resistors 
are usually used with heavy motors; the armatures of small motors have sufficiently high resistance to 
limit the current. 
Rotary Transformers 
40.  The rotary transformer is a combination of a DC motor and generator.  It consists of a single field 
system and a single armature, on which are wound the motor and generator windings.  A DC input is 
transformed  into  a  different  DC  output,  a  typical  example  being  an  input  of  24V  7A  and  an  output  of 
1,200V l00 mA.  The power output is always less than the power input. 
Page 15 of 15 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
CHAPTER 7 - ALTERNATING CURRENT THEORY 
Introduction 
1. 
It was stated earlier that a direct current is one in which the electron flow is in one direction only through 
the  circuit,  whereas  an  alternating  current  is  one  in  which  the  electrons  flow  first  in  one  direction  then  the 
other, changing direction at regular, very short time intervals. 
2. 
The national electrical power supply network delivers power, the mains, to consumers as an AC. 
Two advantages of AC over DC in this case are: 
a. 
With  AC,  voltages  can  be  readily  stepped  up  or  stepped  down  by  transformers  (which  will  be 
discussed  later),  whereas  with  DC  conversion  from  one  voltage  to  another  is  cumbersome  and 
expensive. 
b. 
With AC, the loss of power in transmission is minimized. The power carried by a supply line is 
EI;  the  power  lost  in  transmission  due  to  the  resistance  of  the  cables  is  I2R.    By  using  a  high 
voltage and a small current high power can be carried with little loss. 
3. 
For the mains supply, the AC voltage generated at the power station is stepped up to a high value for 
transmission over the national grid, and then stepped down at sub-stations to the nominal mains supply 
voltage (usually 240 V) for domestic lighting, heating, etc. 
AC WAVEFORMS 
Terms Used 
4. 
The  production  of  an  alternating  emf  by  a  simple  generator was discussed in Volume  14,
Chapter 6. Fig 1 is a graph of an alternating voltage, showing voltage against time. Some of the terms 
associated with such a waveform are: 
a. 
Cycle.  A complete sequence of positive and negative values, such as that from A to B. 
b
Period (or Periodic Time).  The duration of one cycle, denoted by the symbol T.  In Fig 1, 
T = 1/100 second. 
c
Frequency.  The number of cycles completed in one second, denoted by the symbol f.  It will 
be apparent that f=1/T cycles per second.  In Fig 1, since T=1/100 sec, f = 100 cycles per second, 
i.e. 100 hertz (Hz).  Low frequency AC currents are used in the supply of electrical power. The AC 
mains supply in Britain has a frequency of 50 hertz; aircraft generally use 400 hertz.  In radio, AC 
currents with frequencies ranging up to hundreds of megahertz are used. 
Page 1 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 1 Alternating Voltage
+
e
g
lta
o
V A
B
Time
0
1
2
100
100
1 Cycle
T Seconds
Waveform 
5. 
The  shape  of  the  AC  voltage  or  current  graph  is  known  as  the  waveform;  in  Fig  1,  it  is  a  sine 
curve.  Fig 2 shows three voltages with the same frequency but different waveforms.  In some circuits, 
AC and DC are both present, and add together in such a way that the AC is superimposed on the DC.  
The result is that the AC axis shifts from the zero line (Fig 3).  Note that if the resulting voltage never 
falls below zero, the current is called a pulsating DC current. 
14-7 Fig 2 AC Waveforms 
+
+
e
e
g
g
lta
lta
o
o
V
Time
V
Time
0
0
_
_
+
e
g
lta
o
V
Time
0
_
Page 2 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 3 AC Superimposed on DC 
+
dc
e
g
lta
o
V
0
Time
+
ac
e
g
lta
o
V
0
Time
+
dc + ac
e
g
lta
o
V
Axis
Lifted
0
Time
Square Waveform 
6. 
It  is  of  interest  here  to  note  how  a  square  wave  is  produced.    Fourier’s  theorem  states  that  any 
recurrent wave-form of frequency f can be resolved into the sum of a number of sinusoidal wave-forms 
having frequencies f, 2f, 3f etc; the number of sine waves may be finite or infinite.  The frequency f is 
known as the fundamental or first harmonic, and frequencies 2f, 3f, 4f, etc as the second, third, fourth 
etc  harmonics.    The  amplitude  of  a  harmonic  is  inversely  proportional  to  its  frequency.    The  square 
wave  consists  of  a  fundamental  sine  wave  and  all  its  odd  harmonics  up  to  infinity.    Fig  4  shows  the 
result of taking harmonics up to the fifth, and it will be seen that this gives a good approximation to a 
square wave. 
Page 3 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 4 Composition of a Square Wave 
Fundamental
(a)
3rd
Harmonic
(b)
5th
Harmonic
(c)
(a) + (b) + (c)
(d)
AC VALUES 
General 
7. 
Several things can be meant by the value of an alternating quantity such as an AC current; the various 
terms used to make it clear which meaning is intended are defined in the following paragraphs and illustrated 
at Fig 5. 
14-7 Fig 5 AC Values
+
Peak Value E  or I
o
o
Effective or
e
g
RMS Value
lta
(0.707 x Peak)
o
V
r
Time
o 0
t
t1
t2
n
Instantaneous
Average
rre
u
Values e or i
Value
C
at t , t
1
2
(Zero)
Peak Value E  or I
o
o
Page 4 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
Instantaneous Value 
8. 
The value of an alternating quantity is continuously changing, its instantaneous value being that at 
any  given  instant  of  time.    Instantaneous  current  is  denoted  by  the  symbol  'i',  and  instantaneous 
voltage by 'e' (Fig 5). 
Peak Value 
9. 
The maximum value of an alternating quantity (either positive or negative) reached during a cycle 
is called the peak value.  Peak current is denoted by I0 (or Imax) and peak voltage by E0 (or Emax). 
Average or Mean Value 
10.  The average value of an alternating quantity over a number of complete cycles is zero.  In Fig 5, 
the  area  between  the  current  curve  and  the  time  axis  represents  the  quantity  of  electricity  that  has 
passed during the interval concerned.  As the curve is symmetrical about the time axis (provided that 
as in Fig 5 it represents AC with no DC present), the quantity of electricity that passes one way during 
the  first  half  exactly  equals  that  passing  the  other  way  during  the  second  half  of  any  cycle.    The  net 
transfer of electricity, and hence the average current, is zero. 
Effective or Root-Mean-Square (rms) Value 
11.  The  heating  effect  of  an  electric  current  is  independent  of  the  direction  of  the  current,  and  the 
effective value of an alternating current is 1 ampere if it has the same heating effect as an unvarying 
direct current of 1 ampere. 
12.  It  was  shown  in  Volume  14,  Chapter  1,  when  considering  power,  that  the  rate  of  dissipation  of 
energy  as  heat  in  a  resistor  depended  upon  the  square  of  the  current  or  voltage,  ie P =  I2R  =  V2/R 
watts.    This applies also to AC.  In Fig 6, the square of the sinusoidal current is plotted against time, 
I2
giving  a  curve  which  is  always  positive  and  is  symmetrical  about  the  halfway  line  0 .    The  energy 
2
dissipated over any time interval is proportional to the shaded area beneath the curve of (current)2.  In 
this graph, crest a will fit into trough a, crest b into trough b, and so on, so that the area beneath the 
curve of (current)2 equal to the area beneath the horizontal line drawn midway between the square of 
the peak current and the time axis.  Thus, the heating effect of the current plotted at Fig 6 is the same 
as that of a direct current of value  (I2/2) , or  I / 2 . 
0
0
14-7 Fig 6 Effective or rms Value 
2
(Current)
2
+
Ιo
a
b
c
t
n
Ι2o
rre
u
2
C
a
b
c
0
Time
Current
Page 5 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
13.  This value is known as the effective value (since it is that value which has the same heating effect 
as an equivalent direct current), or as the root-mean-square (rms) value (since it is obtained by finding 
the mean value of the square of the current and then taking the square root).  If Irms is the rms value of 
alternating current in a circuit, it is related to its peak value by the expression: 
I
I
0
=
= 0.707 I amps
rms
0
2
Also, I0 = I 2  = 1.414 I (amps) 
14.  Alternating  currents  and  voltages  are  usually  measured  by  their  rms  values.    For  instance,  the 
normal AC mains supply has a voltage of 240 V; this is an rms value, the peak voltage being 240 2
which equals 340 V.  Ammeters and voltmeters for AC are normally calibrated in rms values. 
REPRESENTATION OF SINUSOIDAL WAVEFORM 
General 
15.   Alternating  currents  and  voltages  have  so  far  been  represented  by  graphs.    In  the  following 
paragraphs  this  method  of  representing  sinusoidal  wave-forms  will  be  examined in  more detail, and 
brief mention will be made of two other methods often encountered: representation by trigonometrical 
equations and by vectors. 
Graphical Representation 
16.  Consider a  conductor loop  (PQ) rotating in  an  anti-clockwise  direction  at  constant  speed  in  a 
uniform magnetic field, as shown in Fig 7.  When the loop is in the neutral plane, at right angles to the 
magnetic  field  (θ =  0º),  the  emf  induced  in  the  loop  is  zero.    When  the loop  is at  right angles  to  the
neutral plane (θ = 90º) the emf is a maximum (E0), its value depending on the speed of rotation and on 
the flux density.  At intermediate points, the induced emf is between zero and its maximum value and 
depends on the angle which the loop makes to the neutral plane. The emf induced in the loop at any 
instant is proportional to the sine of the angle (θ) through which the loop has rotated from the neutral 
plane, i.e.: 
e = E0sin θ (volts). 
For example, when the loop is in the neutral plane, θ = 0º, sin θ = 0, and e = E0sin θ = zero.  When the 
loop is at right angles to the neutral plane, θ = 90º, sin θ = 1, and e = E0sin θ = E0 volts. 
14-7 Fig 7 Dependence of emf on Sin θ 
S
P
θ
Neutral Plane
Q
N
Page 6 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
17.  To plot a curve showing the instantaneous value of the emf for al  values of the angle θ, consider 
Fig  8.    The  line  OP  is  assumed  to  rotate  about  the  point  O  in  an  anti-clockwise  direction,  its  length 
representing  the  maximum  value  of  the  emf  (E0)  to  any  convenient  scale.    A  horizontal  line is  drawn
through the centre of rotation (O) and, along this, a scale of degrees of rotation is marked.  Now: 
sin θ =  PS
OP
∴ PS = OP sin θ = E0sin θ 
Thus, the vertical line PS represents, to scale, the instantaneous emf 'e' = E0sin θ.  As OP rotates, the 
length of the line PS varies, and plotting this against the various values of the angle θ on the horizontal 
axis,  the  graph  of  the  instantaneous  emf  is  obtained.    This  curve  is  termed  a  sine  curve,  and  any 
quantity which varies in this manner is said to have a sinusoidal waveform. 
14-7 Fig 8 Plotting a Sine Wave 
4
E
4
4
o
5
3
3
5
3
5
P
6
2
2
6
e
2
6
E o
1
θ
7
1
7
7
1
O
S
0
540o
90o
180o
270o
360o
450o
θo
8
12
8
12
E
9
11
o
9
11
10
10
18.  Phase  Difference.    When  two  alternating  quantities  of the same frequency pass through
corresponding points in a cycle at the same instant of time they are said to be in phase with each other 
(Fig  9a).    If  they  pass  through  corresponding points at different instants of time, there is  a  phase 
difference between them and one is said to be leading or lagging the other by a certain phase angle.  
For example, in Fig 9b, i1 is leading i2 by θ radians (or i2 is lagging by θ radians).  Thus, i1 reaches its 
maximum value θ radians before i2. 
Page 7 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 9 Phase Difference by Graphs 
a    In Phase 
+
e = E  sin t
w
o
Eo
i = I  
o sin t
w
Io
3p
2
2p
wt
0
p
p
Radians
2
Io
Eo
-
b    Out of Phase 
I
w q
+
q
i  =   sin( t- )
2
o
Io
i  =   sin t
1
o
I
w
3p
2
2p
wt
p
p
0
Radians
2
q
Io
q
-
Trigonometrical Representation 
19.  Angular  Velocity.    Normally  the  size  of  angles  is  expressed  in  degrees.    When  dealing  with 
rotation  another  unit  of  measurement,  the  radian,  is  used.    A  radian  is  the  angle  subtended  at  the 
centre of a circle by an arc of the circumference equal in length to the radius of that circle.  As the total 
length of the circumference is 2πr and a complete revolution is 360º. 
360º = 2π radians, or 1 radian = 57.3º 
20.  Instantaneous Values of e and i.  Using radians, expressions for the instantaneous values of e
and I, which are related to time, can be derived.  In one revolution, the loop passes through 360º or 2π
radians. If it rotates at f revolutions per second it passes through 2πf radians per second; this is termed 
the angular velocity of the loop and is denoted by the Greek letter ω.  Thus: 
angular velocity = ω (radians per sec) 
After an interval of t seconds from the commencement of rotation the loop has rotated through an angle
θ equal to 2πft = ωt radians, and the emf at this instant is: 
e = E0sin θ 
   = E0sin ωt (volts) 
Page 8 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
Similarly, with an alternating current in a circuit, the value of the current at any instant 't' is: 
 i = I0sin ωt (amps) 
21.  Phase  Difference.    The information in the graph of  Fig  9b  can  also  be  conveyed  by 
trigonometrical equations.  For instance, the pair of equations i1 = I0sin ωt and i2 = I0sin (ωt – θ) indicate 
that  the  two  currents  i1  and  i2  have  the  same  amplitude  I0 and the same angular velocity, ω, but i2 is 
lagging i1 by θ radians. 
Vectorial Representation 
22.  The trigonometrical representation of voltages and currents, described in para 20, can be depicted by 
vectors.  In the special application of vectors to alternating quantities, the vector is assumed to be fixed at 
its origin but free to rotate at the frequency of the alternations, the length of the vector being equal to the 
peak value of the alternating quantity.  For example, consider a voltage e = E0sin ωt.  This voltage may be 
represented by a vector of length corresponding to E0 rotating in an anti-clockwise direction with reference 
to a datum or reference line, with angular velocity ω radians per second.  This is shown in Fig 10 where, 
after time 't' seconds, the vector has rotated through an angle of ωt radians.  The instantaneous value of e 
is shown to the same scale as the vector E0 by the line PQ (see para 17). 
14-7 Fig 10 Vector Representation of AC 
ω
P
E o
e
ωt
Reference Line
O
Q
23.  While the voltage E0 throughout one cycle could be represented by a complete series of lines OP, 
OP1,  OP2,  etc  (Fig  11),  it  is  usually  sufficient  to  show  one  position  of  the  vector,  for  its  rotation  with 
angular velocity ω is understood.  It is usual to take the instant t = 0 for the voltage e = E0sin ωt as the 
reference line. 
14-7 Fig 11 Vector Convention 
P
P
3
2
ω
P1
P
Reference
O
24.  Figs 12a and 12b both show the phase difference between a current and its related voltage, but 
the vector representation is simpler to construct and use.  In Fig 13, let Eo represent the peak value of 
an alternating voltage, and Io the peak value of the current in a circuit.  Then, if the voltage and current 
are in phase, Eo and Io may be represented by vectors which are coincident in direction and rotate at 
equal  angular  velocity  ω  radians  per  second.    E0  and  I0  are  therefore  represented  as  in  Fig 13a.    In 
Page 9 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
practice I0 may be alternatively in phase with, or lead, or lag the voltage E0.  In Fig 13b, I0 is shown as 
leading by angle θ, and in Fig 13c as lagging by angle θ with reference to E0. 
14-7 Fig 12 Phase Difference by Graphs and Vectors 
E0
θ
I0
E0
i
I0
θ
e
Time
a
b
14-7 Fig 13 Phase Difference by Vector 
ω
ω
ω
I0
θ
E
E
E
0
0
θ
0
I0
a
b
c
25.  Reference  Vectors.    Consider  two  voltages  e1  =  E1  sin  ωt  and  e2  =  E2sin  (ωt  +  θ).    These  two 
voltages can be represented by vectors of length E1 and E2 respectively, rotating with the same angular 
velocity ω radians per second and displaced from each other by an angle θ.  At the instant t = 0, E1 is 
lying along the reference vector and E2 is leading by an angle θ, as shown in Fig 14a.  Since both vectors 
are rotating at the same angular velocity, they maintain the same relative positions as shown in Figs 14b 
and 14c.  In AC problems, it is sufficient to consider vectors in one position only and it is usual to take the 
instant t = 0 as depicted in Fig 14a when one of the vectors lies along the reference line. 
14-7 Fig 14 Reference Vectors 
ω
ω
ω
E2
E2
ωt
Reference
E1
θ
θ
θ
Reference
ωt
Reference
E
E
1
1
E2
a
b
c
26.  Resultant  of  Two  Voltages.    A  single  voltage,  equivalent to any two alternating voltages acting 
across  the  same  circuit  at  the  same  time,  can  be  found  by  the  parallelogram  rule  for  finding  the 
resultant  of  two  vectors.    Thus,  in  Fig  15,  E1  and  E2  are  the  vectors  representing  two  voltages 
Page 10 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
e1 = E1sin  ωt  volts  and  e2 = E2sin  (ωt  –  θ)  volts respectively.  The resultant voltage is represented by 
the  diagonal  of  the  parallelogram  drawn  outwards  from  O,  ie  the  vector ER.    This resultant vector
rotates at the same angular velocity ω as E1 and E2 and with reference to E1 lags by an angle Ø.  The 
resultant voltage is, therefore, eR =ERsin (ωt – Ø) volts. 
14-7 Fig 15 Resultant of Two alternating Reference Vectors 
E
O
I

ω
θ
E2
ER
IDEAL COMPONENTS IN CIRCUITS  
Introduction 
27.  In the next chapter, the combined effects of resistance, inductance, and capacitance in AC circuits
are  examined  in  some  detail.    In  this  chapter  a  simpler  approach  is  adopted,  the  assumption  being 
made  that  resistance,  inductance  and  capacitance  exist  separately;  as  has  already  been  stated  in 
discussing  DC  circuits  this  is  an  idealized  approach,  inductors  for  example  having  some  resistance, 
and wire-wound resistors some inductance. 
28.  When purely resistive components are used in AC circuits, Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s Laws, and the 
usual  circuit  rules  apply  exactly  as  in  DC  circuits,  noting  that  in  general  cases  rms  values  of  current 
and voltage are used. 
Pure Resistive Circuits 
29.  When an alternating voltage is applied across a resistance (Fig 16a), the waveform of the voltage is a 
sine wave.  As Ohm’s Law applies at any instant, the current flow follows the same waveform, increasing and 
decreasing with the voltage and changing direction with it (Fig 16b).  The voltage and current are said to be in 
phase (sine waves being in phase when they have the same frequency, and pass through zero together in 
the same direction, although they do not necessarily have the same amplitude). 
14-7 Fig 16 A Resistive AC Circuit 
a
b
c
+
E0
e
i
I0
i
ω
e
R
ωt 
0
π
π


2
I
E
2
0
0
I0
E0
Page 11 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
30.  Current.    Since  Ohm’s  Law  applies  at  all  times  to  a  purely  resistive  circuit,  the  rms  value  of 
current is given by: 
E
I
rms
=
rms
R
31.  Power.    The  power  in  AC  circuits  is  the  average  value  of  all  the  instantaneous  values  for  a 
complete  cycle.    The  instantaneous  power  is  the  product  of  e  and  i  at  that  instant.    If  the  multiplying 
process is carried out over a complete cycle, the power curve at Fig 17 is obtained (note that as e and i 
are  both  negative  together,  their  product  is  always  positive).    The  total  power  over  one  cycle  is 
represented  by  the  area  beneath  the  power  curve;  the  same  area  lies  beneath  the  straight-line  AB 
drawn midway between maximum and minimum values of power.  The average power over a complete 
cycle is thus half the peak power.  Note that: 
a. 
The power waveform has twice the frequency of the supply. 
b. 
Maximum power  (P0) = E0 × I0
E × I
E
I
c. 
Average power P
0
0
0
0
×
average = 
 = 
2
2
2
 
 
 
 
 
      = Erms × Irms
d. 
Also, since Erms = Irms × R, 
 
 
      P
2
average =  I
× R
rms
2
 
 
 
          =  E rms
R
14-7 Fig 17 Power Waveform - Resistive AC Circuit 
Power
12
10
tts
8
a
A
Voltage
B
W
6
r
o
,
4
s
p
Current
m
2
A
,
0
lts
π
π
π
o
3

V -2
2
2
-4
-6
Time or Angular Velocity
Page 12 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
32.  Deduction.  The observations made in paras 29 and 30 can be deduced using the trigonometrical 
approach: 
Applied voltage (e) = E0sin ωt volts 
From Ohm’s Law, 
e
E sin ωt
current (i) = 
0
=
amps
R
R
These  equations  show  that  i  is  a  sinusoidal  current  in  phase  with  e  and  having  the  same  frequency 
f = ω/2π Hz.  The peak value of i occurs when e = E0 volts (ie when sin ωt = 1), thus E0 /R = I0 amps.  
Thus: 
a. 
The current and voltage are in phase. 
b. 
The ratio  E
E
0
rms
=
= R ohms
I
I
0
rms
Fig 16c portrays the current and voltage vectorially. 
Pure Inductive Circuits 
33.  It was shown in Volume 14, Chapter 3 that a change of flux through a coil induces a voltage in it, 
and that a change of flux through a coil can be produced merely by varying the current in it.  In steady 
DC  circuits  the  current  changes  only  when  the  circuit  is  being  switched on and off; in AC circuits the 
current  is  continuously  changing,  and  thus  a  voltage  is  induced  in  a  coil  all  the  time  AC  supply  is 
connected.    It  was  noted  that  the  voltage  induced  (the  back  emf)  acts  in  opposition  to  the  applied 
voltage, thus opposing any current change. 
34.  The  back  emf  induced  in  a  coil  by  a  changing  current  is  given  by  e  =  –L  di/dt,  where  di/dt  is  an 
expression meaning the rate of change of current with respect to time and L is the inductance of the coil.  
Fig 18b shows the curve for a sinusoidal current i = I0 sin ωt which is established in the circuit of Fig 18a.  
The slope of the curve is horizontal at the points B, D and F, when θ = π/2, 3 π/2, 5 π/2.  Therefore, the 
rate of change of current is zero at these instants, giving points B, D, and F in Fig 18c. The curve has
maximum and equal gradients at  the  points  A,  C  and  E  of  Fig  18b,  when  θ  =  0,  π  and  2π. At these
instants, the rate of change has a maximum value.  At A and E, the current is positive-going, and the rate 
of change has a maximum positive value; at C, the current is negative-going and the rate of change has a 
maximum negative value. Joining the points A, B, C, D, E, and F by a curve as in Fig 18c gives the curve 
for the rate of change of current.  Such a curve is itself a sine wave leading the current waveform by π/2 
radians or 90º. 
14-7 Fig 18 Rate of Change of Current - Inductive AC Circuit 
a
b
c
+
+
I0
i
B
F
A
E
t
n
rre
e
θ = ωt
L
u
θ = ωt
C
B
D
F
A
C
E
f
(i)
t
0
o
0
n
π
π
π




e
π




g
rre
n
2
2
2
u
2
2
2
a
C
h
c
f
C
o
D
te
a
I0
R
1/4 Period ahead of Current
Page 13 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
35.  Voltage  and  Current  Phases. For a pure inductance  the  back  emf  is  e  =  –L  di/dt  volts;  it  is  in 
anti-phase  to  the  rate  of  change  of  current  (by  virtue  of  the  negative  sign).    The  applied  emf  is, 
however, equal and opposite to the back emf (Kirchoff’s second law) and is given by e = +L di/dt volts; 
it is, therefore, in phase with the rate of change of current. Hence, since the rate of change of current 
leads  the  current  by  π/2  radians,  the  applied  emf  is  a  sinusoidal  wave  leading  the  current  by  π/2 
radians.    Therefore,  in  a  pure  inductance  the  current  and  voltage  are  90º  out  of  phase,  the  current 
lagging the applied voltage by π/2 radians or 90º.  This is shown graphical y in Fig 19 and vectorial y in 
Fig 20. 
36.  Inductive Reactance.  In a pure resistance the ratio of voltage to current gives the resistance R.  
In a pure inductance the ratio of voltage to current is: 
E
E
0 =
= ωL = 2 f
π L (ohms)
I
I
0
E
Thus,  I =
 (amps) 
2π L
f
Hence, in a circuit having inductance only, the current is directly proportional to the applied voltage and
inversely proportional to the frequency and the inductance.  The opposition offered by pure inductance 
to  the  establishment  of  a  current  is  termed  the  inductive  reactance.    The  term  reactance  is  used 
instead  of  resistance  because,  as  can  be  seen  from  the  formula,  the  opposition  depends  upon 
frequency. Inductive reactance is denoted by the symbol XL and is expressed in ohms.  Thus: 
XL = E/I = 2πfL, 
where 
XL = inductive reactance in ohms, 
 
   f = frequency in hertz, and 
 
  L = inductance in henrys. 
14-7 Fig 19 Phase Relationships in an Inductive AC Circuit 
a
c
+
+
I
E
0
0
f
(i)
m
t
wt
e
wt
n
0
p
p
k
0
3p
p
c
p
rre
2p
3p
2p
a
u
2
2
2
B
2
C
I0
E
-
0
-
b

+
e
+
g
f
E
n
t
m
0
a
n
e
h
c
rre
wt
d
wt
f
u
0
p
p
lie
0
o
C
3p
2p
p
p
p
3p
2p
f
2
te
2
p
2
2
a
o
A
R
E
-
0
-
Page 14 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 20 Vector Relationships in an Inductive AC Circuit 

Applied
dt
ω
emf

+L dt
e
g
lta
o
V
Current (I )
0
− dΙ
L dt
Back emf
37.  The  Reactance  Sketch.    The  reactance  of  an  inductance  is  proportional  to  ω  and  so  directly 
proportional  to  the  frequency  f, since ω = 2  πf. A graph  of  inductive reactance against frequency for 
two different values of inductance is at Fig 21. This graph is known as a reactance sketch, and for a
pure inductance is a straight line through the origin at O.  Thus, for a 1 mH inductance: 
when f is 50 Hz, XL = 2π × 50 × 10–3 = 0.314 Ω
when f is 1 kHz, XL = 2π × 103 × 10–3 = 6.28 Ω 
when f is 1MHz, XL = 2π × 106 × 10–3 = 6,280 Ω 
14-7 Fig 21 Variation of lnductive Reactance with Frequency 
) L
(X
e
c
n
ta
c
a
L
e
R
e
Large
tiv
c
u
Small L
d
In
O
Frequency (f)
38.  Power.  The power curve for a purely inductive circuit is derived as usual by multiplying together 
corresponding values of current and voltage to find the instantaneous power and plotting the products 
(Fig  22).    It will be seen that because current and voltage are not in  phase  the  power  is  sometimes 
positive and sometimes negative, that the frequency of the power curve is twice that of the supply, that 
positive power equals negative power, and that true power equals zero.  Meanings can be given to the 
terms positive and negative power.  Power is reckoned positive when energy is being taken from the 
generator to be stored in the magnetic field of the inductor, and negative when power is being extracted 
from this magnetic field and returned to the generator. 
Page 15 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 22 Power Curve of a Purely Inductive Circuit 
+
Voltage
tts
Current
a
W
r
o
0
s
π
3
π
π
p

2
2
m
A
,
lts
o
V
Power
39.  Conclusions.  In a purely inductive circuit: 
a.  The current lags the applied voltage by 90º (π/2 radians). 
b. 
The ratio of voltage to current gives the inductive reactance. 
These two statements are illustrated by the vector diagram at Fig 23. 
14-7 Fig 23 Phases of Current and Voltage in a Pure Inductance 
)
I 0L
X
ω
= 0
(E
e
g
lta
o
V
Current (I )
0
Pure Capacitive Circuits 
40.  In Fig 24: 
a. 
A pure capacitance is shown in Fig 24a connected across an alternating voltage supply. 
b.  The applied voltage is e = E0sin ωt, represented graphical y at Fig 24b. 
c. 
From the general expression Q = CV (where Q is the charge in coulombs, C the capacitance in 
farads, and V the applied emf in volts), the charge on the capacitor at the time t is given by q = CE0sin 
ωt, represented graphical y at Fig 24c, the charge being in phase with the applied voltage. 
d. 
The  current  i  at  time  t  is  the  rate  of  change  of  charge  (dq/dt)  at  that  instant.    Using  the 
arguments  of  para  34,  the  curve  for  the  rate  of  change  of  charge  can  be  shown  to  be  itself 
sinusoidal,  leading  the  curve  for  charge  (and  therefore  the  curve  for  applied  voltage)  by  π/2 
radians or 90º (Fig 24d). 
Page 16 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
41.  The  conclusion  that  the  curve  for  voltage  lags  behind  the  curve  for  current  is  expected  if  one 
considers that when the supply voltage is applied to a capacitive circuit the current rises to a maximum 
value  immediately.    However,  as  the voltage builds up on the plates of  a  capacitor  so  the  opposition 
(reactance) increases, thus delaying the voltage rise. 
42.  In a pure capacitance the ratio of voltage to current is: 
E
E
1
1
0 =
=
=
 or, transposing 
I
I
ωC
2π fC
0
   I = E2πfC 
That is, in a circuit having capacitance only, the current is directly proportional to the applied voltage, 
the frequency, and the capacitance. 
14-7 Fig 24 Phase Relationship in a Capacitance 
i
e
C
a
+
e = E  
o sin ωt 
Eo
d
e
ωt 
lie
g
p
lta
0
p
o
π
π


A
V
2
2
Eo
b
+
q = CE  
o sin ωt 
Qo
)
(Q
e
ωt 
rg
0
a
π
π


h
C
2
2
Qo
c
Ιo +
dq = i
dt
t(i)
ωt 
n
0
rre
π
π


u
C
2
2
Ιo
d
1/4 Period ahead
of Voltage
Page 17 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
43.  Capacitive Reactance.  It will be recalled, from Volume 14, Chapter 4, that capacitance opposes 
any change in the value of voltage applied to a capacitor, thus when the applied voltage is alternating 
the capacitor presents an opposition at all times.  This opposition is called capacitive reactance (XC), 
and,  as  with  inductive  reactance,  the  term  reactance  is  used  rather  than  resistance  because  the 
opposition to the change depends upon frequency. 
44.  Capacitive reactance is expressed in ohms, and is given by: 
X
E
1
C = 
=
I
2 f
π C
Thus,  capacitive  reactance  is  inversely  proportional  to  frequency.    A  graph  of  capacitive  reactance 
against frequency is shown at Fig 25.  The reactance of a capacitance is assumed negative (opposite 
to  that  of  an  inductance)  and  is  normally  given  as  XC  =  1/ωC;  it  decreases  as  the  capacitance 
increases, and as the frequency increases.  Thus, for a 2μF capacitor: 
1
106
when f is 50 Hz, X
=
=
C
  = 1,600 Ω 
2 f
π C
2π × 50 × 2
106
when f is 1 kHz, X
=
C
 = 80 Ω 
2π ×103 × 2
106
when f is 1 MHz, X
=
C
 = .08 Ω 
2π ×106 × 2
14-7 Fig 25 Variation of XC with Frequency 
+
) c
(X
e
c
n
ta
c
Frequency (Hz)
a O
e
R
e
Incr
itiv
e
c
as
a
in
p
g
a
C
C
45.  Power.  The power curve for a purely capacitive circuit is derived as usual by multiplying together 
corresponding values of current and voltage to find the instantaneous power and plotting the products.  
The power curve is similar to that derived in Fig 22 for an inductive circuit, but, as in this case current 
leads voltage, inverted.  Again, the total power is zero. 
46.  Conclusions.  In a purely capacitive circuit: 
a.  The current leads the voltage by 90º (π/2 radians). 
b. 
The ratio of voltage to current gives the capacitive reactance XC. 
These two statements can be shown by drawing a vector diagram as at Fig 26. 
Page 18 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-7 - Alternating Current Theory 
14-7 Fig 26 Phases of Current and Voltage in a Pure Capacitance 
ω
Ι  =E ω
o
o C
E
Summary 
47.  The  relative  phase  of  current  and  voltage  in  a  capacitor  and  in  an  inductor  can  be 
remembered from the word 'CIVIL', where C is the capacitance, I the current, V the voltage, and L 
the  inductance.    CIVIL  then  indicates  that  in  a  capacitor  the  current  leads  the  voltage;  in  an 
inductor, the current lags the voltage. 
Page 19 of 19 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
CHAPTER 8 - AC CIRCUITS 
Introduction 
1.
In the last chapter ideal components in AC circuits were examined.  In this chapter components in 
combination as they actually occur in circuits are discussed. 
2. 
Circuits  containing  combinations  of  resistance,  inductance  and  capacitance  in  series  and  in 
parallel  are  considered  in  detail,  and  the  phase  and  magnitude  relationships  of  circuit  voltages  and 
currents are illustrated for various typical circuits. 
Notes
1. 
Unless otherwise specified it should be assumed that rms values of current and voltage are 
intended. 
2. 
As  this  is  a  general  theoretical  treatment,  units  are  not  always  specified.    It  should  be 
assumed  that  quantities  are  in  compatible  units,  viz  current  in  amperes,  emf  and  PD  in  volts, 
frequency in hertz, resistance in ohms, inductance in henrys, and capacitance in farads. 
SERIES CIRCUITS 
Resistance and Inductance in Series 
3. 
In  Fig  1  a  sinusoidal  alternating  voltage  of  rms  value  V  volts  and  frequency  f  hertz  is  applied 
across  a  circuit  consisting  of  resistance  R  ohms  and  inductance  L  henrys  connected  in  series.    A 
corresponding  rms  current  I  amperes  is  established  in  the  circuit.    With  components  in  series,  the 
current  is  the  same  at  all  points  in  the  circuit,  and,  for  this  reason,  the  current  vector  is  taken as the 
reference when constructing a vector diagram. 
14-8 Fig 1 R and L in Series 
I
R
VR
V~
L
VL
4. 
The vector diagram for this circuit is shown in Fig 2 and is constructed in the following manner: 
a. 
The current vector I is drawn to form the reference line. 
b. 
The voltage drop across R is the product of the current and the resistance.  It is in phase with 
the current and has an rms value VR = IR.  This vector is drawn to any convenient scale in line with 
the current vector. 
c. 
The voltage across L is the product of the current and the inductive reactance XL.  It leads the 
current  by  90º  and  has  an  rms  value  VL  =  IXL.    This  vector  is  drawn  to  the  same  scale  as  VR, 
leading the current by 90º. 
Page 1 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
d. 
The applied voltage V is found by applying the analogous parallelogram of forces rule.  This 
voltage is seen to lead the current by an angle θ (the phase angle). 
14-8 Fig 2 Phase Relationships, R and L in Series 
V  = X I
V
L
L
q
V  = IR
I
R
5. 
Application  of  Pythagoras’  Theorem.    The  magnitude  and  phase  of  the  applied  voltage  V  is 
found  by  considering  the  triangle  ABC  in  Fig  3.  This  is  a  right-angled  triangle  to  which  Pythagoras’ 
theorem applies.  Thus, from Fig 3: 
2
2
2
2
2
V = V + V , and V =
V + V
R
L
R
L
Alternatively, substituting for VR and VL, 
2
2
2
2
2
V = I R + I XL
2
2
∴ V = I R + XL
Also, V leads I by an angle θ where: 
V
X
tan
L
L
θ =
=
V
R
R
Re
t
ac ance
∴ θ tan 1

=
Re sistance
(Where tan–1 means "the angle whose tangent is given by".) 
14-8 Fig 3 Magnitude and Phase of V 
V  = X I
V
L
L
XL
q = tan-1
2
R
X L
2
+
R
I
V  = X I
L
L
=
V
q
C
I
A
V  = IR
R
Page 2 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
6. 
Impedance.    The  total  opposition  to  current  in  a  circuit  containing  resistance  and  reactance  in 
combination is termed impedance (symbol Z) and is measured in ohms.  For the whole circuit I = V/Z.  
Using  Z  =  V/I,  which  applies  to  any  circuit,  for  a  series  circuit  containing  resistance  and  inductance 
where the voltage V is 
2
2
I R + X
the impedance is: 
L
V
2
2
Z =
= R + XL
I
7. 
The  Impedance  Triangle.    Although  Z  is  composed  of  both  resistance  and  reactance,  it  is  not 
merely  the  sum  of  these,  as  the  phases  of  current  and  voltage  in  each  of  them  are  different.    An 
impedance triangle can be constructed from the vector diagram of Fig 2 by dividing each voltage vector 
by  I.    The  result  is  shown  in  Fig  4,  where  the  base  represents  the  resistance,  the  perpendicular  the 
reactance, and the hypotenuse the impedance.  The tan of the phase angle Z is given by XL/R. 
14-8 Fig 4 Impedance Triangle, R and L in Series 
B
tan θ
X
 =
L
R
2
X L
2
+
R
=
XL
Z
θ
A
R
C
8. 
Summary.  In a circuit containing resistance and inductance in series: 
a. 
The applied voltage V = 
2
2
V + V  volts. 
R
L
V
V
b. 
The magnitude of the current I = 
=
 amperes. 
2
2
Z
R + XL
c. 
The phase of the applied voltage relative to the current is found from tan θ =XL/R, tan θ being 
positive indicating that V leads I. 
d. 
The  impedance  of  the  circuit  is  Z = 
2
2
R + X
  ohms,  where  X
L
L  (the  inductive  reactance), 
equals 2πfL (i.e. ωL). 
Resistance and Capacitance in Series 
9. 
With  a  current  of  rms  value  I  amperes  established  in  the  circuit  of  Fig  5,  components  of  the 
applied voltage V appear across R and across C.  The vector diagram (Fig 6) is constructed as follows: 
a. 
The current I is common to R and C and the vector I is the reference vector. 
Page 3 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
b. 
The voltage across R is VR = IR, and is in phase with I. 
c. 
The  voltage  across  C  is  VC  =  IXC  =  –I/ωC,  and  it  lags  the  current  by  90º.    Its  magnitude 
decreases as the frequency increases. 
d. 
The  resultant  applied  voltage  V  is  found  by  applying  the  analogous  parallelogram  of  forces 
rule.  This voltage is then seen to lag the current by an angle θ. 
14-8 Fig 5 R and C in Series 
I
R
VR
V~
 C
VC
14-8 Fig 6 Phase Relationship, R and C in Series 
V  = IR
R
I
q
V =I
R 2+
I
X
V  = IX =
C

2
wC
C
1
V   I
tan   
q = -
C =  XC
wCR
10.  Application of Pythagoras’ Theorem.  Applying Pythagoras’ theorem to Fig 6: 
2
2
2
2
2
V = V + V , and V V + V
R
C
R
C
Or, substituting: 
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
V = I R + I X , and V = I R + X

C
C
Also, V lags I by an angle θ where: 
V
V

1

tan θ =
C = C =  −

V
IR
R
 ωCR 
− 
re t
ac ance 
∴ θ = tan 1−

 resistance 
Page 4 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
Note that tan θ is negative in a capacitive circuit, indicating that V lags I. 
11.  Impedance.  The impedance of this circuit is: 
V
2
2
Z =
= R + XC
I
The corresponding impedance triangle is shown in Fig 7. 
14-8 Fig 7 Impedance Triangle, R and C in Series 
R
q
Z =
1
X   = -
R
C
wC
2
+ X 2
C
1
tan   
q = - wCR
12.  Summary.  In a circuit containing resistance and capacitance in series: 
a. 
The applied voltage 
2
2
V =
V + V  volts. 
R
C
V
V
b. 
The magnitude of the current is  I =
=
 amperes. 
2
2
Z
R + XC
c. 
The  phase  of  the  current  relative  to  the  applied  voltage  is  found  from  tan  θ  =  XC/R.    The 
current leads the voltage in a capacitive circuit. 
d. 
The  impedance  of  the  circuit  is:  Z  = 
2
2
R + X
  ohms,  where  X
C
C,  the  capacitive  reactance, 
equals 1/2πfC. 
Inductance and Capacitance in Series 
13.  In an AC circuit containing only L and C in series (Fig 8a), the voltage VL across the inductance leads 
the current by 90º, and voltage VC across the capacitance lags the current by 90º.  Thus VL and VC are 180º 
out of phase as shown in Fig 8b, and oppose each other so that the total applied voltage V is their difference.  
In Fig 8 VL is taken to be larger than VC and V is leading I by 90º.  However, if the frequency of the applied 
voltage and values of L and C are such that XC > XL, then VC >VL and V lags I by 90º. 
14.  Ohm’s law applies to each part of the circuit and to the whole circuit: VL  = IXL; VC = IXC; V = IZ.  
Since  VL  and  VC  oppose  each  other,  XL  and  XC  act  in  opposite  directions  and  the  impedance  of  the 
Page 5 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
circuit is their difference.  Thus Z = XL – XC, or XC – XL, depending on which is the larger.  If XL > XC, 
then Z is an inductive reactance.  If XC > XL, then Z is a capacitive reactance. 
14-8 Fig 8 L and C in Series 
a  Circuit Diagram
b  Phase Relationship
VL
I
V
L
L
V ~
I
VC
C
VC
Resistance, Inductance and Capacitance in Series 
15.  Fig 9a shows a circuit consisting of R ohms, L henrys and C farads connected in series across an 
alternating supply of frequency f Hz.  With a current of rms value I amperes established in the circuit, 
voltages (in volts) across each component are as follows: 
a. 
Across R, VR = IR and is in phase with I. 
b. 
Across L, VL = IXL and leads I by 90º. Its magnitude increases with frequency. 
c. 
Across C, VC = IXC and lags I by 90º.  Its magnitude decreases as the frequency increases. 
14-8 Fig 9 R, L and C in Series 
a Circuit Diagram
b Phase Relationship
V  = X I
L
L
I
VR
R
V  = IR
I
R
V ~
L
VL
C
VC
V  
C = X I
C
16.  The resultant vector diagram is constructed as shown in Fig 9b, the current I, which is common to 
all components, being the reference vector.  By Kirchoff’s second law the vectorial resultant of VR, VL, 
and VC must equal the applied voltage V.  To obtain this: 
Page 6 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
a. 
Add the two vectors VL = IXL and VC = IXC to give a single resultant vector I(XC + XL).  Since 
the capacitive reactance is negative with respect to the inductive reactance and is given by: 
1

1 
XC =  −
, the resultant vector is  IωL −
 . 
C
ω

ωC 
b. 
Apply the rule of the parallelogram of forces to vector VR and the combined vector (VL + VC)
to obtain the resultant applied voltage vector V.  This is shown in Fig 10. 
14-8 Fig 10 Resultant Applied Voltage, R, L and C in Series 
V  + V  = I(X  + X )
V = I√R  
2 + (X  + X )2
L
C
L
C
L
C
q
V  = IR
I
R
17.  Application of Pythagoras’ Theorem.  Apply Pythagoras’ theorem to Fig 10: 
2
2
V = V + V + V
and V =
V + V + V
R
( L C)2
2
R
( L
)2
C
Or, substituting: 
2
2
2
V = I R + (IX + IX
and V = I R + X + X
L
C )2
2
( L
)2
C
2


2
1
∴ V = I R +  L
ω −


ωC 
In this case, V leads I by an angle θ where: 
V + V
+
L
C
(X X
L
)
tan
C
θ =
=
V
R
R
( L
ω −1 C
ω )
∴ tan θ =
R
−  effective re
t
ac ance 
θ = tan 1


resistance

The factor tan θ is positive in this instance since XL is greater than XC. 
Page 7 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
18.  Impedance.  The impedance of this circuit is: 
V
2
Z =
= R + (X +
L
X )2
C
I
The  corresponding  impedance  triangle  is  shown  in  Fig 11.    It  should  be  noted  that  XL  is  a  positive 
reactance and XC is a negative reactance so that it is, in fact, their numerical difference which gives the 
magnitude of the effective reactance (Xe) in the circuit. 
14-8 Fig 11 Impedance Triangle, R, L and C in Series 
R
2
X e
2
+
R
1
ωL –
=
X  =
e
ωC
Z
θ
R
19.  Variation  of  Frequency.   A variation in the frequency of the supply has an effect on the results 
obtained.    The  vector  diagrams  of  Figs  9b  and  10  apply  when  the  frequency  of  the  supply  voltage  is 
such that XL is greater than XC.  As the frequency is reduced, XL is reduced and XC is increased.  Thus 
the  vector VL = IXL is correspondingly reduced in amplitude, and the vector VC = IXC increased.  The 
condition  where  the  frequency  of  the  supply  voltage  is  such  that  XC  is  greater  than  XL  is  shown  in 
Fig 12, in which it is seen that the resultant voltage V now lags the current I.  Thus the applied voltage 
V  either  leads  or  lags  the  current  I  depending  on whether VL is greater than VC (ie XL > XC), or VC is 
greater than VL (ie XC > XL).  If the voltage leads the current (tan θ positive) the circuit is 'inductive'; if 
the voltage lags the current (tan θ negative) the circuit is 'capacitive'. 
14-8 Fig 12 Effect of Variation of Frequency 
V  
L = X I
L
V  
R = IR
θ
I
V  
L + VC
V
V  
C = X I
C
Page 8 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
20.  Variation  of  L  or  C.    Similar  results  to  those  in  the  preceding  paragraphs  are  obtained  if  the 
frequency of the supply is fixed and the value of L or C is altered.  With a constant value of ω (ie of 2πf) 
the inductive reactance ωL can be altered by varying the value of L.  Similarly, a variation in C will alter 
the capacitive reactance (1/ωC.)  In this way, XL or XC can be varied to give resultant vector diagrams 
similar to Figs 10 and 11. 
21.  Summary.  In a circuit containing resistance, inductance and capacitance in series: 
a. 
The magnitude of the applied voltage is 
2
V =
+
R
V
( L
V ~ V )2
C
, noting that VC is negative. 
b. 
The magnitude of the current is 
2
I = V / Z = V / R + (XL ~ X )2
C

c. 
The phase of the applied voltage relative to the current is found from tan θ = (ωL–1/ωC)/R, or 
(XL  ~  XC)/R  noting  that  XC  is negative, and the angle is either positive or negative depending on 
the relative values of XL and XC. 
d. 
The impedance of the circuit is Z = 
2
R + (X ~ X
, noting that X
L
)2
C
c is negative. 
Power 
22.  When an alternating voltage is applied across a pure resistance R, current and voltage are always 
in phase.  The power developed in R is VI watts, where V and I are rms values. 
23.  In  a  coil  which  is  considered  to  be  a  pure  inductance,  there  is  no  dissipation  of  energy  as  heat 
when the coil is connected across an alternating supply of voltage.  The current and voltage are 90º out 
of phase, and the energy supplied (LI2/2) during that part of the cycle when the current is growing to its 
peak  value  is  stored  in  the  magnetic  field,  and  restored  to  the  source  as  the  current  decays  to  zero.  
Similarly, in a pure capacitance the current and voltage are 90º out of phase, and the energy supplied 
(CV2/2) to the capacitance during that part of the cycle when the voltage is building up to its peak value 
is  stored  in  the  electric  field,  and  restored  to  the  source  as  the  voltage  falls  to  zero.    Thus,  when  an 
alternating  voltage  is  applied  across  a  pure  reactance,  either  inductive  or  capacitive,  no  power  is 
developed at all and the current is said to be 'wattless'. 
24.  In  an  actual  circuit  containing  both  resistance  and  reactance,  there  is  a  phase  difference  (θ) 
between the current and the voltage.  The vector diagram for the circuit of Fig 13a is given in Fig 13b, 
from  which  it  is  seen  that  the  current  I  lags  the  applied  voltage  (V)  by  an  angle  θ.    It  was  shown  in 
Volume  14,  Chapter  7  that  a  vector  I,  at  an  angle  θ  to  the  reference,  can  be  resolved  into  two 
components  at  right  angles  to  each  other  in  terms  of  I  and  θ.    This  is  shown  in  Fig  13c.    The 
component of current I which is in phase with the applied voltage (termed the in-phase component of I) 
is Icos θ; the out-of-phase component of I at right angles to the applied voltage is Isin θ.  The former 
current  develops  a  power  of  VIcos  θ  watts.    The  latter  develops  no  power  at  all  since  it  is  90º  out  of 
phase with the applied voltage; for this reason it is termed the wattless component of current. 
Page 9 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
14-8 Fig 13 Working and Wattless Components of Current 


V  =  X
I  
L
L
V =   
I    R  
2 + X 2
I
L
R
VR
V ~
L
VL
q
I
V  =  R
I
R
c
of V
Phase
q
I cos
q
I
I sin q
25.  Power Factor.  The factor cos θ is known as the 'power factor' of a circuit.  The product VI is that 
of the rms values of voltage and current and is termed the voltamperes (VA) or the apparent power in a 
circuit.    The  true  power  in  a  circuit,  where  V  and  I  are  out  of  phase,  is  given  by  the  product  of  the 
applied voltage and the in-phase component of current.  Thus: 
P = VI cos θ
P
 cos θ =  VI
true power
∴ power factor = apparent power
The power factor may be found by measuring the true power with a wattmeter, and the apparent power 
with a voltmeter and ammeter.  Referring again to Fig 13b it is seen that: 
  voltage V = 
2
2
I R + XL  = IZ. 

