This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
CHAPTER 1 - INTRODUCTION TO RADAR 
Introduction 
1.
The word radar (from the acronym Radio Detection and Ranging) was originally used to describe the 
process of locating targets by means of reflected radio waves (primary radar) or automatically retransmitted 
radio  waves  (secondary  radar).    The  word  has  now  been  fully  integrated  into  the  English  language  and, 
despite being derived from an acronym, is no longer written in capital letters.  Today the meaning of radar 
has  been  extended  to  include  a  much  wider  variety  of  techniques  in  which  electromagnetic  waves  are 
employed  for  the  purpose  of  obtaining  information  relating  to  distant  objects.    It  includes  not  only  active 
systems,  in  which  the  energy  originates from the system itself, but also semi-active systems, in which the 
energy  originates  from  some  other  source;  and  passive  systems  which  receive  energy  originating  at  the 
target. 
An Elementary System 
2. 
An  elementary  form  of  radar  consists  of  a  transmitting  aerial  emitting  electromagnetic  radiation 
generated by a high frequency oscillator, a receiving aerial, and an energy detecting device or receiver.  A 
portion of the transmitted signal is intercepted by a reflecting object (target) and is re-radiated in all directions.  
The receiving aerial collects the returned energy and delivers it to a receiver, where it is processed to detect 
the presence of the target and to extract its location and relative velocity. 
3. 
The distance to a target is determined by measuring the time taken for the signal to travel to the target 
and back.  The direction, or angular position, of the target may be determined from the direction of arrival of 
the reflected wavefront.  The usual method of measuring the direction of arrival is with narrow aerial beams.  
If  relative  motion  exists  between  target  and  radar,  the  shift  in  the  carrier  frequency  of  the  reflected  wave 
(doppler effect) is a measure of the target’s relative (radial) velocity and may be used to distinguish moving 
targets from stationary objects.  In radars which continuously track the movement of a target, a continuous 
indication of the rate of change of the target position is also available. 
4. 
To summarize, the information that can be communicated by radar consists mainly of: 
a. 
Range - by echo timing. 
b. 
Relative radial velocity - by measuring Doppler shift. 
c. 
Angular position - by observing the direction of echo arrival. 
d. 
Target identity - by using secondary radar. 
Classification of Radar Systems 
5. 
The profusion of radar systems in use today necessitates a logical means of classification.  One 
method, which appears to have achieved general acceptance, is to classify a radar system according 
to four main characteristics, namely: 
a. 
Installation environment (ground, airborne, etc).
b. 
Functional characteristics (search, track, etc). 
c. 
Transmission characteristics (pulse, CW, etc). 
d. 
Operating frequency band. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
6. 
By this method, an early warning radar might be classified as a ground search, pulse radar operating in 
D-band, and an airborne interception radar as an airborne, search and track, pulse-Doppler radar operating 
in I-band.  Such statements provide a useful qualitative description of a radar system. 
7. 
Installation  Environment.    The  main  types  of  radar  installation  are  ground  systems  (static, 
ground-transportable and air-transportable), airborne systems (aircraft, missile and satellite), and ship-
borne systems. 
8.
Functional Characteristics.  Radar systems may perform either a single function or, as is common in 
airborne applications, one of a number of functions.  Multi-mode radars can offer operational flexibility, but 
some compromise is usually entailed.  Some important radar functions include the following: 
a.
Search  and  Detection.    The  interrogation  of  a  given  volume  of  space  for  the  presence  or 
absence of targets is one of the most important functions of radar.  This is normally achieved by a 
primary search radar which scans the volume to be searched by moving a concentrated beam of 
energy  in  a  repeated  pattern.    The  beam  may  either  be  fan-shaped  and  scan  in  a  single 
dimension,  or  it  may  be  pencil-shaped  and  scan  in  two-dimensions.    The  time  required  to 
complete each scan cycle is dependent on the ratio of the solid angle searched to that of the radar 
beam,  and  to  minimize  this  time  it  is  sometimes  necessary  to  sacrifice  either  coverage  or  the 
angular precision of the beam. 
b.
Identification.  If the volume interrogated is likely to contain both friendly and hostile targets, 
an important function of radar is the identification of friend or foe (IFF).  This is normally achieved 
by  secondary  radar,  in  which  transponding  equipment  carried  in  the  friendly  aircraft  transmits 
replies  in  response  to  coded  transmissions  received  from  the  interrogating  radar.    The 
interrogation may be performed either by the search radar or by a separate system.  Other criteria 
may sometimes be used to establish the identity of a target, eg by comparing the parameters of a 
computed ballistic trajectory with predetermined values. 
c. 