θ = IR
cos
= R = power factor 
IZ
Z
This  gives  an  alternative  expression  for  the  power  factor  in  terms  of  the  components  in  a  circuit.  
Summarizing, for a series AC circuit: 
a. 
True power = power actually consumed in the resistance of a circuit = VI cos θ. 
b. 
Apparent power = volts × amperes = VI. 
Page 10 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
true power
R
c. 
Power factor = 
= cos θ =

apparent power
Z
d. 
When V and I are in phase, θ = 0, cos θ = 1, and true power = apparent power. 
e. 
When V and I are 90º out of phase, θ = 90º, cos θ = 0, and true power = zero. 
26.  Adjustment of Power Factor.  In a pure resistance, the power factor cos θ = R/Z = 1.  In a pure 
reactance, it is zero.  In a practical circuit, it lies between these extremes.  The value of power factor 
required by a circuit depends on the purpose of the circuit.  Where the power developed must be kept 
to a minimum, the power factor should be as nearly zero as possible (ie R should be small).  Where a 
large power is required to be developed, eg electric fires, the power factor should be as near to unity as 
possible (i.e. X should be small). 
27.  Power Factor of One.  Where a power factor of unity is required, the out-of-phase component of 
current  must  be  zero  (ie  the  reactive  component  must  be  zero).    When  the  circuit  is  inductive,  the 
current  will  lag  the  voltage  by  an  angle  θ,  and  the  power  factor  will  be  less  than  unity.    This  can  be 
adjusted by inserting a capacitive component of such value that it balances the inductive component.  
The current and voltage will then be in phase and the power factor will be unity. 
28.  Power Losses in Components.  The power factor of an inductor or a capacitor should, in theory, 
be  zero.    That  is,  these  components  should  be  pure  reactances.    This  cannot  apply  in  practice 
however,  since  power  losses  are  developed  in  the  components.    Most  of  the  losses  listed  below 
increase with the frequency of the supply.  They occur mainly in high frequency circuits, and because 
of this, are more important in radio engineering than in power engineering. 
29.  Losses in Inductors.  Power losses occur in inductors because of: 
a. 
Eddy current in the cores. 
b. 
Hysteresis in the cores. 
c. 
Skin effect in the coils. 
d. 
Proximity effect of conductors in the near vicinity. 
e. 
Ohmic resistance of the windings. 
Αll  of  these  losses  can  be  grouped  together  by  supposing  that  the  inductor  has  in  series  with  it  a 
resistance  R  ohms,  such  that  the  power  loss  is  I2R  watts,  where  I  amperes  is  the  rms  value  of  the 
current.    An  inductor  can  thus  be  represented  as  L  henrys  and  R  ohms  in  series,  where  L  is  a  pure 
inductance  and  R  represents  the  losses  (Fig 14a).  The vector diagram is then as shown in Fig 14b, 
from which it is seen that I no longer lags V by 90º but by an angle θ, this being less than 90º by δ (the 
loss angle).  The inductor has, therefore, a power factor of cos θ. 
Page 11 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
14-8 Fig 14 Power Factor of a Coil 
a
b
V
VL = IXL
R to represent
Losses
L
Loss
Angle
Pure L
δ
Actual
Equivalent
θ
Coil
Circuit
I
V  = IR
R
30.  Losses in Capacitors.  Power losses occur in capacitors because of: 
a. 
Leakage through the dielectric. 
b. 
Dielectric hysteresis or absorption. 
c. 
Brush discharge. 
d. 
Ohmic resistance of the connecting leads. 
e. 
Skin effect in the plates and connecting leads. 
Remarks similar to those for the inductor apply to the capacitor, and a capacitor can be represented as 
C and R in series, where C is a pure capacitance and R represents the losses (Fig 15a).  The vector 
diagram is then as shown in Fig 15b, from which it is seen that I leads V by an angle θ, this being less 
than 90º by the angle δ (the loss angle).  A capacitor has, therefore, a power factor cos θ.  In practice it 
is nearer zero than that of an inductor and in normal circuits of capacitor and inductor in series, most of 
the losses are in the inductor. 
14-8 Fig 15 Power Factor of a Capacitor 
a
b
V  = I R
R
Loss
I
R to represent
θ
Angle
Losses
δ
C
Pure C
Actual
Equivalent
Capacitor
Circuit
V  = I X
C
C
V
Page 12 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
Series Circuit Resonance 
31.  Consider the circuit shown in Fig 16 where R is the combined loss resistance of L and C.  When 
the  frequency  of  the  supply  is  such  that  the  capacitive  reactance  XC  is  greater  than  the  inductive 
reactance  XL,  the  impedance  is  capacitive  and  the  phase  angle  negative  indicating  that  the  applied 
voltage  is lagging the current.  When the frequency of the supply is such that XL is greater than XC, 
the impedance is inductive and the phase angle positive, indicating that the applied voltage is leading 
the current.  In between these conditions, at some particular frequency, XL will equal XC, and VL will 
equal VC.  This is shown vectorially in Fig 17.  The circuit is then said to be at resonance.  Where the 
frequency of the supply is fixed, either L or C can be varied to give the condition XL = XC.  The circuit 
has then been tuned to resonance with the supply frequency. 
14-8 Fig 16 Power Factor of a Capacitor 
I
R
VR
V ~
Variable
Frequency
L
VL
C
VC
14-8 Fig 17 Series Resonance 
V  =
L
 X I
L
X  
L = XC
V  = IR = V
R
I
V  
C = XCI
32.  Conditions at Resonance.  At resonance: 
2
1

1 
a. 
L
ω =
,  and  the  impedance  Z  is  given  by:  Z 
2
= R +  L
ω −
   =  R  ohms.    Thus,  at 
C
ω

ωC 
resonance  in  a  series  tuned  circuit,  Z  is  a  minimum  and  equal  to  R  ohms.    In  a  well-designed 
circuit, R will be small, being only the loss resistance of L and C. 
V
V
b. 
The current  I =
=
 amperes has a maximum value. 
Z
R
(ωL −1/ C
ω )
c. 
The  phase  angle  θ,  given  by  tan θ = 
,  is  zero.    Thus,  at  resonance  in  a  series 
R
circuit, the current and the applied voltage are in phase. 
Page 13 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
33.  Reactance  Sketches.    A  reactance  sketch  is  a  graph  relating  reactance  and  frequency.    The 
reactance sketches for an inductance and for a capacitance are shown in Volume 14, Chapter 7.  In a 
series  circuit  where  both  capacitance  and  inductance  are  present,  the  reactance  sketches  can  be 
combined  to  give  the total variation of reactance with frequency.  This is shown in Fig 18.  From this 
graph it is seen that at the resonant frequency (fo), XL = XC and the total reactance is zero.  The circuit 
is then purely resistive with the current and the applied voltage in phase. 
14-8 Fig 18 Reactance Sketch for a Series Tuned Circuit 
+
f0
Inductive
L
ω
=
e
X
X  = X  + X  
L
e
L
C
c
n
ta
c
0
a
Frequency
e
R
1
X  = 
C
ωC
Capacitive
_
f0
34.  Variation  of  Impedance  with  Frequency.    If  the  graph  for  resistance  R  (which  for  practical 
purposes remains constant with frequency) is combined with the graph for the total effective reactance 
Xe, a curve for impedance Z against frequency can be obtained.  To plot this graph the expression Z = 
2
2
R + Xe   ohms  is  used  and as shown in Fig 19, Z is all above the horizontal axis.  At the resonant 
frequency  f0  the  impedance  Z  is  minimum  and  equal  to  R  ohms.    Either  side  of  resonance  the 
impedance  rises,  and,  as  can  be  seen  from  the  reactance  curve,  below  resonance  the  circuit  has 
capacitive reactance and above resonance the circuit has inductive reactance. 
14-8 Fig 19 Variation of Z with Frequency 
Z =   R  
2 + X 2
e
+
f
Inductive
0
e
c
n
ta
R
c
a
e
0
R
Frequency
Capacitive
_
f0
Page 14 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
35.  Resonant Frequency.  At resonance, XL = XC, i.e. 
1
1
2
1
2πf L =
∴ f =
∴ f =
0
2 f
π C
0
4π2LC
0

0
LC
where  f0 = resonant frequency in hertz, L = inductance in henrys, C = capacitance in farads 
This gives the resonant frequency of a series tuned circuit.  By altering either L or C the frequency at 
which resonance occurs is changed.  It should be noted that R has no effect on this. 
Voltage Magnification 
36.  Selectivity.  Selectivity is the property of a tuned circuit which makes it responsive to a particular 
frequency.    Selectivity  is  dealt  with  more  fully  in  the  Annex,  but  it  is  sufficient  here  to  note  that  it  is 
represented  by  the  symbol  Q0,  and  defined  as  the  ratio  of  reactance  to  circuit  resistance  at  the 
resonant frequency, i.e. Q0 = 2πf0L/R (or ωL/R). 
37.  At resonance, in a series RLC circuit, the impedance is a minimum and equal to the resistance R.  
The current I is a maximum and equal to V/R.  Voltages across the components shown in Fig 20a are 
as follows: 
a. 
Resistor.  The voltage across the resistance at resonance is: 
V
V = IR =
× R = V  volts 
R
R
∴ V  = applied voltage 
R
b. 
Inductor.  The voltage across the inductance at resonance is: 
V
         VL = XLI = ωLI =  R
ω

 L 
VL =  − 
 × V  = QV volts, where 
 R 
ωL
Q =
o
R
The voltage across the inductance is Q0 times the applied voltage V and voltage magnification has 
taken place. 
c. 
Capacitor.    Q0,  as  already  defined,  is  equal  to  ωL/R.    However,  at  resonance,  ωL  =1/ωC.  
Hence Q0 is also equal to 1/ωCR and the voltage across the capacitance at resonance is: 
I
1
V
V = X I =
=
×
C
C
C
ω
ωC R
 1 
∴ V = 
 × V = QV  volts 
C
 C
ω R 
Thus  the  voltage  across  the  capacitance  at  resonance  is  equal  in  magnitude  but  opposite  in 
polarity to the voltage across the inductance (Fig 20b). 
Page 15 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
14-8 Fig 20 Voltage Magnification 
a
b
I
V
V = QV
R
R
L
V ~
V =  IR  = V
L
V
R
I
L
C
V
V = QV
C
C
38.  When  a  series  circuit  is  resonant  to  a  given  input,  the  voltage  across  either  L  or  C  at  the  input 
frequency  can  be  many  times  greater  than  the  input  voltage.    If  V = 0.1V  and  Q  =  100,  the  voltage 
across either L or C is 10V and this voltage can be applied to another circuit.  A resonant series circuit 
is, therefore, a voltage magnifier. 
PARALLEL CIRCUITS 
Introduction 
39.  In this part, circuits consisting of different types of components connected in parallel are considered.  
The  phase  and  magnitude  relationships  for  currents  and  voltages  are  discussed,  as  they  were  for  the 
series circuits.  There are important differences in the construction of vector diagrams for series and for 
parallel AC circuits, and these are summarized as follows: 
a. 
Series Circuit. 
(1)  All components carry the same current in the same phase. 
(2)  The  resultant  applied  voltage  is  the  vector  sum  of  the  individual  voltages  across  the 
separate components. 
(3)  Vector  diagrams are constructed by drawing the voltage vectors relative to the current, 
which is the reference vector. 
b. 
Parallel Circuit. 
(1)  All branches have the same voltage across them in the same phase. 
(2)  The  resultant  supply  current  is  the  vector  resultant  of  the  individual  currents  in  the 
separate branches. 
(3)  Vector  diagrams are constructed by drawing the current vectors relative to the voltage, 
which is the reference vector. 
Resistance and Inductance in Parallel 
40.  The vector diagram for the circuit of Fig 21a is given in Fig 21b.  It shows that: 
a. 
The applied voltage V is common to both R and L and is the reference vector.  
b. 
The current through the resistor is IR = V/R amperes and is in phase with V.  The vector IR is 
drawn to any convenient scale in line with V. 
Page 16 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
c. 
The current through the inductor is IL = V/XL amperes and is drawn to the same scale as IR, 
lagging V by 90º. 
d. 
The  resultant  supply  current  I  is  the  vector  sum  of  IR  and  IL  and  is found by completing the 
parallelogram and applying Pythagoras’ theorem to Fig 21b.  Thus: 
1
1
2
2
I =
I + I = V
+
 amps 
R
L
2
2
R
XL
e.
I lags V by an angle θ, where: 
I
V/X
R
resistance
tanθ
L
L
=
=
=
=
I
V/R
X
reactance
R
L
1
V
f. 
From the equation in d, 
=
1
1
= impedance (Z), ohms. 
I
+
2
2
R
XL
14-8 Fig 21 R and L in Parallel 
a Circuit Diagram
b Vector Diagram
V
I =

R
V
I
θ
I
I
L
R
L
L
R
tan θ
I
 =
V ~
V
 I  
L =
2
2
X
 I =   I  + I
L
R
L
Resistance and Capacitance in Parallel 
41.  The  vector  diagram  for  the  circuit  of  Fig  22a  is  given  in  Fig  22b.    This  vector  diagram  is 
constructed as follows: 
a. 
The applied voltage V is the reference vector. 
V
b. 
The current through the resistor is IR = 
 amperes and is in phase with V. 
R
V
c. 
The current through the capacitor is IC = 
 amperes and leads 90º on V.  
XC
d. 
The  resultant  supply  current  I  is the vector sum of IR and IC and is found by completing the 
parallelogram and applying Pythagoras’ theorem to Fig 22b.  Thus: 
2
2
1
1
I =
I + I
= V
+
 amps. 
R
C
2
2
R
XC
e. 
I leads V by an angle θ, where: 
I
V / X
R
resist ce
an
tan
C
C
θ =
=
=
=

I
V / R
X
react
ce
an
R
C
Page 17 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
f. 
From the equation in d, 
V
1
=
= impedance (Z), ohms. 
I
1
1
+
2
2
R
XC
14-8 Fig 22 R and C in Parallel 
a Circuit Diagram
b Vector Diagram
V
2
2
I  =
I
C
 I =    I  + I
R
C
XC
I
I
C
R
V ~
C
R
 tan θ
I
 =    C
IR
θ
V
V
I  =
R
R
Inductance and Capacitance in Parallel 
42.  Fig 23b is the vector diagram for the circuit of Fig 23a, and is constructed as follows: 
a. 
The applied voltage V is the reference vector. 
b. 
The current through the inductance is IL = V/XL and lags V by 90º. 
c. 
The current through the capacitance is IC = V/XC, and leads V by 90º. 
d. 
The resultant supply current I is the vector sum of IL and IC and as IL and IC are 180º out of 
phase, I is therefore IC ~ IL. 
e. 
I is 90º out of phase with V, leading or lagging V depending on the relative sizes of IL and IC.  
In Fig 23b I is shown leading E by 90º because IC > IL. 
14-8 Fig 23 L and C in Parallel 
b Vector Diagram
I
V
I =
C
IL
I = I  – I
C
L
V ~
L
C
V
V
I =
L
XL
Page 18 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
Tuned Circuit with Resistance 
43.  Consider the circuit of Fig 24.  This shows a practical arrangement of a coil and a capacitor in a 
parallel tuned circuit.  The coil has certain power losses and these are represented by a resistance in 
series with the inductance of the coil.  The capacitor losses are small in comparison and are ignored.  
This  approximation  is  satisfactory  for  most  purposes  and  is  normally  assumed  when  considering  low 
power RF circuits. 
14-8 Fig 24 Practical Parallel Tuned Circuit 
I
IL
L
V ~
C
R
44.  The vector diagram for the circuit is constructed as shown in Fig 25, where: 
a. 
The applied voltage V is the reference vector. 
b. 
The capacitive current is IC = V/XC amperes and leads V by 90º.  IC increases with frequency. 
c. 
The inductive current is I
2
L = V/
2
R + X
, and lags V by an angle θ
L
L which is less than 90º by 
virtue of the series resistance.  IL decreases as the frequency increases. 
d. 
The resultant supply current I is the vector sum of IC and IL. 
14-8 Fig 25 Vector Relationships in a Parallel Tuned Circuit 
V
I  = 
C
X  
C
I = IL + I  
C (Vector Sum)
V
θL
V
V
I  
=  
L =  
2
2
ZL
 R  + XL
Page 19 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
45.  The  phase  of  the  supply  current  I  relative  to  the  applied  voltage  V  depends  on  the  supply 
frequency, as well as on the values of L and C.  At a low frequency, IC = V/XC = VωC will be small and 
V
IL = 
 will be large so that I lags V by an angle θL (Fig 26a).  At a high frequency, IC will be 
2
2 2
R + ω L
large and IL small, so that I leads V by an angle θC (Fig 26b).  At a particular frequency (the resonant 
frequency) I will be in phase with V (Fig 26c). 
14-8 Fig 26 Effect of Variation of Frequency 
a Low Frequency 
b High Frequency 
c Resonant Frequency 
IC
IC
I
IC
V
θL
I = I cos θ
L
L
I
V
θL
θC
V
I
I sin θ  

L
I
L
IL
L
46.  Resonance occurs in a parallel tuned circuit when the supply current I is in phase with the applied 
voltage  V.    For  this  to  be  so,  the  out-of-phase  (or  reactive)  component  of  IL  must  equal  IC.    There  is 
then no reactance offered by the circuit and its impedance is a pure resistance.  Thus the condition for 
resonance in a parallel tuned circuit is that of zero reactance. 
47.  Resonant Frequency.  The out-of-phase component of a current IL, which is at an angle IC to the 
reference, is IL sin θL as shown in Fig 26c, and for resonance to occur IL sin θL = IC.  It can be shown 
1
1
R 2
that  at  resonance,  the  resonant  frequency  is  given  by:  f =

.   Unlike  in  the  series  tuned 
o

LC
L2
circuit case, R has an effect on the resonant frequency of a parallel tuned circuit.  In most cases, the 
resistance  is  very  small  and  R2/L2  can  be  ignored,  so  that  for  practical  purposes  the  resonant 
1
frequency can be taken as  f =
 (Hz). 
o
2π LC
48.  Dynamic  Impedance.    At  resonance  in  a  parallel  tuned  circuit  there  is  zero  reactance  and  the 
supply current I is in phase with the applied voltage V.  From Fig 26c it is seen that at resonance, I is 
equal  to  the  in-phase  (or  resistive)  component  of  IL.    Thus  at  resonance  I  =  IL  cos  θL  and  it  can  be 
shown  that  Z  =  L/CR.    Note  that  the  smaller  R  is,  the  greater  is  Z;  if  R  is  zero  Z  is  infinite.    The 
expression ZD = L/CR is known as the dynamic impedance and is the purely resistive impedance of a 
parallel tuned circuit at resonance. 
49.  Frequency at or Near Resonance.  The frequency at which resonance occurs is given by: 
2
1
1
R
f =

o
2

LC
L
If  the  applied  frequency  is  greater  than  fo  the  current  (IC =  VωC)  through  the  capacitor  will  increase 

2
2 2 
whilst that through the inductor   I = V / R + ω L
 will decrease.  If the frequency is lower than f
L



0, 
the reverse occurs. 
Page 20 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
50.  Supply  Current  at  or  Near  Resonance.    At  resonance  the  supply  current  is  in  phase  with  the 
supply  voltage  and  is  at  a  minimum  equalling  VCR/L.    When  the  frequency  is  above  f0,  the  supply 
current  leads  the  supply  voltage  and  the  circuit  is  capacitive  (see  Fig  26b).    When  the  frequency  is 
below f0, the circuit is inductive (see Fig 26a). 
51.  Impedance at or Near Resonance.  At resonance the impedance equals L/CR and is at maximum.  
Either side of f0 the impedance falls by an amount dependent on: 
a. 
The departure from resonance. 
b. 
The ratio of C to L. 
c. 
The value of R. 
52.  Resistance  Ignored.    If  the  coil  losses  are  so  small  that  R  can  be  ignored,  the  parallel  tuned 
circuit has the 'ideal' form of Fig 23.  The vector diagrams for this circuit will be as shown in Fig 27.  If 
the applied frequency, or the values of L and C, are such that XC is greater than XL, I leads V by 90º 
and the circuit behaves as a pure capacitance (Fig 27a).  If XL is greater than XC, I lags V by 90º, and 
the circuit behaves as a pure inductance (Fig 27b).  If XL equals XC, the supply current into the circuit is 
zero  and  the  circuit  behaves  as  an  infinite  resistance  (ie  impedance  is  infinite).    This  is  the  resonant 
1
condition (Fig 27c), which occurs at a frequency  f =

o
2π LC
14-8 Fig 27 Effect of Varying XC and XL
a
b
c
IC
IC
I = I
IC
C +
 
 IL 
I = Zero
V
V
V
I
I = I + I


I
L
L
IL
Current Magnification 
53.  Although at resonance the current I into a parallel tuned circuit from the supply has a low value, 
this  does  not  apply  to  the  current  within  the  closed  LC  loop.    Thus  the  parallel  tuned  circuit  may  be 
thought of as having both an internal and an external circuit (Fig 28). 
14-8 Fig 28 Supply and Circulating Current 
External Circuit
I
Internal Circuit
IL
V~
C
L
15 mA
IC
Circulating
14 mA
Current
Page 21 of 22 

AP3456 - 14-8 - AC Circuits 
54.  In the ideal LC parallel circuit without resistance, the supply current I is the difference between IL and 
IC, since these currents are 180º out of phase.  Thus IL and IC act in the same direction round the internal 
circuit, forming a circulating current.  For example, if the ideal LC parallel circuit is near resonance, IL may 
have a value of 15 mA and IC a value of 14 mA.  The circulating current is equal to the smaller of the two 
currents, and the supply current of 1 mA makes up the difference between IL and IC. 
55.  Fig  29  shows  a  practical  parallel  tuned  circuit  with  resistance.    At  resonance,  I  has  its  minimum 
value of V/ZD but the circulating current within the tuned circuit has a high maximum value equal to Q0
C
times  the  supply  current.    It  can  be  shown  that  at  resonance  IC  =  IL  =  V
  =  Q0I.    Thus  a  parallel 
L
tuned circuit is a current magnifier, as distinct from the series tuned circuit which is a voltage magnifier. 
14-8 Fig 29 Current Magnification 
Circulating
I
Current is a
Maximum
I
IC
Supply
L
Current
Anti Phase
Minimum
V~
R
56.  Selectivity.  The selectivity of a parallel tuned circuit is discussed at greater length in Volume 14, 
Chapter 9.  It may be noted here that: 
a. 
The  higher  the  impedance  at  resonance  in  relation  to  the  impedance  at  frequencies  off 
resonance, the greater the selectivity of the circuit. 
b. 
A circuit with a high value of Q has high selectivity. 
Page 22 of 22 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
CHAPTER 9 - SELECTIVITY OF TUNED CIRCUITS 
Introduction 
1.
Selectivity  of  a  tuned  circuit  is  defined  as  the  circuit’s  ability  to  pick  out  (select)  a  desired 
frequency, or band of frequencies, and reject the unwanted ones.  The sharpness of response over a 
range  of  frequencies  near  resonance  gives  an  indication  of  the  selectivity  of  a  circuit.    In  this  Annex, 
considerations affecting the selectivity of series and parallel tuned circuits are examined. 
SERIES TUNED CIRCUITS 
General 
2. 
For the series tuned circuit, selectivity is a measure of the ease with which the circuit can accept 
an  input  at  the  resonant  frequency  as  compared  with  inputs  off  resonance.    Fig  19  of  Volume  14, 
Chapter 8 shows that the impedance Z of a series tuned circuit falls as resonance is approached.  At 
the  resonant  frequency,  such  a  circuit  allows  the  maximum  current  to  flow  through  it,  and  is  often 
termed an acceptor circuit.  A graph showing the variation of current with frequency is at Fig 1. 
14-9 Fig 1 Variation of Current with Frequency - Series Tuned Circuit 
V
I = R
t
n
rre
u
C
f
Frequency
0
Capacitive                Resistive                  Inductive
The Effect of Resistance 
3. 
At  resonance  I  =  V/R,  thus,  if  R is  doubled,  the  current  at  resonance  is  halved.    In  a  properly 
designed  acceptor  circuit,  above  resonance  XL  is  much  greater  than  R,  and  below  resonance,  XC  is 
greater than R.  Thus, the effect of R is progressively less important as the frequency is moved away 
from resonance.  The effect of resistance is to reduce the current at frequencies near resonance to a 
far  greater  extent  than  at  other  frequencies,  i.e. to  'flatten'  the  response  curve  as  shown  in  Fig  2.  
Selectivity is therefore reduced by an increase in resistance. 
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
14-9 Fig 2 Effect of Resistance on Selectivity 
Low Resistance
t
n
rre
u
C
High
Resistance
Frequency
f0
The Effect of the L/C Ratio 
4. 
The  resonant  frequency  of  an  acceptor  circuit  is  given  by 
1
f =
.    It  is  dependent  on  the 
0
2π LC
product  LC,  thus,  if  the  inductance  of  a  circuit  is  doubled  and  the  capacitance  halved  the  resonant 
frequency remains unaltered.  However, the ratio of L to C has been increased four times and this has 
an effect on the selectivity of the circuit.  Fig 3 shows the response curves for two circuits having the 
same resonant frequency and equal values of resistance but different L/C ratios.  From this it is seen 
that the greater the L/C ratio the more selective is the circuit. 
14-9 Fig 3 Effect of L/C Ratio on Selectivity 
V
I = R
L
Low    Ratio
t
C
n
rre
u
C
L
High    Ratio
C
f
Frequency
0
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
Q Factor 
5. 
The quantity used to represent the selectivity of a circuit at resonance is denoted by Q0 which is 
defined  as  the  ratio  of  reactance  to  circuit  resistance  at  the  resonant  frequency.    It  is  usually 
ω L
considered for the coil, ie  Q
0
=
0
R
2ππ L
1
     Thus,  Q
o
=
, but  f =
0
R
0
2π LC
2πL
1
L
1
∴ Q =
×
= ×
0
R
2π LC
R
LC
1
L
∴ Q =
0
R
C
This expression supports paras 3 and 4 as it shows that the Q0 or selectivity of a tuned circuit is inversely 
proportional  to  R,  and  proportional  to  the  ratio  of  L  to  C.    Thus, a circuit with a high value of Q0 has high 
selectivity. 
Q0 and Bandwidth 
6. 
Series tuned circuits are used in radio to accept inputs at the resonant frequency and in the immediate 
neighbourhood  of  resonance.    In  order to present a high impedance to inputs considerably removed from 
resonance,  a  circuit  must  have  a  high  Q0  value.    In  practice,  values  of  Q0  vary  from  about  10  at  audio 
frequencies to several hundreds at radio frequencies.  The graph of current against frequency for a circuit 
having a high Q0 shows a sharp response curve (Fig 4).  An alternative way of describing this is to say that 
the circuit has a narrow bandwidth.  Bandwidth is defined as the separation between two frequencies either 
side of the resonant frequency at which the power has fallen to 50% of the maximum power.  This is known 
as the half-power bandwidth.  Since power is proportional to the square of the current, reducing the power to 
1
one-half means reducing the current by a factor of 
 = 0.707.  Thus in terms of current the bandwidth of a 
2
series  tuned  circuit  is  the  difference  between  two  frequencies  f1  and  f2  at  which  the  current  is  70%  of the 
current at the resonant frequency f0 (Fig 4).  The selectivity of a series tuned circuit can therefore be defined 
either in terms of Q0 or in bandwidth.  For purposes of calculation, Q0 and the bandwidth as defined above 
are related by the expressions: 
resonant frequency
fo
Q =
=
o
bandwidth
f − f
1
2
Thus if the resonant frequency of a circuit is 200 kHz and the bandwidth required is 12 kHz, 
200
Q0 =
 = 16.7 
12
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
14-9 Fig 4 The Half-power Bandwidth 
V
I = R
0.7071
t
n
rre
u
C
f
f
Frequency
2
f0
1
Bandwidth
Effect of Supply Impedance 
7. 
When a series resonant circuit is used for tuning purposes, it is often intended that the voltage across 
the capacitor be applied to another stage.  The voltage applied to the circuit itself can be considered as the 
supply from a generator with an internal resistance RG (Fig 5).  If RG is considered non-reactive, it will modify 
the tuned circuit characteristics as follows: total circuit resistance is RT = R + RG, ie: 
1
L
effective Q = R + R
C
G
If RG is large compared with R, then Q is reduced and the voltage across the capacitor at the resonant 
frequency (VC = QV) and the selectivity of the circuit are both relatively small.  Thus, the series circuit is 
more selective when fed by a generator of low internal impedance. 
14-9 Fig 5 Effect of Supply Impedance on Selectivity 
I
L
Internal
L

Q =
R
Resistance
G
R
C
T
R
Generator ~
V
V  = QV
C
C
 = Output
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
The Q Factor of Components 
8.
It  was  shown  in  Volume  14,  Chapter  8  that  the  power  losses  associated  with  inductors  and 
R
capacitors  can  be  expressed  in  terms  of  the  power  factor,  cos θ = R/Z = 
  where  R  is  the 
2
2
R + X
equivalent loss resistance of the component.  In well-designed components, R is small compared with 
X,  and  the  power  factor  approximates  to  R/X  (i.e.,  R/ωL for  inductors  and  ωCR  for  capacitors).    It is, 
however, more convenient to express the quality of inductors and capacitors in terms of the reciprocal 
of  the  power  factor,  namely  ωL/R = 1/ωCR  =  Q.    Thus,  a  coil  having  a  high  value  of  Q  indicates  a 
component  with  low  losses.    Q  remains  relatively  constant  with  frequency  since  the  value  of  loss 
resistance  (R)  varies  with  frequency  in  much  the  same  way  as  the  reactance  (X).    At  audio 
frequencies, Q values for coils rarely exceed 10, whilst coils normally used for radio frequencies have 
Q  values  around  50  to  300.    Q values  from  100  to  300  are  common  with  paper  dielectric  capacitors 
and from 1,000 to 3,000 for mica capacitors. 
PARALLEL TUNED CIRCUITS 
General 
9. 
The variation of supply current with frequency for a parallel tuned circuit is shown in Fig 6a.  The 
sharpness of the response curve denotes the selectivity of the circuit.  For parallel circuits, selectivity is 
often defined in terms of impedance rather than of current, and the higher the impedance at resonance 
in relation to the impedance at frequencies off resonance, the greater the selectivity of the circuit.  Fig 
6b shows the variation of impedance with frequency. 
14-9 Fig 6 Variation of I and Z with Frequency about Resonance - Parallel Tuned Circuit 
a
b
L
CR
e
c
n
a
depmI
VCR
L
fo
fo
Frequency
Frequency
Inductive
Resistive
Capacitive
Q0 and Selectivity 
10.  An increase in resistance R will reduce the impedance at resonance (Z = L/CR) to a greater extent 
1
L
than  at  frequencies  removed  from  resonance.    Since  Q =
  is  reduced,  the  response  curve  is 
o
R
C
'flattened'  and  the  circuit  is  made  less  selective.    A  variation  in  the  ratio  of  L  to  C  will  also  affect  the 
impedance at resonance and, hence, the selectivity of the circuit.  Thus, a circuit with a high value of 
Q0 has a high selectivity, and vice versa (Fig 7). 
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
14-9 Fig 7 Q0 and Selectivity 
High Q0
e
c
n
a
d
e
p
Im
Low Q0
f0
Frequency
Inductive
Resistive
Capacitive
Q0 and Bandwidth 
11. Parallel  tuned  circuits  are  used  in  radio  equipment  to  'reject'  inputs  at,  and  near,  the  resonant 
frequency, by offering a high impedance at those frequencies.  To inputs at frequencies considerably 
removed from the resonant frequency, the parallel tuned circuit should offer a low impedance.  To do 
this satisfactorily, the circuit must have a high Q0, ie a narrow bandwidth.  The bandwidth of a parallel 
tuned circuit is defined as the difference between two frequencies f1 and f2 at which the impedance has 
fallen  to  70%  of  the  resonant  value  (Fig  8).    For  purposes  of  calculations,  Q0  and  the  bandwidth  are 
related by the expression: 
resonant frequency
f
Q =
o
=
o
bandwidth
f − f
1
2
14-9 Fig 8 The Half - power Bandwidth 
L
Z  =
D
CR
0.0707 ZD
e
c
n
a
d
e
p
Im
f
f
f
Frequency
2
0
1
Bandwidth
Damping of Parallel Circuits 
12.  In  some  circuits  in  radio  equipments,  it  is  desired  to  'pass'  a  wide  band  of  frequencies  in  the 
neighbourhood of resonance, and for this a circuit with a wide bandwidth is required.  From para 11, it 
is  seen  that  the  bandwidth  of  a  parallel  tuned  circuit  is  inversely  proportional  to  Q0
(ie bandwidth = f0/Q0).  Thus, a circuit with a low value of Q0 will give a wide bandwidth.  To reduce Q0
an  actual  resistor  is  inserted  in  parallel  with  the  rejecter  circuit  to  'damp'  the  response  (Fig  9a).  The 
impedance at resonance is then the dynamic impedance ZD(= L/CRL) in parallel with R.  Consequently, 
the reduction of Q results in reduced impedance at resonance and a flattened response curve with a 
corresponding increase in bandwidth (Fig 9b). 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-9 - Selectivity of Tuned Circuits 
14-9 Fig 9 Effect of Damping on Selectivity 
a
b
Z
 without R
D1
(High Q )
o
e
I
R Inserted
c
n
0.707 ZD1
a
d
L
e
p
V∼F
C
Im
RL
Z
 with R
D2
0.707 ZD
(Low Q )
2
o
fo
Narrow
Frequency
Bandwidth
Wide Bandwidth
Effect of Supply Impedance 
13.  When  a  parallel  circuit  is  used  for  tuning  purposes,  the  idea  is  that  the  voltage  across  the 
capacitor shall be applied to a further stage.  The voltage applied to the circuit itself can be considered 
to be applied from a generator, and the behaviour of the circuit then depends on the impedance of the 
generator  as  well  as  all  the  characteristics  of  the  circuit  itself.    If  the  internal  impedance  of  the 
generator  (RG)  is  small  compared  with  the  impedance  of  the  parallel  tuned  circuit,  then  VC will  be 
approximately  equal  to  V  at  all  frequencies  (Fig  10).    If,  however,  RG  is  large  compared  with  the 
impedance  of  the  circuit,  then  the  current  will  be  approximately  equal  to  V/RG.    Thus,  VC  will  be 
proportional to the impedance of the parallel circuit and will vary with frequency, being a maximum at 
resonance.    Hence,  the  parallel  circuit  is  selective  only  if  supplied  from  a  generator  having  a  high 
internal impedance. 
14-9 Fig 10 Effect of Supply Impedance on Selectivity 
I
Internal
RG
Impedance
L
C
VC
R
Generator
V
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
CHAPTER 10 - AC GENERATORS AND MOTORS 
POLYPHASE AC - GENERAL 
Introduction 
1. 
The  simple  AC  generator  (sometimes  called  an  alternator),  discussed  in  Volume  14,  Chapter  3, 
produces  a  single-phase  AC  output  at  its  slip  rings.    In  other  AC  generators,  the  armature  winding 
consists of two or more groups of series-connected coils, with their outer ends connected to separate 
slip rings.  Two or more alternating voltages are then produced at the slip rings, these voltages being, 
in general, out of phase with each other.  Such machines are known as polyphase or multiphase AC 
generators, or alternators. 
Effect of Load on Single-phase and Polyphase Supply 
2. 
In polyphase systems, loads can be arranged to draw power from the generator at a uniform rate, 
so  that  the  machine  runs  steadily  under  a  uniform  torque.    Fig  1  shows  the  relationship  between 
current  and  voltage  when  a  single-phase  AC  generator  is  supplying  an  inductive  load.    The 
instantaneous  power  is  the  product  VI  at  each  instant  and  is  indicated  by  the  shaded  portion  of  the 
graph.  When the power graph is above the time axis, it indicates that energy is being drawn from the 
generator;  below  this  axis,  energy  is  being  returned  from  the  inductive  load.    Since  the  load  on  the 
generator  not  only  fluctuates  during  each  half  cycle,  but  also  changes  sign,  the  torque  changes  in  a 
similar  manner.    Though  this  may  happen  in  the  individual  cycles  of  each  phase  in  a  multiphase 
system,  the  power  peak  and  zero  values  of  various phases will not normally coincide because of the 
phase difference.  Power is therefore drawn from the generator at a much more uniform rate, and the 
torque remains steadier. 
14-10 Fig 1 Power Variation with Inductive Load in a Single-phase Supply 
P = VI
V
I
0
ωt
θ
θ
Generation of Polyphase Voltages 
3. 
The output of a simple AC generator, consisting of a single group of coils rotating uniformly in a 
uniform  magnetic  field,  is  a  sine  wave  (V1),  as  shown  in  Fig  2a,  which  represents  the  voltage  in  the 
coils (AA1) available at the slip rings. 
Page 1 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
4. 
If, on the same armature core, a second group of coils (BB1) is mounted at right angles to the first 
and connected to a second pair of slip rings, two independent voltages are available, differing in phase 
by 90º.  This arrangement, shown in Fig 2b, represents a two-phase generator. 
5. 
With  three  groups  of  coils  (AA1,  BB1  and  CC1)  wound  independently  on  the  same  armature,  and 
connected to three separate pairs of slip rings, three independent voltages are generated, as indicated in Fig 
2c.  The start of one coil is at an angle of 120º to the start of the next (i.e. A is 120º removed from B) and the 
three voltages differ in phase by 120º, the arrangement representing a three-phase generator.  It should be 
noted that, when the voltage is in one phase at peak value, the voltage in each of the other phases is at half 
peak value in the opposite direction.  The sum of the voltages in the three phases is thus zero; this holds 
good for all points in the cycle. 
14-10 Fig 2 Generation of Polyphase Voltages 
a
ω
ω
V1
3 π
A
2

N
S
0
π
π
A
ω t
1
2
V1
b
ω
B
V
V2
1
A

ω
N
S
0
π
A
V2
3 π
ω t
1
2
π
2
B1
V1
c
ω
V
V2
ω
V
V
2
1
3
B1
C
π
A
2

120o
N
S
0
120o
A
π
3 π
ω t
o
120
1
V1
C
2
1
B
V3
6. 
The  armature  can  be  wound  with  any  number  of  symmetrically  spaced  groups  of  coils  and 
independent pairs of slip rings; six-phase and twelve-phase AC supplies are sometimes used.  However, 
since  many  of  the  advantages  of  polyphase  voltages  are  available  with  three  phases,  the  three-phase 
system is that in most general use for the generation and transmission of power. 
Advantages of Polyphase Systems 
7. 
The advantages of polyphase systems can be summarized as follows: 
a. 
Other parameters being unchanged, the power rating of a polyphase machine increases with 
the number of phases. 
Page 2 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
b. 
Both the heating loss for a given power transmitted, and the line voltage drop, are less than 
they would be if the whole power was transmitted by a single phase only. 
c. 
Loads can be arranged to draw power from the generator at a uniform rate (see para 2). 
d. 
Polyphase alternators can be made to work in parallel without much difficulty. 
e. 
Polyphase motors may be self-starting and provide uniform torque. 
Symmetrical and Balanced Systems 
8. 
A polyphase system is said to be: 
a. 
Symmetrical, when the phase voltages have the same amplitude and are displaced from one 
another by equal angles. 
b. 
Balanced,  when  voltage,  current  and  phase  angle  are  the  same  for  each  phase.    In  a 
balanced three-phase system, the sum of the instantaneous values of voltage (or current) is zero. 
AC GENERATORS 
Single-phase Generators 
9. 
A simple form of AC generator (the rotating armature type), consisting of a coil caused to rotate in 
a magnetic field by a prime mover, is described in Volume 14, Chapter 3.  Most actual machines are of 
the  rotating  field  type,  designed  the  other  way  around.    That  is,  the  rotating  part  (rotor)  consists  of 
electromagnets energized from a DC supply, while the coils in which the generated emf is induced are 
wound  on  a  fixed  frame  (stator).    The two arrangements are electrically equivalent, since the relative 
motion of flux and coils that gives rise to an induced emf is the same in both cases.  However, fixed 
connections to stationary windings are easier to insulate at high voltages than slip rings would be, and 
whether the output is single-phase or polyphase, only one pair of slip rings is needed for the relatively 
low voltage, DC energizing supply. 
10.  Fig 3 shows the arrangement of a two pole, single-phase AC generator of the rotating field type.  
The  stator  winding  consists  of  a  number  of  coils  connected  in  series  and  inserted  in  slots  cut  in  the 
inner  surface  of  the  laminated  frame.    The  rotor  is  driven  by  a  prime  mover  and  carries  the  field 
windings, which are energized from a DC source via slip rings, as shown. 
Page 3 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
14-10 Fig 3 Two-pole Single-phase AC Generator 
Start of
Winding
Stator
+
Rotor
DC
Finish of
Winding
Two-phase Generators 
11.  By  mounting  two  separate  coils  on  the  rotor  at  right angles to each other, a two-phase output is 
produced.  The voltages induced in each coil will be of the same magnitude and frequency, but there 
will  be  a  90º  phase  difference  between  the  voltages.    Two-phase  supplies  have  limited  application, 
mostly confined to direction control, where phase relationship determines the direction of rotation. 
Three-phase Generators 
12.  The stator of a three-phase AC generator has three separate windings equally spaced round the 
interior of the frame, and, between them, occupying all the slots in the laminations.  The poles of the 
rotor  sweep  past  each  winding  in  turn,  so  that  three  alternating  voltages  are  produced,  differing  in 
phase  by  120º.    This  is  shown  in  Fig  4.    Standard  practice  identifies  the  phases  by  the  colours  red, 
yellow (or white), and blue; each phase then being referred to by its colour. 
14-10 Fig 4 Two-pole Three-phase AC Generator 
Start
Finish
Finish
N
S
S
N
N
S
Finish
Start
Start

90°
180°
270°
360°
Page 4 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
13.  The emf generated in each conductor completes one cycle as it is passed by a pair of rotor poles.  
The  machine  shown  in  Fig  4  has  two  poles  (one  pair)  on  the  rotor.    However,  some  machines  have 
many pairs of poles on the rotor, with the stator winding spaced accordingly, in a manner similar to that 
for  the  multi-pole  DC  generator  discussed  in  Volume  14,  Chapter  6.    Thus,  in  one  revolution  of  the 
rotor,  the  emf  will  complete  a  number  of  cycles  corresponding  to  the  number  of  pairs  of  poles  in  the 
generator.  The frequency of the supply given by the machine will be: 
η
p
Frequency (F) =
s Hz, 
60
where p = number of pairs of poles and ηS = speed in rpm. 
The factor ηS is called the synchronous speed; it is the speed at which the machine must run in order 
to generate the required frequency.  Thus: 
f
η = × 60 (rpm)
s
p
INTERCONNECTION OF PHASES 
General 
14.  Each  phase  of  a  three-phase  generator  may  be  brought  out  to  separate  terminals  and  used  to 
supply  separate  loads  independently  of  one  another.    This  method  requires  a  pair  of  lines  for  each 
phase.    The  number  of  wires  may  be  reduced,  with  a  consequent  saving  in  cable,  if  the  phases  are 
interconnected.    There  are  two  main  methods  of  connecting  the  generator  windings  and  the  loads  in 
three-phase systems: 
a. 
The Star, or Y, Connection.  A development of this is the four-wire star connection. 
b. 
The Delta, or Mesh, Connection. 
Star (Y) Connection 
15.  A  star,  or Y, connection is achieved by joining similar ends (the starting or the finishing ends) of 
the three windings to a common point (the neutral or star point).  The other ends are joined to the line 
wires.   In Fig 5, let Ea, Eb and Ec be the phase voltages, and Ia, Ib and Ic the phase currents, lagging 
behind their respective phase voltages by a constant angle θ (ie a balanced load).  The arrows indicate 
the  assumed  positive  directions  of  the  phase  voltages.    Voltage  between  lines  is  equal  to  vector 
difference between the two-phase voltages.  Hence, the voltage between lines 1 and 2 (1V2) is obtained 
by the vector addition of vector Ea and vector Eb reversed.  Thus: 
1V2 = Ea – Eb = 2E cos 30º 
3
      = 2E  2
      =  E 3
where the magnitudes of Ea = Eb = Ec = E, the phase voltage. 
Similar results are obtained for 2V3, and 3V1, thus line voltages are each equal to  3 × phase voltage, 
or, generally: 
VL =  E 3
Since  each  line  is  in  series  with  its  individual  phase  winding,  the  line  current  must  equal  the  phase 
current, i.e. IL = I. 
Page 5 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
14-10 Fig 5 Three-phase Star Connection 
Ea
Ia
1
Neutral or
Star Point
V
V
Industrial
1
2
3
1
Machine
Ec
Ib
Eb
2
V
2
3
Ic
3
V
1
2
-Eb Ea
o
I
-30
a
θ
I
o
V
2
3
c
30
θ
-E
o
E
θ
c
c
30
E
I
b
-E
b
a
V
3
1
Three-phase Four-wire Star Connection 
16.  In  the  three-phase  four-wire  star  connection  system,  used  in  the  National  Grid,  the  phases  of  the 
alternator or transformer are connected in star, and three-line wires taken from the terminals.  In addition, a 
fourth wire is taken from the star point (Fig 6).  This enables lighting loads and domestic services to be taken 
at phase voltage E (240 V) by connecting between line and neutral, and at the same time allows industrial 
machines to be supplied at line voltage  3 E (415 V). 
14-10 Fig 6 Three-phase Four-wire System 
I
Neutral
2
3
17.  Three-phase  motors  constitute  a  balanced  load,  but  domestic  loads  across  the  phases  may  not 
be balanced; in this case, the live conductors carry unequal currents, and the out of balance current is 
carried by the neutral. 
Page 6 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
Mesh or Delta () Connection 
18.  In the Mesh, or Delta, system the phase windings are connected to form a closed mesh (Fig 7).  
Assuming, as before, a balanced load: 
voltage between lines = phase voltage, i.e. VL = E. 
In this case, the line current is equal to the vector difference between two phase currents.  Hence: 
I1 = Ia – Ic = 2I cos 30º 
   =  I 3
where  the  magnitudes  of  Ia  =  Ib  =  Ic  =  I, the phase current.  Similar results are obtained for I2 and I3, 
thus line currents are each equal to  3 × phase current, or generally, IL =  I 3
14-10 Fig 7 Three-phase Delta Connection 
V
1
2
Ea
−I
I
C
1
I1
Ia
I3
Ec
1
Ic
θ 30°
Ea
−Ib
30°
I
I
a
c
θ
I
E
2
θ
b
30°
2
Ec
Eb V
I
3
1
V
3
I
2
3
b
3
−Ia
I2
Power in Three-phase Circuits 
19.  In a balanced three-phase circuit, the total power equals three times the power per phase, ie 
total power = 3 × phase voltage × phase current × power factor, 
 
  or, P = 3VI cos θ watts, 
where θ is the angle between phase voltage and phase current. 
Expressing this in line quantities: 
a. 
Star Connection.
P =
V
3 L I cos θ = 3V I cos θ
L
L L
3
b. 
Delta Connection.
P =
I
V
3
L cos θ = 3V I cos θ
L
L L
, as for star connection. 
3
Page 7 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
AC MOTORS 
Introduction 
20.  There  are  three  main  types  of  AC  motor  -  the  synchronous  motor,  the  induction  motor,  and  the 
series  or  commutator  motor.    Of  these,  the  induction  motor  is  the  most  common  in  industry;  the 
commutator motor is the most common in the home. 
21.  As most large AC motors do not have commutators (some do not even have slip rings), they are 
more trouble-free in operation than DC motors.  Some are also useful as constant speed motors; their 
speed being determined by the AC supply frequency. 
22.  AC  motors  may  be  operated  from  single-phase  or  polyphase  supplies;  the  basic  principles  of 
operation are similar in both cases.  Synchronous and induction AC motors work on the principle that 
AC applied to the stator produces a rotating magnetic field, which causes the rotor of the machine to 
turn with the field. 
Production of a Rotating Magnetic Field 
23.  A rotating magnetic field can be produced by applying a three-phase supply to a stationary group 
of  coils,  provided  the  latter  are  suitably  wound,  spaced,  and  connected.    The  field  produced  is  of 
unvarying strength, and its speed of rotation is directly related to the frequency of the supply. 
24.  Fig  8a  shows  a  typical  three-phase  stator.    The  two  windings  in  each  phase  (eg  A  and  A1)  are 
connected in series and are so wound that current flowing through the two windings produces a North 
pole  at  one  of  them  and  a  South  pole  at  the  other.    Thus,  if  current  is  flowing  in  the  A  phase  in  the 
direction  from  the  A  to  the  A1  terminal,  pole-piece  A  becomes  a  North pole and A1 a South pole.  In 
operation, the three-phase stator is connected in delta, as shown in Fig 8b, so that only three terminals, 
each common to two of the windings, are provided for the three-phase input. 
14-10 Fig 8 Three-phase Stator and Connections 
a Stator
b Delta Connection
A
A and C1
C1
N
B1
C1
A
A
B1
C1
Three
Phase
C
A1
Input
C
B
A1
 C and B1
B1
B
C
S
B
B and A1
A1
Page 8 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
25.  At any instant, the magnetic field generated by one particular phase is proportional to the current 
in  that  phase;  as  the  current  alternates,  so  does  the  magnetic  field.    As  the  currents  in  the  three 
phases are 120º out of phase, the three magnetic fields will also alternate 120º out of phase with each 
other, and the resultant magnetic field is the vector sum of these three. 
26.  Fig 9 shows how the magnetic fields add up to give a resultant magnetic field which continuously 
shifts  in  direction.    After  one  complete  cycle  of  AC  input,  the  resultant  magnetic  field  has  shifted 
through 360º, or one revolution.  Thus, although the coils are stationary, the application of three-phase 
AC produces a magnetic field that rotates at the frequency of the supply. 
14-10 Fig 9 Production of a Rotating Magnetic Field 
A
A
A
A
0
N
S
0
B1
C
B1
C
B1
C
B1
C
N
S
1
0
N
1
S
0
1
N
S
1
N
S
C
B
S
0
C
N
N
S
B
0
C
B
C
B
0
S
N
0
A
A
A
A
1
A1
A1
A1
Resultant
N
0
S
B1
C
B
B
1
1
C
C
Field
N
0
1
1
S
N
0
S
1
0
S
C
S
N
N
B
0
C
B
C
B
S
0
N
A1
A
A
1
1
Position 1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Phase A
Phase B
Phase C
+
Three-Phase
Input
Time
0
Currents
60°
120°
180°
240°
300°
360°

B
C
A
27.  At position 1 in Fig 9, the current in phase A is zero, as shown by the graph; the current in phase C is 
positive and flows in the direction C to C1, and that in phase B is negative and flows in the direction B1 to B.  
Equal currents therefore flow in opposite directions through the B and C phase windings, and magnetic poles 
are established as shown.  Since the magnetic fields of the B and C phases are equal in amplitude (equal 
currents), the resultant field lies in the direction shown by the arrow. 
28.  Position 2 shows the condition when the supply cycle has advanced 60º.  The current C is now zero; A 
is positive and B negative.  The resultant field is as shown.  The other positions shown are at intervals of 60º.  
Thus,  the  field  rotates  one  complete  revolution  during  one  complete  cycle  of  the  AC  supply.    An  input 
frequency of 50 Hz produces a field rotating at 50 revolutions per second, i.e. at 3,000 rpm. 
Synchronous Motors 
29.  The  AC  generator,  like  the  DC  generator,  is  a  reversible  machine;  if  supplied  with  electrical 
energy, it will run as a motor.  An AC generator used in this manner operates as a synchronous motor 
(so  called,  because  the  speed  of  the  machine  is  dependent  upon  the  synchronous  speed  of  the 
rotating field produced by the input to the stator windings). 
Page 9 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
30.  When a three-phase stator winding is supplied with three-phase AC, a magnetic field, of constant 
magnitude and rotating at synchronous speed, is produced within the stator gap.  In a two-pole stator 
supplied at 50 Hz, this is equivalent to two poles (NS and SS) rotating at 3,000 rpm.  The rotor carries 
the  field  windings,  which  are  supplied  with  DC  to  produce  two  poles  (N  and  S).    With  the  rotor 
stationary in the position shown in Fig 10a, there will be repulsion between N and NS, and between S 
and SS.  A torque will therefore be exerted on the rotor in an anti-clockwise direction. 
14-10 Fig 10 Principle of Operation of a Synchronous Motor 
a
b
Rotation of Field
Rotation of Field
NS
SS
Rotor
N
N
S
S
Stator
SS
NS
31.  Half  a  cycle  (i.e.  0.01  sec)  later,  the  poles  of  the  rotating  stator  field  will  have  changed  position,  as 
shown in Fig 10b.  There is now attraction between N and SS, and between S and NS, so that a clockwise 
torque  is  applied  to  the  rotor.    Because  of  its  inertia,  the  rotor  cannot  respond  to  this  rapidly  alternating 
torque, and so remains at rest.  The synchronous motor cannot, therefore, be started simply by applying AC 
to the stator winding, even if the rotor is already supplied with DC. 
32.  Suppose now that the rotor, driven by an external force, is already turning in a clockwise direction at just 
below  synchronous  speed.    The  relative  speed  between  the  rotating  field  and  the  rotor  will  be  low,  and 
eventually  the  N  pole  of  the  rotor  will  become  adjacent  to  the  SS  pole  of  the  rotating  field,  as  the  latter 
overtakes  the  rotor.    At  this  point,  the  two  magnetic  fields  will  lock  together,  and  the  rotor  will  maintain  its 
position relative to the rotating field; that is, it will rotate at synchronous speed.  The synchronous motor is 
usually started and run up towards the synchronous speed with the help of a small induction motor. 
33.  Characteristics
a. 
Effect  of  Load.    When  a  mechanical  load  is  applied  to  a synchronous motor, the electrical 
input  to  the  motor  increases,  the  speed  remaining  constant.    If  too  great  a  load  is  applied,  the 
machine is pulled out of synchronism and comes to rest.  The torque at which this occurs is called 
the 'pull-out torque'. 
b. 
Effect  of  DC  Excitation.    If  the  mechanical  load  is  kept  constant,  and  the  DC  excitation 
varied, the back emf varies, and hence the supply current to the stator varies.  A graph showing 
the variation of stator current as the excitation is varied is shown in Fig 11.  The greater the load 
on the machine, the greater is the current and the higher is the curve on the graph.  At a low value 
of DC excitation, the stator current is large and lags the applied voltage.  At normal excitation, the 
current is a minimum and the phase angle zero.  At a high value of excitation, the current again 
increases, but it now leads the applied voltage.  This is an important property of the synchronous 
motor  since,  by  over-exciting  the  field,  the  machine  is  made  to  take  a  leading  current  which 
Page 10 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
compensates  for  any  lagging  current  taken  by  other  apparatus  connected  to  the  same  supply.  
The power factor of the supply is thereby improved. 
14-10 Fig 11 Effect of Varying the DC Excitation to a Synchronous Motor 
Current Lagging
Current Leading
Full Load
t
n
rre
u
C
r
Half Load
to
ta
S
No Load
DC Excitation
34.  Summary.  The synchronous motor: 
a. 
Requires to be started by an external prime mover. 
b. 
Runs only at the synchronous speed. 
c. 
Can  be  used  to  adjust  the  power  factor  of  a  system  at  the  same  time  as  it  is  driving  a 
mechanical load. 
Three-phase Induction Motors 
35.  Construction.    Fig  12  shows  the  basic  construction  of  a  simple  type  of  three-phase  induction 
motor (note that the stator windings are usually in pairs of poles as in Fig 8a).  It consists of a three-
phase  stator  winding  supplied  with  three-phase  AC  to  produce  a  rotating  magnetic  field.    The  rotor 
consists of a set of stout copper conductors, laid in slots in a soft-iron armature, and welded to copper 
end rings, thus forming a closed circuit.  This is termed a 'squirrel-cage' rotor and it will be seen that 
there is no electrical connection to the rotor. 
Page 11 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
14-10 Fig 12 Three-phase Induction Motor 
Phase
1
Stator
Rotor
Copper
Conductors
Rotor
Copper
End Ring
Phase
Phase
3
2
36.  Principle.  If a conductor is set at right angles to a magnetic field, as in Fig 13a, and moved across 
the flux from left to right, the direction of the induced emf will be into the paper (Fleming’s Right-hand Rule 
– Volume 14, Chapter 6).  If this conductor is part of a complete circuit, a current will be established in the 
direction  of  this  voltage,  and  there  will  be  a  force  on  the  conductor  tending  to  urge  it  from  right  to  left 
(Fleming’s  Left-hand  Rule  –  Volume  14,  Chapter  6).    The  same  relative  motion  of  field  and  conductor 
applies if the conductor is stationary and the field moves from right to left, as in Fig 13b; if the circuit is 
completed so that current can be established in the conductor, the conductor tends to move from right to 
left.    The  conductor  experiences  a  force  moving  it  in  the  same  direction  as  the  field’s  motion.    As  the 
conductor follows the field, the relative motion is reduced, thereby reducing the conductor current and the 
force  on  the  conductor.    Thus,  the  conductor  speed  is  limited  to  something  less  than  that  of  the  field, 
otherwise there will be no relative motion, no current, and no torque. 
14-10 Fig 13 Principle of Induction Motor 
a
b
Fixed Field
N
N
Motion
of Field
Fixed
Conductor
Force on
Motion
Force on
Conductor
of Conductor
Conductor
Motion
of Field
S
S
37.  The  squirrel-cage  rotor  of  the  induction  motor,  set  in  the  rotating  field  of  the  stator,  should 
accelerate until it is running steadily at a speed which is slightly less than the synchronous speed at 
which  the  magnetic  field  rotates.    Thus,  the  rotor  runs  slightly  slower  than  the  rotating  field,  the 
amount  depending  on  the  load:  the  larger  the  load  the  greater  the  speed  difference.    In  practice, 
very little speed change occurs between a light and a heavy load, and the main use of an induction 
motor is to drive a load at relatively constant speed. 
38.  Slip.    The  difference  between  the  synchronous  speed  and  the  rotor speed, measured in rpm, is 
termed the 'slip speed'.  The ratio of slip speed to synchronous speed, expressed as a percentage, is 
Page 12 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
termed  'slip'.    For  example,  a  six-pole  motor  supplied  at  50  Hz  will  have  a  synchronous  speed  of 
ηS = 60f/p = 60 × 50/3 = 1,000 rpm.  With a rotor speed of 960 rpm, the slip speed will be 1,000 - 960 = 
40 rpm and the slip will be 40 × 100/1,000 = 4%.  In practice, the value of slip varies from 2%, for large 
machines, to 6% for small machines. 
39.  Starting  Current.    When  the  stator  winding  is  energized,  and  the  rotor  stopped,  the  slip  is 
100%  and  maximum  emf  is  induced  in  the  rotor.    A  heavy  current  is  thus  established  in  the  rotor, 
and  this  produces  a  flux  which  opposes  and  weakens  the  stator  flux.    The  self-induced  emf  in  the 
stator is therefore reduced, and a heavy current is taken by the stator winding on starting.  To reduce 
this heavy starting current, the voltage applied to the stator windings should be at a reduced level on 
starting, until the rotor is turning at such a speed that its effect on the stator current is negligible.  The 
normal  way  of  doing  this  is  to  use  a  'star-delta'  starting  switch.    For  normal  running,  the  motor  is 
designed  to  operate  with  the  stator  phases  mesh  or  delta  connected  to  the  supply  via  the  switch 
(Fig 14a),  so  that  the  phase  voltage is equal to the line voltage.  For starting, the stator windings are 
1
connected  up  in  star  (Fig  14b)  via  the  switch  to  the  supply,  so  that  the  phase  voltage  is 
  of  the 
3
normal voltage.  This reduced voltage limits the starting current to a safe level. 
14-10 Fig 14 Star-delta Starter 
a
b
Stator
Windings
3
2
3
Three-
Three-
1
Stator
Phase
1
Phase
Windings
Supply
Supply
2
1
Phase Voltage = Line Voltage
Phase Voltage =      Line Voltage
3
40.  Torque.  The frequency of the current induced in the rotor is the frequency with which the stator 
field  rotates  relative  to  each  conductor.    When  the  rotor  is  at  rest,  this  frequency  equals  the  supply 
frequency.  When the motor is running lightly loaded, the slip is small, and the frequency of the induced 
rotor current may be only a few cycles per second.  However, the resistance of a squirrel-cage rotor is 
small  and  its  inductance  high.    Its  impedance  will,  therefore,  be  large  at  the  frequency  of  the  supply 
when the rotor is stationary, and much less when it is running.  Thus, on starting, the rotor current and 
the rotor emf are nearly 90º out of phase.  The flux produced by this lagging rotor current is such that 
there  is  little  interaction  between  it  and  the  stator  flux,  and  the  starting  torque  is  poor.    As  the  rotor 
current  comes  round  into  phase  with  the  rotor  emf  with  increased  rotor  speed  (decreased  slip  and 
inductive  reactance),  the  rotor  and  stator  fluxes  come  more into phase, and the torque increases.  A 
typical torque-speed characteristic curve is shown in Fig 15. 
Page 13 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
14-10 Fig 15 Torque-Speed Characteristics of an Induction Motor 
Pull Out Torque
e
u
rq
o
T
Full Load Torque
Starting
Torque
Stationary
Speed
Synchronous Speed
41.  Load-Speed Characteristics.  Off load, the torque developed by the rotor is only that required to 
overcome  friction,  and,  in  this  condition,  the  rotor  speed  is  almost  synchronous.    When  a  load  is 
applied, the rotor slows down to the point at which the resultant increased driving torque balances the 
load  torque.    The  fall  in  speed  from  no  load  to  full  load  is  small,  as  shown  in  Fig 16.    As  the  load  is 
increased, slip increases, until eventually a load is reached at which any further increase in slip, instead 
of  increasing  torque,  reduces  torque,  and  the  motor  will  shut  down.    Usually,  therefore,  motors  are 
designed  so  that  the  pull-out  torque  is  at  least  twice  the  normal  full  load  torque,  to  give  an  ample 
operating margin. 
14-10 Fig 16 Load-Speed Characteristics of an Induction Motor 
Synchronous Speed
d
e
e
p
S
Load
Full Load
42.  The  speed  of  a  squirrel-cage  motor  is  not  easily  controlled,  since  it  is  related  to  synchronous 
speed, and its main use is on devices where a fairly constant speed is required.  One typical use is as 
the prime mover for generators used in control systems, where ratings of 2 to 30 hp at speeds of up to 
3,000  rpm  may  be  required.    The  squirrel-cage  motor  can  be  readily  adapted  for  frequent  reversing.  
To do this, it is necessary to reverse the direction of rotation of the stator field, and this is achieved by 
changing over any two of the three connections at the stator terminals. 
43.  Summary.  The three-phase squirrel-cage motor: 
a. 
Has a high starting current (reduced by a star-delta starter). 
Page 14 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
b. 
Has a poor starting torque. 
c. 
Runs at almost synchronous speed, and the speed cannot easily be varied. 
d. 
Can be adapted for frequent reversing. 
Two-phase Induction Motors 
44.  A  rotating  magnetic  field  is  also  produced  if  two  phases,  90º  out  of  phase  with  each  other,  are 
used  instead  of  a  three-phase  supply.    The  production  of  the  rotating  magnetic  field  in  a  two-phase 
induction motor employs similar methods to those described for the three-phase motor, and the motor 
principles are also similar to those of the three-phase motor.  Two-phase motors are less efficient than 
three-phase motors, and therefore less widely used. 
Single-phase Induction Motors 
45.  Fig 17 represents a single-phase induction motor with one pair of stator poles and a squirrel-cage rotor.  
Such a motor is not capable of producing a rotating field in the manner previously described, and it is not 
self-starting. 
14-10 Fig 17 Single-phase Induction Motor 
Squirrel-cage
Rotor
Out-of-
Single
Phase
Phase
Starting
Supply
Poles
46.  The  field  produced  by  the  single-phase  winding  alternates  according  to  the  frequency  of  the 
supply.  As the field changes polarity every half-cycle, it induces currents in the rotor which try to turn it 
through 180º but, as the force is exerted on the rotor axis, there is no turning force on the rotor at rest.  
If the rotor is turned by external means to overcome its inertia, an impulse every half-cycle will keep it 
rotating.  As the field is pulsating rather than rotating, single-phase motors are not as smooth running 
as two or three-phase motors. 
47.  The starting device often takes the form of an auxiliary stator winding spaced 90º from the main 
winding  (Fig  17)  and  connected  in  series  with  an  impedance  to  the  main  supply.    This  impedance  is 
chosen  to  produce  as  great  a  phase displacement as possible between the currents in the main and 
auxiliary  windings,  so  that  the  machine  starts  up  virtually  as  a  two-phase  motor  (Fig  18).    A  switch, 
usually  operated  by  centrifugal  action,  cuts  out  the  auxiliary  winding  when  a  fair  speed  has  been 
attained, and the machine continues to run on the main stator winding.  Single-phase induction motors 
(operating on 230 V 50 Hz supply and rated up to 5 hp) are used to provide a relatively constant-speed 
drive to DC generators. 
Page 15 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
14-10 Fig 18 Starting Device for a Single-phase Induction Motor 
Auxiliary
Winding
Single-phase
Main
Z
Supply
Winding
Switch
Wound Induction Motors 
48.  The squirrel-cage motor takes a large starting current, and has a poor starting torque, due to the low 
resistance  rotor.    These  features  are  improved  in  the  wound  or  slip-ring  type  of  induction  motor.    The 
stators of wound induction motors are identical to those of squirrel-cage motors, but the rotor conductors 
are insulated and form a three-phase, star-connected winding, the three ends of which are connected to 
three insulated slip rings mounted on the motor shaft (Fig 19).  When the motor is running normally, these 
slip rings are short-circuited to give a low resistance rotor equivalent to the squirrel cage.  For starting, the 
slip rings are connected to a three-phase, star-connected resistance, as shown in Fig 19, and maximum 
resistance is inserted in the rotor circuit, improving the starting torque and giving a lower starting current.  
The resistance is gradually cut out as the machine speeds up until, finally, the three slip rings are short-
circuited, and the motor runs as for a squirrel-cage machine. 
14-10 Fig 19 Slip Ring Induction Motor 
Three-Phase Supply
Main Switch
Stator Windings
Rotor
Slip Rings
Windings
(To Slip Rings)
Starting Resistance
Synchronous Induction Motors 
49.  The  features  of  constant  speed  and  capacitor  action  of  the  synchronous  motor  are  often 
combined  with  the  self-starting  feature  of  the  induction  motor  by  using  a  machine  which  is  virtually  a 
hybrid  of  the  two  types.    One  type  of  synchronous  induction  motor  in  wide  use  consists  of a slip-ring 
induction  motor  coupled  to  a  DC  exciter;  the  rotor  windings  are  connected,  via  the  slip  rings,  to  the 
exciter and a three-phase starting resistance, as shown in Fig 20.  The exciter is driven by the motor, 
which is started up as a slip-ring induction motor.  There is no appreciable DC from the exciter until the 
motor  has  attained  some  90%  of  full  speed.    As  synchronous  speed  is  approached,  the  machine 
Page 16 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
automatically  pulls  itself  into  synchronism,  and  continues  to  run  as  a  synchronous  motor,  with  DC 
applied to the rotor windings from the exciter.  If the machine is overloaded, it pulls out of synchronism 
like an ordinary synchronous motor but continues to run at reduced speed as an induction motor. 
14-10 Fig 20 Synchronous Induction Motor 
Slip Ring
Slip Ring
Starting
Resistance
1
Stator
1
Rotor
Three-
2
3
Phase
2
3
Supply
DC Exciter
Slip Ring
Single-phase Commutator Motors 
50.  The  induction  and  synchronous  types  of  AC  motor,  although  possessing  many  excellent  features, 
are  not  variable-speed  machines.    Furthermore,  the  starting  torque  of  a  squirrel-cage  motor  is  poor,  it 
takes  a  large  starting  current,  and  the  power  factor  is  low.    For  these  reasons,  AC  commutator  motors 
have been developed, in an attempt to obtain improved speed control, starting torque, and power factor. 
51.  An  ordinary  DC  series  motor,  when  connected  to  an  AC  supply,  will  rotate  and  exert  a 
unidirectional  torque.    The  ordinary  DC  series  motor  would  not,  however,  be  capable  of  giving  an 
efficient and satisfactory performance for the following reasons: 
a. 
Large eddy currents in the field magnets would cause undue heating. 
b. 
Each  coil  of  the  armature  winding,  when  short-circuited  by  the  brushes,  would  give  rise  to 
destructive sparking at the brushes. 
c. 
The  power  factor  would  be  very  low  because  of  the  highly  inductive  nature  of  the  field  and 
armature windings. 
52.  To  overcome  these  drawbacks,  a  series  motor  designed  for  use  on  AC  supply  (or  for  use  on 
either AC or DC, in which case it is known as a universal motor), is modified in the following manner: 
a. 
The entire magnetic circuit is laminated. 
b. 
The field winding is distributed in core slots, like the stator winding of an induction motor. 
c. 
The  armature  winding  is  sub-divided  to  a  greater  extent  than  in  DC  machines.    This 
necessitates a relatively large number of commutator segments, and gives a large commutator for 
the size of the motor. 
Page 17 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-10 - AC Generators and Motors 
d. 
The  brushes  are  of  high  resistance  carbon,  and  each  brush  is  restricted  in  width  so  that  it 
bridges only two commutator segments. 
e. 
Connection  between  armature  coils  and  commutator  segments  is  often  made  through 
resistors, instead of by direct soldering.  This reduces the circulating current when a coil is short-
circuited by a brush. 
53.  The  main  characteristics  of  the  AC  series  motor  are  similar  to  those  of  DC  series  motors 
(Volume 14, Chapter 6), and the variable series resistor method for starting and speed control of 
the  DC  motor  is  used  for  the  AC  motor.    AC  commutator  motors  are  not  very  efficient,  and  their 
use is confined to fractional horsepower motors.  They are widely used in household appliances. 
ROTARY INVERTERS AND CONVERTERS 
Rotary Inverters 
54.  A rotary inverter combines the functions of a DC motor and an AC generator.  It is similar in construction 
to  a  rotary  transformer  (Volume  14,  Chapter  6),  except  that  the  generator  windings  are  connected  to  slip 
rings.  The function of the machine is to invert the DC input to an AC output. 
Rotary Converters 
55.  A rotary converter is a combination of an AC motor and a DC generator and converts an AC input 
to a DC output. 
Page 18 of 18 

AP3456 – 14-11 - Transformers 
CHAPTER 11 - TRANSFORMERS 
Introduction 
1. 
In  the  main,  transformers  are  used  as  a  means  of  increasing  or  decreasing  AC  voltages.    They 
are  devices  with  no  moving  parts  and  depend  on  mutual  inductance  between  two  electric  circuits  for 
their  action.    Transformers  are  not  amplifiers  or  generators,  as  no  external  power  supplies are used.  
The power out of the device is slightly less than the power put in to it. 
The Basic Voltage Transformer 
2. 
The voltage transformer is a mutual inductor in which the coupling is arranged to be a maximum 
by  concentrating  the  flux  in  an  iron  core,  so  that  the  flux  through  the  input  (primary)  and  output 
(secondary)  windings  is  identical.    Under  ideal  conditions,  with  the  same  flux  in  both  primary  and 
secondary windings, the transformer is said to have a coupling coefficient (k) equal to unity.  In reality, 
device losses have to be taken into account and unity is never achieved.  Fig 1 shows the construction 
of a typical transformer along with its symbolic representation. 
14-11 Fig 1 A Typical Voltage Transformer 
3. 
In  the  circuit  shown  in  Fig  2,  the  applied  AC  voltage  V  causes  a  current  I  to  flow  in  the  primary 
which  induces  the  same  number  of  volts  per  turn  in  both  primary  and  secondary  windings  of  the 
transformer.  The voltage induced in the primary, E1, is a back emf and as such is in opposition to the 
applied voltage.  If the primary has n1 turns in its windings and the secondary has n2, then the voltage 
induced in the secondary, E2, is given by: 
n
E
2
=
× E (Back emf) 
2
1
n1
The phasor diagram representation of this equation is also shown in Fig 2. 
14-11 Fig 2 Voltages and Currents in a Transformer 
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 – 14-11 - Transformers 
Transformer Turns Ratio 
4. 
The  number  of  turns  in  the  secondary  winding  (n2)  divided  by  the  number  of  turns  in  the 
primary (n1) is known as the turns ratio of the transformer.  The secondary voltage can be made many 
times larger or smaller depending on the turns ratio.  Transformers are referred to as either step-up or 
step-down devices. 
5. 
Some transformers are designed with tapings on their primary and secondary windings in order to 
accommodate  a  wide  range  of  voltages.    In  these  cases,  the  transformer  ratio  is  determined  by  the 
number of active windings in circuit for a given configuration. 
Transformer Losses 
6. 
During  the  process  of  transformer  action  two  phenomena  occur  within  the  metal  core,  namely 
hysteresis and eddy current effects.  Both of these give rise to power losses within the device and are 
present whether a load is connected across the secondary or not.  These losses are grouped under the 
heading of magnetization or iron losses, and, because they are associated with the input, they may be 
likened to the internal resistance losses of a battery or generator.  These losses may be minimized as 
follows: 
a. 
Using  magnetic  materials  with  a  high  permeability  and  a  small  hysteresis  loop  area  (see 
Volume 14, Chapter 2). 
b. 
Constructing a core made up of laminated sheets rather than a solid block.  The laminations are 
insulated from each other, giving high resistance to the eddy currents tending to flow. 
7. 
When current flows in the secondary circuit of a transformer, ie load connected, additional losses 
are introduced which are known as copper losses.  Copper losses are caused by the resistance of the 
windings, and, because they are associated with the output, they may be likened to the load across a 
battery or generator. 
8. 
For any transformer, maximum efficiency occurs, i.e. maximum transference of power, when the 
load losses (copper losses) equal the internal fixed losses (iron losses).  This is very much in line with 
the maximum power transfer theorem stated in Volume 14, Chapter 1. 
Transformer Regulation 
9. 
The rated voltage of a transformer is the voltage that appears across the secondary terminals on no-
load, when the rated primary voltage is applied to the primary.  However, the secondary voltage on-load will 
generally be less than this value; the drop depending on the load, the load power factor and the losses within 
the  transformers.    The  value  of  the  on-load  voltage  is  particularly  important  because  it  is  the  value  which 
applies in practice when the transformer is in operation with a load connected.  The numerical value of the 
reduction is known as the inherent voltage regulation and is expressed as: 
Secondary voltage, off-load (ES) − Secondary voltage, on-load  (VS). 
This is normally expressed as a percentage, or as a per-unit (pu) value. 
E − V
As a percentage = 
S
S ×100
ES
E − V
       As a pu = 
S
S
ES
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 – 14-11 - Transformers 
Three-phase Transformers 
10.  In  a  three-phase  AC  system,  three  separate  transformers  could  be  used  in  order  to  provide  the 
necessary  voltage  transformation;  however,  it  is  more  economical  to  use  a  single  unit.    It  is  usually 
more  efficient,  requires  less  space  and  weighs  less  than  three  transformers  of  the  same  capacity.  
Fig 3 shows the development of the three-phase core. 
11.  Fig  3a  shows  three  single-phase  transformers  brought  together  to  share  a  common  central  leg.  
However,  the  sum  of  the  fluxes  in  the  common  leg  will  always  be  zero,  and  it  is  therefore  not 
necessary.  Fig 3b shows a combined core without the central leg, but this shape is difficult to make.  
The practical shape is shown at Fig 3c and is a distorted version of the previous form. 
12.  The  primary  and  secondary  coils  of  a  three-phase  transformer  may  be  connected  together  in 
various star and delta configurations, depending on load and circuit requirements. 
14-11 Fig 3 The Development of a Three-phase Core 
Auto Transformers 
13.  Any tapped inductance can be used as a transformer, and this is illustrated in Fig 4.  This device 
is  called  an  auto  transformer  and  the  action  is  similar  to  that  of  the  conventional  type.    The  main 
difference is that part of the inductance is common to both primary and secondary circuits and as such 
provides  direct  coupling  between  them.    Primary  and  secondary  currents  are  essentially  in  antiphase 
and  equal  in  value  when  the turns ratio is zero.  The inductance then carries zero current.  The auto 
transformer is particularly efficient for small transformer ratios. 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 – 14-11 - Transformers 
14-11 Fig 4 The Auto Transformer (Principle of Operation) 
Transformer Matching 
14.  The  maximum  power  transfer  theorem  established  that  maximum  transference  of  power  takes 
place when the resistance of the load is equal to the internal resistance of the supply source.  Under 
these conditions the power source and load are said to be matched. 
15.  Unfortunately, in practice, circuit loads very rarely equal the internal resistance of the supply and 
transformers  are  used  with  suitable  turns  ratios  to  provide  the  required  matching.    This  is  shown  in 

n 
Fig 5.  A turns ratio  t = 2  is chosen so that: 