Tracking.    Numerous  tactical  situations  require  continuous  target  information  for  display 
purposes, e.g. airborne interception, or for calculation of relative target motion or future position.  
Tracking radars which perform these functions must be capable of producing continuous outputs 
of  the  range  and  angular  co-ordinates  of  the  selected  target  and,  in  some  cases,  the  rates  of 
change of these parameters. 
d.
Target  Illumination.    Target  illumination  is  the  function  performed  by  the  active  element  in 
semi-active  radar.    The  illuminating  radar  must  be  capable  of  tracking  the  selected  target  whilst 
the  passive  receiver  carried  in  the  homing  missile  intercepts  the  radiated  energy  after  reflection 
from the target.  The information communicated to the missile consists of target direction only, but 
if the missile is roughly on the line between the illuminating radar and target, and can receive the 
energy directly as well as by reflection, its range to the target is approximately proportional to the 
difference in the times of arrival of the direct and reflected signals. 
e.
Mapping.  Mapping by airborne radar has numerous military applications of which navigation, 
bombing  and  reconnaissance  are  perhaps  the  most  noteworthy.    Other  functions  employing 
specialized  mapping  techniques  are  submarine  detection,  cloud  warning  and  terrain  avoidance.  
Mapping radars may employ either circular or sector scan.  Alternatively, the aerial beams may be 
fixed  in  direction  and  scanned  by  the  motion  of  the  aircraft.    Mapping  is  normally  performed  by 
active pulse radar but passive systems which intercept naturally radiated infra-red energy are also 
possible. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
f.
Navigation.  Numerous navigational functions may be performed by radar: 
(1)  Mapping radars can provide fixing facilities and both cloud and terrain warning. 
(2)  Height can be measured by a radar altimeter. 
(3)  Secondary radar techniques are used in various forms of navigational beacon, e.g. DME 
and TACAN. 
(4)  Ground speed and drift can be measured by means of Doppler radar. 
g.
Other Radar Functions.  This is by no means an exhaustive list of radar functions.  Among the 
less familiar secondary functions which may sometimes be incorporated in a radar system are: 
(1)  Passive operation for the detection and location of enemy radiation. 
(2)  Radiation of jamming signals. 
(3)  Use of the radar transmission as a carrier for communicating intelligence. 
9. 
Transmission  Characteristics.    The  most  fundamental  basis  for  classifying  a  radar  system  is 
provided  by  its  transmission  characteristics  because  on this  depends  the  nature  of  the  target  information 
which the system is inherently capable of conveying.  The ability to convey target information is provided by 
modulating the transmission in various ways, and by observing in the receiver the manner in which the echo 
signal  has  been  affected  by  the  target.    Directional  information  is  achieved  by  the  radar  aerial  which 
modulates  the  transmission  into  a  narrow  beam  (space  modulation).    Range  information  necessitates  the 
provision of timing marks in the transmitted carrier in order to facilitate the measurement of the propagation 
time  to  and  from  the  target.    This  may  be  achieved  by  modulating  amplitude  (pulse  radar)  or  frequency 
(FMCW radar).  The measurement of relative velocity between target and radar is achieved by observing the 
change of frequency in the echo signal brought about by the Doppler effect.  For this to be possible, both the 
frequency and phase of the transmission must be present in a reference signal at the time the echoes are 
received.  This condition is inherent in a continuous wave (CW) radar and in coherent, pulse and Doppler 
radar;  but  in  the  majority  of  pulse  radars  the  Doppler  shift,  although  present,  cannot  be  measured.    The 
fundamental  division  in  radar  types  lies  between  pulse  systems  (which  resolve  targets  in  range)  and 
continuous  wave  systems  (which  resolve  targets  in  velocity).    Other  types,  such  as  pulse  Doppler,  can 
perform both functions if required to do so. 
10.  The main features of the fundamental radar classifications are as follows: 
a.