n1 
R
R
r =
or t =
t 2
r
14-11 Fig 5 Transformer Matching 
Current Transformers 
16.  Current  transformers,  sometimes  referred  to  as  instrument  transformers,  utilize  the  current  or 
voltage  transformation  properties  of the normal transformer.  The main difference in operation is that 
the primary winding forms part of the circuit under test (see Fig 6). 
14-11 Fig 6 A Current Transformer 
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 – 14-11 - Transformers 
17.  Current transformers are used for: 
a. 
Measuring current or power in high voltage systems. 
b. 
Measuring high current with low range instruments. 
c. 
Operating relays and other control devices according to the current in a system. 
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
CHAPTER 12 - FUNDAMENTAL ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS 
Introduction 
1. 
Electronics  is  the  science  and  technology  of  controlling  suitably  modified  electron  flow  so  as  to 
convey  information.    A  good  deal  of  electronic  equipment  looks  complicated  and  complex  on  first 
examination, but it has to be realized that all electronic circuits are made up of relatively simple basic 
units  each  performing  a  specific  function.    The  way  in  which  these  units,  or  'building  blocks',  are 
assembled governs the function of the complete system. 
2. 
The whole of modern electronic circuitry is built on a foundation of resistors, capacitors, inductors, and 
semiconductor devices.  From these simple components, intermediate units are assembled, such as: 
a. 
Amplifiers, to increase the size of signals. 
b. 
Oscillators, to generate desired waveforms and signal frequencies. 
c. 
Mixers, to combine signals of different frequencies. 
d. 
Power supplies, to energize the whole system. 
e. 
Modulators, to superimpose information on radio waves. 
f. 
Demodulators (detection), to remove information from radio waves. 
g. 
Transducers,  to  convert  a  physical  quantity  (force,  light,  sound,  etc)  to  an  electrical  signal, 
and vice versa. 
h. 
Logic gates, to perform logic functions. 
i. 
Shift registers, for use in microprocessors. 
3. 
Electronic  components  fall  into  two  main  categories,  namely  active  and  passive  devices.  
Resistors,  capacitors,  and  inductors  are  regarded  as  being  'passive',  while  transistors  and  allied 
semiconductor  devices  are  regarded  as  'active',  because  they  modify  the  power  supplied  to  them.  
This  chapter  is  devoted  to  the  subject  of  active  devices;  passive  devices  are  covered  in  detail  in 
Volume 14, Chapter 1. 
SEMICONDUCTORS 
Introduction 
4. 
Most materials used in electricity and electronics are either conductors or insulators.  However, a 
few materials do not fall into either of these categories because conduction through them is too small 
for  them  to  be  classed  as  conductors,  and  too  large  for  them  to  be  insulators.    Such  materials  are 
known as semiconductors.  Germanium and silicon are the two most common semiconductors. 
Doped Semiconductors 
5. 
At  ordinary  room  temperatures,  a  pure  semiconductor  has  few  free  electrons.    However,  if  very 
small  quantities  of  another  selected  element,  such  as  indium  or  arsenic,  are  combined  with  the  pure 
semiconductor, conductivity is increased.  This process of adding 'impurities' to the pure germanium or 
silicon is known as 'doping'.  The resulting conductivity of the semiconductor depends upon the amount 
of doping, and can be strictly controlled. 
N-Type and P-Type Semiconductors 
6. 
Doped  semiconductors  can  be  one  of  two  types  (n-type  or  p-type)  depending  upon  the  element 
that  is  added  during  doping.    For  an  n-type  semiconductor,  the  result  of  doping  is  to  produce  free 
Page 1 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
electrons  which,  as  negative  charges,  become  available  as  n-type  'charge  carriers'  (n  for  negative).  
Conversely, for a p-type semiconductor, doping produces positive (or p-type) charge carriers known as 
'holes'.  A hole has a positive charge, equal and opposite to that of an electron.  If a voltage is applied 
to an n-type semiconductor, the resulting current is due mainly to a movement of electrons; in a p-type, 
it  is  due  mainly  to  a  movement  of  holes  (Fig  1).    The  moving  charges  in  each  case  are  known  as 
'majority carriers'. 
14-12 Fig 1 Flow of Electrons and Holes 
Majority Carriers (Electrons)
Majority Carriers (Holes)
Electron Movement
Hole Movement
I
V
I
V
Conventional
Conventional
Current Flow
Current Flow
P
Note: While hole movement is in the same direction as conventional
current flow, electron movement is in the opposite direction.
7. 
Although the majority of charge in an n-type is carried by electrons, there is a small flow of charge 
due to hole movement, known as 'minority carriers'.  Similarly, minority carriers are electrons in p-type 
material where the majority carriers are holes.  Minority carriers can be ignored when considering the 
basic  operation  of  semiconductor  devices,  but  they  are  very  important  when  determining  breakdown 
voltages, heating, and the efficiency of devices. 
P-N Junctions 
8. 
A single piece of n-type or p-type semiconductor conducts readily in either direction; reversing the 
applied voltage merely reverses the direction of current (Fig 2a). 
9. 
In a continuous piece of pure semiconductor that has been doped in such a way that one end of 
the  semiconductor  has  n-type  properties  and  the  other  end  p-type,  conduction  takes  place  easily  in 
only  one  direction  (Fig  2b).    This  is  the  basis  of  the  p-n  junction  diode.    Note  that  it  is  not  sufficient 
merely  to  join  a  piece  of  n-type  semiconductor  to  a  piece  of  p-type,  the  junction  must  occur  in  a 
continuous piece of single-crystal semiconductor. 
Page 2 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
14-12 Fig 2 Direction of Flow 
a  N Type (P Type Similar)
b  P-N Junction
N
Junction
P
Electrons
Electrons
Holes
Conventional
Conventional
Current
Current
V
I
V
I
Electrons
No Movement
Conventional
Current
Voltage Reversed
No Current
V
I
V
Properties of P-N Junctions 
10.  When  a  p-n  junction  is  formed,  the  distribution  of  charges  in  the  n  and  p-type  materials  is  such 
that there is no net flow of current across the junction.  Thus, under the condition shown in Fig 3a, with 
no external voltage applied, there is no current flow. 
11.  If a battery is connected across the semiconductor slice, as shown in Fig 3b, the positive terminal 
attracts electrons in the n-type region away from the junction, and the negative terminal of the supply 
has  the  same  effect  on  the  holes.    There  is  now  even  less  possibility  of  current  flow  through  the  p-n 
junction.    A  junction  diode  operating  under  these  conditions  is  'reverse  biased'.    In  practice,  in  a 
reverse biased diode, a very small reverse current flows (measured in micro amps) and this is called 
the leakage current; due to minority charge carriers. 
12.  If  the  external  battery  is  reversed,  electrons  are  attracted  from  the  n-type  region  through  the 
junction  to  the  positive  terminal  of  the  battery,  and  holes  are  attracted  the  other  way.    The  two 
movements  combine  to  give  a  large  forward  current  through  the  junction  in  the  direction  shown.    A 
junction diode operating under these conditions is 'forward biased', as shown in Fig 3c.  A large current 
(normally  measured  in  milliamps)  flows  for  a  small  forward  bias  voltage;  this  indicates  that  the  diode 
has a low resistance in the forward direction. 
Page 3 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
14-12 Fig 3 Effect of Bias in P-N Junction Diode 
Junction
N
P
Zero Applied Voltage
No Movement of Charges
Zero Current
a
Junction
N
P
Electrons
Holes
Move Away From Junction
V
Reverse Bias
Small ‘Leakage’ Current
Positive Terminal to N
(Conventional Flow)
b
Junction
N
P
Electrons
Holes
Attracted Through Junction
V
Forward Bias
Large Forward Current
Negative Terminal to N
(Conventional Flow)
c
P-N Junction Diode Characteristics 
13.  By measuring the current flowing in the external circuit for various values of reverse and forward 
bias  voltages  applied  to  a  diode,  we  can  obtain  a  series  of  readings  relating  the  current  and  the 
voltage.    From  these  readings,  a  'characteristic'  of  the  diode  may  be  plotted  showing  how  the  diode 
current varies with the voltage applied to it (Fig 4). 
Page 4 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
14-12 Fig 4 Typical Diode Characteristics 
Forward
Current
mA
N P
Forward Current
Conventional Flow
Forward Bias
Breakdown
Voltage
Reverse
Forward
0
Bias
Bias
(Volts)
(Volts)
N P
Reverse Current
Conventional Flow
Reverse Bias
Reverse
Current
µA
Note: Because forward current scale is in mA and the reverse current scale is in µA,
reverse current is scaled up 1,000 times.  Without this scale magnification, the reverse
current would appear to be zero up to the breakdown point.
14.  Fig  4  shows  that  current  flows  more  easily  in  the  forward  direction  than  in  the  reverse  direction.  
After  the  initial  'bend'  around  zero  volts,  the  current  in  the  forward  direction  is  proportional  to  the 
forward bias voltage and the graph becomes approximately a straight line.  When the diode is reverse 
biased,  only a very small reverse (leakage) current flows until a certain 'breakdown' point is reached.  
At this point, the reverse current rises to a high value, often sufficient to destroy the diode.  The reverse 
voltage at which the diode breaks down depends upon the construction of the device, but a diode must 
not  be  used  in  circuits  where  the  reverse  voltage  that  can  be  applied  to  it  exceeds  its  breakdown 
voltage. 
Junction Diode as a Switch 
15.  When  a  p-n  junction  is forward biased, its resistance is very low, often a fraction of an Ohm.  When 
reverse biased, the very small leakage current, even at high reverse voltages, means that the resistance in 
this direction is very high, of the order of megohms.  Thus, by applying suitable forward and reverse voltages 
to a diode, it may be used in the same way as a switch: ON when forward biased; OFF when reverse biased.  
Diode switches have many uses in electronics.  The switching is faster than that of a mechanical switch, the 
diode may be very small, and there are no moving parts to wear out. 
16.  For rapid switching (of the order of picoseconds) at high powers (up to l0 kW peak), a PIN diode is 
often used.  This has an undoped (intrinsic) layer sandwiched between the p and n layers.  This layer 
alters the diode characteristics to give the high speed, high power requirements. 
TRANSISTORS 
Introduction 
17.  A semiconductor diode is a two-electrode device, one end having p-type properties and the other end n-
type.  A transistor is a three-electrode device and has three layers of semiconductor, alternately p-type and n-
type.  The three layers merge into one another to form a sandwich (Fig 5).  One of the outer layers is known 
as the 'emitter', the other is the 'collector', and the thin centre layer is known as the 'base'. 
Page 5 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
14-12 Fig 5 Two Types of Transistor 
Base
b
b
Emitter
Collector
e
N
P
N
c
e
P
N
P
c
c
c
b
b
e
e
NPN Symbol
PNP Symbol
18.  There  are  p-n-p  or  n-p-n  transistors.    In  an  n-p-n  transistor,  the  emitter  and  collector  are  n-type 
semiconductors  and  the  base  is  p-type.    In  a  p-n-p  transistor,  the  semi-conductor  materials  are 
interchanged.    The  circuit  symbols  are  also  shown  in  Fig 5.    The  arrow  on  the  emitter  points  in  the 
direction  of  conventional  current  flow;  for  an  n-p-n  transistor,  this  is  into  the  emitter,  whilst  in  a  p-n-p 
type it is away from the emitter. 
19.  A transistor has many functions: it may be used as a switch, as a control device, or as the active 
device in amplifier and oscillator circuits.  It has the advantages of being very small and light; but, even 
more important, it is reliable, it requires very little power for its operation and, if operated correctly, has 
a long life. 
Transistor Junctions and Bias Voltages 
20.  In  a  semiconductor  junction  diode,  there  is  one  p-n  junction.    In  a  transistor,  we  have  two:  one 
between the emitter and the base, the other between the collector and the base (Fig 6). 
14-12 Fig 6 Transistor Junction 
b
e
c
N
P
N
Emitter-Base
Collector-Base
Junction
Junction
21.  For a transistor to operate, it must have suitable voltages applied across each junction, and these 
voltages must be of the correct polarity; in other words, the transistor has to be properly biased.  A p-n 
junction is forward biased when the p-type semiconductor is connected to the positive terminal of the 
supply; under this condition, the resistance of the junction is low and current flows easily.  A junction is 
reverse biased when the p-type semiconductor is connected to the negative terminal of the supply; the 
resistance of this junction is high and the only current flowing is that due to leakage. 
22.  Under  operating  conditions,  the  emitter-base  junction  in  a  transistor  is  forward  biased  and  the 
collector-base  junction  is  reverse-biased.    This  applies  whether  the  transistor  is  n-p-n  or  p-n-p.  
Page 6 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
Because  of  the  forward  and  reverse  bias,  the  emitter-base  junction  has  a  low  resistance  and  the 
collector-base junction a high resistance. 
Current Flow in Transistors 
23.  Transistor  action  relies  upon  a  controllable  current  flowing  between  collector  and  emitter.  
Consider  the  n-p-n  configuration  shown  in  Fig  7.    Electrons  are  flowing  from  the  emitter  to  the  base 
across the forward-bias junction.  These electrons would normally flow out of the base, and could not 
go  on  to  the  collector  because  the  base-collector  junction  is  reverse  biased.    However,  if  the  base 
junction is very thin, there are more electrons arriving from the emitter than there are positive holes in 
the p-type material.  The base-collector junction then effectively becomes forward biased, so most of 
the free electrons in the base can continue their journey to the collector. 
14-12 Fig 7 Current in NPN Transistor 
Collector Current
c +15V
Reverse
Bias 15V
N
b
Base Current
P
Forward
N
Bias 0.5V
e
-0.5V
Emitter Current
24.  There is a large current between collector and emitter and a small current into the base.  Controlling 
the current which can enter the base, controls the junction biasing and the current which flows between 
the collector and the emitter, ie a small base current controls a large collector-emitter current. 
25.  Similar remarks apply to a p-n-p transistor, except that the batteries must be reversed to provide 
the correct bias.  The forward-biased p-type emitter injects holes into the n-type base, with most of the 
holes moving through the base region to be collected by the collector. 
Advantages of Transistors 
26.  Transistors and their allied semiconductor devices have now replaced thermionic valves in almost 
every  type  of  electronic  equipment.    Their  success  has  been  due  to  the  great  advantages  they  offer 
over valves, that is: 
a. 
Much smaller size. 
b. 
They do not require heating. 
c. 
The ability to withstand greater levels of vibration and shock. 
d. 
No warming up period. 
e. 
Supply voltages are much lower. 
f. 
Longer life. 
Page 7 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
g. 
They  are  better  suited  for  use  in  remote  locations,  such  as  space  satellites  and 
booster/repeater amplifiers. 
27.  The  early  problems  associated  with  limited  power  output,  noise,  frequency  response,  and 
operating  temperature  are  all  being  overcome  as  research  intensifies.    Nowadays  there  are  very  few 
applications in which a thermionic device is superior to a transistor. 
FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS 
Introduction 
28.  The  type  of  transistor  so  far  discussed  is  often  called  the  'bipolar'  transistor  because  there  is  a 
simultaneous  flow  of  both  main  and  leakage  currents.    Another  type  of  transistor  which  has  been 
introduced  has  certain  advantages  and  disadvantages  when  compared  with  the  bipolar  type.    It  is 
known  as  the  field  effect  transistor  (FET).   There are basically two types of field effect transistor, the 
junction-gate (or 'jugfet') and the insulated gate FET (or 'igfet'). 
The Junction Gate FET 
29.  The schematic outline of a basic FET is shown in Fig 8.  It consists of a slice of n-type silicon into 
which  two  p-type  regions  are  inserted  opposite  each  other.    The  p-type  regions  are  joined  together 
externally and form a control electrode known as the gate (G).  One end of the slice is referred to as 
the source (S) and the other end is the drain (D).  The source is comparable to the emitter in a bipolar 
transistor, the gate to the base, and the drain to the collector. 
14-12 Fig 8 Basic Construction of the FET 
Gate G
p Type
n Type
Drain D
Source S
30.  Fig 9 indicates how the FET works.  It normally has a conducting n-type channel between S and D.  
Therefore,  if  D  is  made  positive  relative  to  S,  charge  carriers  (electrons  in  this  case)  flow  from  S  to  D, 
channelling between the p-type gate regions.  If G is made negative to S, it effectively repels the moving 
electrons and 'squashes' them into a narrower funnel.  In other words, the conducting channel becomes 
narrower  and  the  drain  current  decreases.    By  making  G  more  negative,  a  point  is  reached  where  the 
channel is 'pinched off' altogether and the drain current falls to zero. 
31.  If  a  signal  voltage  is  applied  to  G,  the  drain  current  is  caused  to  vary  in  sympathy.    By  suitable 
choice  of  load  resistor  in the drain circuit, the output voltage variations produced by the drain current 
can  be  much  larger  than  the  applied  signal  voltage.    Amplification  may  therefore  be  obtained.    The 
characteristics of a FET differ from bipolar transistors in three ways: 
a. 
The  bipolar  transistor  is  a  current-operated  device,  ie  it  depends  for  its  operation  on  the 
current  applied  as  input  to  the  emitter-based  circuit.    For  a  current  to  flow  for  a  small  signal 
Page 8 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
voltage, the input resistance of the device must be low.  In a FET, there is no current in the gate 
electrode.    Thus,  the  FET  is  a  voltage  operated  device,  and  has  a  very  high  input  impedance, 
which is a requirement in many circuits. 
b. 
The FET has practically no leakage current. 
c. 
Transit time effects are negligible, so that the FET has a high cut-off frequency. 
14-12 Fig 9 How the FET Works 
a Gate Zero.
b Gate Negative.
c Gate More Negative.
Wide channel,
Narrow channel,
Channel pinched off,
high drain current.
smaller current.
zero current.
G
0
G
G
S
D
S
D
S
D
d Amplification
Drain
Current
a
b
Drain
Pinch Off
Current
Variation
c
0
Gate Voltage
Gate Input Signal
The Insulated Gate FET 
32.  Junction  FETs  are  now  only  manufactured  for  replacement  parts;  all  new  FETs  are  of  the 
Insulated Gate family.  The basic construction of an insulated gate FET is shown in Fig 10.  In this type 
of  FET,  the  gate  is  insulated  from  the  channel  and,  in  the  example  shown,  the  source  and  drain 
connections  are  to  two  n-regions  contained  within  a  p-region.    The  gate  is  a metallic layer separated 
from  the  p-region  by  an  insulating  layer of silicon dioxide.  The sequence of materials - metal, oxide, 
semiconductor  -  has  given  the  device  its  alternative  name  of  'mosfet'.    Although  this  is  an  n-channel 
device, there is, in fact, no n-layer between the source and the drain until the gate is biased positively 
with  respect  to  the  p-region  (known  as  the  'base'  or  'substrate').    Such  a  potential  attracts  free 
electrons from the n and p-regions to the upper surface of the p-region, where they form an n-channel 
bridging  the  two  n-regions  and  so  providing  a  conducting  path  between  source  and  drain.    It  is 
significant  that  in  the  absence  of  a  gate  bias,  no  drain  current  can  flow;  a  positive  gate  bias  is 
necessary to give a drain current. 
Page 9 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
14-12 Fig 10 MOSFET 
a  n-Channel Insulated Gate FET (n-mos)
b  Symbols
Source ‘s’
Gate ‘g’
Silicon
Drain ‘d’
Dioxide Layer
d
d
g
s
g
s
p-mos
n-mos
p-Type Silicon
INTEGRATED CIRCUITS 
Introduction 
33.  The  twin  requirements  for  small  size  and  reliability,  particularly  in  military  systems,  have  led  to 
many different approaches to the miniaturization of electronic circuits.  Perhaps the most important of 
these is the monolithic silicon integrated circuit. 
Composition 
34.  Silicon  integrated  circuits  are  manufactured  by  a  diffusion  process  developed  from  the  planar 
technique,  used  for  making  transistors.    In  this  process,  hundreds,  or  even  thousands,  of  transistors 
and other components can be diffused into a single silicon slice, which is then separated into individual 
circuit  wafers  with  dimensions  typically  1.5  mm  ×  1.5  mm  ×  0.3  mm.    These  components  are 
connected  together  in  the  desired  circuit  configuration  by  a  network  of  metal  interconnections  on  the 
surface of a wafer.  Fig 11 represents a simplified cross-section of a piece of such an integrated circuit 
containing  a  resistor  and  a  transistor.    Diodes  can  also  be  incorporated  into  integrated  circuits,  and 
small-value capacitors can be provided by using reverse-biased diodes which exhibit capacitance of a 
few  pF.    Larger  value  capacitors  and  inductors  must  be  added  externally  to  the  diffused  integrated 
circuits.    A  far  greater  degree  of  miniaturization  can  be  achieved  using  MOS  techniques;  because  of 
their high input resistance and simple construction, thousands of these devices may be diffused on a 
single silicon slice. 
Page 10 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
14-12 Fig 11 Piece of an Integrated Circuit 
Isolation
Metal
Region
Transistor
Resistor
Connections
Oxide
Epitaxial
Layer
N
N+
Substrate
P
Buried
Layer
Applications 
35.  The range of applications for integrated circuits is almost limitless; they can be used to provide all 
the  basic  computer  circuits,  such  as  NAND  and  NOR  gates,  and  binary  counters.    Indeed,  it  is  the 
widespread  use  of  integrated  circuits  which  has  made  possible  high  capacity,  small  size  computers.  
There are also integrated circuits for single and multiple linear amplifier stages, pre-amplifying circuits 
and operational amplifiers. 
Development 
36.  A development in the field of integrated circuits is the concept of forming the system wiring between 
integrated circuits while they are still on the whole silicon slice, so that a single slice will form a complete 
electronic  sub-system.    This  technique  is  generally  called  large-scale  integration  (LSI).    It  is  important 
because one of the major causes of failure in electronic equipments is failure in the interconnecting wiring.  
The integrated circuit, with its system of interconnections within each circuit (formed as part of the slice 
fabrication process), gave a significant improvement in reliability.  It is a logical step, in order to obtain still 
higher  reliability,  to  produce  the  interconnections  between  circuits  while  they  are  still  on  the  slice.    This 
concept has been extended to cover very-large-scale integration (VLSI) and extra-large-scale integration 
(ELSI). 
CATHODE RAY TUBES 
Introduction 
37.  The  cathode  ray  tube  (CRT)  is  an  electron  tube  in  which  electrons  emitted  from  a  cathode  are 
formed  into  a  narrow  beam,  accelerated  to  high  speed,  and  directed  to  a  screen  coated  with  a 
fluorescent  material.    This  material  glows  at  the  point  of impact, producing a visible dot.  A changing 
field,  either  electrostatic  or  electromagnetic,  between  the  source  of  electrons  and  the  screen  causes 
the dot of light to move in accordance with the field variations. 
38.  There  are  two  basic  types  of  CRT;  the  electrostatic  CRT  and  the  electromagnetic  CRT.    In  the 
electrostatic CRT, focusing and deflection are done with electronic fields, while in the electromagnetic 
CRT, magnetic fields do these jobs. 
Page 11 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
The Electrostatic CRT (ESCRT) 
39.  Fig 12 shows the main parts of an electrostatic CRT.  These parts can be divided into three groups: 
a. 
The electron gun, which produces a stream of fast-moving electrons and focuses them into a 
narrow  beam.    Sometimes  the  electron  gun  refers  only  to  the  cathode  and  grid;  the  anodes  are 
then called the focusing system. 
b. 
The  deflecting  plates,  which  enable  the  beam  of  electrons  to  be  moved  up  and  down  and 
from side to side. 
c. 
The fluorescent screen, which shows the movement of the beam by producing a spot of light. 
All of the electrodes are enclosed in an evacuated glass envelope. 
14-12 Fig 12 The Electrostatic CRT (ESCRT) 
Fluorescent
Screen
Aquadag
Coating
Cathode
Y Deflector
Grid
Grid Aperture
Plates
Electron
Beam
Heater
2nd Anode
X Deflector
1st Anode
3rd Anode
Plates
40.  The cathode is a small tube, coated at the end with an oxide which emits electrons when heated.  The 
grid is a hollow cylinder surrounding the cathode, with a central hole through which the electrons pass.  The 
grid is made negative with respect to the cathode and, by varying this voltage, the number of electrons in the 
beam is varied, thus controlling the brilliance of the spot of light on the CRT screen.  The brilliance control 
alters the voltage on the grid of the CRT.  If the grid is made sufficiently negative, the electron beam will be 
completely cut off, and the spot on the screen will be blanked out. 
41.  The  first  and  third  anodes  are  circular  plates,  with holes through their centres.  They are held at a 
high  positive  voltage  relative  to  the  cathode  (several  hundred,  or  even  thousand,  volts),  and  so  they 
accelerate the electrons to a high speed.  The third anode voltage is higher than the first anode voltage. 
42.  The second anode is a hollow cylinder mounted between the first and third anodes.  Its purpose is 
to focus the electrons into a narrow beam and, for this reason, it is made negative with respect to the 
other anodes; this voltage can be varied to adjust the focusing of the beam.  Hence, the focus control 
varies the voltage on the second anode. 
43.  In practice, the third anode is earthed and the other electrodes are made negative with respect to it.  
Typical EHT (extra high tension) voltages used in CRTs are: cathode –4 kV; grid –4.02 kV (variable); first 
anode –2 kV; second anode –3 kV (variable).  Third anode and screen OV EHT voltages are needed in 
order to give the electrons enough speed to produce light on the fluorescent screen. 
Page 12 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
44.  Two sets of deflecting plates are mounted after the third anode, as shown in Fig 12.  By applying 
varying voltages to these plates, the focused beam can be swung in any direction.  The plates nearer 
the third anode (the Y plates) are used to move the beam vertically, and those nearer the screen (the X 
plates)  deflect  the  beam  horizontally.    The  plates  are  often  flared  at  the  ends  to provide the required 
amount  of  deflection  without  fouling  the  beam.    When  a  voltage  is  applied  to  the  plates,  the  electron 
beam will be attracted or repelled, depending on the polarity. 
45.  For  horizontal  deflection,  a  sawtooth  voltage  is  applied  to  the  X  plates.    This  voltage  increases 
from minimum to maximum values at a uniform rate (the sweep) and then returns rapidly to minimum 
(the fly-back).  The waveform is repetitive and causes the beam to move from the left-hand to the right-
hand side of the screen and then to return quickly to the left-hand side to start another sweep.  The fly-
back  may  be  'blanked  out'  by  applying  either  a  negative  pulse  to  the  grid  or  a  positive  pulse  to  the 
cathode during this period. 
46.  Thus,  with  this  waveform  applied  to  the  X  plates,  a  horizontal  line  is  produced  on  the  screen.  
When a voltage pulse is applied to the Y plates, the beam is vertically deflected for the duration of the 
pulse and a 'blip' appears on the screen. 
47.  The  fluorescent  screen  is  a  chemical  coating  on  the  inside  end  of  the  glass  tube.    When  fast-
moving  electrons  hit  the  screen,  they  cause  it  to  glow  with  a  colour  which  depends  upon  the  type  of 
chemical  used.    The  spot  of  light  remains  for  a  time  after  the  electron  beam  has  moved  away;  this 
effect is after-glow and enables a complete steady picture to be seen.  In sonic types of radar display, 
the time base trace rotates slowly round the centre of the CRT screen and a chemical with a long after-
glow is used to retain the picture. 
48.  When  electrons  hit  the  screen,  secondary  electrons  are  emitted.    These  are  conducted  via  a 
powdered graphite coating, called the 'aquadag', to the third anode (earth).  The coating prevents the 
screen becoming negatively charged. 
49.  In  some  types  of  CRT,  an  extra  anode  is  used.    It  is  made  of  a  conducting  ring  of  powdered 
graphite held at about twice the voltage of the third anode with respect to the cathode.  This enables 
small input signal voltages to produce large displays on the screen, ie the deflection sensitivity of the 
tube is increased (Fig 13). 
14-12 Fig 13 Post-deflection Acceleration 
Deflector Plates
Gun
Post-Deflection
Anode
Page 13 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
The Electromagnetic CRT (EMCRT) 
50.  The construction of an electromagnetic CRT, employing magnetic focusing and deflections, is shown in 
Fig 14.  The heater, cathode, and grid are the same as for an electrostatic CRT, but there is usually only one 
anode.  This may be the aquadag coating, connected to a suitable voltage.  Deflecting and focusing currents 
are passed through coils mounted on the outside of the neck of the tube.  The electron beam is acted upon 
by  a  sideways  force  as  it  passes  through  the  magnetic  field  around  the  coil,  in  much  the  same  way  as  a 
current-carrying conductor has a force exerted on it in an electric motor. 
14-12 Fig 14 The Electromagnetic CRT (EMCRT) 
Connection to
Fluorescent
Focusing Coil
Aquadag Coating
Screen
Glass
Cathode
Electron
Beam
Heater
Grid
Aquadag
Coating (Anode)
Deflection Coils
at Right Angles
51.  Focusing is done by passing DC through a specially shaped coil.  The position of the coil, and the 
amount of current, control the focusing of the beam.  The focus control is a rheostat, which varies the 
current through the coil. 
52.  Deflection is produced by two pairs of coils, mounted at 90º to each other, round the neck of the tube.  
In Fig 14, only one pair is shown for clarity.  The amount of deflection depends on the strength of current in 
the coils.  If the current is reversed, the direction of deflection reverses.  To produce a horizontal time base, a 
sawtooth waveform of current must be passed through the horizontal deflection coils.  Vertical deflection can 
be  obtained  by  passing  a  signal  current  through  the  vertical  deflection  coils,  but  it  is  more  usual  to  show 
signals  on  an  electromagnetic  CRT  by  using  intensity  modulation.    In  this  case,  a  positive-going  signal 
voltage is applied to the grid of the CRT.  The number of electrons in the beam increases for the duration of 
the signal, and a bright spot appears on the time base. 
The ESCRT and EMCRT Combined 
53.  Combinations  of  the  two  CRT  systems  may  be  used,  the  most  popular  being  that  using 
electrostatic  focusing  and  electromagnetic  deflection.    There  are  various  advantages  and 
disadvantages of the two types, and, until recently, the greatest advantage of the electromagnetic tube 
has  been  its  higher  resolution,  ie  ability  to  reduce  the  spot  size  to  very  small  proportions.    However, 
recent  research  has  improved  the  resolution  of  the  electrostatic  CRT,  although  it  has  increased  the 
complexity of the tube and necessitated the use of low-power magnetic correcting coils.  Present-day 
electromagnetic tubes have spot sizes of about 0.25 mm. 
Page 14 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
CRT Displays 
54.  Time  Base  Production.    All  CRT  displays  need  some  form  of  time  base;  a  large  number  of 
displays  use  the  A-scope  time  base.    With  this  type,  the  spot  moves  linearly  across  the  face  of  the 
screen,  usually  from  left  to  right,  then  returns  rapidly  to  its  starting  point.    During  the  rapid  return, 
known  as  'fly-back',  the  spot  of  light  is  normally  extinguished  by  application  of  a  suitable  blackout 
waveform  to  the  grid  of  the  tube.    The  ESCRT  uses  a  voltage  waveform,  whilst  the  EMCRT  uses  a 
current waveform, as follows: 
a. 
The  ESCRT  Waveform.    Fig  15  shows  the  voltage  waveform  required  to  produce  a 
type A time  base.    The  frequency  of  the  waveform  is  equal to the pulse recurrence frequency of 
the  radar.    A  circular  time  base,  rotating  with  angular  velocity  ω,  can  be  obtained  by  applying 
voltages proportional to sin ωt and cosine ωt to the X and Y plates respectively. 
14-12 Fig 15 A-scope Waveform 
+V
0
-V
0 Cut Off
Trace
Visible
Fly-back
b. 
The  EMCRT  Waveform.    As  the  coils  of  the  EMCRT  are  subject  to  inductance,  current 
modulations must be used to produce the sawtooth waveform.  A PPI display can be produced by 
physically rotating the coils. 
55.  Calibration Markers.  For accurate measurement of range, the time base of a CRT must be set 
up  against  some  accurate  standard.    This  is  done  by  a  calibrator  unit  which  is  synchronized  with  the 
transmitter pulse.  The calibration markers appear as pips or bright rings. 
56.  Types  of  Display.    The  CRT  in  a  radar  receiver  can  be  used  to  present  one,  two  or  three-
dimensional information concerning the target. 
a. 
One-dimensional  Displays.    If  only  one-dimensional  information  is  presented,  the  trace  is 
deflection-modulated (ie the spot is deflected from its normal path to indicate the presence of an 
echo  signal  from  a  target).    Examples  of  this  type  of  display  are  the  A-scope,  I-scope,  and  J-
scope. 
b. 
Two-dimensional Displays.  For two-dimensional displays, the trace is intensity-modulated 
(ie  the  brilliance  of  the  trace  is  varied  by  an  echo  signal  from  the  target).    Examples  of  two-
dimensional displays are: 
(1)  The  PPI,  sector-PPI,  and  B-scope,  each  of  which  shows  the situation in a bearing and 
range plan format. 
(2)  The C-scope, which shows elevation and azimuth error, and is therefore of special use 
in fighters, where the display corresponds to the pilot’s view through the windscreen.  The C-
scope information can also be readily transferred to the pilot’s Head-up Display. 
Page 15 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-12  Fundamental Electronic Components 
c. 
Three-dimensional  Displays.    Three-dimensional  information  is  displayed  in  a  variety  of 
ways,  often  by  combining  complementary  two-dimensional  displays.    For  example,  a  C-scope, 
showing  elevation  and  azimuth  error,  can  be  superimposed  on  to a B-scope showing range and 
azimuth.  The I-scope shows target range, displacement from the axis, and angle-off error. 
In all types of display, the spot moves in some pre-determined manner on the screen, this movement being 
termed the time base.  Some of the commonly-used radar displays are illustrated in Volume 11, Chapter 1. 
57.  Strobes.    In  some  radar  equipments,  it  is  necessary  to  expand  a  section  of  the  main  time 
base on either side of the echo blip in order to measure the range more accurately.  To do this, a 
strobe  pulse  is  generated  at  some  definite  time  after  the  start  of  the  main  time  base,  the  delay 
being  controlled  by  the  operator.    The  strobe  pulse  is  made  to  trigger  a  strobe time-base circuit, 
with its own calibration on a larger scale. 
Page 16 of 16 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
CHAPTER 13 - POWER SUPPLIES 
Introduction 
1. 
In order to function, all electronic equipment needs to be energized by means of a power supply.  
In  the  great  majority  of  cases,  this  power  needs  to  be  delivered  at  a  steady  or  fixed  voltage.    In  the 
early days of radio and electronics, power was derived from batteries, but with the advent of thermionic 
valves,  which  called  for  high  currents  and  voltages,  this  source  of  power  became  inconvenient.  
Equipment power supplies were therefore developed which relied on the main domestic supply as the 
energy source.  With the invention of the transistor, battery packs came back into favour, and remain 
so due to modern digital technology allowing for equipment portability and modest power requirements.  
For  larger  power  requirements  or  fixed  installations  mains  or  AC  generator-driven  power  packs  are 
usually  more  economical.    For  remote  locations,  such  as  space  satellites,  the  solar  cell  has  been 
developed to convert solar energy into electrical power. 
BATTERIES 
The Simple Cell 
2. 
When a metal electrode is immersed in an electrolyte, either: 
a. 
Atoms  of  the  electrodes of the more reactive metals (like zinc) are dissolved in the solution 
as positive ions, leaving the electrode negative with respect to the electrolyte, or 
b. 
Positive  ions  from  the  electrolyte  are  attracted  to  the  electrode  of  less  reactive  metals  (like 
copper) making it positive with respect to the electrolyte. 
3. 
If  a  zinc  rod  and  a  copper  rod  are  placed  in  dilute  acid  and  are  joined  by  a  wire, then the positive 
charge on the copper will tend to flow along the wire and neutralize the negative charge on the zinc.  This 
will  cause  more  zinc  to  dissolve  in  the  acid  and  more  hydrogen  to  be  liberated  at  the  copper  so  as  to 
maintain  the  potential  difference  between  the  electrodes.    Current  will  flow  until  all  the  zinc  is  dissolved 
away or until the acid is exhausted. 
4. 
One disadvantage of the simple cell is that hydrogen bubbles being liberated at the copper electrode 
tend to insulate it from the solution and stop the chemical action.  This effect is called polarization.  Another 
disadvantage is that of 'local action'.  Impurities present in the zinc form small local cells causing the zinc to 
be dissolved away without supplying power to the main circuit. 
The Dry Cell 
5. 
Fig 1 depicts an early dry cell, also known as a 'Leclanché cell'.  The positive electrode is the carbon 
rod and the negative electrode is the zinc case.  The electrode is ammonium chloride, in paste form, and 
is  separated  from  the  carbon  rod  by  a  depolarizing  agent.    This  is  a  mixture  of  powdered  manganese 
dioxide and carbon, which oxidizes the hydrogen molecules to water. 
Page 1 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
14-13 Fig 1 An Early Dry Cell 
Carbon Rod
Positive
Electrode
Zinc
Case
Ammonium
Negative
Chloride
Electrode
Paste
Manganese
Dioxide and
Powered
Carbon
6. 
Similar  materials  were  used  in  a  later  version  of  the  Leclanché  with  the  addition  of  mercuric 
chloride  to  reduce  local  action,  and  potassium  dichromate  to  inhibit  the  corrosion  of  zinc.    A 
disadvantage  of  this  type  of  cell  is  that  current  quickly  falls  off,  principally  because  hydrogen  forms 
more  quickly  than  it  can  be  removed  by  the  depolarizer.    For  this  reason,  they  are  best  suited  for 
intermittent work. 
Mercury Cells 
7. 
The  mercury  cell, the full name of which is zinc-mercuric oxide, was developed during the Second 
World War for use in portable equipment where maximum energy with minimum volume was the prime 
aim.  The modern day mercury cell, shown at Fig 2, is capable of providing a steady voltage over nearly 
all of the cell’s useful discharge period.  Over long periods of operational use, or long storage, a voltage 
regulation within one per cent of the initial voltage is still maintained. 
14-13 Fig 2 Mercury Cells (Flat and Cylindrical) 
Outer Case
Top Plate
Potassium
Positive
Negative
Hydroxide
Steel Case
Connecting 
Electrolyte
(positive)
Cap
Cylindrical
Zinc Anode
Mercuric
Zinc
Oxide
Insulating
Potassium
Insulating
Gasket
Hydroxide
Gasket
Insulator
8. 
In  the  mercury  cell,  the  negative  electrode  is  zinc,  as  in  the  Leclanché  cell,  but  the  positive 
electrode  and  its  depolarizer  consist  of  graphite  and  mercuric  oxide.    The  electrolyte  consists  of 
potassium hydroxide. 
Page 2 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
Solar Cells 
9. 
The necessity for continuous electric power generation on space satellites led to the development 
of the solar cell.  These devices, which are generally made from thin slices of highly pure single crystal 
silicon,  produce  electric  power  from  radiant  energy.    Wavelengths  in  the  range  400  to  1,100 
nanometers are the most efficient, and about half the solar spectrum falls in this range. 
10.  Solar cells have no storage capacity, and for terrestrial applications they are used in conjunction 
with electrical storage batteries. 
Non-rechargeable Batteries 
11.  Considerable effort and research has been put into rechargeable batteries over recent years but 
non-rechargeable  batteries  continue  to  fill  an  important  niche  market  in  applications  such  as 
wristwatches,  remote  controls  and  electronic  keys.    Non-rechargeable  batteries  are  useful  when 
charging  is  impractical  or  impossible,  such  as  in  some  military  applications.    They  possess  high 
specific  energy,  can  be  stored  for  protracted  periods  and  be  ready  for  immediate  use.    Most  non-
rechargeable batteries are relatively inexpensive to produce and environmentally friendly. 
12.  Carbon-zinc  general  purpose  batteries  are  used  for  applications  with  low  power  drain  such  as 
remote  controls  and  torches.    One  of  the  most  common  non-rechargeable  batteries  is  the  alkaline-
manganese,  or  alkaline  battery.    Alkaline  batteries  deliver  more  energy  at  higher  load  currents  than 
carbon-zinc and do not leak when depleted, as carbon-zinc does.  
13.  Non-rechargeable  batteries  have  one  of  the  highest  energy  densities.    Although  rechargeable 
batteries have improved, a regular household alkaline battery provides 50 percent more energy than a 
lithium-ion  one.    The  most  energy-dense  non-rechargeable  type  is  the  lithium  battery  made  for  film 
cameras and military combat and holds over three times the energy of lithium-ion. 
Rechargeable Batteries 
Lead Acid Batteries 
14.  A  lead-acid  battery  is  a  device  for  storing  electricity.    It  produces  power  by  means  of  chemical 
reaction.  Unlike the batteries described so far, this reaction is reversible; so that when the battery has 
discharged power, it can be recharged by passing an electric current through it. 
15.  In  its  simplest  form,  shown  in  Fig  3,  the  lead-acid  battery  consists  of  two  groups  of  interleaved 
plates, one group of lead and the other group of lead dioxide, immersed in a weak solution of sulphuric 
acid.    Connecting  the  two  groups  of  plates  together  electrically  causes  a  chemical  reaction  to  take 
place  and  current  flows  between  the  plates.   This reaction continues until both plates change to lead 
sulphate, and the acid turns to water. 
Page 3 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
14-13 Fig 3 The Lead-acid Battery 
Terminals
Filler Vent
Terminals
+
Container
(eg glass)
Positive Plates
Dilute
Spacers
Sulphuric Acid
Plates
(between positive 
(SG 1270 when
and negative plates)
fully charged)
Supports
Negative Plates
16.  The battery is recharged by passing an electric current (from a generator) through it in the other 
direction.  This reverses all the electrical forces, and all the chemical reactions reverse themselves as 
a result.  The lead sulphate changes back to lead oxide in the positive plates, and lead in the negative 
plates.  The water changes back to sulphuric acid. 
17.  During  the  mid  1970s,  researchers  developed  a  maintenance-free  lead  acid  battery  that  could 
operate  in  any  position.  The  liquid  electrolyte  was  transformed  into  moistened  separators  and  the 
enclosure was sealed. Safety valves allow the venting of gas generated during charge and discharge. 
18.  Driven by different applications, two battery designations emerged. They are the small sealed lead 
acid (SLA), and the large valve regulated lead acid (VRLA).  Technically, both batteries are the same.  
The term SLA is a misnomer as no lead acid battery can be totally sealed.  As a result, the batteries 
are  fitted  with  a  valve  to  control  the  venting  of  gases  during  stressful  charge  and  rapid  discharge.  
Unlike the conventional lead acid battery where the plates are submerged in a liquid, the electrolyte is 
impregnated into a moistened separator.  The design resembles nickel and lithium based systems and 
enables the battery to be operated in any physical orientation without leakage. 
19.  Both the SLA and VRLA are designed with a low over-voltage potential to prohibit the battery from 
reaching its gas-generating potential during charge.  Excess charging would cause gassing and water 
depletion and consequently, these batteries should never be charged to their full potential. 
20.  Leaving the lead acid battery on float charge for a prolonged time does not cause damage.  The 
battery’s  charge  retention  is  the  best  among  rechargeable  batteries,  for  example,  a  Nickel-cadmium 
battery (NiCd) self-discharges approximately 40 percent of its stored energy in three months, the SLA 
self-discharges  the  same  amount  in  one  year.    The  SLA  is  relatively  inexpensive  but  the  operational 
costs can be higher than the NiCd if full cycles are required on a repetitive basis. 
21.  The SLA not suitable for fast charging with typical charge times of 8 to 16 hours.  The SLA must 
always be stored in a charged state as leaving the battery in a discharged condition causes sulphation, 
a condition that makes the battery difficult, if not impossible, to recharge. 
22.  Unlike the NiCd, the SLA is not suitable for deep cycling.  A full discharge causes extra strain and 
each  cycle  robs  the  battery  of  a  small  amount  of  capacity.    This  loss  is  small  while  the  battery  is  in 
good  operating  condition,  but  the  fading  increases  once  the  performance  drops  to  half  the  nominal 
capacity.  This wear-down characteristic also applies to other battery chemistries in varying degrees.   
Page 4 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
23.  Depending  on  the  depth  of  discharge  and  operating  temperature,  the  SLA  provides  200  to  300 
discharge/ charge cycles.  The primary reason for its relatively short cycle life is grid corrosion of the 
positive electrode, depletion of the active material and expansion of the positive plates. These changes 
are most prevalent at elevated operating temperatures and high-current discharges. 
24.  The optimum operating temperature for the SLA and VRLA battery is 25 °C. As a rule of thumb, 
every 8 °C rise in temperature will cut the battery life in half. VRLA that would last for 10 years at 25 °C 
will  only  be  good  for 5 years if operated at 33 °C.  The same battery would endure a little more than 
one year at a temperature of 42°C. 
25.  Among modern rechargeable batteries, the lead acid battery family has the lowest energy density, 
making  it  unsuitable  for  handheld  devices  that  demand  compact  size.    They  work  well  at  cold 
temperatures and are superior to lithium-ion when operating in subzero conditions. 
Table 1 The Advantages and Limitations of Lead Acid Batteries 
Advantages 
Limitations 
Inexpensive and simple to manufacture 
Should not be stored in a discharged condition 
Mature, reliable and well-understood technology 
Low energy density 
Durable and provides dependable service 
Limited number of full discharge cycles 
Low self-discharge 
Environmentally unfriendly 
Low maintenance requirements 
Transportation restrictions on flooded lead acid 
Capable of high discharge rates 
Thermal runaway possible with improper charging 
Good low and high temperature performance 
26.  Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) Batteries.   
AGM  technology  became  popular  in  the  early 
1980s  as  a  sealed  lead  acid  battery  for military aircraft, vehicles and uninterrupted power supplies to 
reduce  weight  and  improve  reliability.  The  acid  is  absorbed  by  a  very  fine  fibreglass  mat  making  the 
battery  spill-proof.    The  plates  can  be  made  flat  to  resemble  a  standard  flooded  lead  acid  pack  in  a 
rectangular case or wound into a cylindrical cell.  AGM has very low internal resistance, is capable of 
delivering  high  currents  on  demand  and  offers  a  relatively  long  service  life,  even  when  deep-cycled.  
AGM  is  maintenance  free,  provides  good  electrical  reliability  and  is  lighter  than  the  flooded  lead  acid 
type.  It stands up well to low temperatures and has a low self-discharge. The leading advantages are 
a charge that is up to five times faster than the flooded version, and the ability to deep cycle.  As with 
all gelled and sealed units, AGM batteries are sensitive to overcharging. 
Table 2 The Advantages and Limitations of AGM Batteries 
Advantages 
Limitations 
Spill-proof 
Higher manufacturing cost 
High specific power, low internal resistance, responsive to load 
Sensitive to overcharging 
Up to 5 times faster charge than with flooded technology 
Capacity has gradual decline 
Better cycle life than with flooded systems 
Low specific energy 
Vibration resistance 
Must be stored in charged condition 
Stands up well to cold temperature 
Not environmentally friendly 
Page 5 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
 Nickel Based Batteries 
27.  Nickel-cadmium Cells.  Rechargeable nickel-cadmium cells are useful in electronic equipment since 
they  can  be  sealed,  thus  avoiding  the  effect  of  corrosive  fumes  which  are  given  off  by  lead-acid 
accumulators.  The sealed type of cell has a long life and can be completely discharged without ill effects. 
Table 3 The Advantages and Limitations of NiCd Batteries 
Advantages 
Limitations 
Fast and simple charging after prolonged storage 
Relatively low specific energy compared 
with newer systems
High number of charge/discharge cycles (over 1000 with 
Memory effect; needs periodic full 
proper care and maintenance) 
discharges
Good load performance; rugged and forgiving if abused 
Environmentally unfriendly; cadmium is 
toxic 
Long shelf life; can be stored in a discharged state
High self-discharge; needs recharging after 
storage 
Simple storage and transportation 
Good low-temperature performance
Economical 
Wide range of sizes and performance options 
28.  Nickel-metal-hydride (NiMH)
NiMH  provides  40  percent  higher  specific  energy  than  a 
standard NiCd and does not contain toxic metals. NiMH also has a high self-discharge rate and loses 
about  20  percent  of  its  capacity  within  the  first  24  hours,  and  10 percent  per  month  thereafter.    The 
NiMH battery in a torch in storage will be ‘flat’ after only a few weeks.
9-12  Table 1 The Advantages and Limitations of NiMH Batteries 
Advantages 
Limitations 
30 % to 40 % higher capacity than a standard NiCd 
Limited service life; deep discharge reduces 
service life
Less prone to memory effect than NiCd 
Requires complex charge algorithm
Simple storage and transportation 
Does  not  absorb  overcharge  well;  trickle 
charge must be kept low
Environmentally friendly 
Generates heat during fast-charge and high-
load discharge 
Nickel content makes recycling profitable 
High self-discharge 
Performance degrades if stored at elevated 
temperatures; should be stored in a cool place 
at about 40 % charge 
Lithium Based Batteries 
29.  Lithium (Li) Batteries. There  are  two  types  of  lithium  battery.  Lithium-ion  batteries  are 
rechargeable  and  used  in  equipment  such  as  laptops,  tablets  and  smart  phones.    Lithium-metal 
batteries are non-rechargeable and are found in items such as watches.  Although lithium batteries are 
safe,  their  high  energy  levels  mean  they  can  pose  a  fire  risk  if  damaged  or  charged  incorrectly.  
Page 6 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
Rechargeable batteries with lithium metal on the anode could provide high energy densities; however, 
cycling  produces  unwanted  growth  particles  (dendrites)  on  the  anode  which  can  penetrate  the 
separator  and  cause  an  electrical  short.    When  this  occurs,  the  cell  temperature  rises  quickly  and 
approaches the melting point of lithium causing thermal runaway, also known as “venting with flame”.  
As  a  result  Li  batteries  must  be  treated  with  care  and  stowed  appropriately  during  flight.    Lithium 
batteries  are  known  to  have  been  the  cause  of  a  number  of fires onboard aircraft and during ground 
handling.  Additionally, poor quality or counterfeit batteries, which are known to be in wide circulation, 
pose an additional safety risk. 
30.  Lithium Ion (Li-ion) Batteries.   
The  inherent  instability  of  lithium  metal,  especially  during 
charging has resulted in the production of a non-metallic solution using lithium ions.  Although lower in 
specific energy than lithium-metal Li-ion is safe provided manufacturers and battery packers follow the 
correct  safety  measures  in  limiting  voltages  and  currents  to  secure  levels.    The  specific  energy  of  a 
Li-ion  battery  is  twice  that  of  NiCd  and  it  is  also  low-maintenance.    The  battery  has  no  memory  and 
does  not  need  exercising  (deliberate  full  discharge).  Self-discharge  is  less  than  half  that  of  nickel-
based systems.  The disadvantages of the LI-ion battery are the need for protection circuits to prevent 
abuse and high cost. 
31.  Similar  to  lead  and  nickel  based  architectures,  lithium-ion  uses  a  cathode  (positive  electrode) 
made from a metal oxide, an anode (negative electrode) made of porous carbon and electrolyte as the 
conductor.  During discharge, the ions flow from the anode to the cathode through the electrolyte and 
separator.    Charging  reverses  the  direction  and  the  ions  flow  from  the  cathode  to  the  anode.    Li-ion 
batteries  come  in  many  varieties  which  vary  in  performance  where  the  choice  of  cathode  material 
determines the unique characteristics of the battery.  Most manufacturers use graphite as the anode to 
attain a flatter discharge curve.  Graphite stores lithium-ions effectively when the battery is charged and 
has long-term cycle stability. 
Table 4 The Advantages and Limitations of Li-ion Batteries 
Advantages 
Limitations 
High energy density 
Requires protection circuit to limit voltage and 
current 
Relatively low self-discharge; less than half that of 
Subject to aging, even if not in use
NiCd and NiMH 
Low maintenance 
Transportation regulations when shipping in 
larger quantities
No periodic discharge is needed 
No memory 
Page 7 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
Table 5 Six Common Lithium-ion Batteries 
Li-ion Battery 
Characteristics 
High specific energy / Relatively short life span and limited 
Lithium Cobalt Oxide(LiCoO2) 
load capabilities (specific power). 
Low  internal  cell  resistance  -  fast  charging  and  high-
Lithium Manganese Oxide (LiMn2O4) 
current  discharging  /  Capacity  that  is  roughly  one-third 
lower compared to Li-cobalt.
Enhanced safety, good thermal stability, tolerant to abuse, 
high  current  rating  and  long  cycle  life  /  cold  temperature 
Lithium Iron Phosphate(LiFePO4) 
reduces  performance,  and  elevated  storage  temperature 
shortens the service life.
Lithium  Nickel  Manganese  Cobalt  Oxide  Can  also  be  tailored  to  high  specific  energy  or  high 
(LiNiMnCoO2) 
specific power, but not both. 
Lithium  Nickel  Cobalt  Aluminium  Oxide  High specific energy and power densities / long life span. 
(LiNiCoAlO2) 
Li-titanate  replaces  the  graphite  in  the  anode  /  can  be 
fast-charged and delivers a high discharge current / High 
Lithium Titanate (Li4Ti5O12) 
cycle  rate  /  Safe  /  Excellent  low-temperature  discharge 
characteristics. 
Lithium-polymer Battery 
32.  Lithium-polymer  differs  from  other  battery  systems  in  the  type  of  electrolyte  used.    The  original 
polymer design used a solid (dry) polymer electrolyte that resembles a plastic-like film.  This insulator 
allows  the  exchange  of  ions  and  replaces  the  traditional  porous  separator  that  is  soaked  with 
electrolyte.    A  solid  polymer  has  a  poor  conductivity  at  room  temperature  and  the  battery  must  be 
heated to between 50 and 60 °C (122 to 140 °F) to enable the current to flow. 
33.  To make the Li-polymer battery conductive at room temperature, gelled electrolyte is added.  All 
Li-ion  polymer  cells  today  incorporate  a  micro  porous  separator  with  moisture.    The  correct  term  is 
“Lithium-ion  polymer”  (Li-ion  polymer  or  Li-polymer  for  short).    Li-polymer  can  be  built  on  many 
systems,  such  as  Li-cobalt,  Li-phosphate  and  Li-manganese.    For  this  reason,  Li-polymer  is  not 
considered a unique battery chemistry.   
34.  Li-polymer cells may also be shaped into a flexible foil-type case (polymer laminate or pouch cell) 
that  resembles  a  food  package.    While  a  standard  Li-ion  needs  a  rigid  case  to  press  the  electrodes 
together, Li-polymer uses laminated sheets that do not need compression.  Although less durable that 
conventional  packaging,  a  foil-type  enclosure  reduces  the  weight  by  more  than  20  percent  over  the 
classic hard shell and thin film technology liberates the format design and the battery can be made into 
any shape. 
35.  Charge  and  discharge  characteristics  of  Li-polymer  are  identical  to  other  Li-ion  systems  and  do 
not require a special charger.  Safety issues are also similar in that protection circuits are needed.  Gas 
build-up during charge can cause some Li-polymer in a foil package to swell.  Li-polymer is not limited 
to a foil package shape and can also be made into a cylindrical design. 
36.  Li-cobalt
 
Most Li-polymer packs for the consumer market are based on Li-cobalt.  With 
gelled electrolyte added the lithium polymer is essentially the same as the lithium-ion battery.  Both use 
Page 8 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
identical  cathode  and  anode  material  and  contain  a  similar  amount  of  electrolyte.    Although  the 
characteristics and performance of the two systems are alike, the Li-polymer is unique in that a micro 
porous  electrolyte  replaces  the  traditional  porous  separator.    The  gelled  electrolyte  becomes  the 
catalyst that enhances the electrical conductivity.  Li-polymer offers slightly higher specific energy and 
can be made thinner than conventional Li-ion. 
DC POWER FROM AC SOURCES 
Overview of Process 
37.  When  comparatively  large  amounts  of  power  are  needed,  the  sources  of  supply  are  nearly 
always alternating currents.  However, before the power can be used inside a piece of electronic 
equipment  it  needs  to  be  converted  to  a  DC  of  the  correct  magnitude.    The  component  parts  of 
this process are shown in Fig 4. 
14-13 Fig 4 Component Parts of a Power Supply 
Smoothing
250V AC
Transformer
Rectifier
Stabilizer
Load
Circuits
Transformation 
38.  In most cases, the amplitude of the AC voltage delivered to a piece of electronic equipment is of 
the  incorrect  value  and  needs  to  be  transformed,  up  or  down,  to  suit  the  equipment  needs.    This 
transformation is accomplished by means of a transformer.  The subject of transformers is covered in 
some detail in Volume 14, Chapter 11. 
Rectification 
39.  Once the AC voltage has been transformed to a level that is suitable for use in the equipment, the 
first stage of converting AC into a DC takes place.  This stage is known as rectification, and involves 
the production of a pulsating unidirectional output from an alternating input.  The process can be either 
half-wave rectification or full-wave rectification (see Fig 5). 
14-13 Fig 5 Rectification 
Half Wave
Input
Output
Full Wave
Input
Output
Page 9 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
40.  Half-wave  Rectification.    The  diode  (thermionic  or  semi-conductor)  is  the  fundamental 
component  in  all  rectification  circuits.    As  the  diode  conducts  only  when  the  anode  is  positive  with 
respect  to the cathode, pulses of current flow through the load on alternate half-cycles of the voltage 
waveform.  The output of a half-wave rectifier is shown in Fig 6a. 
14-13 Fig 6 Types of Rectification 
a Half-wave Rectifier
Easy Flow Direction
+
+
L
V
R
V
L
L
0
Time
b Full-wave Rectifier
+
A
V
R
L
L
B
LV
C
0
Time
c Bridge Rectifier
A
L
+
V
B
V
R
L
L
0
Time
41.  Full-wave Rectification.  By using two diodes, the full applied waveform can be used to produce 
an  output,  as  shown  in  Fig  6b.    The  anodes  of  the  two  diodes  are  connected  to  opposite  ends  of  a 
centre-tapped  transformer winding.  The voltages at the diode anodes are thus in anti-phase, so that 
the diodes conduct on alternate half-cycles of the applied waveform.  The current through the load is 
always  in  the  same  direction,  regardless  of  which  diode  is  conducting,  so  producing  a  unidirectional 
flow of pulses through the load on every half-cycle.  Note that a double diode could be used instead of 
two separate diodes. 
421. Bridge  Rectification.    An alternative form of a full-wave rectifier is the bridge rectifier.  This does 
away with the need for a centre-tapped transformer, but uses four diodes (thermionic or semi-conductor) 
arranged like a Wheatstone Bridge, with the supply connected across one diagonal of the bridge and the 
load across the other.  The diodes act in pairs and, as before, the current through the load is always in the 
same direction (Fig 6c). 
43.  P-N  Junction  Diode  as  a  Rectifier.    Since a junction diode passes current only when the voltage 
across it is of one polarity and allows almost none to flow when the polarity is reversed, it may be used as a 
rectifier. 
Page 10 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
44.  Practical Junction Diode Rectifiers.  Junction diodes are manufactured in a wide range of sizes 
and  cases.    In  general,  the  more  power  a  diode  has  to  handle,  the  bigger  it  will  be.    If  the  diode  is 
passing a large current, heat is developed because of the resistance of the diode.  This heat must be 
removed if the diode is not to be damaged, and the easiest way to do this is to provide large surface 
areas  exposed  to  the  air.    Very  often  special  'heat  sinks'  are  provided  to  give  quick  removal  of  heat 
from the diode. 
Filters or Smoothing Circuits 
45.  The  fluctuating  output  from  the  rectification  stage  cannot  be  regarded  as  a  unidirectional  supply 
suitable for equipment use; the AC component needs to be minimized.  This is achieved by a filter, or 
smoothing circuit and the action is illustrated in Fig 7. 
14-13 Fig 7 Filter/Smoothing Action 
DC Ripple
Filter
Circuit
Smaller DC Ripple
Filter
Circuit
46.  Reservoir Capacitor.  If a large value capacitor is placed across the output terminals of a rectifier, 
and  the  load  is  disconnected,  a  steady  DC  voltage  is  developed  across  the  capacitor.    A  rectifier  has 
resistance,  due  mainly  to  the  internal  resistance  of  the  rectifying  device,  therefore,  when  a  capacitor  is 
placed across the output of a rectifier, it charges up every time the rectifier conducts.  If it does not reach 
the  full  output  voltage  at  the  end  of  the  first  half-cycle,  it  will  do  so  during  the  next  few  half-cycles.    It 
cannot discharge between the peaks of the pulsating DC because the rectifier will not pass current in the 
reverse direction.  Therefore, after a few half-cycles, a steady DC voltage appears across the capacitor, 
as shown in Fig 8, and the AC has been filtered out.  If a load is connected across the capacitor (Fig 9a), 
the capacitor begins to discharge and its voltage will fall.  However, in a full-wave rectifier a new voltage 
peak occurs 100 times per second and this voltage peak recharges the capacitor.  The resulting output 
waveform is shown in Fig 9b.  The DC is not quite steady, but the amplitude of the pulses is much smaller 
than if there were no capacitor at all.  The voltage waveform is now DC plus a small component of AC 
called the 'ripple'.  The voltage is not smooth enough for the final HT output and more components are 
needed in the smoothing circuit. 
14-13 Fig 8 Rectifier Output with Capacitor 
Capacitor
Pulsating
Voltage
Rectifier
Pure DC
Output
e
+
g
lta

o
V
Time
Page 11 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-13 - Power Supplies 
14-13 Fig 9 Rectifier Output with Capacitor and Load 
a
b
B
A
Pulsating
Load Voltage
Output Voltage
C
+
e
Load
g

lta
o
V
Time
47.  Smoothing  Circuit  Resistor.    The  ripple  can  be  reduced  by  adding  a  resistor  and  capacitor, 
which will act as an AC voltage divider, to the smoothing circuit.  It is common for two resistors to be 
connected across the capacitor.  This would normally give constant voltage to within 1 to 2% of the 
required HT supply.  If this is not satisfactory, another RC section could be added. 
Stabilization 
48.  If  it  is  required  to  ensure  that  the  DC  supply  from  the  smoothing  circuits  remains  constant, 
regardless  of  the  applied  load,  compensation  is  needed.    This  compensation  is  generally  known  as 
stabilization. 
49.  Although  there  are  a  number  of  such  circuits,  they  are  usually  based  around  the  cold-cathode, 
gas-filled diode for HT circuits and the zener diode for low voltage circuits. 
50.  Zener  Diode.    Most  junction  diodes  will  be  permanently  damaged  by  the  high  reverse  current 
flowing if the breakdown voltage is exceeded.  The zener diode is specially designed to make use of 
this part of the diode characteristic, and is not damaged by the high reverse current.  If the zener diode 
is reverse biased to a value just beyond the breakdown voltage, as shown in Fig 10, the voltage across 
the  diode  remains  practically  constant  for  large  variations  of  current  through  it.    Therefore,  the  zener 
diode  may  be  used  to  provide  a  constant  reference  voltage  point  in  a  circuit,  or  as  a  means  of 
stabilizing  the  voltage  over  a  wide  range  of  circuit  currents.    A  whole  range  of  zener  diodes  with 
different values of breakdown (stabilizing) voltage is available. 
14-13 Fig 10 Zener Diode 
Forward
Current
(mA)
16
Symbol
12
Bias Operating
Point for
8
Zener Diode
4
Reverse
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Forward
Voltage
Voltage
(Volts)
A
(Volts)
4
8
Over the range of
current from A-B,
12
voltage remains
almost constant
16
from C-D
20 Reverse
Current
B
(mA)
C
D
Page 12 of 12 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
CHAPTER 14 - AMPLIFIERS 
Introduction 
1. 
Amplification is needed in a system in order to boost weak signals to a level where they can be of 
some  practical  use.    In  the  case  of  a  radio  receiver,  signals  at  the  aerial,  of  the  order  of  a  few 
microwatts,  require  amplification  before  they  can  be  used  to  drive  a  speaker  system  demanding 
several watts. 
2. 
Amplifiers  are  classified  according  to  the  function  they  perform.    There  are  four  main  types  of 
amplifier, each designed to amplify signals in a specific part of the frequency spectrum: 
a
Audio Amplifiers.  These amplify a band of frequencies in the audio range, ie between about 20 
and 20,000 Hz.  Audio amplifiers are used in radio and television receivers and transmitters, in intercom 
equipment, CDs, cassette tape decks, and in many other electronic devices. 
b. 
Video Amplifiers.  These are similar to audio amplifiers except that they cover a much wider 
frequency  band,  ranging  from  about  20  Hz  to  6 MHz.    Whereas  audio  amplifiers  deal  with 
electrical  waveforms  corresponding  to  sounds,  video  amplifiers  handle  electrical  waveforms 
corresponding to pictures.  They are used in television and in radar apparatus. 
c. 
RF  Amplifiers.  These amplify only a narrow band of frequencies, so narrow that they may 
be considered to amplify at one frequency only.  This frequency may be anywhere in the RF band, 
ie from 20 kHz to 100 GHz.  They are used in radio and television transmitters and receivers, in 
radar and in weapon guidance systems. 
d.
DC Amplifiers.  These direct-coupled amplifiers are used to amplify inputs at frequencies of 
a  few  hertz  and  slow non-regular changes in voltage.  They are not used to amplify steady non-
varying  DC,  as  this  would  be  pointless.    They  are  used  in  many  types  of  electronic  equipment, 
particularly in analogue computers. 
3. 
These  main  categories  for  amplifiers  may  be  broken  down  further  into  the  sub-categories  of 
wideband,  narrow  band,  tuned,  stagger  tuned,  voltage  and  power.    Thus,  for  example,  a  particular 
amplifier may be referred to as an AF stagger tuned voltage amplifier. 
The Transistor as an Amplifier 
4.
In  a  properly  biased  transistor  the  resistance  of  the  forward  biased emitter-base (input) circuit is 
low  whilst  that  of  the  reverse  biased  collector  (output)  circuit  is  high.    Typical  values  for  the 
arrangement shown in Fig 1 are one kΩ and 50 kΩ respectively. 
5. 
The  forward  and  reverse-bias  voltages  are  such  that  certain  steady  values of current flow in the 
emitter,  base  and  collector  circuits.    Ninety-eight  percent  of  the  electrons  from  the  emitter  reach  the 
collector; therefore if the emitter current is l00 mA, the collector current will be about 98 mA, and the 
base current about 2 mA as shown in Fig1b.  Furthermore, the ratios of these currents remain constant 
so that if one current changes the other two also change.  For example, using the ratios given above, if 
the emitter current changes by 1 mA, the collector current will change by 0.98 mA and the base current 
by  0.02  mA.    Similarly,  if  the  base  current  is  made  to  change  by  0.02  mA,  the  collector  current  will 
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
change  by  0.98  mA  and  the  emitter  current by 1 mA.  In an amplifier, it is these changes in currents 
and voltages which generate interest. 
14-14 Fig 1 Transistor Principles 
a.  Input and Output Resistances 
 
 
 
 
b.  Division of Current 
Collector Current
(98mA)
Reverse
Reverse
Bias
Bias
20V
Base Current
c
c
b
(2mA)
b
Forward
Forward
e
e
Bias
High Output
Bias
Low Input
Resistance
Resistance
(50kΩ)
1V
Emitter Current
(1kΩ)
(100mA)
6. 
If a very low resistance alternating voltage source in the emitter-base circuit is connected in series 
with the forward bias battery, the voltage applied to the input circuit can be varied.  A 4 kΩ load resistor 
in the collector circuit is also connected in series with the reverse bias battery as shown in Fig 2.  The 
alternating  voltage  source  represents  an  input  signal  voltage,  eg  from  a  pick-up  on  a  record  player.  
The output voltage is taken between the collector and earth. 
7. 
If the input signal voltage in the circuit of Fig 2 is changed from zero to 0.02 V, the base current 
flowing in the 1 kΩ input resistance will change by 0.02 mA (ie 0.02V/1 kΩ).  This causes the collector 
current to change by 0.98 mA. 
14-14 Fig 2 Transistor Amplifier Circuit 
Reverse
The Voltage
Bias
Dropped Across
Load by Collector
4kΩ Load
Current Provides
Output Voltage
Amplified
Output
Voltage
Input
Signal
Voltage
1kΩ
Input
Resistance
Forward
Bias
Gain 
8. 
Technically,  gain  is  defined  as  the  increase  in  power  level  in  the  load,  ie  the  ratio  of  the  actual 
power delivered to that which would be delivered if the source were correctly matched, without loss, to 
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
the  load,  in  the  absence  of  an  amplifier.    Put  more  simply,  gain  in  an  amplifier  is  the  ratio  of  output 
quantity to input quantity.  Therefore, using the previous paragraph figures: 
Output (collector) current change
Current gain =
Input (bas )
e current change
.
0 98 mA
=
= 49
0.02 mA
9. 
The  change  in  output  current  flowing  in  the  4 kΩ  load  resistor  produces  a  change  of  voltage 
across the load.  This change of voltage represents the output signal voltage, given by IR = 0.98 mA ×
4 kΩ = 3.92 V.  Therefore: 
Output voltage change
.
3 92 V
Voltage gain =
=
= 196
Input voltage change
.
0 02 V
10.  There is also a power gain given by: 
Current gain × voltage gain = 49 × 196 = 9,604 
11.  All the output quantities are greater than the input quantities and amplification has been achieved.  
The large voltage and power gains arise from the fact that the transistor transfers current from a low 
resistance input circuit to a high resistance output circuit. 
Transistor Amplifier Action 
12.  The action of the circuit of Fig 2 is summarized in Fig 3: 
a. 
The  increase  in  input  signal  voltage  increases  the  forward  bias  at  the  emitter-base  junction 
(battery and signal voltages add). 
b. 
The increase in forward bias increases the base current and this causes the collector current 
to rise also - much more than the base current. 
c. 
The  rise  in  collector  current  increases  the  voltage  drop  across  the  load  resistor  and  this 
causes the output (collector-to-earth) voltage to become smaller (less positive). 
d. 
Note the phase relationship between input and output signals.  An increase in input signal voltage 
causes a fall in output voltage.  Thus, in this circuit, input and output voltages are 180º out of phase. 
Similar results would have been obtained if the above had been applied to a p-n-p transistor amplifier. 
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
14-14 Fig 3 Transistor Amplifier Action 
c.  Increase in Volts Drop across R and Output Voltage less Positive
+
Reverse Bias
+
Load
R

+
b.  Rise in Collector Current
+
+
c
+
b
e
0

Emitter Current
+
a.  Increase in Signal increases Forward Bias and Base Current
13.  The  transistor  amplifier  action  has  also  been  covered  in  some  detail,  as  it  is  imperative  that  the 
principles are understood. 
Transistor Circuit Arrangements 
14. In  the  transistor  amplifier  circuits  so  far  discussed,  the  emitter  is  common  to  both  input  and  output 
circuits.  This arrangement is called a common emitter or grounded emitter amplifier.  Although the common 
emitter amplifier is the arrangement used most often, there are other ways of connecting the input and output 
circuits to the transistor.  In practice, three circuit arrangements are in use as shown in Fig 4. 
14-14 Fig 4 Three Circuit Arrangements 
Common Emitter
Common Base
Common Collector
(Emitter Follower)
c
b
Load R
Load R
e
Output
Output
Output
c
b
e
c
e
Load R
b
15.  When dealing with the common emitter circuit several important factors are noted: 
a. 
The input resistance is low and the output resistance high. 
b. 
The current, voltage and power gains are all high. 
c. 
The input and output signals are 180° out of phase. 
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
16.  If  this  procedure  is  repeated  for  the  other  two  circuits,  several  points  of  difference  will  be noted.  
Table 1 compares the important factors for each of the three circuits.  Each arrangement is used only 
for those jobs to which it is suited. 
Table 1 Transistor Circuit Comparisons 
Common Emitter 
Common Base 
Common Collector 
Input Resistance 
Low (1 kΩ) 
Very low (100 Ω) 
High (100 kΩ) 
Output Resistance 
High (50 kΩ) 
Very high (250 kΩ) 
Low (200 Ω) 
Current Gain 
High (50) 
Low (less than 1) 
High (50) 
Voltage Gain 
High (50-1,000) 
High (50-1,000) 
Low (less than 1) 
Power Gain 
High (100-10,000) 
Moderate (10-1,000) 
Low (10-100) 
Phase Relationship 
180º Out of phase 
In phase 
In phase 
Amplifiers in Cascade 
17. So  far  the  amplifying  device  has  been  considered  as  a  single  amplifier  stage.    In  some  cases  the 
amplification afforded by one stage is sufficient, but more often several stages are needed, one following 
after  the other, to obtain the required amplification (Fig 5).  Therefore, if in a three-stage amplifier each 
stage has a gain of 20 and the input to the first stage is 1 mV, the output from this stage is 20 mV.  This is 
applied as the input to the second stage which gives an output of 400 mV.  This becomes the input to the 
third stage which provides an output of 8 volts.  The overall amplification of the three stages is 20 × 20 ×
20 = 8,000.  The three amplifier stages are said to be connected in cascade. 
14-14 Fig 5 Cascade-connected Amplifiers 
1mV
Stage 1
20mV
Stage 2
400mV
Stage 3
8V
Gain = 20
Gain = 20
Gain = 20
Input
Output
Resistance Capacitance (RC) Coupling 
18.  In order to couple two amplifier stages together some form of connection between the output of the 
first stage and the input to the next stage is required.  A direct connection between the collector of stage 
one and the base of stage two, would not do, since the collector DC voltage would be applied to the base 
and would upset the biasing arrangements.  In order to block this DC and still allow the AF variations of 
collector voltage to be applied to the input of the next stage, a coupling capacitor is needed (Fig 6).  This 
capacitor  and  the  bias,  form  a  potential  divider  across  the  output  of  stage  one.    All  the  DC  voltage  is 
dropped across the capacitor and most of the AF voltage is developed across the resistor and applied to 
the input of the next stage.  This is a common method of coupling the stages of an AF amplifier. 
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
14-14 Fig 6 Coupling Network 
Stage 1
Collector
Coupling
Stage 2
Capacitor
Base
Bias
Transformer Coupling 
19.  Another method of coupling the stages of an AF amplifier is by using transformers.  The primary 
winding of the AF transformer forms the output load of the first stage and the secondary winding forms 
the input circuit of the next stage (Fig 7).  No coupling capacitor is required. 
14-14 Fig 7 Transformer Inter-stage Coupling 
Output
Input
Circuit
Circuit
Primary
of
Secondary
to
Stage 1
Stage 2
20.  With  transformer  coupling,  a  higher  stage  gain  can  be  obtained.    In  a  transistor  amplifier,  by 
choosing  the  correct  turns  ratio,  the  high  output  impedance  of  stage  one  can  be  matched  to  the  low 
input impedance of stage two thus giving a considerable increase in gain over RC-coupled stages. 
21.  The main disadvantage of transformer coupling is the poor frequency response compared with an 
RC-coupled amplifier.  The impedance of the windings varies with frequency; thus at the bottom end of 
the frequency range the impedance of the primary winding is low and so the voltage developed across 
it  is  low.    At  the  high  end  of  the  frequency  range  the  impedance  is  high  and  so  these  frequencies 
receive greater amplification than the middle frequencies.  The response drops sharply at the top end 
of  the  frequency  range  due  to  the  shunting  effect  of  stray  capacitances.    The  frequency  response 
curves  of  transformer  and  RC-coupled  amplifiers  are  compared  in  Fig  8.    The  uneven  response  of 
transformer coupling results in distortion. 
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
14-14 Fig 8 Comparison Between Transformer and RC Couplings 
Transformer
Coupling
in
a
G
RC Coupling
100
1,000
10,000
Frequency (Hz)
22.  For this reason, and because of the size and weight of iron-cored AF transformers, RC inter-stage 
coupling  is  preferred.    Because  they  provide  a  simple  way  of  matching  a  high  impedance  to  a  low 
impedance, transformers are often used between the output stage and a loudspeaker load. 
Decibels 
23.  The gain of an amplifier (see para 8) is the output divided by the input.  We have so far expressed 
the  gain  as  a  number  without  units  and  as  can  be  seen  from  Fig  9  in  a  multi-stage  amplifier  this 
number can become quite large. 
14-14 Fig 9 Gain in a Multi-stage Amplifier 
10 µW
Gain
500 µW
Gain
15 mW
Gain
1.5 W
50
30
100
24.  Radio  amplifiers  commonly  have  a  power  gain  of  several  million  and  the  overall  gain  figure 
becomes very cumbersome.  Thus it is more convenient to express the power gain of an amplifier as 
the logarithm, to the base 10, of the output to input power ratio.  The basic unit for this measurement is 
the bel.  Therefore: 
Power
Power gain = log
out bels
10 Power in
In practice the bel is a very large unit, so work is done in decibels (dB), a decibel being one-tenth of a 
bel.  Therefore: 
Power
Power gain in decibels = 10log
out dB
10 Power in
25.  The amplifier in Fig 9 would have a power gain, expressed in dB, of: 
10 log10 50 + 10 log10 30 + 10 log10 100 dB = (10 × 1.699) + (10 × 1.477) + (10 × 2) = 51.76 dB 
Note  that  when  the  gain  of  each  stage  is  expressed  in  decibels,  the  overall  gain  of  the  amplifier  is 
found by adding the gain of individual stages. 
Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
26.  In the case of an attenuator the output power is less than the input power, the power loss being 
indicated by a minus sign, e.g. 
Input power    = 160 watts 
Output power = 5 watts 
Power
Attenuation in dB = 10 log 
out
10  Power in
Power
 
 
 
      = –10 log 
in
10  Powerout
 
 
 
      = –10 log 
160
10 
5
 
 
 
      = –15 dB 
27.  Fig 10 shows the frequency response curve for an amplifier; the gain is measured in dB.  At the 
lower and upper ends of the curve where the response falls off, the gain can be expressed as minus so 
many  decibels.    A  commonly  used  point  is  where  the  power  has  fallen  to  half  the  normal  value.  
Therefore: 
Power loss = 10 log ½ = –10 log 2 
 
 
    = –3dB, or 3dB down 
This point is known as the half-power point and the frequency range between the two half-power points 
is known as the bandwidth of the amplifier. 
14-14 Fig 10 Gain Frequency Curve 
0
)
-3
B
(d
-6
in
a
Half-power Points
G
-9
Bandwidth
30
10,000
Frequency (Hz)
Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
28.   With  voltage  amplifiers  it  is  more  convenient  to  express  the  gain  of  an  amplifier  in  terms  of  a 
voltage ratio. 
V2
Power = R
2
2
V out
V in
Power gain =
÷
R
R
out
in
2
V out
R in
=
×
2
V in
Rout
If the amplifier has the same value of input and output resistances: 
2
V out
Power gain =
2
V in
Using decibels the power gain becomes: 
2
 V 
Power gain =10log
out
dB


V
 in 
V
20 log
out
=
dB
V in
Similarly, since power also equals  I2R , gain can be expressed in terms of a current ratio provided that 
the values for R in input and output are equal.  Therefore: 
I
Power gain
20 log out
=
dB
I in
29.  The voltage at the half-power points in Fig 10 compared with the normal voltage of the amplifier 
is 
1 ,  since  power    =  V2 .    This  ratio  is  0.707  and  so  the  voltage  at  the  half-power  points  is 
2
R
approximately 70% of the normal voltage. 
30.  Fig 11 is a graph relating decibels to voltage and power ratios. 
Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
14-14 Fig 11 Conversion to Decibels from Voltage and Power Ratios 
1
10,000
1
9
9
8
8
7
7
6
6
Power Gain
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1,000
1
9
9
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
Voltage
in
1
1
a
100
9
9
Gain
G
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
10
9
9
8
8
7
7
6
6
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
0
10
20
30
40
50
Decibels
Video Amplifiers 
31.  Audio frequency signals are electrical representations of waveforms which can be heard.  In radar 
and  television,  we  need  to  amplify  electrical  signals  which  correspond  to  waveforms  which  can  be 
seen.  These signals are known as video signals. 
32.  Some video waveforms are shown in Fig 12.  The important point to note is that some parts of the 
waveform  consist  of  sudden  changes  in  voltage  and  other  parts  are  formed  by  steady  or  slowly 
changing voltages.  The ideal square wave shown in Fig 12 is a typical video waveform.  It rises to it 
maximum  voltage  in  a  very  short  time,  ideally  in  zero  time,  as  shown  by  points  a  and  b.    Then  it 
remains  at  a  steady  voltage  (b  to  c)  and  at  c  falls  sharply  to  its  original  value  (point  d).    The  steady 
parts indicate a very low frequency; the sudden changes indicate high frequencies.  In fact, the square 
wave is made up of a low fundamental frequency plus many harmonics, or multiples, of this frequency.  
If we want to amplify the square wave without distorting it, we must amplify all these frequencies by the 
same  amount.    This  means  designing  an  amplifier  which  can  give  equal  amplification  to  a  range  of 
frequencies;  in  theory  the  range  of  frequencies  is  infinite  but,  in  practice,  it  must  cover  several  MHz.  
For TV signals, the range is about 30 Hz to 4.5 MHz.  This is the major difference between the video 
amplifier and the audio amplifier. 
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
14-14 Fig 12 Ideal Video Wave-forms 
a  Example Waveforms
b  Ideal Square Wave
Sudden
Steady
Sudden
Rise
Fall
e
b
c
g
lta
o
V
a
d
Time
Radio Frequency (RF) Amplifiers 
33. Amplifiers  designed  to  handle  signals  from  20  kHz  up  to  many  thousand  megahertz  are  called 
radio frequency amplifiers.  They are used in transmitters to amplify the input signal from the receiver 
aerial.    The  main  difference  between  RF  amplifiers  and  the  amplifiers  so  far  considered  is  that  one 
particular RF amplifier handles only a very narrow band of frequencies. 
34.  When a receiver is tuned to a particular radio station the RF amplifier is adjusted so that it amplifies only 
a narrow band of frequencies; signals from other stations on different frequencies are rejected.  If another 
station is required the RF amplifier is adjusted to respond to the new station’s carrier frequency.  Therefore, 
although  the  RF  amplifier  only  accepts  a  narrow  band  of  frequencies  at  any  one  time,  the  band  can  be 
chosen from a wide range of frequencies by changing the value of the tuning capacitor. 
35.  The same principles apply to both television and VHF broadcasting.  A TV station may have a carrier 
frequency of 45 MHz and the signals occupy the band of frequency 42.5 MHz to 47.5 MHz.  In this case the 
band is wider than that for sound broadcasting and it is different again at VHF; but in all types of transmission 
there is a radio frequency carrier wave with a narrow band of frequencies on either side. 
36.  The  RF  voltage  induced  in  the  receiving  aerial  is  in  the  order  of  microvolts  and  it  must  be  amplified 
many times before any use can be made of it.  Usually some amplification is carried out at the RF signal 
frequency, some at a lower radio frequency and some at audio or video frequency.  The amplification at the 
original signal frequency is done by the RF amplifier, but, in addition to amplifying the signal, this stage also 
selects the desired station.  This process of selection is called tuning.  Therefore when the tuning dial on a 
receiver is turned the frequency to which the RF amplifier stage responds is altered. 
37.  The amplification is done by the transistor and the selection of the narrow band of frequencies to 
be  amplified  is  performed  by  the  tuned  circuits  which  form  part  of  the  amplifier  circuit.    The  tuned 
circuits  consist  of  coils  and  capacitors  which  are  designed  to  resonate  at  the  required  frequency.  
Tuning is the process of bringing the tuned circuit to resonance. 
Direct-coupled Amplifiers 
38.  A  direct-coupled  amplifier  is  one  in  which  the  output  of  one  stage  is  connected  directly  into  the 
input of the next stage and not via a coupling capacitor or transformer.  Direct-coupled amplifiers are 
used  to  amplify  voltages  which  change  in  value  at  a  very  slow  irregular  rate,  ie  voltages  at  very  low 
frequencies.  They are used in radar equipments, in analogue computers and in power supply circuits. 
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
AMPLIFIERS WITH FEEDBACK 
Introduction 
39.  If  a  fraction  of  the  output  of  an  amplifying  device  or  amplifying  stage  is  added  to  its  input,  then 
feedback is said to occur.  Should this feedback be in-phase with the input then it is classed as positive 
feedback and oscillation takes place, (this is the subject of Volume 14, Chapter 15).  When a part of 
the output is fed back in antiphase, the feedback is said to be negative. 
Principle of Negative Feedback 
40.  Fig  13  depicts  an  amplifier  with  an  “open-loop”  gain  (A),  a  signal  voltage  (VS)  and  a  feedback 
fraction of β. 
14-14 Fig 13 Block Diagram Representation of a Feedback Amplifier 
V
V  = V  +  V
β
V
= V
S

+
g
S
out
Amplifier
out 
g



Load
Signal
Gain = A
Voltage


β
Feedback Circuit


β is Fraction of
V
 Fed Back
out
41.  The 'closed-loop' gain, ie the gain with feedback, can be expressed by the following equations: 
V
= AV = A(V + βV )
out
g
s
out
 ........ (in general) 
For negative feedback, β is negative, 
Hence,  V
= A(V − βV )
out
s
out
V
A
and,     
out =
V
1 + βA
s
42.  If  the  'open-loop'  gain  of  the  amplifier  is  very  high  then  the effective gain, with feedback, closely 
approaches 1/β.  The gain of the feedback amplifier is therefore independent of the gain of the basic 
amplifier.    Variations  in  power  supplies, ageing of components and other causes of variation in basic 
gain, have little effect on an amplifier operating with negative feedback. 
Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
The Effect of Feedback on Frequency Response 
43.  The  upper  curve of Fig 14 represents the frequency response of a basic amplifier; that is to say 
the device’s ability to amplify over a specified range of frequencies.  Ideally the frequency curve should 
be flat over the desired range in order to provide uniform amplification. 
14-14 Fig 14 Frequency Response Curves of an Amplifier with and without Negative Feedback 
AMax
Bandwidth of Amplifier
without Fe
 