Pulse Radar.  In pulse radar, the transmission is concentrated into very short pulses which 
are  separated  by  sufficiently  long  intervals  to  permit  all  echoes  from  targets  within  the  operating 
range  to  be  received  from  one  pulse  before  transmission  of  the  next.    Targets  are  resolved  in 
range by virtue of the different times of arrival of their echoes and the degree of resolution being 
determined  by  the  length  of  the  pulses.    Range  measurement  (R)  is  made  by  observing  the 
elapsed time (t (in microseconds)) between the leading edge of the transmitted pulse leaving the 
aerial and the leading edge of the return echo arriving back at the aerial.  Because the pulse has 
travelled  to  the  target  and  back,  t  therefore  equals  2  ×  R.    If  c  is  the  velocity  of  propagation 
(3 × 108 metres per second), then: 
2R
t = c
ct
and
R = 2
b. 
Moving  Target  Indication  (MTI)  Radar.    MTI  radar  employs  a  pulsed  transmission  but,  in 
addition to performing range resolution and measurement, it also discriminates between fixed and 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
moving  targets  by  its  ability  to  recognize  the  existence  or  absence  of  Doppler  shift  in  the  echo 
signals.  The fixed targets are suppressed and only moving targets displayed. 
c. 
Continuous Wave Radar.  In CW radar, the transmitted and received signals are continuous 
and  targets  are  resolved  in  relative  velocity  by  virtue  of  the  differing frequencies in their echoes.  
The  measurement  of  relative  radial  velocity  is  made  by  observing  the  magnitude  of  the  Doppler 
shift (fd) in the echo signals, ie the difference in frequency between the transmitted and received 
signals.  If the relative velocity is ±V, and λ is the transmitted wavelength, then: 
2V
f
= ±
d
λ
d.
Frequency  Modulated  CW  (FMCW)  Radar.    FMCW  radar  employs  a  continuous 
transmission  in  which  the  frequency  is  modulated.    In  addition  to  performing  velocity  resolution 
and  measurement,  the  system  has  the  ability  to  measure  the  range  of  a  discrete  target,  but  it 
cannot  resolve  a  number  of  targets  at  differing  ranges  other  than  by  virtue  of  their  differing 
velocities  or  directions.    The  measurement  of  range  is  less  precise  than  that of a pulse radar at 
medium  and  long  ranges  but  can  be  more  accurate  at  short  range.    In  addition,  FMCW  can 
measure down to zero range, which is not possible with a pulse system. 
e.
Pulse  Doppler  Radar.    Pulse  Doppler  radar  employs  a  transmission  in  which,  unlike 
conventional pulse radar, there is continuity in the phase of the carrier from pulse to pulse.  This 
property, called coherence, permits the Doppler shift in echoes to be measured and the system is 
thus able to resolve and measure both range and relative velocity.  The avoidance of ambiguity in 
velocity  measurement  requires  the  pulse  repetition  frequency  to  be  higher  than  in  conventional 
pulse radar and, as a result, potential ambiguity is introduced into the measurement of range and 
range  eclipsing  may  occur.    Nevertheless,  sophisticated  processing  techniques  have  meant  that 
pulse Doppler radar is the most important and widely used type in airborne applications. 
11.  Operating Frequency Band.  Modern radar systems operate over a wide range of frequencies, 
usually between about 200 and 35,000 MHz, ie wavelengths between 1.5 metres and rather less than 
one  centimetre.    Within  this  range,  radar  systems  tend  to  be  grouped  in  a  number  of  fairly  distinct 
regions,  partly  because  of  frequency  allocation  and  partly  because  of  constructional  convenience.  
Fig 1 gives the system of frequency classification used by the NATO Forces and summarizes the effect 
of operating frequency on the following characteristics of radar systems: 
a. 
Resolution.  The ability of radar to resolve detail in angle, range, or velocity is directly related to 
transmission  frequency.    With  increasing  frequency,  the  beamwidth  for a given physical aerial size 
can  be  made  narrower,  pulselengths  may  be  shorter  and  the  Doppler  frequency  shift  for  a  given 
target velocity becomes greater.  For these reasons, the inherent resolving power of radar improves 
in all dimensions with increasing frequency. 
b. 
Size  and  Weight.    The  physical  dimensions  of  radar  components,  eg  power  oscillators, 
waveguides,  aerials,  etc,  are  fundamentally  related  to  the  transmission  wavelength.    Size  and 
weight  of  equipment,  therefore,  reduce  with  increasing  frequency  and  it is mainly for this reason 
that airborne systems usually operate at I band frequencies and above. 
c. 
Power  Handling  Capacity.    The power handling capacity, and hence performance, of a radar 
system is mainly limited by the physical dimensions of its power oscillator and waveguides, the capacity 
being reduced with increased frequency. 
d. 
Propagational  Aspects.    A  number  of  propagational  aspects  are  affected  by  the  transmission 
frequency.  Above 10,000 MHz, 3 cm wavelength, attenuation due to both atmospheric gases and rain 
begins  to  be  significant  and  above  35,000  MHz  it  becomes  prohibitively  high  for  most  purposes, 
although  there  are  some  windows  giving  opportunity  for  use  around  32-35  GHz  and  94 GHz.  
Susceptibility to unwanted clutter is another aspect which tends to get worse as frequency rises.  Finally, 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
the  uniformity  with  which  power  is  distributed  in  the  vertical  plane  by  a  ground  radar  is  strongly 
dependent on frequency because the number of wavelengths in the height of the aerial determines the 
number  of  interference  lobes  generated  by  ground  reflection.    At  metric  wavelengths,  large  gaps  in 
vertical cover may be unavoidable owing to the small number of lobes. 
11-1 Fig 1 Radar Band Characteristics 
Metric
C
(50-25 cms)
Resolution
Equipment
Power and
and precision
and weight
operating range 
Interference
Radar
E/F
(10 cms)
    increase
   reduce
      reduce
  increases
     Bands
(Wavelength)
I/J
(3 cms)
K
(1 cm)
Aerial Parameters 
12.  The  function  of  a  radar  aerial  during  transmission  is  to  concentrate  the  radiated  energy  into  a 
shaped  beam  which  points  in  the  desired  direction  in  space.    On  reception,  the  aerial  collects  the 
energy contained in the echo signal and delivers it to the receiver.  Thus, in general, the radar aerial is 
called upon to fulfil reciprocal but related roles. 
13.  In  the  radar  equation  derived  in  Volume  11,  Chapter  2,  Para  20  et  al,  these  two  roles  are 
expressed as: 
a. 
Transmitting  Gain  (G).    In  a  transmitting  antenna,  gain  is  the  ratio  of  the  field  strength 
produced  at  a  point  along  the  line  of  maximum  radiation  by  a  given  power  radiated  from  the 
antenna, to that produced at the same point by the same power from an omnidirectional antenna. 
b. 
Effective  Receiving  Aperture  (A).    The  large  apertures  required  for  long-range  detection 
result  in  narrow  beamwidths,  one  of  the  prime  characteristics  of  radar.    Narrow  beamwidths  are 
important if accurate angular measurements are to be made or if targets close to one another are 
to  be  resolved.    The  advantage  of  microwave  frequencies  for  radar  application  is  that  with 
apertures  of  relatively  small  physical  size,  but  large  in  terms  of  wavelength,  narrow  beamwidths 
can be obtained conveniently. 
The two parameters are proportional to one another.  An aerial with a large effective receiving aperture 
implies a large transmitting gain. 
14.  The subject of microwave aerials is no longer discussed in AP 3456 and readers should research via 
other sources. 
Displays 
15.  Once  the  radar  echo  signal  has  been  processed  by  the  receiver  the  resulting  information  is 
presented  on  a  visual  display,  in  a  suitable  form,  for  operator  interpretation  and  action.    When  the 
display  is  connected  directly  to  the  video  output  of  the  receiver,  the  information  displayed  is  called 
RAW  VIDEO.    This  is  the  'traditional'  type  of  radar  presentation.    When  the  receiver  video  is  first 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
processed  by  an  automatic  detector  or  automatic  detection  and  tracking  processor (ADT), the output 
displayed is sometimes called SYNTHETIC VIDEO. 
16.  The  cathode-ray  tube  (CRT)  has  been  almost  universally  used  as  the  radar  display.    There  are 
two basic methods of indicating targets on a CRT: 
a. 
Deflection modulation, in which the target is indicated by the deflection of the electron beam.  
An  example  of  this  is  the  Type  A  scope  (Fig  2),  which  plots  the  amplitude  of  a  received  signal 
against range on a horizontal line. 
11-1 Fig 2 Type A Scope Display (Deflection Modulated) 
Target
Signal
Amplitude
Noise
0
R A N G E
b. 
Intensity  modulation,  in  which  the  target  is  indicated  by  intensifying  the  electron  beam  and 
presenting  a  luminous  spot  on  the  face  of  the  CRT.    The  target  thus  appears  brighter  than  the 
background on the screen.  An example of this is the Plan Position Indicator (PPI) (Fig 3) which 
displays  targets  in  a  polar  plot,  providing  360º  of  azimuth  cover,  centred  on  the  radar’s  position.  