edback
)
(A
Bandwidth of Amplifier
in
with Feedback
a
G
A = 1/β
In  practice  this  does  not  happen,  mainly  due  to  the  frequency  sensitivity  of  the  passive  components 
associated with the amplifying device, eg capacitors and inductors. 
44.  The  lower  curve  represents  the  frequency  response  of  the  same  amplifier,  but  with  negative 
feedback applied.  The result is a flatter response curve with a central gain of 1/β.  The fall-off in gain 
at the top and bottom ends of the band does not occur until the basic amplifier gain (A) has fallen to 
such a level as to become insignificant in the feedback equation. 
Frequency Selective Feedback 
45.  The type of feedback discussed so far assumes a constant value of β regardless of the frequency 
of  the  input  signal;  this  can  be  achieved  using  a  simple  resistive  network.    However,  there  are 
occasions when, for example, frequencies at the lower end of the band need to be amplified more than 
the ones at the top end, a form of bass boost.  By introducing capacitance into the feedback network β
becomes  a  variable  value.    High  frequencies  result  in  low  reactance  and  a  good  deal  of  feedback, 
while low frequencies result in high reactance and reduced feedback. 
Input and Output Impedances with Feedback 
46.  The application of negative feedback has a marked effect on the input and output impedances of 
an amplifier, and this is summarized by Table 2.  These changes with respect to an amplifier without 
feedback  depend  on  the  method  of  feedback  tapping  and  injection.    Feedback  tapping  can  take  the 
form of voltage or current, and injection can either be series or parallel. 
Table 2 Changes to Input and Output Impedances due to Feedback 
Series 
Parallel 
Higher 
Lower 
Input Impedance 
Voltage 
Lower 
Lower 
Output Impedance 
Higher 
Lower 
Input Impedance 
Current 
Higher 
Higher 
Output Impedance 
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-14 - Amplifiers 
47.  These changes in impedance values may be used to some advantage when matching the output 
of  one  stage  to  the  input  of  another.    The  emitter  follower  (Fig  4)  is  a  good  example,  where  the 
application  of  series  voltage  feedback  makes  the  device  ideally  suited  for  matching  a  video  output 
amplifier to a transmission line, or coaxial cable. 
POWER AMPLIFIERS 
Introduction 
48.  The  amplifiers  considered  so  far  have,  in  the  main,  been  designed  to  deal  with  voltage 
amplification  where  the  reduction  of  distortion  has  been  a  major  consideration.    Although  such 
amplifiers develop power in their loads, this power is of little importance.  Power amplifiers, however, 
are those in which the power is of chief consideration. 
49.  Voltage  amplifiers  normally  operate  over  the  linear  part  of  the  device’s  characteristic  and  with 
comparatively  small  voltage  swings,  well  within  the  supply  voltages.    On  the  other  hand,  power 
amplifiers must use all the voltage available in order to operate efficiently. 
Classes of Operation 
50.  Voltage  amplifiers  normally  work  with  a  circuit  arrangement  known  as  Class  A.    Under  these 
conditions the amplifier is regarded as being linear and provides low distortion but with low efficiency.  
The output current flows over the whole of the input cycle. 
51.  By  biasing  the  input  to  the  amplifier  so  that  output  current  flows  for  only  half  the  input  cycle, 
greater  efficiencies  can  be  achieved.    In  order  to  duplicate  the  input  waveform  successfully,  two 
devices working in a push-pull arrangement are required.  This class of operation is known as Class B.  
With push-pull arrangement, Class AB can be used in order to reduce crossover distortion. 
52.  Radio frequency (RF) power amplifiers normally work under Class C conditions where the output 
current flows for less than half the input cycle.  Although more efficient than other types of amplifier this 
class of amplifier introduces more distortion. 
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-15 - Oscillators 
CHAPTER 15 - OSCILLATORS 
Introduction 
1. 
An oscillator is a circuit, containing active and passive components, which converts DC power into 
AC  power  at  a  frequency  determined  by  the  values  of  the  components.    In  many  cases,  the  output 
waveform  is  sinusoidal  and  the  oscillator  is  then  referred  to  as  a  sine-wave  or  harmonic  generator.  
Oscillators  which  generate  waveforms  such  as  sawtooth,  square-wave  and  triangular,  are  known  as 
relaxation oscillators. 
2. 
The main uses of oscillators are: 
a. 
The generation of radio frequency (RF) for transmission. 
b. 
The generation of RF for test equipment. 
c. 
The generation of an intermediate frequency (IF) in superheterodyne receivers 
d. 
The production of timing pulses in radar transmitters. 
Maintenance of Oscillation 
3. 
If  an  electrical  impulse  is  applied  to  the  circuit  shown  in  Fig  1,  the  circuit  will  oscillate  or  'ring'  at  its 
natural  frequency.    However,  the  resistance  in  the  circuit  gradually  uses  up  the  power  contained  in  the 
original impulse and the amplitude of the oscillation decays exponentially.  This is known as damping.  (The 
process of natural oscillation is discussed in detail in Volume 14, Chapter 4.) 
14-15 Fig 1 A Simple Oscillatory Circuit 
C
L
4. 
If, on the other hand, the circuit can be continually supplied with power at the right frequency and 
in the correct phase, the oscillations may be maintained at a constant level.  This can be achieved by 
applying  the  oscillations  to  the  input  of  an  amplifier  and  then  feeding  part  of  the  output  back  to  the 
input, in phase.  This is shown diagrammatically in Fig 2.  Such an arrangement is called an oscillator, 
and the feedback required for the maintenance of oscillation is 'positive'.  The frequency of oscillation 
depends on the values of the inductance and the capacitance in the LC 'tank' circuit.  It is given, to a 
very close approximation, by the equation: 
1
f =
Hz
o
2π LC
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 14-15 - Oscillators 
where L is in henries and C is in farads.  This equation shows that the resonant frequency, f0, increases 
with  a  decrease  in  either  L  or  C.   If the feedback is more than enough to compensate for the damping 
effect,  it  might  be  expected  that  the  oscillations  would  build  up  to  an  infinite  amplitude.    In  fact,  the 
oscillations reach a maximum value determined by the flattening of the amplifier’s characteristics. 
14-15 Fig 2 An Oscillatory Circuit 
Amp
Frequency Stability of Oscillators 
5. 
One of the most important features of an oscillator is its frequency stability, ie its ability to provide 
a constant frequency output under varying conditions.  Some of the factors which affect the frequency 
stability of an oscillator, and some of the methods used to counteract frequency drift, are as follows: 
a. 
Temperature.    Coils  and  capacitors  alter  in  size,  and  therefore  in  value,  with  temperature 
changes.  This can be compensated for by enclosing the tuned circuit in a temperature controlled 
compartment,  or  by  using  a  capacitor  whose  value  decreases  with  an  increase  in  temperature, 
thus counteracting the corresponding increase in value of the inductor. 
b.
Variations  of  Load.    The  output  from  an  oscillator  is  coupled  to  some  other  device,  eg  an 
aerial or an amplifier.  Any change in the value of this load causes the oscillator frequency to drift.  
This  effect  can  be  reduced  by  taking  only  a  fraction  of  the  power  which  the  oscillator  could 
provide, ie loosely coupling the oscillator to its load.  Alternatively, a buffer amplifier can be placed 
between the oscillator and load.  This buffer stage screens the oscillator circuit from variations in 
load impedance. 
c. 
Changes in Power Supplies.  If the power supplies to the oscillator circuit vary, the output 
frequency will change.  To avoid this, power supplies are carefully stabilized. 
d. 
Vibration  and  Shock.    If  mobile  equipment  is  subject  to  vibration,  it  can cause changes in 
oscillator frequency.  Frequency drift due to this cause is reduced by mounting the equipment on 
shock absorbers. 
e
Hand  Capacitance.    The  proximity  of  the  operator’s  hand  or  other  parts  of  the  body  may 
introduce extra capacitance into the oscillatory circuit.  This can be reduced by earthing one side 
of the tuned circuit or by screening the whole circuit. 
Crystal-controlled Oscillators 
6. 
A class of oscillator which has exceptionally good frequency stability is the crystal-controlled oscillator.  It 
is widely used when oscillations at one fixed frequency are required, but it cannot be tuned over a range of 
frequencies as can the LC oscillator.  However, by using harmonics generated by several crystal oscillators, 
a number of spot frequencies in a wide range can be chosen. 
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 14-15 - Oscillators 
7. 
If  a  voltage  at  the  same  frequency  as  the  natural  frequency  of  the  crystal  is  applied  to  opposite 
faces of the crystal, resonance occurs.  The crystal’s natural frequency is very stable and will remain 
constant to within one part in 106.  If temperature compensation and other arrangements are included, 
stability  of  1  in  107  can  be  obtained.    The  range  of  frequencies  covered  by  normal  crystals  is  from 
50 kHz to 9 MHz. 
8. 
The crystal which controls the frequency is the same type as that used in the crystal microphone; 
it is made from Rochelle salt or quartz.  These crystals exhibit a piezo-electric effect, ie they develop a 
voltage across opposite faces when they are compressed or expanded and they contract and expand 
(ie  oscillate)  when  an  alternating  voltage  is  applied  across  them.    Such  a  crystal  has  a  natural 
frequency of oscillation which depends on its size, its thickness, and the way in which it has been cut; a 
thick crystal will oscillate at a lower frequency than a thin one. 
9. 
The construction of an oscillator control crystal is shown in Fig 3.  A thin crystal wafer is mounted 
between two metal plates from which electrical connections are taken. 
14-15 Fig 3 Crystal Used for Frequency Control 
Electrode
Container
Air Gap
Crystal
Spring
Pins
Frequency Multiplication 
10.  For frequencies above 14 MHz, it is not practical for quartz crystals to be ground thinly enough for 
general usage.  If a crystal is used at a relatively low frequency, it can be used to control a non-linear 
amplifier which generates harmonic multiples of the fundamental.  The crystal oscillator is more stable 
at a lower frequency. 
11.  If the LC output circuit of an amplifier is tuned to a harmonic of the input then the circuit receives a 
'kick' every second or third cycle of its oscillation, which is sufficient to keep it going.  In this way, any 
frequency  may  be  multiplied  up  as  many  times  as  are  desired,  although  it  is  not  usual  to  multiply  by 
factors greater than three in one stage. 
Frequency Synthesizers 
12.  A  frequency  synthesizer  is  basically  a  circuit  in  which  harmonics  and  sub-harmonics  of  a  single 
standard  oscillator  are  combined  to  provide  a  multiplicity  of  output  signals  which  are  all  harmonically 
related to a sub-harmonic of the standard oscillator.  A simple block diagram is shown in Fig 4. 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 14-15 - Oscillators 
14-15 Fig 4 Single Crystal Frequency Synthesizer 
Frequency
Harmonic
10
300
Divider
Generator
Mixer
Filter
÷
kHz
kHz
 10
× 30
Standard
Oscillator
100 kHz
Harmonic 2000
Generator kHz
× 20
13.  The output from the × 30 harmonic generator is a spectrum of frequencies, centred on 300 kHz, with 
a  separation  of  10  kHz.    Similarly,  the  output  from  the  × 20  harmonic  generator  is  a  spectrum  of 
frequencies, centred on 2,000 kHz, with a separation of 100 kHz.  The desired 'harmonic mix' is selected 
by  the  filter.    A  great  advantage  of  this  circuit  is  that  accuracy  and  stability  of  the  output  signal  is 
essentially equal to that of the standard oscillator, which can be tightly controlled. 
Relaxation Oscillators 
14.  Relaxation  oscillators  generate  non-sinusoidal  outputs,  the  most  important  examples  of  these 
being  the  rectangular  or  square  wave,  and  the  sawtooth  wave.    Square  waves  are  of  immense 
importance  in  digital  computers  and  radar,  whilst  sawtooth  generators  are  used  extensively  as  a 
source for the time-base waveforms associated with cathode-ray tubes. 
15.  The most commonly used square wave oscillator is the multivibrator.  This generator, in its basic 
form,  consists  of  two  RC  cross-coupled  amplifiers;  the  output  of  one  being  connected  to  the  input  of 
the  other,  and  vice  versa.    Normally,  one  device  is  conducting  while  the  other  is  cut-off,  and  the 
change-over is determined by the RC time constant.  The multivibrator action ensures rapid switching 
from the 'off' to the 'on' IF state for each amplifier, resulting in a square-wave output with sharp leading 
and trailing edges. 
Microwave Oscillators 
16.  At frequencies higher than about 1,000 MHz, conventional low frequency devices and resonant circuits 
become inefficient.  Most microwave components and equipment take on a different form.  For example, a 
resistor  is  replaced  by  an  attenuator,  an  LC  tuned  circuit  by  a  resonator,  a  connecting  wire  or  cable  by  a 
waveguide.    The  cavity  magnetron  and  the  reflex  klystron  are  well-established  examples  of  microwave 
oscillators.  These devices, along with other methods of microwave generation, are discussed in Volume 14 
Chapter 20. 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
CHAPTER 16 - TRANSMITTERS 
Introduction 
1. 
Many types of practical transmitters are in use, ranging from low frequency ground installations of 
considerable  size,  weight,  and  power,  to  miniaturized  VHF  and  UHF  equipment  for  airborne  or  man-
portable applications.  Although the appearance and uses of these transmitters may vary considerably, 
they all use the same basic principles. 
2. 
The  simplest  form  of  transmitter  comprises  an  oscillator  connected  to  an  aerial.    However,  this 
simple  arrangement  produces  only  a  limited  amount  of  radiated  power,  and  suffers  from  poor 
frequency stability, since any oscillator from which more than a very little power is drawn tends to drift 
in frequency. 
3. 
In a practical transmitter, these drawbacks are overcome by incorporating amplifiers between the 
oscillator and the aerial.  The arrangement is illustrated in Fig 1 and is known as the Master Oscillator 
Power Amplifier (MOPA) System.  The main components of the system and their functions are: 
a. 
Master  Oscillator.    The  function  of  the  master  oscillator  is  to  produce  a  radio  frequency 
voltage  of  good  frequency  stability.    A crystal-controlled oscillator is normally used.  To enhance 
frequency  stability,  it  is  normally  run  at  low  power  and  may  have  its  crystal  mounted  in  a 
thermostatically temperature-controlled enclosure. 
14-16 Fig 1 The MOPA Transmitter 
Buffer
Power
Master
Oscillator
Amplifier
Amplifier
Class C
Class A
Class C
b. 
Buffer Amplifier.  The buffer amplifier provides a constant light load for the master oscillator, 
thereby  isolating  the  oscillator  from  load  variations,  which  improves  frequency  stability.    In 
addition,  the  buffer  amplifier  amplifies  the  RF  signal  from  the  oscillator  to  provide  the necessary 
drive to the power amplifier.  The buffer amplifier normally operates under Class A conditions (see 
Volume 14, Chapter 14, Para 50). 
c. 
Power Amplifier.  The function of the RF power amplifier is to convert the RF drive from the 
buffer  amplifier  to  a  sufficiently  high-power  level  to  feed  the  aerial  and  provide  adequate  energy 
for radiation.  The power amplifier operates at a high power and at high efficiency under Class B 
or C conditions. 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
4. 
In many instances, especially at VHF or above, the frequency of the output at the aerial is required 
to be higher than that at which the master oscillator can efficiently maintain a stable frequency.  In this 
situation,  frequency-multiplier stages (doublers or treblers) are inserted between the master oscillator 
and the final power amplifier stage. 
5. 
The simple MOPA transmitter described would transmit a constant frequency, constant amplitude, 
RF  wave  (Fig  2),  ie  it  would  carry  no  information.    In  order  to  transmit  information,  the  transmitter 
output must be altered in some way. 
14-16 Fig 2 A Constant Frequency, Constant Amplitude, RF Wave 
0
Time
KEYING AND MODULATION 
General 
6. 
The techniques of superimposing information onto a transmitted signal are covered in Volume 14, 
Chapter 22.  However, for convenience, the basic ideas will be reviewed in the following paragraphs, 
since the technique employed affects the arrangement of a practical transmitter. 
7. 
The information to be transmitted may be either in the form of a quantity which varies continuously 
with  time,  e.g.  speech,  which  is  termed  an  analogue  signal,  or  it  may  be  in  a  form  which  is  only 
permitted to have discrete values or levels, e.g. Morse code, which is known as a digital signal. 
Transmitter Keying 
8. 
In order to transmit Morse (or any similar) code by the continuous wave of Fig 2, it is necessary to 
switch the transmitter on and off in such a way that radiation from the aerial occurs for short and long 
periods of time corresponding to the dots and dashes of the code (Fig 3) - the operation is known as 
'keying'.  One method of interrupting the transmitted output would be to switch the master oscillator on 
and off, but this is not normally done since it may cause the frequency to drift.  Instead, the switching is 
normally applied to one of the other stages in the transmitter. 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
14-16 Fig 3 Transmitter Keying - Morse Code 
0
Time
Analogue Modulation 
9. 
Analogue  information  is  transmitted  by  changing  the  amplitude,  frequency,  or  phase  (which  has 
limited applications and is not considered further here) of the output (carrier) signal, to reflect changes 
in the information signal.  Alternatively, the transmitter radiation may be concentrated into short bursts 
of RF energy, whose amplitude, length, or interval can be varied (pulse modulation). 
10.  Amplitude  Modulation  (AM).    In  amplitude  modulation,  the  modulating signal is used to modify 
the  amplitude  of  the  RF  carrier  signal  without  affecting  its  frequency  (Fig  4).    Fig  4a  represents  the 
unmodulated  CW  carrier  signal  from  the  transmitter.    Fig  4b  shows  the  audio  frequency  modulating 
signal, and Fig 4c shows the change in the amplitude of the carrier, above and below the unmodulated 
level, proportional to the amplitude and sign of the modulating signal.  The rate of change of amplitude 
of the carrier depends on the modulating frequency.  The outline of the modulated wave, known as the 
modulation envelope, is an exact replica of the modulating signal.  Single sideband systems (SSB) are 
a variation of AM. 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
14-16 Fig 4 Amplitude Modulation 
a
0
Time
b
AF Modulating Signal
0
Time
c
Amplitude-Modulated Wave
0
Time
11.  Frequency Modulation (FM).  In frequency modulation, the modulating signal is used to modify 
the  carrier  frequency  without  affecting  its  amplitude  (Fig  5).    Fig  5a  represents  the  unmodulated  CW 
carrier  signal  from  the  transmitter.    Fig  5b  shows  the  audio  frequency  modulating  signal  and  Fig  5c 
shows  the  changes  in  the  frequency  of  the  carrier,  above  and  below  the  unmodulated  frequency, 
proportional  to  the  amplitude  and  sign  of  the  modulating  signal.    The  rate  of  change  of  carrier 
frequency depends on the modulating frequency. 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
14-16 Fig 5 Frequency Modulation 
a
0
Time
b
AF Modulating Signal
0
Time
Smaller Modulating
Signal
c
Smaller Frequency
Deviation
0
Time
High
Low
Frequency
Frequency
12.  Pulse  Modulation  (PM).    Pulse  modulation  can  be  used  to  convey  information  by  varying  the 
pulse  amplitude  (Fig  6b),  the  pulse  length  (Fig  6c),  or  the  interval  between  pulses  (Fig  6d)  in 
accordance with the modulating signal (Fig 6a). 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
14-16 Fig 6 Methods of Pulse Modulation 
a  Modulating Signal
0
Time
b  Pulse-amplitude Modulation
0
Time
c  Pulse-length Modulation
0
Time
d  Pulse-position Modulation
0
Time
TRANSMITTER SYSTEMS 
Amplitude Modulated Transmitters 
13.  The  modulating  signal  in  an  AM  system  may  be  a  keyed  audio  note  representing  the  dots  and 
dashes of the Morse code, or it may be an analogue signal derived, for example, from a microphone.  
Modulation is said to be high or low, depending on whether it is applied in the transmitter at a point of 
high or low RF power.  If the modulation is applied at an early stage, ie low-level modulation, then the 
following stages must be operated in Class A or B in order to avoid distorting the modulated RF input.  
A block diagram of a high-level system is shown in Fig 7.  The RF carrier is generated by the oscillator 
and then amplified to the power level required for radiation from the aerial.  The AF amplifiers raise the 
power  of  the  AF  signal  from  the  microphone  to  the  level  required  for  modulation.    The  AF  signal 
amplitude  modulates  the  RF  carrier  in  the RF power amplifier stage.  For a given total output power, 
low-level  modulation  would  need  very  little  modulation  or  audio  frequency  power,  but  a  large  pre-
amplifier (PA) stage.  The PA stage would be inefficient since it would have to be operated in Class A 
or B, but offsetting the disadvantage, the AF stage would be small without the need for a heavy, high 
power, AF transformer.  High-level modulation uses an efficient Class C amplifier at the PA stage, but 
uses a bulky, high power, inefficient AF amplifier (the modulator). 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
14-16 Fig 7 High-level Modulation AM Transmitter 
Buffer
Power
Mast
s er
Osci
c llla
l tor
Amplifier
Amplifier
Modulator
Frequency Modulated Transmitters 
14.  A block diagram of a basic FM transmitter is shown in Fig 8.  The AF signal is amplified and passed to 
the  reactance  device,  which  is  used  to  vary  the  frequency  produced  by  the  oscillator.    The  reactance 
modulator  will  produce  only  small  frequency  deviations,  and  a  practical  FM  transmitter  must  raise  the 
frequency deviation by using frequency multipliers.  For example, if the output from the oscillator is 2 MHz + 
650 Hz, it is necessary to convert this to a VHF output of say 90 MHz with a frequency deviation of 75 kHz.  
To change the frequency deviation from 650 Hz to 75 kHz requires multiplication by about 115.  Since this 
would produce a carrier of 230 MHz, which is too high, means must be found of bringing the carrier back to 
90 MHz without affecting the frequency deviation.  This is achieved by the mixer, which would be fed by an 
RF oscillator at a frequency of 140 MHz (230 MHz minus 90 MHz). 
14-16 Fig 8 A Basic FM Transmitter 
Audio
Reactance
Frequency
Power
LC
Mixers
Oscillator
Amplifier
Valve
Multipliers
Amplifier
Pulse Modulated Transmitters 
15.  A pulse-modulated transmitter may be either a higher power oscillator type or a MOPA type.  The 
choice between the two configurations is governed mainly by the application.  Transmitters that utilize 
power  oscillators  are  usually  smaller  than  MOPA  transmitters,  but  the  latter  are  more  stable  and  are 
usually capable of providing greater mean power.  Power oscillators are therefore likely to be found in 
applications where small size and portability are of the greatest importance, and MOPA transmitters in 
radar applications in which high power or good MTI performance are desired. 
16.  The  High-Power  Oscillator  Transmitter.    The  high-power  oscillator,  typically  a  magnetron 
(see Volume 14, Chapter 20), is switched on and off by the modulator.  The modulator may be either a 
high-power stage, as shown in Fig 9a, or it may consist of several stages which amplify and shape the 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-16 - Transmitters 
master timing pulse, as shown in Fig 9b.  In both cases, the RF energy of the pulse is generated in the 
oscillator and forms the final RF output. 
14-16 Fig 9 High Power Oscillator Transmitters 
Power
Supply
a
Master
Driver
Timer
Amplifier
b
17.  The Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA).  In the MOPA type of pulse transmitter (Fig 10), a 
low  power RF oscillator is amplitude modulated, and its output is then amplified by the RF amplifier.  The 
master oscillator may be crystal controlled, or it may be a stable frequency resonant cavity oscillator.  The 
MOPA system has the following advantages over other systems: 
a. 
The frequency stability is much better. 
b. 
A simple modulator can be used because it does not have to provide the high power required 
to feed a single stage transmitter. 
c. 
Phase coherency between radiated pulses is much easier to obtain. 
14-16 Fig 10 A MOPA Pulse Transmitter 
Low Power
Modulator
Trigger Pulse
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
CHAPTER 17 - RECEIVERS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  task  of  a  radio  frequency  receiver  is  to  intercept  some  of  the  RF  energy  radiated  from  the 
transmitter, to detect the information it contains, and to reproduce it in an acceptable form.  The basic 
receiver  shown  in  block  form  in  Fig  1  uses  an  RF  amplifier  to  select  and  amplify  the  required 
frequency,  a  detector  to  extract the information, and an audio frequency amplifier to produce enough 
power to operate the loudspeaker (transducer).  This type of receiver could be used for single channel 
operation, but has limited potential for tuning to other channels. 
14-17 Fig 1 A Basic Radio Frequency Receiver 
RF Amplifier
Detector
AF Amplifier
Transducer
2. 
A practical receiver uses the superheterodyne (often abbreviated to superhet) principle in which all 
incoming  signals  are  changed  to  a  fixed  frequency  (the  intermediate  frequency  -  IF)  for  amplification 
before  demodulation.    Most  of  the  amplification  within  the  receiver  takes  place  in  the  IF  stages.    Fig  2 
depicts a multi-purpose, superhet receiver.  The various stages are: 
a. 
Transmit/Receive  (TR)  Switch.    The  TR  switch  is  used  to  allow  the  aerial  to  act  as  a 
radiator or receiving aerial.  TR switches are discussed in Volume 14, Chapter 20. 
b. 
RF Amplifier.  Although not always essential, an RF amplifier is usually included and is an RF 
voltage amplifier with Class A bias and a tuned circuit collector load.  Its functions are to select the 
wanted signal from a background of other signals and noise, to give some pre-mixer amplification to 
the signal and hence improve the signal-to-noise ratio at the receiver output, and to isolate the aerial 
from the local oscillator so as to reduce radiation at the local oscillator frequency. 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
14-17 Fig 2 A Superheterodyne Receiver 
TR Switch
Low Noise
AF or VF
Mixer
RF Amplifier
IF Amplifier
Amplifiers
Transducer
AGC
Automatic
Frequency
Local 
BFO
Control
Oscillator
(AFC)
c. 
Local Oscillator.  The local oscillator can be any one of the basic oscillator circuits provided 
that it is stable over the required frequency range.  The local oscillator and the RF amplifier tuned 
circuits  are  ‘ganged’  together  so  that  there  is  always  a  constant  fixed  difference  between  their 
frequencies.  At HF and below, the local oscillator frequency is usually chosen to be higher than 
that of the incoming signal in order to receive signals of lower frequency than the IF, and to keep 
the ratio of the maximum and minimum frequencies within the range of a normal tuning capacitor.  
At  VHF  and  above,  the  local  oscillator  operates  below  the  signal  frequency  in  order  to  improve 
stability.  At these frequencies the ratio of the maximum and minimum frequencies is much lower 
and well within range of the tuning capacitor. 
d. 
Mixer  (First  Detector).    The  inputs  to  the  mixer  are  the  modulated  signal  and  the  local 
oscillator output, the mixer producing the sum and difference of these frequencies.  The difference 
frequency  is  selected  by a tuned circuit and this forms the IF signal which is modulated with the 
same  waveform  as  the  original  RF  signal.    The  choice  of  mixer  circuit  depends  primarily  on  the 
frequency  of  the  input  signal.    At  HF  and  below  the  multiplicative  type  is  used,  but  above  these 
frequencies additive mixing is used since this results in less interaction between the two inputs to 
the  mixer.    Interaction  can  be  reduced  further  by  the  insertion  of  a  buffer  amplifier  between  the 
local oscillator and the mixer. 
e. 
IF  Amplifier.    The  IF  amplifier  is  an  RF  amplifier  operating  at  a  low,  fixed,  radio  frequency 
and  because  the  frequency  is  fixed,  this  stage  is  always  operating  under  optimum  conditions.  
This permits the sensitivity, selectivity, and stability to be much higher than would be possible with 
a  tuneable  RF  amplifier.    In  most  receivers  there  are  usually  several  IF  amplifiers  in  cascade, 
forming  what  is  known  as  the  IF  strip,  and  it  is  in  this  part  of  the  receiver  that  most  of  the 
amplification is achieved.  The IF amplifier also sets the bandwidth of the receiver overall. 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
f. 
Demodulator  (Second  Detector).    The  demodulator  is  invariably  a  diode  detector  since  the 
amplitude  of  the  signal  at  this  stage in a receiver is sufficiently large (a few volts) to allow a diode to 
operate efficiently and with good linearity. 
g. 
AF  or  Video  Frequency  Amplifier.    The  AF  or  video  frequency  amplifiers  form  the  final 
processing stage in a receiver and are necessary to bring the signal to a level suitable for presentation.  
The number of amplifiers present in this stage is determined by the power output required. 
h. 
Beat Frequency Oscillator (BFO).  A beat frequency oscillator is required for the reception of 
CW signals.  It produces a signal at a frequency which combines at the demodulator with the output of 
the  IF  stage  to  produce  a  component  at  the  difference  frequency,  usually  1  kHz.    This  can  now  be 
detected and amplified to give an audio output.  Since the BFO is not required when full AM signals are 
being received, an on/off switch is incorporated. 
i. 
Automatic  Gain  Control  (AGC).    The  automatic  gain  control  circuit  reduces  the  gain  of  the 
receiver  in  proportion  to  the  input  signal  strength,  and  the  output  thus  tends  to  remain  constant 
despite  signal  fading  and  changes  due  to  tuning.    The  circuit  achieves  this  by  feeding  back  a  DC 
voltage (from a diode driven by the last IF stage) which is proportional to the signal strength at that 
point.    This  voltage  varies  the  bias  on  the  earlier  stages,  thus  varying  the  gain  of  the  controlled 
stages.  A simple AGC circuit reduces the gain of the receiver for all signals, even weak ones.  This 
is  a  disadvantage  and  so  the normal arrangement is to use a delayed AGC circuit which does not 
feed back an AGC voltage until the signal rises above some predetermined value. 
Selectivity and Choice of IF 
3. 
There  are  two  main  ways  in  which  an  unwanted  signal  may  cause  interference  with  the  wanted 
signal in the superhet: 
a. 
Adjacent Channel Interference.  Adjacent channel interference is interference from a signal 
which is close in frequency to the wanted signal.  It may be reduced or eliminated by making the 
tuned circuits of the IF amplifiers highly selective. 
b. 
Second (or Image) Channel Interference.  The carrier frequency of the wanted signal differs 
from the local oscillator frequency by the IF.  However there is another frequency, also differing from the 
local oscillator frequency by the IF, but in the opposite sense to the wanted signal, which could cause 
interference.    For  example,  consider  a  wanted  carrier  frequency  of  2.2  MHz  being  received  by  a 
receiver  with  an  IF  of  500  kHz;  the  local  oscillator  would  in  this  situation  be  tuned  to  2.7  MHz.    In 
addition to the wanted signal, a frequency of 3.2 MHz could also mix with the local oscillator to produce 
a 500 kHz difference frequency.  This second channel interference can be prevented by ensuring that 
the image channel frequency lies well outside the pass band of the RF amplifier. 
4. 
Choice of IF.  The higher the IF, the further away is the second channel interference frequency, 
which makes it easier for the RF amplifier tuned circuit to discriminate between them.  Conversely, a 
low  value  for  the  IF  assists  in  discriminating  between  adjacent  signals  thereby  reducing  adjacent 
channel  interference.    The  choice  of  IF  must  therefore  be  a  compromise  between  these  conflicting 
requirements.    However,  in  high  quality  receivers  where  this  compromise  is  not  acceptable,  the 
problem can be avoided by use of the double superhet receiver technique. 
5. 
The Double Superhet Receiver.  In the double superhet receiver the incoming signal is first changed 
to a high IF which assists in second channel rejection.  After amplification at this frequency, a second mixer 
is used to produce a final low IF which improves adjacent channel rejection.  Since the input to the second 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
mixer has a fixed centre frequency, the second local oscillator can be preset and its tuning does not have to 
be ganged to the tuning capacitors of the first RF and first local oscillator stages. 
6. 
Typical Output.  Typical signal and intermediate frequencies for various types of input signal are 
shown in Table 1. 
Table 1 Typical Intermediate Frequencies 
Type of Signal 
Signal 
IF 
Frequency 
AM Broadcast 
1 MHz 
454 kHz 
FM Broadcast 
90 MHz 
10.7 MHz 
Television 
150 MHz 
34 MHz 
HF Communication 
10 MHz 
600 kHz 
15 MHz - 1st IF 
VHF/UHF Comms 
300 MHz 
2 MHz - 2nd IF 
7. 
Functional  Differences.    Although  most  RF  receivers  use  the  superhet  principle,  there  are 
differences  between  communications  and  radar receivers, and between types of receiver within each 
group.  These characteristics will be reviewed in the following paragraphs. 
COMMUNICATION RECEIVERS 
General 
8. 
The essential features of a communication receiver are: 
a. 
Frequency Coverage.  No one receiver can possibly cover successfully the whole of the RF 
spectrum and so receivers are designed to operate in a particular band. 
b. 
Sensitivity.    Sensitivity  is  a  measure  of  the  ability  of  the  receiver  to  intercept  weak  signals 
and extract information from them and it depends upon the amount of RF amplification available 
at  the  beginning  of  the  receiver.    Sensitivity  cannot  be  increased  indefinitely  by  increasing  the 
number  of  RF  stages  because  of  instability  due  to  interaction  and  usually  only  one  amplification 
stage is used. 
c. 
Selectivity.    Selectivity  is  a  measure  of  a  receiver’s  ability  to  intercept  only  the  required 
signal  and  to  extract  the  information  it  carries,  even  though  there  may  be  other  information 
carrying signals on close frequencies.  An RF stage on its own is unable to provide the required 
response  for  good  selectivity  and  the  superhet  principle  is  almost  universal  since  it  is  easier  to 
obtain the required selectivity at lower frequencies. 
d. 
Fidelity.    Fidelity  is  a  measure  of  how  well  the  receiver  reproduces  the  received  baseband 
signal without distortion.  Whereas effective sensitivity and selectivity require a narrow bandwidth, 
good fidelity can only be obtained with a wide bandwidth. 
e. 
Stability.  As a communication receiver can be remotely operated it is necessary for the local 
oscillator to have good frequency stability. 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
Single Sideband (SSB) Receivers 
9. 
The SSB receiver is a superhet arrangement but with the additional requirement of re-inserting the 
carrier at the correct frequency and amplitude.  The carrier must be present in the receiver along with 
the  sideband  before  demodulation  can  take  place,  but  if  the  frequency  is  incorrect,  the  signal  will  be 
distorted, and if the amplitude is incorrect, the effective depth of modulation will be changed. 
10.  When  the  SSB  signal  is  transmitted  with  a  controlled  carrier  or  a  pilot  carrier,  a  triple  superhet 
receiver is often used.  From the amplified composite signal, the carrier is selected by a filter, and used 
to produce an automatic frequency control (AFC) voltage (by means of a discriminator and reactance 
device) with which the frequency of the second local oscillator is controlled.  If the transmitter drifts in 
frequency, the receiver will follow the drift because the pilot or controlled carrier indicates the direction 
and  extent  of  the  drift.    A  portion  of  the  signal  output  from  the  third  frequency  changer  is  passed 
through a filter which rejects the sidebands and passes the carrier frequency only.  After amplification 
and limiting, this is fed into the demodulator stage where it recombines with the sideband frequencies 
and enables demodulation to take place in the normal way. 
11.  With the suppressed carrier system there is no carrier present in the receiver to use as a reference, 
and  so  the  frequency  drift  in  both  transmitter  and  receiver  must  be  negligible.    The  oscillators  are  thus 
usually  crystal  and  thermostatically  controlled  to  provide  this  high  standard  of  stability.    The  receiver  is 
usually  a  double  superhet,  both  local  oscillators  being  controlled  by  the  frequency  of  a  very  stable 
temperature  controlled  crystal  oscillator  which  is  also  used  to  provide  the  re-insert  carrier  at  the 
demodulation stage.  The frequency at this point is that of the second IF; thus, the difference frequencies 
produced in the detector are the original audio frequencies, i.e. the modulation. 
12.  In airborne SSB systems, the receiver forms part of a combined transmitter-receiver, and the stable 
oscillators  used  in  the  frequency  translation  process  in  the  transmitting  function  are  also  used  as  local 
oscillators in the receiver function.  This helps to ensure the overall frequency stability of the system. 
FM Receivers 
13.  The FM receiver is a superhet arrangement but with wider bandwidth IF amplifiers compared to an 
AM  receiver,  and  with  a  limiter  and  discriminator  taking  the  place  of  the  envelope  detector  in  the 
demodulation stage.  The limiter eliminates unwanted amplitude variations in a signal by cutting off the 
positive  and  negative  extremities  of  the  waveform.    The  discriminator  is  a  device  which  produces  a 
voltage  proportional  to  the  instantaneous  deviation  of  the  FM  signal.    This  voltage  will  then  be 
equivalent to the original modulating signal.  An FM receiver, operating at VHF and above, is used for 
short-range communication and there is therefore usually a fairly strong input signal.  AGC is normally 
only necessary in fringe areas and where it is employed the AGC diode would normally take its input 
from the last IF stage. 
Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) Receivers 
14.  The  input  to  an  FSK  receiver  is  frequency  modulated  with  very  small  deviation and so the basic 
requirements  for  the  reception  of  FSK  signals  are  a  narrow  bandwidth,  stringent  frequency  stability, 
and  selective  filtering  in  the  demodulator  to  separate  the  mark  and  space  frequencies.    The  RF 
amplifier,  mixer,  and  IF  amplifier  stages  are  similar  to  those  of  a  normal  communications  superhet, 
although  the  bandwidths  of  these  stages  are  reduced.   The output from the last IF amplifier is fed to 
the input filter which accepts the mark and space frequencies but rejects unwanted interfering signals.  
The  limiter  passes  constant  amplitude  mark  and  space  signals  to  selective  filters which separate the 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
mark  and  space  frequencies  and  pass  them  to  the  detectors.    The  positive  (mark)  and  negative 
(space)  pulse  outputs  are  then  amplified  in  the  wideband  pulse  amplifier,  the  output  of  which  is well-
shaped  pulses  of  +  80  volts  suitable  for  operating  a  teleprinter  relay.    An  emitter-follower  provides  a 
correct  match  to  a  600-ohm  line  without  distorting  the  pulses.    To  improve  the  reliability  of  FSK 
systems,  two  separate  aerials  and  receivers  are  sometimes  used  with  a  common  crystal  controlled 
local oscillator used for both receivers. 
RADAR RECEIVERS 
Introduction 
15.  Radar  receivers  are  invariably  of  the  superhet  type  but  with  certain  special characteristics which 
differentiate them from the normal communications receivers.  These desired characteristics are: 
a. 
High Gain.  High gain is necessary so that the weakest echo may be detected and gains in 
the order of 150 - 200 dB are common. 
b. 
Low Noise Figure.  The advantages of high gain will be negated if the receiver noise figure 
is  also  high  since  a  reasonable  signal-to-noise  ratio  at  the  input  will  be  degraded  to  an 
unacceptable  value  at  the  output.    Noise  figures  for  microwave  radar  receivers  should  be  no 
greater than about 6 dB. 
c. 
Bandwidth.    The  bandwidth  of  a  radar  receiver  will  inevitably  be  a  compromise  since, 
whereas it must be wide enough to encompass the frequency spectrum of the transmitted signal 
plus any Doppler shift which might occur, it should also be relatively narrow to minimize noise.  In 
pulse  radar,  the  optimum  bandwidth  is  the  reciprocal  of  the  transmission  pulselength,  and  a 
receiver  with  such  a  bandwidth  is  said  to  be  'matched'  to  the  pulselength.    For  CW  radar,  the 
optimum bandwidth is the reciprocal of the length of the 'pulse' generated in the Doppler filter as 
the radar beam scans through the target. 
d. 
Automatic  Frequency  Control.    Radar  transmitters,  especially  those  using  self-excited 
power  oscillators,  tend  to  drift  in  frequency,  and  some  means  of  automatic  tuning  must  be 
incorporated in the receiver so that it follows the drift of the transmitter. 
CW Receivers 
16.  In  a  CW  radar,  echoes  are  received  while  the  transmitter  is  operating  and  it  is,  therefore, 
necessary  (except  for  very  low  power  systems)  to  employ  separate  aerials  for  transmission  and 
reception,  and  elaborate  measures  are  sometimes  needed  to  minimize  direct  leakage  of  transmitter 
power into the receiver.  However, a controlled amount of leakage entering the receiver along with the 
echo  signal  supplies  the  reference  necessary  for  the  detection  of  the  Doppler  frequency  shift  on  the 
received  echoes.    The  amount  of  isolation  required  depends  on  the  transmitter  power  and  the 
accompanying transmitter noise as well as the ruggedness and sensitivity of the receiver. 
17.  The  receiver  of  a  simple  CW  radar  is,  in  some  respects,  analogous  to  a  superhet  receiver.    It  is 
termed  a  homodyne  receiver  or  superhet  receiver  with  zero  IF.    The  function  of  the  local  oscillator  is 
carried out by the leakage signal from the transmitter.  This type of receiver suffers from poor sensitivity 
which  is  overcome  by  using  a  receiver with a non-zero IF.  The reference signal in this case is derived 
from a portion of the transmitted signal mixed with a locally generated signal of frequency equal to that of 
the receiver IF.  Since the output of the mixer consists of two sidebands on either side of the carrier, a 
narrow  band  filter  selects  one  of  the  sidebands  as  the  reference  signal.    This  receiver  is,  therefore, 
sometimes called a sideband superhet receiver.  The received signal (fo ± fd) is mixed with the reference 
signal (fo ± fif) to produce a difference frequency of (fif ± fd).  After IF amplification the Doppler signals are 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
resolved in a Doppler filter bank.  This consists of a number of narrow band filters which together cover 
the range (fif – fd max) to (fif + fd max), where fd max is the maximum Doppler shift expected.  Each filter is 
provided  with  its  own  detector  and  an  output  from  any  one  of  these  indicates  a  target.    An  electronic 
switch is used for rapid examination of each filter detector in turn.  The number of targets that the radar 
can resolve at any one time is equal to the number of Doppler filters. 
18.  The  receivers  employed  in  FMCW  radars  are  similar  to  those  of  the  simple  CW  radar.    In  the 
homodyne  type,  the  receiver  consists  of  a  crystal  mixer  followed  by  a  low  frequency  amplifier  and  a 
frequency-measuring  device.    A  reference  signal  is  necessary  to  be  able  to  extract  the  Doppler  shift 
and  the  range,  and  this  is  usually  obtained  by  direct  connection  from  the  transmitter  rather  than  by 
transmitter leakage, so that its magnitude can be more easily controlled.  In the sideband superhet type 
of  FMCW  receiver,  the  output  from  the  mixer  is  an  IF  signal  of  frequency  (fif  +  fb),  where  fb  is 
composed of the range frequency fr and the Doppler shift fd.  The IF signal is amplified and applied to a 
balanced detector along with the local oscillator signal fif.  The output of the detector contains the beat 
frequency (range frequency and the Doppler velocity frequency), which is amplified to a level where it 
can actuate the frequency measuring circuits.  The output of the low frequency amplifier is divided into 
two  channels:  one  feeds  an  average-frequency  counter  to  determine  range  and  the  other  feeds  a 
switched frequency counter to determine the Doppler velocity. 
Pulse Doppler Receivers 
19.  In a simple pulse Doppler system, a pulsed coherent transmitter is coupled to a common aerial via 
a TR switch.  As in the CW system, the Doppler signals are extracted at an IF and targets are resolved 
in velocity by means of IF Doppler filters.  However, whereas in the CW system a target signal which 
appears  in  the  Doppler  filters  consists  of  a  single  frequency  lying  above  or  below  fif  by  the  Doppler 
shift,  fd,  in  the  pulse  Doppler  system  the  echo  is  pulsed  and  is  therefore  composed  of  a  number  of 
discrete  components  of  pure  CW  separated  in  frequency  by  the  PRF.    If  the  echo  signal  is  from  a 
moving target, all components in this spectrum are shifted by the Doppler frequency and in the IF stage 
the  central  component  has  a  frequency  (fif ±   fd).    In  order  to  resolve  the  target  velocity  without 
ambiguity  only  this  component  must  be  allowed  to  appear  in  the  Doppler  filters,  and  because  of  this 
rejection of other than the central frequency component, much of the echo power is lost.  The fraction 
of  the  total  power  contained  in  the  central  component  depends  on  both  pulselength  and  PRF,  an 
increase  in  either  increasing  the  fraction.    This  reduced  effective  power  degrades  the  signal-to-noise 
ratio compared to an equivalent CW system. 
20.  The signal-to-noise ratio of the system described may be restored if the operation of the receiver 
can be confined to the short period in each pulse cycle when the required echo arrives.  The effect of 
this  is  to  reduce  the  effective  noise  power  to  an extent comparable to the reduction in effective echo 
power,  the  net  result  being  that  the  signal-to-noise  ratio  is  recovered  to  a  value  similar  to  that  of  an 
equivalent CW system.  This is achieved by the addition of a gating circuit which causes the receiver to 
be  opened  for  a  short  period,  τg,  after  an  interval,  t,  following  the  transmission  of  each  pulse.    The 
duration of the range gate, τg, is equal to or slightly greater than the pulselength, τ, and the interval t is 
controlled so as to cause the gate to coincide with the time of arrival of the selected echo. 
21.  In a single-gate system, the gate must be swept across the inter-pulse period in order to search 
for a target.  This not only increases the search time, but also reduces the target information rate if the 
system is to be able to deal with multiple targets.  An alternative solution is to employ a number of fixed 
range gates which together cover the entire inter-pulse period.  As each gate requires a separate bank 
of  Doppler  filters,  the  cost  in  complexity  can  be  high.    For  example,  a  pulse  Doppler  radar  having  a 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-17 - Receivers 
duty cycle of .1 can have up to 9 range gates, each of which might feed as many as 500 Doppler filters.  
However, by using Fast Fourier Transform techniques, this number of filters can be accommodated on 
a single integrated circuit card. 
Logarithmic Receivers 
22.  A  requirement  of  a  radar  receiver  is  that  it  shall  not  easily  saturate,  so  that  for  example,  a 
weak  target  echo  will  still  be  visible  when  superimposed  on  a  strong  clutter  signal.    This 
requirement  may  be  met  by  adopting  the  successive  detection  principle  in  which  a  detector  is 
connected across the output of each IF stage, the outputs of the detectors being added together 
in  a  delay  line  in  such  a  way  that  the  delay  introduced  between  the  outputs  of  successive 
detectors  is  equal  to  the  propagation  delay  through  the  intervening  IF  stage.    Each  stage,  in 
addition  to  feeding  the  next  stage,  thus  makes  an  independent  contribution  to  the  final  output  of 
the  receiver.    If  the  input  to  such  a  receiver  is  steadily  increased,  the  final  IF  will  be  the  first  to 
saturate.    After  a  further  increase  in  input  the  penultimate stage will saturate, and so on.  In this 
way, the resistance of the receiver to saturation effects is greatly extended.  In such an amplifier 
there  is  an  approximately  logarithmic  relation  between  input  and  output  amplitudes,  and  a 
receiver employing an IF amplifier of this type is, therefore, known as a logarithmic amplifier. 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
CHAPTER 18 - TRANSMISSION LINES 
Introduction 
1. 
A  transmission  line  is  any  system  of  conductors  by  means  of  which  electrical  energy  can  be 
transferred from one point to another with negligible loss.  In radio and radar systems, the majority of 
transmission  lines  are  used  to  transfer  RF  energy  either  from  a  transmitter  to  an  aerial,  or  from  an 
aerial to a receiver.  The loss in each case must be as small as possible.  In the first case, any loss of 
energy  is  wasteful  since  it  involves  a  needless  use  of  power  at  the  transmitter,  while  in  the  second 
case,  a  loss  of  RF  energy  could  mean  a  serious  loss  of  signals  at  the  receiver  input.    Thus,  in  any 
transmission  line  system,  steps  must  be  taken  to  ensure  that  energy  losses  incurred  are  negligible 
compared with the magnitude of the energy being transferred. 
2. 
As well as having low losses, a transmission line should not 'pick up' stray external voltages which 
would  degrade  the  signal/noise  ratio.    This  is  particularly  important  in  a  receiving  system,  where  the 
strength of the signal is relatively low. 
Types of Transmission Lines 
3. 
All transmission lines consist of a conducting medium and a dielectric medium (which may be air).  
There  will  be  electric  and  magnetic  fields  in  both  media,  and  it  can  be  shown  that  the  energy  is 
transmitted along the line mainly by the fields in the dielectric, the conductors merely acting as guides.  
The four examples of transmission lines shown in Fig 1 represent the main types of line used in radio 
systems.  At frequencies higher than the metric band (which includes most radar systems) waveguides 
are used, and these will be dealt with in Volume 14, Chapter 20. 
4. 
Open Twin Wire Feeder.  The open twin wire feeder consists of two parallel wires spaced a small 
λ
fraction of a wavelength apart (less than 
).  The magnetic fields around the two conductors tend to 
10
cancel, and losses due to radiation are kept to a minimum.  It has the following properties: 
a. 
Advantages
(1) 
High  transmitter  power  outputs  can  be  handled without danger of breakdown of the air 
dielectric. 
(2) 
Standing waves (see paras 10 and 11) can be easily measured. 
(3) 
Maintenance of the line is relatively simple. 
(4) 
The  line  is  balanced;  that  is,  the  impedance  between  wire  and  earth  is  the  same  for 
each wire.  This is an important property when considering matching the line to the load. 
b. 
Limitations
(1) 
It is bulky and rigid and can be used only on static installations. 
(2) 
At  very  high  frequencies,  the  spacing  becomes  so  small  that,  if  high  powers  are  being 
handled, there is a danger of 'flashover' between the wires.  The upper frequency limit for high 
power installations is about 100 MHz. 
(3) 
It must be kept clear of the ground and walls. 
(4) 
Radiation losses limit the upper frequency to about 400 MHz.  In practice, twin feeders 
cannot be used above 200 MHz. 
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
c.
Applications.  It is the type of line invariably used for feeding balanced aerials for the HF band.  
It is usually run about 3 m above the ground and supported on insulators at intervals of 70 to 100 ft. 
14-18 Fig 1 Types of Tranmission Line 
a  Open Twin Feeder
b  Coaxial Cable
Plastic Insulation
Low Loss
Dielectric Spacers
Polyethylene
Dielectric
Copper Wire
Outer Conductor
Braided Copper
Copper Wire
Inner Conductor
c  Shielded Pair
d  Strip Feeder
Twin 
Wires
Plastic Insulation
Insulation
Copper
Braid Screen
Twin Copper
Conductors
Polyethylene
Dielectric
5. 
Coaxial  Cable.    Coaxial  cable  is  a  concentric  type  of  twin  wire  transmission  line.    The  inner 
conductor  is  held  in  the  correct  position  relative  to  the  outer  conductor  (braiding)  by  the  use  of 
insulating  washers,  spaced  along  the  line  at  frequent  intervals,  or  by  completely  filling  the  space 
between  the  conductors  with  a  low-loss  dielectric,  eg  polyethylene.    Compared  with  the  open  wire 
feeder, its properties are: 
a. 
Advantages
(1) 
The coaxial line is a screened cable.  The fields are confined within the space between the 
inner conductor and braiding.  Since the braiding may be earthed, negligible energy from the outside 
will penetrate into the cable circuit; there is also little radiation from the cable. 
(2) 
It is flexible and compact and can be buried in the ground. 
(3) 
It can be used at higher frequencies than open wire line since losses due to radiation are 
negligible. 
b. 
Limitations
(1) 
 Power handling capabilities are less than those of an open wire feeder. 
(2) 
 It  is  an  unbalanced  line; this introduces additional problems when matching the line to 
the load. 
(3) 
 Although  it  can  be  operated  at  higher  frequencies  than  twin  wire  lines,  it  is  subject  to 
skin  effect  and  dielectric  losses  which  can  cause  a  half  power  loss  (3  dB)  at  3,000  MHz,  in 
three metres of line. 
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
c.
Applications.  It is widely used for radio and radar purposes up to frequencies of the order 
of 3,000 MHz though waveguides tend to be used over about 1,000 MHz. 
6. 
Shielded  Pair.    The  shielded  pair  (or  screened  twin  wire  feeder) consists of two parallel conductors, 
mounted in a flexible braid screen, suitably insulated from each other and the screen by polyethylene.  The 
metal  braiding  surrounding  the  polyethylene  acts  solely  as  a  screen.    In  this  way,  the  advantages  of  the 
coaxial  feeder  are  combined  with  one  advantage  of  the  open  wire  feeder.    The  shielded  pair  is  thus  a 
screened  and  flexible  line  as  well  as  being  balanced.    However,  its  power  handling  capacity  is  relatively 
small,  and  it  has  higher  power  losses  for  a  given  size  and  weight  compared  with  coaxial  cable.    It  is, 
therefore, used only for special applications where a balanced line is required. 
7. 
Strip Feeder.  The strip feeder consists of two conductors mounted along the edges of a strip of 
insulating  material.    It  is  extremely  flexible  but  has  a  relatively  small  power  carrying  capacity.  
Therefore,  it  is  usually  used  only  for  receiving  systems.    It  also  has  applications  in  modern  radar 
systems,  in  printed  circuit  form,  in  connection  with  microwave  filters,  receiver  heads,  printed  aerial 
arrays and miniaturized microwave assemblies. 
Characteristic Impedance 
8. 
The ratio of voltage to current, measured at intervals along a transmission line of infinite length, is 
found to be a constant, as shown in Fig 2.  This ratio is known as the characteristic impedance (Z0) of 
the line.  It is a complex quantity, but at very high frequencies the characteristic impedence is a pure 
resistance given by: 
L
Z =
ohms
0
C
where L = inductance per unit length, and C = capacitance per unit length. 
14-18 Fig 2 Variation of Voltage and Current with Line Length 
Ratio of Voltage to
Current is Constant
i.e. Constant Impedance
t
n
rre
u
C
d
n
a
e
g
lta
o
Line Voltage
V
e
in
L
Line Current
0
To Infinity
Line Length
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
9. 
Instead of using inductance and capacitance per unit length to calculate Z0, it is possible to use 
the physical dimensions of the line as follows: 
a. 
Twin Feeder
276
D
Z =
log
0
10
k
r
where   D = distance between the centres of the wires, r = radius of wire, 
 
k = relative permittivity of dielectric (1 for air). 
b. 
Coaxial Cable
138
b
Z =
log
0
10
k
a
where   a = radius of inner conductor, b = inner radius of outer conductor. 
Standing Waves 
10.  Although  an  infinitely  long  line  is  a  physical  impossibility,  it  is  possible  to  get  the  characteristics  of 
such a line to exist in a finite length if the practical limit is terminated in a resistance equal to the Z0, of the 
line.  If a transmission line is terminated in a resistance which is not equal to Z0, the load cannot absorb 
all  the  energy  being  sent  down the line and some of the energy will be reflected back to the generator.  
Although  there  are  an  infinite  number  of  mismatch  conditions,  only  the  two  extremes,  open  and  short 
circuit,  need  be  considered.    Neither  of  these  is  capable  of  absorbing  any  energy,  and  so  the  incident 
wave is totally reflected.  In order to reverse the direction of travel of an electromagnetic wave, only one 
component’s  direction  should  be  reversed.    In  the  case  of  a  short  circuit  it  is  the  electric  field  (voltage) 
component that is reversed, or phase shifted by 180º, whereas, for an open circuit, it is the magnetic field 
(current) component that is phase shifted by 180º.  Thus, at a short circuit, incident and reflected electric 
fields cancel out to give a zero electric field, and incident and reflected magnetic fields reinforce to give a 
maximum magnetic field.  The converse applies to the open circuit. 
11.  The  Standing  Wave.    The  resultant  voltage  distribution  produced  by  the  combination  of  the 
incident  and  reflected  voltage  waves  is  referred  to  as  a  standing  wave.    The  positions  of  its  maxima 
and  minima  on  the  line  are  fixed,  and  it  rises  and  falls  sinusoidally  about  these  fixed  positions.    The 
distance  between  an  adjacent  maximum  (anti-node)  and  minimum  (node)  is  a  quarter  wavelength.  
Voltage nodes coincide with current anti-nodes, and voltage anti-nodes with current nodes. 
12.  The Standing Wave Ratio (SWR).  The range of variation between the maximum and minimum 
values  of  standing  wave  current  or  voltage  gives  an  indication  of  the  degree  of  mismatch,  and  is 
usually expressed in terms of the standing wave ratio as follows: 
Emax
Imax
SWR =
or
E
I
min
min
where E max etc are rms values indicated by a meter. 
13.  The  Effect  of  Line  Termination.    Fig  3  shows  the  effect  of  different  line  terminations  on  the 
standing wave ratio.  When the line is correctly terminated in a resistive impedance equal to Z0, there 
is  no  standing  wave,  Emax  equals  Emin  and  the  SWR  is  unity  (Fig  3a).    With  a  slight  mismatch 
(R slightly less or slightly more than Z0), the reflected wave is small, Emax is only slightly greater than 
Emin  and  the  SWR  is  slightly  greater  than  unity  (Fig  3b).    As  the  degree of mismatch increases, the 
SWR  increases,  and  for  the  short-circuited  (Fig  3c)  or  open-circuited  (Fig  3d)  transmission  line,  the 
SWR is Emax/0 = infinity. 
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
14-18 Fig 3 Effect of Termination on Standing Wave Ratio 
Input
Emax
RMS
~
SWR =
= I
R = Z0
E
Volts
min
Emax
Emin
0
Line Length
a
Input
Emax
RMS
~
SWR =
I

Z0
E
Volts
min
Emax
Emin
0
Line Length
b
Input
Emax
Short
RMS
~
SWR =
= ∞ 
E
Circuit
Volts
E
min
max
0
Line Length
c
Emax
Open
Input
RMS
~
SWR =
= ∞ 
E
Circuit
Volts
min
Emax
0
Line Length
d
Input Impedance 
14.  For a correctly terminated line, the input impedance is constant, no matter what the length of the 
line, and is equal to Z0.  With a mismatched line, however, the input impedance varies with length.  Fig 
4  shows  a  short-circuited  line,  in  which  the  impedance  varies  from  minimum  at  the  short  circuit 
(corresponding  to  a  series-tuned  circuit  at  resonance),  through  a  region  of  increasing  inductive 
reactance  to  a  maximum  (corresponding  to  a  parallel  tuned  circuit  at  reasonance)  a  quarter 
wavelength  from the short circuit, and then through a region of decreasing capacitive reactance, to a 
minimum again at the half-wavelength point.  A short length of open or short-circuited line is, therefore, 
a  most  versatile  component,  and  can  act  as  inductor,  capacitor,  rejector  circuit  or  acceptor  circuit, 
depending on its length. 
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
14-18 Fig 4 Input Impedance along a Short-circuited Line 
E
To Generator
Shorted
I
λ4
λ 2
3 λ
4
λ
Matching 
15.  Where  a  load  does  not  match  the  line  directly,  a  short  piece  of  suitable  line  can  be  used  as  an 
impedance  matching  device.    It  can  be  shown  that  a  quarter  wavelength  of  line  impedance  ZT  will 
match a load ZL to the main transmission line of impedance Z0 when: 
Z =
Z Z
T
0
L
The  impedance  (ZT)  required  for  this  quarter  wave  transformer  is  achieved  by  either  varying  the 
diameter of its conductors, or, more commonly, by varying their distance apart. 
16.  Stub Matching.  Where the load is reactive as well as resistive, the reactive component may be 
cancelled by a short-circuited line of equal but opposite reactance.  This is termed 'stub matching' and 
may be used, either alone, or in conjuction with a quarter wave transformer. 
Transmission Line Losses 
17.  In  their  primary  role  as  carriers  of  energy,  transmission  lines  are  subject  to  a  number  of  losses.  
The most important of these are: 
a. 
Radiation loss. 
b. 
Skin effect loss. 
c. 
Dielectric loss. 
18.  Radiation  Loss.    Radiation  loss  affects  twin  feeders.    The  electromagnetic  waves  are  merely 
guided by the line in the insulating medium surrounding it, and there is thus a tendency for the waves to 
escape into space.  This is desirable in an aerial, but not in a transmission line.  The fields of the wave 
may  also  induce  currents  in  nearby  conductors,  providing  another  source  of  loss.    The  seriousness  of 
radiation loss depends on the spacing between the waves in terms of the wavelength (the spacing should 
be less than λ/10), and the use of twin feeder is restricted to frequencies below about 400 MHz, or lower if 
the line has to carry high power.  Radiation loss does not affect coaxial line since the waves are contained 
within a closed reflecting surface and are thus unable to escape.  Coaxial line may be used up to about 
3,000 MHz and is limited in its use by skin effect and dielectric losses.  These two losses also affect twin 
feeders, but are overshadowed in their effect by radiation loss. 
19.  Skin Effect.  Skin effect loss is basically a resistive loss (i.e. ohmic heating).  The resistance of a 
conductor to alternating current increases with increasing frequency, since the current is caused to flow 
in  a  progressively  decreasing  depth  of  the  conductor  as  a  result  of  the  magnetic  fields  set  up  by  the 
currents.  Thus, at frequencies of about 1 GHz, a thin-walled hollow tube has the same resistance as a 
solid  tube  of  the  same  diameter.    The  effective  increase  of  resistance  is  more  marked  for  small 
diameter conductors than for large diameter ones. 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-18 - Transmission Lines 
20.  Dielectric Loss.  Dielectric loss arises partly from conduction currents, ie imperfect insulators, and 
partly  from  dielectric  hysteresis.    Dielectric  hysteresis  is  the  electrical  equivalent  of  magnetic  hysteresis 
and  is  a  lag  in  electric  flux  behind  the  applied  electric  field.    If  the  field is alternating, there is a heating 
effect in the insulator similar to the heating of a ferromagnetic material to which an alternating magnetic 
field is applied.  Reduction of dielectric loss may be accomplished in one of two ways: 
a.
Improving  the  Dielectric.    The  best  dielectric  is  air,  and  air-spaced,  or  semi-air-spaced, 
lines  are  extensively  employed.    If  large  powers  are  to  be  handled,  this  may  pose  technical 
problems since the spacing between lines affects the radiation loss (see para 18). 
b.
Reducing the Volume of Dielectric.  Reducing the volume of dielectric reduces the power 
handling capacity of the line and also increases the skin effect losses. 
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
CHAPTER 19 - AERIALS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  purpose  of  an  aerial  is  to  act  as  a  transducer  between  free-space  propagation  and  guided-
wave  (transmission  line)  propagation.    A  transmitting  aerial  converts  the  electrical  signals  from  a 
transmitter (wireless or radar) into an electromagnetic wave, which then radiates from it.  A receiving 
aerial  intercepts  this  wave  and  converts  it  back  into  electrical  signals  that  can  be  amplified  and 
decoded by a receiver. 
2. 
In  this  chapter  aerials  will,  in  the  main,  be  considered  as  radiating  elements,  however,  the 
properties of a transmitting aerial apply equally well to a receiving aerial.  This law of reciprocity means 
that  many  installations  can  use,  in  conjunction  with  suitable  switching,  a  common  aerial  for 
transmission and reception. 
3. 
Aerials  used  at  centimetric  wavelengths  (microwaves)  are  dealt  with  as  a  separate  subject  in 
Volume 14, Chapter 20. 
Properties of Electromagnetic Waves 
4. 
An  electromagnetic  (em)  wave  consists  of  mutually  sustaining  and  moving  electric  (E)  and 
magnetic (H) fields which are at right-angles to the direction of propagation, ie it is a transverse wave.  
The E and H fields are always at right-angles to each other in space as well as being at right-angles to 
the direction of propagation. 
5. 
At  any  point  in  space  the  E  and  H  fields  are  in  phase  with  one  another,  and  their  variation  as  a 
function of distance in the direction of propagation is as shown in Fig 1.  The velocity of propagation is 
186,240 miles/sec, or 3 × 108 metres/sec. 
6. 
The ratio of E/H is a constant of 377 ohms, and is known as the impedance of free space. 
14-19 Fig 1 Electromagnetic Waves 
x
E
H
0
z
H
y
E
Polarization 
7. 
The  polarization  of  an  electromagnetic  wave  is  defined  as  the  orientation  of  the  E  field.    This  is 
convenient because the electric component is in the same plane as the linear radiating element of the 
aerial.    Thus,  a  simple  linear  radiator  orientated  horizontally  with  respect  to  the  earth  will  emit 
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
horizontally polarized waves.  It is for this reason that aerials are often referred to as being horizontally 
or vertically polarized. 
8. 
There  are,  however,  certain  types  of  aerial  which  emit  a  circularly  or  elliptically  polarized  wave.  
Under  these  conditions  the  directions  of  the  E  and  H  fields  are  not  constant  but  rotate  round  the 
direction  of  propagation  with  constant  amplitude,  in  the  case  of  circularly  polarized  waves,  and  with 
varying amplitude in the case of elliptically polarized waves. 
The Half-wave Dipole 
9. 
A simple transmitting aerial is a conductor, usually a wire, which is designed to radiate em waves as 
efficiently  as  possible.    The  simplest  form  of  aerial  is  a  half-wave  dipole.    This  is  a  wire  which  is  a 
half-wavelength long at the frequency of the current being carried by the wire, if the frequency is 30 MHz (10 
metres wavelength), a half-wave dipole for use at this frequency will be 5 metres long. 
10.  A half-wave dipole can be shown to work by comparing it with a quarter-wave section of open-circuited 
transmission line.  Fig 2 shows that such a section may be considered as a series resonant circuit; it has a 
low  input  impedance  and  the  current  at  resonance  is  maximum  with  the  impedance  at  a  minimum.    The 
current and voltage distribution along the stub is shown in Fig 2a; note that the stub length is measured from 
the open-circuited end.  The positions of maximum magnetic field (equivalent to inductance) and maximum 
electric field (equivalent to capacitance) are shown in Fig 2b. 
11.  The  magnetic  fields  around  the  two  conductors  are  caused  by  currents  flowing  in  opposite 
directions.  In the space between the conductors these fields reinforce each other, but away from the 
conductors the fields cancel; thus very little radiation occurs. 
12.  However, if the lines are opened out as shown in Figs 3b and c, the currents in the two conductors flow 
in the same direction and have a maximum value at the centre falling to a minimum value at the ends.  There 
is  now  an  open  oscillatory  circuit  and  em  waves  are  radiated  into  space.    This  is  the  dipole  aerial.    The 
standing waves of voltage and current along the dipole are shown in Fig 3c.  As the aerial is vertical the axes 
of the graph have moved through 90° compared with those of Fig 2a. 
14-19 Fig 2 Open Circuited Stub as a Series Resonant Circuit 
a
b
c
I
V
H Field = L

L
λ
O
4
λ 4


C
V
I
E Field = C
λ
Length
4
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 3 Development of a Dipole 
a
b
c
V
I
I
I


λ 2

λ 4
Aerial Matching 
13.  In  transferring  energy  to  the  surrounding  space  in  the  form  of  electromagnetic  radiation  an 
aerial  converts  energy  from  one  form  to  another  just  as  a  resistor  converts  electrical  energy  into 
heat energy when a current flows through it.  The radiation resistance of an aerial is defined as that 
resistance  which,  when  connected  in  place  of  the  aerial,  would  dissipate  the  same  power.    For  a 
half-wave dipole the radiation resistance is approximately constant at 73 ohms.  In order  to  achieve 
maximum  transfer  of  power  to  the aerial, the characteristic impedance of the transmission line must 
be  matched  to  the  input  impedance  of  the  aerial  (for  an  aerial  at  the  resonant  length  the  input 
impedance is equal to the radiation resistance) and a number of devices, such as the Delta match, are 
available  for  doing  this.    In  the  Delta  match,  two  points  on  the  dipole  are  found  where  the  aerial 
impedance matches that of the twin feeder transmission line at the point of connection.  As the voltage 
between  these  two  points  on  the  dipole  is  practically  zero,  the  centre  of  the  aerial  can  be  made 
continuous.    The  twin  feeder  transmission  line  is opened out to fan the delta.  Radiation occurs from 
the delta which upsets the radiation pattern and reduces aerial efficiency. 
Directional Properties of Aerials 
14.  Aerials do not in general radiate isotropically, ie radiate fields of equal intensities in all directions.  
In the great majority of cases it is desirable to concentrate power in certain directions and to minimize it 
in others.  An important aspect of aerial design concerns the means of distributing (or receiving) power 
via  the  aerial  in  such  a  way  that  the  performance  of  a  particular  communications  system  shall  be 
optimized, eg long distance point-to-point communication by HF skywave. 
15.  The directional properties of aerials may be expressed either in terms of power gain or in terms of 
angular concentration.  The two methods express different aspects of the same property, gain being of 
primary  significance  when  considering  the  transmission  and  reception  of  power,  and  angular 
concentration  or  beamwidth  being  significant  in  applications  where  direction-defining  properties  are 
involved, eg radio direction finding and radar. 
a.
Gain.  The power gain of an aerial is normally defined as the ratio of the power it radiates in 
the direction of maximum concentration to that which would have been radiated from an isotropic 
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
source fed into equal power.  (More generally, aerial gain may be referred to any defined direction 
and hence may be greater or less than unity.  By definition, the mean gain of any aerial is unity.) 
Aerial  gain  is  usually  expressed  in  decibels  but  in  calculations  involving  the  communications  or 
radar equations the power ratio must be used. 
b.
Beamwidth.    The  beamwidth  of  an  aerial  is  defined  as  being  the  angle  between  the  two 
directions in which the power radiated is one-half the power radiated in the direction of maximum 
concentration.    The  plane  to  which  the  measurement  relates  must  be  defined.    Referred  to  field 
strength, beamwidth is the angle between the directions where the signal is 0.707, ie 1/ 2  of the 
maximum, since power is proportional to the square of field strength. 
16.  Radiation  Patterns.    To  portray  the  directional  characteristics  of  an  aerial,  graphs  of  relative 
power (or field strength)  as a function of angle are plotted.  Polar coordinates are normally used but 
for highly directional aerials it is difficult to interpret a narrow diagram and cartesian coordinates are 
used.  The two types of radiation pattern graph for an aerial having a beamwidth of 33º are shown in 
Fig  4.    To  describe  the  directional  properties  fully  it  is  necessary  to  portray  the  radiation  pattern  in 
two  orthogonal  planes.    The  radiation  pattern  of  a  dipole,  shown  in  Fig  5,  is  omni-directional  in  a 
plane at right angles to its axis and has a beamwidth of 78º in any plane containing its axis.  In most 
directional aerials the beam has an axis as opposed to a plane, and in radar aerials the beamwidths 
in orthogonal planes may sometimes be as small as 0.5º. 
14-19 Fig 4 Radiation Patterns in Polar and Cartesian Coordinates 
Beam Width
Beam Width
0
1.0
30
30
1.0
.8
.8
.6
r
e
w
.6
o .4
 P
Relativ e .4
tive
Power
la .2
e
R
.2
30
20
10
0
10
20
30
A ngular D isplacement (Degrees)
14-19 Fig 5 Field Strength Polar Diagrams of a Half-wave Dipole 
78°
Ae
Ae
17.  Directional  Arrays.    The  dipole,  which  has  an  approximately  omni-directional  pattern,  may  be 
adapted in a number of ways to obtain directional properties.  This may be achieved by the addition of 
parasitic elements, or by the combination of a number of driven dipoles. 
a. 
Arrays  with  Parasitic  Elements.    Parasitic  elements  are  conducting  rods  placed  near  a 
driven dipole.  The transmitted energy of the dipole induces a current flow in the parasitic element, 
which  then  re-radiates  the  energy.    By  adjusting  the  lengths  and  spacings  of  the  parasitic 
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
elements,  either  cancellation  or  reinforcement  may  be  obtained  in  a  given  direction.    There  are 
two  types  of  parasitic  element,  the  reflector  and  the  director.    The  reflector’s  length  is  slightly 
λ
greater than 
 and when placed at the correct distance from the dipole the reflector cancels the 
2
radiation in a direction from the dipole to the reflector, but reinforces the radiation in the opposite 
λ
direction.  Directors are slightly shorter than 
 in length and are placed, relative to the direction of 
2
maximum  radiation,  in  front  of  the  dipole.    The  most  common  aerial  array  having  parasitic 
elements is the Yagi array which is formed from a driven dipole with at least one reflector and one 
director.    The  beamwidths  in  the  two  orthogonal  planes  are  comparable,  and  by  the  use  of 
additional directors (normally up to a maximum of about five) beamwidths down to about 30° may 
λ
be achieved in both planes.  The spacing of the elements is theoretically about 
 but in practice 
4
is between 0.1λ and 0.15λ.  The presence of parasitic elements reduces the radiation resistance 
of the dipole, and since this is undesirable because of matching problems, the dipole is usually of 
the  ‘folded’  type  whose  radiation  resistance  is  higher  than  that  of  a  single  dipole,  and  so  the 
overall radiation resistance is maintained at an acceptable level for convenient matching.  A Yagi 
array with a folded dipole is shown in Fig 6a and its polar diagram in Fig 6b. 
14-19 Fig 6 Yagi Array with its Polar Diagram 
6a  Array
6b  Horizontal Polar Diagram
Reflector
Direc tors
Minor Lobes
For ward
Dir ection
Aer ial
b.
Multiple Driven Arrays.  Directional arrays are often used at HF and above.  They have two 
or more driven elements instead of parasitic elements.  Some examples of multi-driven arrays and 
their characteristics are given in Fig 7.  In the broadside array the spacing between the elements 
is  half  a  wavelength  with  the  result  that  the  phases  add  in  directions  at  right  angles  to  the  array 
and cancel in directions parallel to the array.  The broadside array can be made to radiate in one 
direction only by placing parasitic reflectors a quarter of a wavelength behind the driven elements.  
Such  arrays  give  direction  only  in  the  plane  of  the  array.    It  is  often  desirable  to  have  an  array 
which  possesses  directional  properties  in  both  the  horizontal  and  vertical  planes.    This  can  be 
achieved  by  stacking  a  number  of  broadside  arrays  one  above  the  other.    This  was  a  common 
technique in early metric radars and is the basis of modern electronically-steered aerials.  In the 
'end  fire'    array,  the  elements  are  spaced  a  quarter  of  a  wavelength  apart  and  are  fed  in  phase 
quadrature.  This causes the phases to add in one direction only. 
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 7 Characteristics of Driven Arrays 
TYPE  OF ARR AY
POL AR DIA GRAM ( PD)
CHA RACTE RISTIC S
Aerials fed in  Phase  and
spaced λ
Horizontal
2
PD
a  Linear Broadside Array (Plan View)
Aerials fed in  Phase.
Horizontal
Reflectors spaced λ behind Aerials
PD
4
b  Linear B roadside Array 
with Reflectors (Plan View)

Aerials fed 90° Phase 
Lagging and spaced λ
4
Ho rizontal PD
c  End Fire Array (Plan View)
h
Aerials fed in  Phase
and s paced λ Vertica l y
2
Vertical PD
d  Stacked Array (Side View)
18.  Travelling Wave Aerials.  The aerials so far considered in these notes have been standing wave 
(or resonant) aerials, on which the combination of incident and reflected waves forms standing waves.  
If the wire forming the aerial is terminated in a resistor equal in value to the characteristic impedance of 
the  wire,  then  there  will  be  no  reflected  energy  and  the  only  waves  on  the  wire  will  be  the  incident 
waves moving towards the termination.  These waves are called travelling waves and give this family of 
aerials  its  name.    Travelling  wave  aerials  are  simple  to  construct  and  service,  they  possess  good 
directional  properties  and,  being  non-resonant,  can  be  used  over  a  wide  band  of frequencies without 
being  retuned.    This  is  of  considerable  advantage  when  the  system  employs  the  sky  wave  and  is 
required  to  operate  on  several  widely  spaced  frequencies  during  day  and  night.    The  most  common 
travelling  wave  aerial  is  the  ‘rhombic’    which  is  widely  used  by  ground  stations  for  transmitting  and 
receiving at HF.  It consists of four wires forming a diamond or rhombus shape in the horizontal plane, 
as shown in Fig 8.  It has a very wide bandwidth and a high gain.  The direction of maximum gain is 
along  the  major  axis  of  the  rhombus  towards  the  terminating  resistor.    The  exact  shape  of  both  the 
vertical and the horizontal polar diagrams is determined by the leg length (l), the tilt angle (θ) and the 
height  of  the  aerial  above  the  ground  (h).    For  example,  as  leg  length  increases,  the  beamwidth 
narrows and the angle of elevation decreases. 
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 8 The Rhombic Aerial 
a Isometric View
b Plan View
B
B
A
R = Z
C
0
Input
A
C
R = Z
Input
0
D
θ
h
D
c Polar Diagram
Aerial Aperture 
19.  A useful aerial parameter, which is related to gain, is the aerial receiving aperture.  Aperture may 
be  regarded  as  the  effective  area  presented  by  a  receiving  aerial  to  the  incident  wave.    The  basic 
relationship between gain (G) and aperture (A) can be expressed as: 
G

= Constant = 2
A
λ
For  a  half-wave  dipole,  which  has  a  gain  of  1.635,  the  effective  receiving  aperture  is  approximately 
2
λ
equal to 

8
Image Aerials 
20.  In  the  basic  description  of  aerials  it  is  assumed  that  the  aerials  have  always  been  placed  so  far 
above the earth’s surface that any reflected energy from the surface (due to the original radiation from 
the aerial) is negligible.  In practice aerials are seldom so far above the earth’s surface, or the skin of 
an aircraft, and the actual directional characteristics exhibited are due to the vector summation of the 
direct and the reflected waves. 
21.  For  the  purpose  of  calculation,  it  is  convenient  to  consider  that  the  reflected  wave  is  generated, 
not by reflection, but by an 'image' aerial located below the surface of the earth.  The image aerial is so 
chosen  that  the  joint  action  of  the  actual  aerial  and  its  image  produces  the  same  conditions  in  the 
space above the earth as exists with the actual aerial in the presence of the earth. 
22.  If  the  earth  is  considered  to  have  a  reflection  coefficient  of  approximately  unity,  together  with  a 
180° phase change, then the currents in the corresponding parts of the actual and image aerials are of 
the same magnitude. 
Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
VLF and LF Aerials 
23.  The major problem encountered in the design of aerials for operation in the VLF and LF bands is 
the  physical  size  of  the  elements  involved.    For  example,  at  100  kHz  the  wavelength  is  3  km  (nearly 
10,000  ft)  and  so  a  half-wave  dipole  is  out  of  the  question.    The  Marconi  aerial  consists  of  a  single 
conductor  a  quarter-wavelength  long.    It  is  mounted  vertically  and  the  transmission  line  is  connected 
between its lower end and the Earth.  The Earth, acting as a reflecting surface, creates an image of the 
aerial  and  the  whole  system  behaves  as  if  it  were  a  half-wave  dipole.    The  conductivity  of  the  Earth 
surrounding a Marconi aerial must be high and if, as in the case of dry sandy soil, this is not so, then a 
metal mesh round the base of the aerial, called a counter-poise, is necessary.  The polar diagrams for 
this type of aerial are shown in Fig 9.  It should be noted that the radiation resistance is about half that 
of a half-wave dipole, i.e. about 36 ohms. 
14-19 Fig 9 Marconi Quarter-wave Aerial 
Aeri al
V
λ4
Horizont al Polar
Image
Aerial
Aerial
Vertical Polar
24.  The Marconi aerial is not the complete answer however at VLF and LF since structural problems 
restrict heights in general to about 300 ft.  Masts for aerials operating in these bands can therefore be 
only  a  fraction  of  a  wavelength  high  and  the  efficiency  of  the  aerials  is  correspondingly  low.  
Furthermore,  directional  arrays  would  requir  massive  structures  and  so  omni-directional  systems  are 
generally used at these frequencies. 
25.  One  method  of  increasing  the  radiation  without  increasing  the  mast  height  is  shown  in  Fig  10.  
The current distribution for an aerial of height h is shown at a.  By connecting a horizontal wire to the 
top  of  the  aerial,  the  current  distribution  in  the  vertical  (and  most  important)  portion  is  as  shown  at  b 
and  the  'effective'  height  is  thereby  increased.    This  L  aerial  is  very  common  at  VLF  and  LF.    A 
variation, known as the T aerial, is shown at c. 
Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 10 VLF and LF Aerials 
a  Vertical Aerial
b  Inverted L Aerial
c  T Aerial
h
Input
Input
Input
MF Aerials 
26.  At  the  lower  end  of  the  MF  band  the  techniques  employed  at  VLF  and  LF  have  to  be  used.  
Towards  the  upper  end  of  the  band,  aerials  half  a  wavelength  long  can  be  used.    Fig  11  shows  a 
typical  half-wave  vertical  MF  aerial.    It  is  insulated  at its base and energized with respect to an earth 
conductor system.  The current at the base is therefore small and ground losses are low.  The radiation 
resistance  is  high  compared  with  the  total  loss  resistance  and  so  a  high  efficiency  is  obtained.    The 
physical height of the aerial can be reduced by 5 to 10%, without affecting the radiation pattern to any 
marked degree, by the addition of a capacitance 'hat' on the top of the aerial. 
14-19 Fig 11 Half-wave Vertical MF Aerial 
a
b
HF Aerials 
27.  Communication  in  the  band  of  frequencies  between  3  and  30  MHz  generally  employs  sky  wave 
propagation.    At  the  lower  end  of  the  band  the  simplest  form  of  aerial  used  by  ground  stations  is  the 
horizontal half-wave dipole shown in Fig 12.  It is rigged between two support masts and uses the Earth 
as a reflector.  Maximum gain is obtained at high angles of elevation and no ground wave is present.  This 
aerial is thus suitable for ionospheric communication using horizontally polarized waves. 
Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 12 Horizontal Centre-fed Half-wave Dipole for HF 
28.  In the HF band, increased ranges can be obtained by using highly directional arrays with the main 
beam directed at a shallow angle to the ionosphere.  Rhombic and multi-drive arrays are used for this 
purpose.    An  example  of  the  latter  is  the  curtain  array  which  consists  of  pairs  of  half-wave  end-fed 
horizontal  dipoles  stacked  vertically,  the  whole  being  suspended  from  two  or  more  lattice  masts.  
Reflectors are usually suspended behind the dipoles. 
VHF and UHF Aerials 
29.  Aerials  for  use  in  the  VHF  and  UHF  bands  are  generally  made  of  hollow  aluminium  or  copper 
tubing,  and  as  the  diameter  of  the  elements  can  be  increased,  so  the  bandwidth  becomes  greater.  
Yagi  arrays  are  in  common  use  in  these  bands,  particularly  as  receiving  aerials,  but  since  the 
wavelength is relatively small, aerials which are large in terms of wavelength and which often possess 
elaborate reflecting systems can be used.  In these bands there is the problem of interference between 
the  direct  and  reflected  waves  from  the  ground,  but  this  can  be  minimized  by  placing  the  aerial  on  a 
mast at a height of several wavelengths from the ground. 
30.  Transmission  in  these  bands  is  almost  solely  by  means  of  the  space  wave  and  therefore  the 
range  depends  on  the  heights  of  the  transmitter  aerials.    Horizontal  or  vertical  polarization  can  be 
employed.  Some of the most common aerials at VHF and UHF are: 
a
Biconical  and  Discone  Aerials.    The  biconical  and  discone  aerials,  shown  in  Fig  13,  are 
widely  used  on  UHF  ground  installations  employed  on  air-to-ground  communications.    They  will 
operate  efficiently  over  the  band  for  which  the  cone  slant  length,  r,  is  between  0.25λand  λ,  thus 
giving frequency bandwidths of the order of 4:1 and greater.  The cones are sometimes made in 
the form of a wire cage to reduce weight and wind resistance. 
b.
Quarter-wave  Ground  Plane  Aerial.    As  shown  in  Fig  14,  this  aerial  consists  of  a  0.25λ
radiating  element  with  four  radial  rods  joined  to  the  outer  conductor  of  the  coaxial  feeder  and 
forming  an  artificial  earth.  The aerial gives all-round radiation in the horizontal plane, and in the 
vertical plane the angle of elevation is determined by the length of the rods. 
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 13 Wide Band UHF Aerials 
Disk
r
Input
a  Bioconical Aerial
b  Discone Aerial
14-19 Fig 14 The Quarter -wave Ground Plane Aerial 
λ4
Artificial
Earth
Co-Ax ial Cable
c. 
Turnstile Aerial.  The turnstile aerial, shown in Fig 15, gives all-round horizontally-polarized 
radiation in the horizontal plane suitable for broadcast transmission.  The beamwidth in the vertical 
plane is reduced by stacking the crossed aerials in tiers.  This increases horizontal radiation and 
decreases vertical radiation. 
14-19 Fig 15 The Turnstile Aerial 
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
d.
The Helical Aerial.  The helical aerial is of the travelling wave type.  It provides a circularly-
polarized  beam  of  radiation  which  may  be  required  in  applications  where  the  orientation  of  the 
receiving  aerial  cannot  be  controlled,  e.g.  command  guidance  link  to  a  guided  missile.    Its 
construction  is  shown  in  Fig  16.    The  diameter  of  the  helix  and  the  spacing  between  the  turns 
must be carefully chosen to obtain the required polar diagram. 
14-19 Fig 16 The Helical Aerial 
16a  Helical Aerial
16b  Polar Diagram
Reflector Disc
Co-Axial
Cable
Aircraft Aerials 
31.  LF, MF and HF.  Aerials employed on aircraft for use up to about 30 MHz are invariably restricted 
to dimensions which are shorter than one wavelength.  In older aircraft carrying HF equipment this was 
partially overcome by a trailing wire of about 50 metres in length.  An alternative is a simple wire aerial 
such  as  an  inverted  L  or  T  rigged  between  the  top  of  the  tail  fin  and  a  small  mast  near  the  cockpit.  
When used for transmitting at relatively high altitudes, these wire aerials are prone to corona troubles 
due  to  the  high  voltage  gradients  combined  with  the  low  air  pressure.    When  used  for  receiving  they 
are liable to have a high noise level due to a phenomenon known as precipitation static.  Higher aircraft 
speeds  and  the  need  to  reduce  precipitation  static  have  necessitated  the  design  of  aerials  known  as 
'suppressed aerials'.  Suppressed aerials fall into two main classes: 
a.
Concealed  Aerials.    In  many  cases  these  are  conventional  aerials  but  they  are  so 
constructed and mounted that they are concealed inside the aircraft.  Typical of these are radar 
scanners  mounted  behind  a  radome  nose  section  and  the  general  purpose  communication 
aerial  of  the  'helmet'    type  mounted  on  top  of  the  tail  fin  and  enclosed  in  a  plastic  cover.    A 
helmet aerial is shown in Fig 17. 
b
Aerials  Using  the  Aircraft  Skin.    This  type  of  suppressed  aerial  forms  a  resonant  cavity 
within the aircraft and uses the metal skin of the aircraft as the radiating element.  It may take one 
of two forms: 
(1) 
A  Notch  Aerial.    This  is  a  notch  cut  out  of  the  wing or tail and covered with insulating 
material to prevent the notch affecting the aerofoil.  The RF power from the transmitter is fed to 
both sides of the notch and the RF voltage set up across the notch causes currents to flow in 
the  outside  skin  of  the  aircraft  and  an  electromagnetic  wave  is  radiated.    The  notch  aerial  is 
shown in Fig 17. 
(2) 
A Slot Aerial.  This is a half-wave length long slot cut in the aircraft skin.  It differs from the 
notch in that the slot is resonant and functions in a manner similar to that of a half-wave dipole.  
The slot aerial is shown in Fig 17. 
Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
14-19 Fig 17 Suppressed Aerials 
a  Helmet Aerial
b  Slot Aerial
Helmet A erial
Ai rcraft Skin
Feeder
Cable
Tail Fin
Slot
Line
c  Notch Aerials
Tail
Wi ng
Notch
Notch
Aerial
Aerial
32.  VHF  and  UHF  Aerials.    Aerials  for  aircraft  use  at  VHF  and  UHF  are  generally  easier  to  design 
than  aerials  for  lower  frequencies,  simply  because  the  wavelength  is  shorter.    The  most  common 
types, with examples of their uses, are shown at Fig 18. 
14-19 Fig 18 VHF and UHF Aerials 
a  Whip Aerial
b  Rod Aerial
c  Blade Aerial
(ADF Sensing)
(VHF)
(HF and UHF)
UHF Aerial
Aerial
Aerial
Insulator
Sleeve
Insulator
Insulator
Aircraft Skin
Aircraft Skin
d  Sharks Fin Aerial
            e Towel Rail Aerial
(IFF and TACAN)
(Marker Beacon and ADF Sensing)
Aerial
Aerial
Insulator
Aircraft Skin
Broad Band Aerials 
33.  In many applications it is necessary to have an aerial system whose performance remains virtually 
constant  over  a  wide  band  of  frequencies.    Aerials  based  on  conical  shapes  have  a  tendency  to  be 
broad  banded.    The  discone  aerial  and  the  biconical  aerial  used  at  UHF  (described  in  para  30)  are 
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-19 - Aerials 
examples  of  this.    Unfortunately,  the  finite  size  of  such  aerials  introduces  end  effects  which  limit  the 
range of frequency insensitivity.  Spiral aerials (Fig 19) are used extensively in passive radar direction 
finding and semi-active missiles.  By far the most successful broad band aerial is the log-periodic type 
(Fig 20).  In the log-periodic aerial the distances between the active elements are designed to conform 
to  a  logarithmic  expansion.    Aerials  of  this  type  are  in  use  for  long distance HF communications and 
permit  transmission  with  equal  efficiency  over  the  entire  HF  spectrum.    They  thus  have  bandwidths 
(ratio  of  highest  and  lowest  frequency)  of  at  least  10:1.    Log-periodic  aerials  also  find  applications  in 
ECM and radar. 
34.  The bandwidth of an aerial is also determined by its thickness.  The thicker the aerial, the wider is 
the bandwidth. 
14-19 Fig 19 Spiral Aerials 
14-19 Fig 20 Log-periodic Aerial 
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
CHAPTER 20 - MICROWAVES 
Introduction 
1. 
Microwaves  are  a  form  of  electromagnetic  radiation  with  wavelengths  approximately  midway 
between  those  of  light  and  radio  waves,  ie  between  30 cm  and  1  mm  -  with  equivalent  frequencies 
from  1  to  300  GHz.    As  with  most  divisions  of  the  electromagnetic  spectrum,  these  boundaries  are 
somewhat arbitrary with no physical significance.  Microwaves exhibit many of the same properties as 
both  light  and  radio.    The  principle  military  applications  of  microwaves  are  in  communications  and 
radar.  In radar systems, good azimuth resolution results from a narrow beamwidth.  Short wavelengths 
mean  that  this  can  be  achieved  with  relatively  small  aerials,  which  is  especially  desirable  in  airborne 
systems.    In  communications,  the  high  frequencies  allow  high  bandwidth  signals  to  be  transmitted.  
Microwaves are typically used for satellite communications links. 
2. 
In order to utilize the microwave region of the spectrum, it is necessary to have devices which are 
capable of generating such frequencies and of amplifying them to useful power levels.  Unfortunately, 
the conventional amplifiers and oscillators fail to perform satisfactorily at frequencies above 1 GHz, and 
it  has  been  necessary  to  develop  specialized  devices  which  can  operate  at  these  frequencies.    The 
properties  of  resonant  cavities  and  the  principle  of  velocity  modulation  are  fundamental  to  an 
understanding of these devices. 
Resonant Cavities 
3. 
At  UHF,  a  short-circuited  section  of  transmission  line,  called  a  'lecher  bar',  may  be  used  as  the 
tuned  circuit  of  an  oscillator.    Fig  1a  shows  the  instantaneous  electric  and  magnetic  fields  and  the 
current in an oscillating lecher bar.  The directions of the current and the fields change each half cycle.  
The  relationship  between  the  resonant  frequency  (f0),  the  inductance  (L),  and  the  capacitance  (C)  is 
given by: 
1
f ∝
0
LC
If several lecher bars are connected in parallel (Fig 1b), the inductance is reduced by the same amount 
as the capacitance is increased; thus, the resonant frequency remains the same as for a single lecher 
bar.    The  total  resistance  is,  however,  decreased.    If  an  infinite  number  of  lecher  bars  are  placed  in 
parallel,  a  hollow  cylinder  or  cavity  is  formed  (Fig  1c).    Little  radiation  can  occur  and,  as  the  skin 
resistance is small, total losses are small. 
4. 
The internal diameter of the cavity, which should be approximately half a wavelength, determines 
its  resonant  frequency.    At  centimetric  wavelengths,  the  cavity  dimensions  are  small  enough  for  it  to 
form an integral part of an amplifier or oscillator. 
5. 
The  instantaneous  electric  (E)  and  magnetic  (H)  lines  of  force  present  when  a  lecher  bar  oscillates 
alternate at a high frequency.  The E lines may be associated with the circuit capacitance and the H lines 
with the circuit inductance.  In a resonant cavity formed from an infinite number of lecher bars, the individual 
H  lines  round  each  lecher  bar  combine  as  in  a  solenoid  and  form  closed  loops,  strongest  around  the 
circumference of the cavity and weakening to zero at the cavity centre.  This H field always lies parallel to the 
cavity walls.  The E lines combine to form a strong E field at the centre of the cavity, decreasing to zero at the 
cavity walls.  During each half cycle the E field builds up to a maximum at the instant that the H field falls to 
Page 1 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
zero.  During the next half cycle the opposite happens, i.e. the E and H fields are 90º out of phase, as are the 
energies associated with the capacitance and inductance of a conventional tuned circuit. 
14-20 Fig 1 Development of a Resonant Cavity 
a  Lecher Bar
b  Several Lecher Bars in Parallel
H Fields
1
E Fields
H Field
λ
E Field
4
+
+
+
+
1
1
λ
λ
4
4
c  Resonant Cavity
d  Fields and Walls Current
inside a Resonant Cavity
Approx 1 2λ
Wall Current
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
6. 
The  fields  shown  in  the  cavity  cross-section  of  Fig  1d  are  the  fields  at  one  instant  of  time.    The 
electromagnetic  energy  in  the  cavity  is  oscillating  at  the  cavity  resonant  frequency,  the  E  and  H  fields 
changing  direction  every  half  cycle.    The  changing  H  field  induces  voltages  in  the  cavity  walls  which 
produce wall currents.  These wall currents are of the same frequency as, and always flow at right angles 
to, the H field.  Due to skin effect, the currents flow only on the inner surfaces of the cavity and the outer 
surfaces can therefore be earthed without affecting the cavity operation. 
7. 
A  resonant  cavity  need  not  be  cylindrical.    Depending  on  the  function  of  the  cavity,  it  may  be 
rectangular,  spherical,  or  a  modified  cylindrical  shape.    In  these  cases,  the  field  pattern  (or  'mode'), 
which is formed inside the cavity when it is excited into oscillation, will differ from that shown in Fig 1d.  
Nevertheless, the E field will always be zero at the cavity walls, and the E and H fields will always be at 
right angles to each other and 90º out of phase. 
8. 
Some  common  cavity  modes  are  shown  in  Fig  2;the  rhumbatron  cavity  (Fig  2c)  forms  the 
resonant cavity in the klystron.  Electrons are passed through holes in the roof and floor of the cavity 
and, in order that the transit time of the electrons passing through the E field is short, the shape of the 
cavity is modified from a simple cylindrical shape, as shown. 
Page 2 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
14-20 Fig 2 Common Cavity Models 
a  Cylinder
b  Cube
c  Rhumbatron Cross Section
H Field
H Fields
E Field
E Fields
Velocity Modulation 
9. 
In a conventional amplifier, the device current is modulated in response to changes in the voltage 
existing  in  the  input  circuit;  thus  a  sinusoidal  input  results  in  a  device  current  that  also  varies 
sinusoidally.  By making this current pass through a resistance in the external circuit, an output may be 
obtained  which  is  identical  in  form  to,  but  larger  in  amplitude  than,  the  input.    This  amplitude 
modulation  technique  works  well  at  VHF  and  below,  but  becomes  progressively  less  effective  as 
frequency  increases,  such  that  it  is  unusable  above  about  1  GHz.    At  these  higher  frequencies,  a 
different technique called 'velocity modulation' is used. 
10.  The principle behind velocity modulation is that of varying the velocity of the individual charge carriers 
that make up the device current, rather than their numbers.  This results in bunches of charge being formed 
within the device.  Using suitable circuitry, it is possible to use the bunch formation to produce an amplified 
output in a separate circuit.  This technique is used in the klystron. 
HIGH POWER AMPLIFIERS 
The Klystron Amplifier 
11.  A  schematic  diagram  of  a  klystron  amplifier  is  shown  in  Fig  3.    An  evacuated  tube  contains  an 
electron  gun  at  one  end.    This  sends  a  narrow  beam  of  electrons  to  an  anode  collector  at  the  other 
end.  The beam passes through the narrow necks of two cavity resonators.  The first cavity is known 
as  the  'buncher',  and  it  is  at  the  same  potential  as  the  second  cavity,  the  'catcher'.    Oscillations  are 
induced in the buncher by inputting an RF signal by means of a short coaxial cable. 
14-20 Fig 3 Klystron Amplifier – Schematic 
Input
Output
Terminal
Terminal
'Buncher'
Cavity
Beam Focusing
Plates
'Catcher'
Cavity
Cathode
Collector
Electron
Bunching in
Drift Space −
+
Page 3 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
12.  The  oscillating  cavity  generates  an  alternating  electric  field  in  the  region  through  which  the  electron 
beam  must  pass;  this  field  exerts  a  force  on  the  electrons  in  the  beam.    Since  the  field  is  alternating,  it 
accelerates  electrons  passing  through  the  cavity  during  one  half  cycle,  and  decelerates  electrons  passing 
through during the other half cycle, i.e. it imposes velocity modulation.  The result of the modulation is that 
the 'fast' electrons tend to catch up with the 'slow' electrons as they pass down the tube, with the result that 
electron bunches are formed at some distance from the buncher cavity (Fig 3).  The second (catcher) cavity 
is placed so that the bunches are most pronounced just as they pass through it and, in doing so, they induce 
in it a strong oscillatory electric field, which has a polarity such as to slow down a bunch, thereby extracting 
energy from it.  Half a cycle later, the direction of the electric field across the gap has reversed, and this field 
acts  as  an  accelerator,  but  on  the  low  density,  non-bunched  portion  of  the  beam.    Thus,  many  more 
electrons are slowed down than are accelerated, and there is a net exchange of energy from the beam to the 
catcher’s output RF circuit, i.e. amplification. 
13.  Klystrons of this type are readily available at I-band and above.  The technique may also be used 
at frequencies below the microwave region.  In the frequency range of 100 to 1,000 MHz, the size of 
the  resonant  cavity  is  such  that  quite  large  gap  diameters  can  be  used,  together  with  similarly  large 
diameter electron beams; this permits high powers to be achieved. 
14.  Typically, the two-cavity klystron described achieves power gains of 10 to 15 dBs, exhibits a rather 
low  efficiency  of  about  40%  and,  in  addition,  has  a  narrow  bandwidth  (1  to  2%).    In  order  to  achieve 
better gains and efficiency, additional cavities are introduced. 
Multi-cavity Klystrons 
15.  It would, in theory, be possible to achieve higher gains by taking the output from one klystron and using 
it as the input to a second.  This technique is used, in practice, by combining the two klystrons into one tube, 
as shown in Fig 4.  The middle cavity is placed at the optimum distance from the buncher and acts as an 
additional velocity modulator.  A gain of 40 dB is typical for a three-cavity device, but even higher gains can 
be achieved by introducing further cavities.  Although, in principle, the number of cavities could be increased 
to any number, commonly either 4 or 6 cavities are used, giving gains of 50 and 110 dBs respectively, with 
efficiencies as high as 65%.  The bandwidth may be widened, to a limited extent, by tuning each cavity to a 
slightly different frequency - a technique known as 'stagger tuning'. 
14-20 Fig 4 Three-cavity Klystron Arrangement 
Input
Output
Electron
Gun
16.  Multi-cavity  klystron  amplifiers  are  available  at  frequencies  from  about  400  MHz  to  200  GHz.  
Peak powers produced range from a few kW  to about 400 MW; average powers range from a few 
mW  to  about  175  kW.    High  power  devices  are,  however,  large  and  heavy  and  are  not  suitable  for 
airborne applications.  The kinetic energy of the electrons is converted into heat when they strike the 
collector,  necessitating  water  cooling  in  some  high  power  klystron  amplifiers.    This  heat  represents 
wasted DC energy and, to improve efficiency, the collector voltage may be decreased so as to reduce 
the electrons’ kinetic energy. 
Page 4 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
17.  Beam  Focusing.    In  airborne  applications,  the  weight  of  the  device  is  important.    The  electron 
beam consists of negative charge, and repulsive forces will tend to spread the beam as it passes down the 
tube.  The traditional way of preventing this is to provide a strong axial magnetic field by using a permanent 
magnet, as shown in Fig 5.  The magnet is larger, and much heavier, than the rest of the klystron, typically 15 
kg for a 1.5 kW device operating at 10 GHz.  The use of samarium cobalt as the magnetic material is one 
way  of  reducing  this  weight  by  a  factor  of  as  much  as  7  or  8;  the  material  is,  however,  expensive.    An 
alternative is to use a technique known as periodic permanent magnetic (PPM) focusing, which replaces the 
large magnet with a number of small ones. 
14-20 Fig 5 Klystron Beam Focusing using Large Permanent Magnet 
Magnetic Shield
Soft Steel Pole Piece
Beam
Electron Gun
Permanent Magnet
The Travelling Wave Tube (TWT) 
18.  The main drawback of the klystron amplifier is its narrow bandwidth, resulting from the use of resonant 
cavities.  The travelling wave tube (TWT) overcomes this problem.  The principle of velocity modulation and 
charge  bunching  is  still  used,  but  the  buncher  and  catcher  cavities  are  replaced  by  a  helix  of  wire;  the 
arrangement is shown in Fig 6.  Amplification is achieved by the exchange of energy between the electron 
beam and an electromagnetic wave travelling in the metal helix. 
14-20 Fig 6 Travelling Wave Tube Arrangement 
6a - Schematic 
Waveguide
Waveguide
feed In
feed Out
Matching taper
Shaped Terminations at End
Electron
of Helix Couple to E-Field
Beam
of Waveguide
Heat Dissipating
Collector
Travelling-wave tube passes
Electron Gun
through holes in broad walls
of rectangular waveguides
Magnetic Field to constrain Beam
Page 5 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
6b – Axial View 
Glass Envelope
Helix
Electron Beam
Ceramic Supporting Rods
19.  The electron beam passes down the centre of the tube and is kept in place by an axial magnetic field, 
generated  either  by  a  solenoid  or  by  permanent  magnets.    The  input  signal  is  fed  onto  the  helix  at  the 
electron gun end and it moves along the helical wire in the form of a voltage travelling wave; in principle, the 
same process as the sending of a signal down a transmission line.  The signal travels around the wire of the 
helix at very nearly the speed of light.  However, because of its greatly increased path length, its progress 
along  the  length  of  the  tube  is  very  much  slower.    The  device  is  designed  such  that  the  travelling  wave 
progresses along the tube at the same rate as the electrons in the electron beam and, since the travelling 
wave  carries  with  it  its  own  electric  fields,  the  electrons  in  the  beam  and  the  travelling  fields  are  able  to 
interact with each other all the way along the tube. 
20.  Fig 7 shows a diagram of a portion of the helix and electron beam; examples of the alignments of 
two of the fields are illustrated.  Any electron travelling down the tube will have alternating accelerating 
and decelerating forces applied to it.  As with the klystron, velocity modulation and consequent charge 
bunching  is  achieved  and,  since  the  electrons  travel  with  the  field  for  the  length  of  the  tube,  this 
bunching becomes more marked as the beam progresses. 
14-20 Fig 7 Travelling Wave Tube - Section of Helix Showing Electric Field Pattern 
Signal applied
Strong electric field between
to helix
or close to helix
Electron
Beam
21.  The electron bunches induce electric fields, and hence voltages, into the wire of the helix as they 
move down the tube.  This voltage enhances the signal already present, ie amplification is achieved. 
22.  Feedback.    Since  the  input  and  output  are  directly  connected,  it  is  possible  for  part  of  the 
output  to  be  reflected  back  down  the  helix  to  the  input,  which  can  cause  instability.    It  is, 
therefore, normal to place an attenuator near the wire to reduce any reflection.  Although this also 
attenuates  the  proper  signal,  the  electron  bunches  are  not  affected  and  proceed  to  re-induce  a 
voltage in the wire to amplify the signal (Fig 8). 
Page 6 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
14-20 Fig 8 Travelling Wave Tube with Attenuator 
Beam Forming Anode
200V to 300V
Input Directional Coupler
Lossy Wire Attenuator
Output Directional Coupler
Cathode 0V
for RF Signal
for RF Signal
Single-wire Helix
Collector
Impedance Matching
500V to 1500V
Resistors
Helix Mounting
Electron Beam Bunching
RF Input
Attenuation
RF Induced Into Helix
23.  Slow-wave Structures.  The helix of wire in the TWT is designed to slow down the travelling wave 
to a speed along the tube commensurate with the electron beam.  As such, it is an example of a slow-
wave  structure,  and  is  the  commonest  structure  used,  but  not  the  only  one.  Other forms of slow-wave 
structures are shown in Fig 9; all work on the principle of extending the path of the travelling wave. 
24.  Frequency Range, Bandwidth, and Output Power.  TWTs exist at operating frequencies from 
200 MHz to 50 GHz.  Output power is very much lower than that of a multi-cavity klystron at, typically, 
up to a few kW; gains are in the order of 30 dB.  The advantages of the TWT lie in its wide bandwidth 
(typically  an  octave),  small  size  (length  30  to  60  cm),  and  low  weight  (a  few  pounds  with  PPM 
focusing).  This makes it a particularly suitable device for airborne use, especially for frequency agile or 
jamming  applications.    It  is  also  characterized  by  low  noise  and  this  makes  it  ideal  as  a 
communications amplifier. 
14-20 Fig 9 Examples of Slow-wave Structures 
a Iris-loaded circular waveguide
b Dielectric-loaded waveguide
Iris
Dielectric
Basic Guide
c Interdigital line
d Serpentine waveguide
z
e Helix
z
Page 7 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
The Twystron 
25.  The multi-cavity klystron is characterized by high power, but narrow bandwidth, whereas the TWT 
gives wider bandwidth but with much lower power.  Some applications, notably wide-band, high-power 
jamming,  require  the  best  features  of  both  of  these  devices.    The  twystron  aims  to  provide  these 
characteristics  by  replacing  the  output  cavity  of  a  klystron  with  the  output  section  of  a  TWT.    The 
twystron is, therefore, a hybrid of the two devices and is able to provide peak powers in the MW range, 
bandwidths of 6 to 15%, and an efficiency of about 30%. 
HIGH POWER OSCILLATORS 
The Magnetron 
26.  The  high  power  oscillator  in  most  radars  is  a  device  known  as  a  'magnetron'.    It  relies  for  its 
operation on the manner in which charged particles move in a magnetic field, experiencing a force at 
right  angles  to  both  the  magnetic  flux  lines  and  their  own  motion.    In  a  magnetron,  electrons  are 
emitted by a hot, cylindrical cathode, and are attracted by the high positive voltage of the anode, which 
surrounds the cathode in the form of a hollow cylinder.  A magnetic field is established along the axis of 
the structure, which causes the electrons to move in a curved path towards the anode, the amount of 
curvature being dependent on the strength of the magnetic field.  In practice, the field is arranged so 
that  the  electrons  reach  the  anode  after  six  or  seven  revolutions.  It  is  the  resulting  motion  of  the 
electrons around the cathode that is used to produce oscillations 
27.  In a practical magnetron, the anode block is cylindrical in form, but is modified to include resonant 
cavities on its inner surface.  Fig 10 shows some typical cavity shapes and Fig 11 shows a cutaway to 
illustrate the 3-dimensional structure. 
14-20 Fig 10 Typical Magnetron Anode Block Structures 
a  Hole and Slot
b  Slot
c  Vane
14-20 Fig 11 Cutaway Diagram of Magnetron 