The PPI can be directly correlated with the corresponding geographical map or chart. 
11-1 Fig 3 PPI Display (Intensity Modulated) 
0
R
A
N
G
E
270
0
090
Targets
180
Both methods are capable of indicating multiple targets. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 8 


AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
17.  Two  Dimensional  Displays.   These displays are, of necessity, intensity modulated and may be 
used to display any two of the target’s co-ordinates.  For special purposes, the target co-ordinates can 
be displayed in Cartesian form, directly related to the aerial location, rather than geographical situation.  
Some common examples are: 
a. 
Sector PPI.  A sector of a PPI can be displayed instead of the whole 360º (Fig 4).  This gives a 
relatively  undistorted  picture  of  the  region  which  is  being  scanned  in  azimuth.    The  zero-azimuth 
indicator is normally aligned with the aircraft’s heading or track.  The sector PPI display is commonly 
used  for  weather  mapping,  and  in  tactical  aircraft for ground mapping, where the weight of the radar 
system and aerial size result in fewer penalties than a full PPI display. 
11-1 Fig 4 Sector PPI Display 
Azimuth
0
E
G
N
A
R
b. 
Type B Scope.  The Type B scope (Fig 5) shows range and bearing in Cartesian form.  In 
this  display,  the  zero-range  point  is  expanded  into  a  line  along  the  bearing  axis.    The  B  scope 
display  is  commonly  used  in  fighter  aircraft,  where  the  increase  in  angular  resolution  at  short 
range has advantages over the PPI display. 
c. 
Type C Scope.  The Type C scope shows target position by plotting elevation angle on the 
vertical  scale  against  azimuth  indication  horizontally.    This  is  useful  in  fighter  aircraft,  where  the 
display corresponds to the pilot’s view through the canopy.  The display can be projected onto a 
head-up display.  Fig 6 shows a target high and to the left of the aerial’s fore-aft axis. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-1 - Introduction to Radar 
11-1 Fig 5 Type B Scope Display 
e
g
n
a
R
Target
0
Azimuth
11-1 Fig 6 Type C Scope Display
n
tio
a
0
v
Target
le
E
0
Azimuth
18.  Technological Advances in Displays.  In many radars, solid-state technology has replaced the 
vacuum-tube CRT for displaying target information.  Liquid crystal displays which can operate in high 
ambient  lighting  conditions  are  suitable  for  some  radar  requirements.    The  plasma  panel  has 
applications  as a bright radar display capable of incorporating alphanumeric labels.  Flat displays are 
described in Volume 7, Chapter 29. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
CHAPTER 2 - PULSE RADAR 
Functional Description 
1. 
Pulse  radar  will  determine  the  location  of  a  target  by  measuring  its  range  and  bearing  in  the 
following manner: 
a. 
Range is measured by pulse/time technique (see Volume 11, Chapter 1 Para 10a).  
b. 
Bearing is measured by indication of the aerial’s azimuth during its scanning movement. 
2. 
Fig  1  shows  a  block  schematic  diagram  of  a  typical  pulse  radar  system.    The  functions  of  the 
various component stages are as follows: 
a.
Master  Timer.  The master timer (sometimes referred to as the 'synchronizer') produces timing 
pulses to control the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the radar.  These timing pulses are supplied 
synchronously to: 
(1)  The modulator to trigger the transmitter operation at precise and regular instants of time. 
(2)  The  timebase  generator  of  the  indicator  to  synchronize  the  start  of  the  CRT  run-down 
trace with the operation of the transmitter. 
b.
Modulator.    Upon  receipt  of  each  timing  pulse,  the  modulator  produces  a  square-formed 
pulse of direct current energy to switch the transmitter on and off and so control the pulse width (τ) 
of the transmitter output. 
c.
Transmitter.    The  transmitter  is  a  high-power  oscillator,  usually  a  magnetron.    For  the 
duration  of  the  input  pulse  from  the  modulator,  the  magnetron  generates  a  high-power  radio-
frequency wave.  The wave is radiated into a waveguide, which carries it to the aerial. 
d. 
Transmit-Receive  Switch.    The  Transmit-Receive  (TR)  Switch  controls  the  flow  of  radio 
waves between transmitter, aerial and receiver.  The TR switch is normally a duplexer within the 
waveguides.  A duplexer is a passive device, sensitive to direction of flow of the radio waves.  It 
will  allow  the  waves  from  the  transmitter  to  pass  to  the  aerial,  while  blocking  their  flow  to  the 
receiver.    Similarly,  the  duplexer  allows  the  waves  received  at  the  aerial  to  pass  to the receiver, 
whilst blocking their way to the transmitter. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
11-2 Fig 1 Block Schematic of a Typical Pulse Radar 
Aerial
Azimuth and Elevation Angles of Aerial
Transmit er
TR Switch
Receiver
High Power
Weak Reflected
    Pulses
       Pulses
Switching
   Target
Waveform
Indication
Modulator
Master Timer
Indicator
Trigger Pulses
Trigger Pulses
e.
Aerial.    The  aerial  focuses  the  radiated  energy  into  a  beam  of  the  required  shape  and 
picks  up  the  echoes  reflected  from  the  targets.    Scanning  can  be  achieved  by  moving  the 
complete  aerial  structure  in  azimuth  and/or  elevation.    In  phased  arrays,  scanning  is  done  by 
electronic  means from a fixed aerial.  In both systems, the aerial scan movement is conveyed 
to and replicated in the indicator. 
f.
Receiver.    The  receiver,  which  is  usually  a  superhet,  amplifies  the  very  weak  echoes  and 
presents them to the indicator in a suitable form for display. 
g.
Indicator.  The indicator is often a CRT.  The actual display used will vary according to the 
requirements  of  the  system.    One,  two  or  all  three  target  parameters  (range,  azimuth  and 
elevation) may be displayed. 
Pulse Radar Parameters 
3. 
Pulse  Width.    Fig  2  shows  the  inter-relationship  between  the  basic  parameters  of  pulse  radar.  
The pulse of energy is transmitted when triggered by the Master Timer.  The time duration of a single 
pulse, termed the pulse width, is represented by the period 'τ'. 
11-2 Fig 2 Pulse Radar Parameters 
Interpulse Period (T)
τ
Peak Power
Mean Power
Power
τ
Time
Mean Power
Duty Cycle =         =  
T
Peak  Power
4. 
Pulse Length.  Pulse width may also be expressed in terms of physical length.  The pulse length 
is therefore the distance between the leading and trailing edges of a pulse as it travels through space.  
Pulse length (PL) can be calculated by the following formula: 
PL = τ × c
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
where  τ  is  pulse  width  in  microseconds  (μs)  and  c  is  the  velocity  of propagation (3 × 108 metres per 
second).  Thus, a pulse width of 1 μs equates to a pulse length of 300 metres. 
5. 
The Interpulse Period.  The time period between the start of one pulse and the start of the next 
pulse is the interpulse period (T), also called pulse interval or pulse repetition period. 
6. 
The  Pulse  Repetition  Frequency.    The  pulse  repetition  frequency  (PRF)  is  defined  as  the 
number of pulses occurring in one second.  The interpulse period is the reciprocal of the PRF.  Thus 
for a PRF of 500 pulses per second (pps), the interpulse pulse period is: 
1
T =
sec ond =
,
2 000 micro sec onds ( s
µ )
500
In pulse radars, the PRF normally lies between about 200 and 6,000 pps. 
7. 
The Radar Duty Cycle.  The ratio of the pulse width to the interpulse pulse period (τ/T) is known 
as the duty cycle.  This represents the fraction of time during which the transmitter operates.  The duty 
cycle  controls  the  relationship  between  the  mean  power  of  the  transmitter  (upon  which  depends  the 
operating range of the radar) and the peak pulse power.  As there is a limit to  the  peak power which 
can be handled in a waveguide it is desirable that the duty cycle should be high.  In some cases the duty 
cycle is limited by the rating of the power source, but even when this is not the case the duty cycle cannot 
be  raised  beyond  limits  without  introducing  either  range  ambiguity,  due  to  excessive  shortening  of  the 
interpulse period Tor loss of range resolution due to excessive lengthening of the pulse width, τ. 
PRF and Range Ambiguity 
8. 
Range ambiguity occurs if the pulse transit time to the target and back exceeds the interpulse 
period  T.    If  the  PRF  is  made  too  high,  the  likelihood  of  receiving  target  echoes  from  the  wrong 
pulse transmission is increased. 
9. 