Anode
V
+ ao
End Hat
Cathode
RF
Output
Page 8 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
28.  As  the  electrons  spiral  around  the  cathode,  they  pass  the  openings  of  the  cavities  and,  if  one  of  the 
cavities is oscillating at its resonant frequency, they will be velocity modulated by the field across its opening.  
Bunching  will  be  initiated  in  the  revolving  electron  cloud,  and  this  in  turn  induces  oscillations  in  the  other 
cavities.  The bunching will eventually reach the initially oscillating cavity; its oscillation will be enhanced and 
the  bunching  will  become  more  pronounced.    This  interaction  continues  all  the  while  that  electrons  are 
spiralling round in the device, the bunching coming to resemble spokes, as shown in Fig 12.    In  practice, 
there  is  always  some  oscillation  present  in  all  of  the  cavities  as  the  result  of  thermal  noise;  this  is 
sufficient  to  start  the  device.    In  order  to  use  the  power,  it  is  tapped  off  from  one  of  the  cavities  by 
means of a coaxial feed to a waveguide. 
14-20 Fig 12 Electron Bunching in Magnetron 
Cathode
Anode
Electron Cloud Bunched
into Revolving Spokes
29.  It is necessary to arrange the device so that the electron bunch reaches the original cavity at the 
right  moment  to  enhance  the  oscillations  present  there.    The  normal  arrangement,  achieved  by  the 
choice of DC electric field and magnetic field strengths, is to have the bunch travel at such a rate that it 
moves  from  one  cavity  to  the  next  in  half  a  cycle.    In  this  way,  the  bunch  always  experiences  a 
retarding field, giving up its energy to the cavity. 
30.  The magnetic field is essential for the operation of the magnetron.  If the field was removed, the 
electrons would travel directly outwards to the anode.  In this situation, oscillation would cease and the 
current  would  rise,  since  the  electrons  would  arrive  at  the  anode  in  much  greater  numbers.   With no 
oscillation, all the DC power would be converted to heat; this would be sufficient to melt the device.  To 
obviate this danger, the magnetic field is always produced by a large and powerful permanent magnet, 
and this is the most bulky and weighty part of the structure. 
31.  The operating frequency of a magnetron is determined by the resonant frequency of the cavities, 
but  a  limited  amount  of  mechanical  tuning  is  possible  by  changing  the  cavity  volumes  with  plungers.  
Inductive plungers in the cavity are used to raise the frequency, and capacitive plungers at the cavity 
entrances to decrease frequency. 
32.  Magnetrons are available, for both pulse and CW operation, with efficiencies between 30% and 60% for 
pulse operation, but lower for CW.  In the pulse system, the magnetron is switched on and off by high voltage 
pulses  (typically  20  kV)  supplied  by  a  separate  circuit  known  as  a  'modulator'.    Output  pulses  are  non-
coherent and pulse lengths are normal y in the range 0.1 to 5 μsec. 
Page 9 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
33.  The  rated  duty  cycle  (pulse  length  ×  PRF)  for  pulse  magnetrons  is  normally  in  the  range of 0.005 to 
0.00025, although, in some applications, a high duty cycle, approaching 0.5, is used.  For low duty cycles, 
peak power outputs range from about 5 MW at UHF and D-band, to a maximum of about 200 kW at I-band.  
CW magnetrons generally have lower power outputs, typically 200 W at D-band to 1 W at G-band. 
The Carcinotron 
34.  The carcinotron is a travelling wave oscillator employing a slow wave structure.  The field pattern 
of  an  electromagnetic  wave  travels  at  a  certain  velocity,  known  as  the  'phase  velocity',  whereas  the 
energy which it carries travels at a different velocity, known as the 'group velocity'.  In the case of the 
TWT, these two velocities are in the same direction, but it is possible for them to be sensed in opposite 
directions.    This  is  the  case  in  the  carcinotron,  which  is,  accordingly,  classified  as  a  backward  wave 
oscillator (BWO). 
35.  An electron beam is directed along the structure in the same direction as the phase velocity, and 
oscillations are possible at a frequency at which the phase velocity of the wave is synchronous with the 
velocity of the beam.  The phase velocity of the electromagnetic wave changes with frequency, and so 
the frequency of oscillation depends on the velocity of the electron beam.  Carcinotrons can therefore 
be tuned over a wide range of frequencies by varying the voltage of the electron beam.  There are two 
types of carcinotron: 
a. 
O-type.    The  O-type  of  carcinotron  is  similar  to  the  TWT,  and  the  slow  wave  structure  is 
usually  a  helix.    It  is  normally  a  low  power,  low  efficiency  tube,  principally  used  for  receiver  and 
test equipment applications. 
b. 
M-type.    In  an  M-type  carcinotron,  the  electron  beam  moves  under  the  influence  of 
orthogonal  electric  and  magnetic  fields.    The  device  resembles  a  magnetron,  in  that  it  has  a 
circular, rather than linear, geometry in order to reduce the size of the magnet.  The efficiency of 
M-type carcinotrons is relatively high, and this, combined with wide range electronic tuning, makes 
them attractive for countermeasures or jamming applications. 
LOW/MEDIUM POWER SOLID STATE DEVICES 
Introduction 
36.  Whereas the high power requirements for the output stages of radar transmitters are catered for 
by  the  thermionic  amplifiers  and  oscillators  described  above,  radar  receivers  and  microwave  links  in 
the  low  and  medium  power  region  normally  use  solid-state  devices.    These  are  far  less  noisy,  have 
lower DC power requirements, and are also smaller, lighter, more reliable, and more efficient. 
Point-contact Diode 
37.  The  point-contact  diode,  illustrated  schematically  in  Fig  13,  consists  of  a  metal  'whisker'  which 
presses  on  a  small  crystal  of  p-  or  n-type  semiconductor.    A  diode  made  of  p-type  silicon  with  a 
tungsten whisker can handle very small signals, and is easily damaged by high power.  In some cases, 
welded  or  gold  bonded  contacts  are  used.    Crystals  of  gallium  arsenide  can  withstand  high 
temperatures and can operate at frequencies up to 100 GHz. 
Page 10 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
14-20 Fig 13 Point-contact Diode 
Metal
Ceramic
‘Whisker’
Tube
Semi
Conductor
Brass
Pin
38.  Fig 14 shows the rectifying properties of a point-contact diode and its equivalent circuit.  The resistance 
(r)  is  the  variable  'barrier'  resistance  of  the  contact  and  varies  with  the  applied  voltage,  thus  enabling  the 
diode to be used as a mixer.  The contact capacitance (C) also varies with the applied voltage and is very low 
(approximately 0.2 pF) so that, at microwave frequencies, it does not short circuit r.  The series resistance 
(R) is the constant ohmic resistance of the semiconductor. 
14-20 Fig 14 Properties of a Point-contact Diode 
a Characteristic
b Equivalent Circuit
)
A 8
(m
t
C
r
n 6
rre
u
C 4
rd
a
rw
o 2
F
R
0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8
Forward Voltage (Volts)
39.  Point-contact diodes are fairly robust but, when used as microwave mixers, their life depends on the 
effectiveness of the TR device which protects them from the high transmitter power.  The TR cell takes a 
short time to break down completely after the transmitter pulse has started, and a spike of energy leaks to 
the  mixer  diode  during  this  period.    If  the  power  in  the  spike  is  too  high,  the  metal  to  semiconductor 
contact may overheat and burn out.  Over a period of time, even comparatively small leakage powers can 
cause the contact to change its rectifying properties, and the diode becomes inefficient and noisy.  This 
can be detected by a deterioration in the overall performance of the radar, or by a decrease in the back-
to-front resistance ratio of the diode. 
Page 11 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
40.  Backward Diode.  The backward diode is a form of point-contact diode in which the whisker is coated 
with  semiconductor  material  and  bonded  to  a  crystal  of  n-  or  p-type  germanium.    This  semiconductor-to-
semiconductor contact operates better than the point-contact diode at low signal levels. 
Schottky-Barrier Diode 
41.  The  Schottky-Barrier  diode  uses  a  metal-to-semiconductor  junction,  and  consists  of a thin metal 
film  deposited  on  a  layer  of  n-  or  p-type  semiconductor.    Because  of  the  larger  junction  area,  its 
capacitance  is  greater  than  that  of  the  point-contact  or  backward  diodes  (about  1  pF),  but  it  is  not 
easily  damaged  by  high  power.    Its  characteristics  are  fast  switching  speed,  low  forward  turn-on 
voltage,  low  stored  charge,  low  reverse  leakage  currents,  and  high  rectification  efficiency;  hence  it  is 
used  in  circuits  for  high  and  low  level  detection,  mixing,  UHF  modulation,  pulse-shaping,  voltage 
damping, and pico-second switching (in computers). 
Tunnel Diode 
42.  The  tunnel  diode  is  a  semiconductor  junction  made  of  heavily  doped  germanium.    It  has  a 
very  narrow depletion  layer  between  the  p-  and  n-type  materials  and current-carrying charges can 
'tunnel' through  the  layer  at  low  values  of  forward  bias.    From about 0 to about 50 mV, the forward 
current  due  to  these  'tunnelling'  carriers  rises  fairly  sharply  (region  A  in  Fig  15a)  but,  as  the  voltage  is 
increased above about 50 mV, the tunnelling effect decreases and the forward current falls (region B).  At 
about 350 mV, normal semiconductor action takes over, and the current again increases with an increase in 
forward voltage (region C). 
14-20 Fig 15 Some Properties of a Tunnel Diode 
a  Characteristic
b  Equivalent Circuit
4
A
B
C
)
A 3
(m
C
−r
t
n
rre
u 2
C
rd
a 1
rw
o
F 0
50
150
250
350
R
Forward Bias (mV)
43.  By operating the diode in the region where the voltage/current curve is negative, it can be used as a 
negative resistance oscillator or amplifier.  When employed in an oscillator circuit, the positive resistance 
of the circuit is completely cancelled by the negative resistance of the diode.  In an amplifier circuit, the 
positive resistance is partly cancelled, and the input applied to the circuit is amplified. 
44.  The equivalent circuit of a tunnel diode (Fig 15b), is similar to that of a normal semiconductor diode, but 
the  variable  barrier  resistance  becomes  negative  (–r).    The  constant  resistance  (R)  is  due  to  the 
semiconductor material and the capacitance (C) depends on the junction area and width.  Thus, C is fairly 
high (about 10 pF) and, at microwave frequencies, the tunnel diode presents a very low impedance. 
45.  The  transit  time  of  the  carriers  through  the  very  narrow  depletion  layer  is  very  short  (about  10–13
seconds), so the tunnel diode can be used at the highest radar frequencies. 
Page 12 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
46.  A  typical  construction  of  a  tunnel  diode  is  shown  in  cross-section  in  Fig  16.    The  p-n  junction  is 
formed by alloying a small n-type tin-arsenic bead into the surface of a p-type germanium wafer.  The 
wafer  is  soldered  into  the  casing,  which  forms  one  contact,  and  the  n-type  bead  is  connected  to  the 
other  end  of  the  casing  via  a  strip  of  silver  foil.    The  silver  foil  is  soldered  to  the  bead  to  act  as  a 
support  as  well  as  a  contact.    The  bead  is  very  small  (about  0.025  mm  diameter)  to  ensure  a  low 
junction capacitance and a high cut-off frequency. 
14-20 Fig 16 Conventional Tunnel Diode Construction 
Silver Foil
Metal
Germanium
Tin Arsenic Metal Base Ceramic
Wafer
Bead
47.  Tunnel Diode Oscillator.  Since a suitably biased tunnel diode presents a negative resistance to 
its terminals at all frequencies up to cut-off, it is capable of resonating at the resonant frequency of any 
high  Q  series-tuned  circuit  of  smaller  resistance  connected  across  is  terminals.    It  is  possible  to 
construct  a  resonant  cavity  tunnel  diode  oscillator  capable  of  being  tuned  over  a  broad  frequency 
range.  The outline of a simple system is shown in Fig 17.  The oscillation frequency is that of the cavity, and 
may be varied by altering the setting of the tuning plunger.  Tunnel diode oscillators have been developed to 
operate satisfactorily at 100 GHz, and the cut-off frequency of available tunnel diodes is usually quoted as 
being in excess of 50 GHz.  At this frequency, output powers of 200 μW are possible. 
14-20 Fig 17 Resonant-cavity Tunnel Diode Tuneable Oscillator 
Insulation
Tuning Plunger
Tunnel Diode
Probe
Cavity
Bias
48.  Tunnel  Diode  Amplifier.    The  tunnel  diode  is  a  'majority  carrier'  device  and  is  not  limited  in 
frequency  by  the  low  diffusion  velocity  of  minority  carriers.    Its  high  frequency  performance  is  limited 
only  by  its  CR  product  and  by  the  inductance  of  the  package.    By  using  small  area  junctions,  and 
semiconductor materials with high charge-carrier mobility, the CR product may be kept low to produce 
cut-off frequencies in excess of 50 GHz.  The useful upper frequency limit for tunnel diode amplifiers is 
of the order of 20 GHz.  Up to this frequency, the tunnel diode amplifier can provide gains as high as 
15  dB  at  noise  figures  as  low  as  3.5  dB.    Other  advantages  of  the  tunnel  diode  amplifier  are  its 
reliability,  and  its  small  size  and  weight.    By  using  strip-line  components, very compact RF heads for 
radar receivers operating at frequencies around 10 GHz have been developed. 
Page 13 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
P-I-N Diode 
49.  The p-i-n diode consists of heavily doped layers of p- and n- type silicon, separated by a thin slice 
of high resistance undoped (intrinsic) silicon.  p-i-n diodes have been designed for use as switches at 
frequencies up to 40 GHz, with insertion losses as low as 0.1 dB and isolation better than 30 dB.  This 
insertion  loss  means  that  about  98%  of  the  incident  power  passes  to  the  output  when  'on',  and  the 
isolation  is  such  that  only  about  0.1% of the incident power reaches the output when 'off'.  For some 
applications, high peak power handling capability and high reverse breakdown voltage characteristics 
are required, and p-i-n diodes capable of handling up to 10 kW peak power with breakdown voltages of 
1500 volts are now available. 
50.  It is possible to have an array of p-i-n diodes suitably spaced along the length of a transmission line.  
This gives an improvement in the attenuation and control of RF energy being passed, and also improves the 
reliability of the system, since the failure of any one device would result in only a small reduction in overall 
effectiveness. 
Varactor and Step Recovery Diodes 
51.  In  a  semiconductor  diode,  a  capacitance  is  formed  by  the  opposite  charges  either  side  of  the 
junction.    When  the  diode  is  reverse  biased,  the  charges  move  further  apart  and  the  junction 
capacitance  decreases  (capacitance  is  inversely  proportional  to  the  distance  between  opposite 
charges).  Therefore, by varying the value of reverse bias voltage applied to the diode, the capacitance 
can be varied, as shown in Fig 18. 
14-20 Fig 18 Variation of Capacitance in Varactor Diode 
)
F
Wide
Narrow
(p
e
Gap
Gap
c
n
N
P
N
P
6
ita
c
a
Low C
High C
p
5
a
C Maximum
6V
1V
4
Capacitance
3
Range
2
Minimum
1
0
6
5
4
3
2
1
Reverse Bias (Volts)
Typical Voltage Range
52.  p-n junction diodes that have been specially doped to provide a wide variation of capacitance with 
applied  reverse  bias  are  called  'varactor  diodes'.    They  have  many  uses,  eg  providing  a  voltage 
controlled  variable  capacitance  for  tuning  tuned  circuits,  in  parametric  amplifiers,  and  as  electronic 
switches.    One  of  their  main  uses  is  in  frequency  multiplier  circuits,  where  the  output  frequency  is  a 
multiple of the input frequency. 
53.  The 'step-recovery' diode is a close relative of the varactor diode, differing in the degree of doping 
of the n and p regions, and being particularly suitable for frequency multiplication. 
Page 14 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
Metal Base Transistor 
54.  In the metal base transistor, the usual n- or p-type base region is replaced by a thin metal film of 
molybdenum, which has three effects: 
a. 
The  'energy  gap'  between  the  emitter  and  the  base  is  increased,  so  that  the  electrons 
from an n-type emitter are injected into the base region with high energy. 
b. 
The base resistance is reduced. 
c. 
There are no minority carriers. 
55.  Electrons are injected over the emitter-base barrier and collected after crossing the reverse-
biased  base-collector  junction.    Control  is  effected  by  the  base  voltage;  the  current  is  not  diffusion 
limited  as  there  are  no  minority  carriers  in  the  base  region.    The  emitter  current  is  more  like  the 
thermionic  emission  current  in a valve; the mobility of electrons through the base is high, transit time 
effects  are  negligible,  and  the  low  base  resistance  of  the  metal  base transistor further improves high 
frequency performance. 
56.  Metal base transistor amplifiers have been developed to give 20 dB of gain at 10 GHz, and there are 
indications that they will be used to provide amplifiers and oscillators in the 50 GHz to 120 GHz range. 
IMPATT Devices 
57.  The term IMPATT (IMPact Avalanche and Transit Time device) is used to describe a broad class of 
oscillating devices which use impact ionization to create an avalanche of charge carriers which, drifting in a 
transit time region, produce a negative-resistance oscillation. 
58.  IMPATT  devices  include  those  semiconductor  diodes  which  exhibit  negative  resistance 
characteristics,  and  which  also  depend  for  their  operation  on  transit  time  effects.    Such  diodes 
include  the  silicon  avalanche  diode  and  the  'Read'  diode.    In  general  terms,  an  IMPATT  device 
contains  at  least  one  semiconductor  junction  which  is  reverse  biased  to  such  a  value  that  the 
resulting  electric  field  is  sufficient  to  spontaneously  generate  electron-hole  pairs  by  a  form  of 
internal secondary emission (avalanche or multiplication process). 
59.  Fig  19  shows  the  schematic  outline  of  a  reverse  biased  Read  diode,  and  illustrates  a  typical 
characteristic.    The  reverse  bias  creates  a  strong  electric  field  across  the  transit  time  region.    The 
maximum  field  exists  at  the  p-n  junction,  and  is  large  enough  to  create  avalanche  conditions, 
producing a pulse of electron-hole pairs.  The generated electrons are attracted by the applied field 
to  the  nearby  n-region,  whilst  the  positive  charge  carriers  (holes)  move  through  the  transit  time 
region  to  the  p-electrode.    When  the  holes  reach  the  p-electrode,  another  avalanche  pulse  is 
generated, the frequency of the pulses depending upon the transit time of the charge carriers.  The 
phase relationship between current and voltage is such that the device exhibits negative resistance 
characteristics.  The diode can, therefore, be used as a negative-resistance oscillator. 
Page 15 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
14-20 Fig 19 Basic Read Diode and Characteristic 
a
b
)
A
(m
t
n15
Transit Time Region
rre
u
C
rd10
a
rw
o
+
+

F
n
P
P
5

i
Reverse Volts
50
40
30
20
10
10
20
30
40
Forward Volts
5
)
A
Avalanche
(m
t
Region
n
10
rre
u
C
e
15
rs
e
v
e
R
60.  The usable frequency range is partly determined by the transit time of the current carriers.  Thus, 
for  operation  at  10  GHz,  the  transit  time  region  would  be  very  thin  (about  25  ×  10–6  mm).    However, 
since  the  basic  IMPATT  device  produces  pulses,  sinusoidal  oscillations  can  be  achieved  only  by 
mounting the diode in a microwave cavity.  The same diode can be used with several different cavities 
to produce oscillations over a very wide frequency range.  An experimental Read diode has produced 
oscillations  in  the  2  to  4  GHz  band  in  a  coaxial  system,  in  the  7  to  12  GHz  band  in  an  I-band 
waveguide, and at 50 GHz in a millimetric waveguide. 
61.  A silicon avalanche diode has been developed to provide outputs of 1W CW at 12 GHz with 8% 
efficiency, and a few milliwatts CW at 50 GHz with 2% efficiency.  It seems likely that these figures can 
be  improved  upon  to  provide  perhaps  20W in the 5 to 20 GHz range, with efficiencies of some 30%.  
As  an  amplifier,  IMPATT  devices  have  produced  gains  of  20 dB  at  10  GHz  with  30  MHZ  bandwidth, 
although the high noise of 50 dB prohibits its use as an RF amplifier. 
TRAPATT (Trapped Plasma Avalanche Transit Time) Diode 
62.  Whilst trying to improve the efficiency of the IMPATT by experimenting with the diode/cavity geometry, it 
was accidentally discovered that an anomalous mode of operation is possible.  If the diode is installed in a 
cavity  whose  resonant  frequency  is  approximately  half  of  the  IMPATT  operating  frequency,  and  a  voltage 
approximately  twice  the  breakdown  voltage  is  applied,  unusually  high  power  and  high  efficiency  can  be 
achieved.    The  overvoltage  produces  an  avalanche  shock  front,  which  propagates  through  the  diode  at  a 
velocity  that  is  greater  than  the  velocity  of  the charge carriers.  Behind this front, a high-density plasma is 
trapped  in  the  low  field  region  that  has  been  created.    These  trapped  carriers  then  move  relatively  slowly 
across the diode and maintain a high current in the external circuit, whilst the applied voltage is low.  Diodes 
operating in the TRAPATT mode can achieve up to 20 W pulsed at an efficiency of up to 30%.  Although 
they  are  currently  limited  in  operating  frequency  to  about  16  GHz,  this  is  quite  high  enough  for  airborne 
applications, such as radar transponders and TACAN equipment. 
Gunn Effect Oscillator 
63.  When  the  voltage  applied  to  a  thin  slice  of  gallium  arsenide  semiconductor  exceeds  a  critical 
threshold value, periodic fluctuations of current result and, if the slice is thin enough (4 to 25 × 10–6 mm), 
the frequency of oscillation is in the microwave band.  The effect is known as the 'Gunn' effect, after its 
discoverer.  A Gunn effect semiconductor is called a 'bulk' device since there are no junctions. 
Page 16 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
64.  Fig 20a shows a basic circuit of a gallium arsenide slice connected, in series with a small resistor, 
to  a  source  of  dc  voltage.    If  the  current  through  the  resistor  is  measured,  it  is  found  that  it  is 
proportional  to  voltage  up  to  a  certain  critical  threshold  value  of  voltage  (VT).    However,  when  the 
voltage is increased above VT, the current drops rapidly from its value (IT) to a valley current value (IV).  
The  current  then  remains  at  the  value  IV  for  a  time  (t)  before rising to its original value (IT) (Fig 20b).  
The  period  of  oscillation  is  related  to  the  time  (t),  which  depends  upon  the  slice  thickness,  but  is 
independent of the applied voltage. 
14-20 Fig 20 Gunn Effect in Gallium Arsenide Semiconductor 
a Circuit
b Characteristics
VT
e
g
lta
o
V
0
Time
n Type
Gallium Arsenide
+
I
V
R
T
t
n
rre
u I
C
V
0
Time
t
65.  Gunn oscillators can be tuned to operate over a band of frequencies by mounting the diode in a 
microwave  resonant  cavity  of  variable  length.    Operated  in  a  pulse  mode,  the  output  power  ranges 
from  200  W  at  1  GHz  to  1  W  at  10  GHz.    CW  outputs  between  tens  and  hundreds  of  mW  are 
available.  These devices are simple and reliable, and find applications in receivers, as local oscillators, 
and in low-power transmitters. 
SURFACE ACOUSTIC WAVE (SAW) DEVICES 
Introduction 
66.  Surface  acoustic  wave  devices  are  becoming  increasingly  important  as  components  in  radar 
systems where, typically, they may be used as delay lines, pulse generators, and to produce frequency 
modulated pulse compression pulses.  The underlying phenomenon is that of the piezo-electric effect. 
67.  Piezo-Electric Effect.  The piezo-electric effect is exhibited by a number of crystals, such as quartz.  It 
manifests itself as a change in physical shape in response to the application of a voltage across a slab of 
material made from such crystals.  In effect, the material expands or contracts depending on the polarity of 
the voltage, as shown in Fig 21.  Therefore, if an oscillating voltage is applied, the material will vibrate at the 
frequency  of  the  applied  voltage.    The  effect  is  reversible;  thus,  if  a  piezo-electric  crystal  is  alternately 
compressed and expanded, an oscillating voltage will appear across its face. 
14-20 Fig 21 Piezo-Electric Effect 
+


+
Page 17 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
Basic SAW Device Construction  
68.  A  basic  SAW  device  consists  of  a  slab  of  piezo-electric  crystal  material  with  metal  inter-digital 
fingers  deposited  on  one  surface,  as  shown  in  Fig  22.    When  an  input  oscillating  signal  is  applied, a 
voltage  is  created  across  the  input  finger.    This  produces  a  mechanical  vibration  in  the  surface 
material.  This physical vibration travels along the crystal slab, mimicking the electrical input signal and, 
as the vibrations pass the output fingers, an oscillating voltage is generated. 
14-20 Fig 22 Basic SAW Device 
Input
Surface Vibration
− − −
+ + +
Output
The vibration
'carries' the voltage
pattern along the device
69.  Delay  Line.    The  speed  at  which  the  mechanical  vibration  travels  in  the  slab  is  some  105  times 
slower than the speed of electromagnetic waves in space; so, the simple device of Fig 22 could act as a 
delay line.  For a 1μs delay, the device need only be 3 mm long, compared to 100 ft of cable to achieve 
the same effect.  The delay can be varied by placing a series of inter-digital fingers at different positions 
along the length of the device, so that the output can be tapped after any desired delay (Fig 23). 
14-20 Fig 23 Tapped Delay Line 
O/P
1
O/P O/P
Input
2
O/P
3
4
O/P
5
Output
70.  Pulse Generation.  If a single voltage spike is applied at the input of the simple device of Fig 22, 
the  output  will  also  be  a  single  spike.    However,  if  the  output  contacts  are  modified  to  be  a series of 
inter-digital  fingers  (Fig  24),  an  oscillating  pulse  is  produced.    As  the  mechanical  vibration  pattern 
passes the first two fingers, a positive spike is generated and, as it passes the second pair, a negative 
spike  is  produced,  and  so  on.    The  number  of  cycles  in  the  pulse  depends  on  the  number  of  inter-
digital fingers at the output, and the wavelength on the spacing of the fingers. 
14-20 Fig 24 SAW Pulse Coding 
Input
+ −
Input
Output
Impulse
Output
Radar Pulse
Page 18 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
71.  Production  of  an  FM  Pulse  Compression  Pulse.    The  device  illustrated  in  Fig  24  can  be 
modified to produce an output pulse with a varying frequency by varying the spacing of the output inter-
digital  fingers,  as  shown  in  Fig  25.    By  reversing  the  device,  it  can  act  as  a  detector  for  such  a 
frequency modulated pulse.  In Fig 26, the FM pulse is applied to the input.  The resulting surface wave 
will have an identical pattern, and will only produce a large output when the pattern exactly overlaps the 
output contacts, ie the device compresses the pulse into a narrow width. 
14-20 Fig 25 FM SAW Device 
Input
Input
Impulse
Output
Output
Frequency Swept
Pulse
14-20 Fig 26 A SAW Device for Pulse Compression 
Input
Output
t = 0
t = τ
Compressed
Pulse
LOW NOISE AMPLIFIERS 
Introduction 
72.  If  there  was  no  noise  present  in  a  receiver,  it  would  be  possible  to  detect  any  signal,  given 
sufficient  amplification.    The  noise  generated  within  a  practical  receiver,  compared  with  a  'noiseless' 
receiver, is expressed by the noise figure (F) where: 
S /N
in
in
F = S /N
out
out
where 
Sin  = input signal power 
 
 
Sout = output signal power 
 
 
Nin  = input noise power 
 
 
Nout = output noise power  
73.  Amplifiers  in  a  superhet  receiver  generate  sufficient  noise  to  negate  the  gain  they  provide.  
However, low noise amplifiers have been developed, such as: 
a. 
The travelling-wave tube (paras 18 - 24). 
b. 
The parametric amplifier. 
c. 
The maser. 
Page 19 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
The Parametric Amplifier 
74.    The  parametric  (or  reactance)  amplifier  derives  its  name  from  the  fact  that  the  equation 
governing  its  operation  has  one  or  more  parameters  that  vary  with  time.    The  principle  of  operation 
may  be  explained  by  considering  a  simple  resonant  circuit  having  an  inductance  and  a  capacitance 
oscillating at the resonant frequency.  If the capacitor plates were to be pulled apart at the instant when 
the  oscillating  voltage  was  at  a  positive  maximum,  then,  since  for  a  fixed  charge  the  voltage  is 
inversely  proportional  to  the  capacitance,  the  voltage  would  increase.    If  the  plates  were  returned  to 
their original position as the voltage passed through zero, then, since there would be no charge on the 
plates, the voltage would remain unchanged.  If this process was repeated, separating the plates every 
time  the  voltage  passed  through  a  positive  or  negative  maximum,  and  returning  them  to  the  original 
position  as  the  voltage  passed  through  zero,  then  a  signal  at  the  resonant  frequency  would  be 
amplified.  The principle is illustrated in Fig 27 where, at time T1, corresponding to a voltage maximum, 
the capacitance decreases, leading to a step increase in voltage.  There is no change at T2, where the 
voltage  is  zero,  but  there  is  a  further  step  at  T3,  where  the  voltage  is  at  a  negative  maximum.    The 
process  is  repeated  at  T4,  T5  and  so  on.    The  variable  capacitor  element of a parametric amplifier is 
normally provided by a varactor diode (see para 51), in which the depletion layer at the junction may be 
considered  as  the  dielectric  between  the  plates  of  a  capacitor.    Under  reverse  bias,  the  width  of  the 
depletion layer varies with the applied electric field and hence, if an oscillating voltage is applied across 
a varactor diode, the capacitance will vary at the oscillating frequency. 
14-20 Fig 27 Principle of Parametric Amplifier 
T4
Vc
T2
T1
T3
T5
C
Vc’
Time
Vc = Input Signal Vc’ = Amplified Output
C = Change in Capacitance
75.  Degenerate Parametric Amplifier.  The simple parametric amplifier described above requires that the 
variation  in  the  capacitance  occurs  at  a  frequency,  called  the  'pump'  frequency,  which  is  twice  that  of  the 
resonant frequency of the resonant circuit.  This mode of operation is known as the 'degenerate mode', and 
amplification takes place only if the phase relationship between the pump frequency and the signal frequency 
is correct.  The essentials of a basic degenerate parametric amplifier are shown in Fig 28. 
Page 20 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
14-20 Fig 28 Degenerate Parametric Amplifier 
Filter passes pump
frequency only
Input circuit
tuned to fHz
Circulator
Hz
Input
~
(fHz)
~ ~
~
Output
Varactor
Pump
(fHz)
Oscillates to
fHz
76.  Non-degenerate  Parametric  Amplifier.    The  phase  sensitivity  of  the  degenerate  parametric 
amplifier can be overcome by operating the pump at some frequency other than twice the resonant 
frequency.  The nature of the parametric amplifier is such that a third frequency, known as the 'idling 
frequency',  is  produced.    The  idling  frequency  is  equal  to  the  difference  between  the  pump 
frequency and the signal frequency.  The phase and frequency limitations can be relaxed if an idler 
circuit, resonant at the idling frequency, is added, as shown in Fig 29.  In effect, this idler circuit acts 
as an energy reservoir, accepting energy from the pump or signal circuits, and storing it until needed, 
then  releasing  it  at  the  proper  time  and  phase,  to  provide  power  gain  in  the  signal  circuit.    The  non-
degenerate  parametric  amplifier,  in  which  fp  =  fs  +  fi  (frequencies  of  pump,  signal,  and  idler  circuits 
respectively), is a negative resistance device; it has limited gain and, like any other negative resistance 
amplifier, has a tendency towards instability. 
14-20 Fig 29 Non-degenerate Parametric Amplifier 
Idler Circuit
Input Circuit
f s
Circulator
Input
s

s
f Hz
f l+ s
f  = p


Pump
Output
p
Oscillator
fs
    Hz
Varactor
~ Circuit
77.  Parametric Up-converter.  The problem of instability can be solved by a parametric amplifier which 
presents a positive resistance to the signal circuit, by making fp = fi − fs.  This is called an 'up-converter', 
and is completely stable.  The output is at the idling frequency, which is higher than the signal frequency, 
and  this  amplifier  can  be  followed  by  a  conventional  crystal  mixer  receiver.    The  up-converter  has  a 
maximum gain which is proportional to fi/fs, so is primarily useful at UHF frequencies or lower. 
78.  Other  Parametric  Devices.    If  fp  =  fs −  fi,  the  device  becomes  a  'positive  resistance  down-
converter'.  It has a gain of less than unity, and is used as a mixer in preference to the crystal diode.  
Negative  resistance  up-  and  down-converters  are  also  available;  these  have  high  gains  but  have 
tendencies towards instability. 
Page 21 of 41 

AP3456 – 14-20  Microwaves 
79.  Properties  of  the  Parametric  Amplifier.    The  parametric  amplifier  has  a  very  low  noise  figure, 
typically about 2 to 3 dB at room temperature; this can be improved further by refrigeration using, for 
example, liquid nitrogen at 77 K.  This low noise is mainly the result of not employing a noisy electron 
beam generated by a hot cathode.  A parametric amplifier can be used as a signal frequency amplifier 
in radar receivers to