Multiple-time-around Echoes.  Echo signals received after an interval exceeding the interpulse 
period  (T)  are  called  MULTIPLE-TIME-AROUND  echoes.    They  can  result  in  erroneous  or  confusing 
measurements.    Consider the three targets labelled A, B and C in Fig 3a.  Target A is located within 
the interpulse period (T).  Target B is at a distance greater than T but less than twice T, while target C 
is  greater  than  twice  T  but  less than three times T.  The appearance of the three signals on a radar 
display  would  appear  as  shown  in  Fig  3b.    The  multiple-time-around  echoes  (B  and  C)  on  the  display 
cannot  be  distinguished  from  the  proper  target  echo  of  A,  actually  within  the  maximum  unambiguous 
range.  Only the range measured for target A is correct; those for B and C are not. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
11-2 Fig 3 Multiple-time-around Displays 
Fig 3a Multiple-time-around Echoes 
A
B
A
B C A
T
Fig 3b Radar Display 
B
C
A
Fig 3c Use of Varying PRF 
10.  One method of distinguishing multiple-time-around echoes from unambiguous echoes is to operate 
with  a  varying  PRF.    The  echo  from  an  unambiguous  target  will  appear  at  the  same  place  on  the 
display  for  each  sweep  of  the  time-base  no  matter  whether  the  PRF  is  modulated  or  not.    However, 
echoes  from  multiple-time-around  targets  will  be  spread  over  a  finite  range  as  shown  in  Fig 3c.  
Instead of modulating the PRF, other methods of 'marking' successive pulses so as to identify multiple-
time-around  echoes  could  include  changing  the  pulse  amplitude,  pulse  width,  phase,  frequency  or 
polarization of the transmission from pulse to pulse, but these methods are rarely used. 
11.  Maximum Unambiguous Range.  To avoid range ambiguity, it is necessary to choose a value of 
T sufficiently high to permit all possible echoes from one pulse to be received before transmission of 
the  next.    The  PRF  used  will  therefore  determine  the  maximum  range  at  which  targets  can  be 
measured without ambiguity.  The maximum unambiguous range (Runamb) can be calculated: 
c
R
=
unamb
2 × PRF
For example, a typical long range search radar may operate at a PRF of 250 pps. 
0
300,000,00
R
=
metres
unamb
2× 250
600,000
=
metres
= 600 km
= 324nm
1
A more restrictive short range target radar might operate at 1,000 pps, giving an Runamb of 81 nm. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
Range Resolution 
12.  If two targets are close together in range, they may merge into one target on the display.  Pulse 
length  is  the  fundamental  factor  determining  the  ability  of  a  radar  to  resolve  targets  in  range.    It  also 
imposes a theoretical limit to the minimum range, down to which the radar can operate. 
13.  If two targets are separated in range by less than half the radial distance occupied by the pulse, they are 
seen by the radar as a single echo.  Thus a radar using a pulse width of 4 microseconds (i.e. pulse length = 
1200 metres) would be able to discriminate between two targets provided they were separated in range by 
more  than  600  metres.    Similarly,  provided  the  receiver  could  begin  to  function  at  the  instant  the  pulse 
transmission ceased, the smallest range the radar could measure would be 600 metres.  In radar systems 
required to give high resolution, e.g. ground mapping, SAM and AI radars, pulse lengths may be in the region 
of a microsecond or less, but this is only feasible if the PRF can be high. 
Receiver Bandwidth 
14.  The radio frequency (RF) in a pulse radar transmitter is generated at a spot frequency but the effect 
of  pulse  modulation  is  to  cause  the  transmitted  signal  to  consist  of  separate  frequency  components 
spread  across  a  wide  spectrum.    Most  of  the  pulse  energy  is  contained  in  the  components  which  are 
close to the basic RF, and 90% of the energy lies within a frequency band 2/τ MHz wide (where τ is the 
pulse  width  in  microseconds).    It  follows  that  the  shorter  the  pulse  the  more  widely  spread  is  the  pulse 
energy and the greater must be the bandwidth of the receiver in order to accept the echo pulse without 
distortion.  The bandwidth of a pulse radar receiver is normally several MHz and in this major respect it 
differs from a communications receiver which has a bandwidth measured in kHz. 
Pulse Compression 
15.  Pulse  compression  allows  a  radar  to  utilize  a  long  pulse  to  achieve  ample  radiated  energy,  but 
simultaneously  to  obtain  the  range  resolution  of  a  short  pulse.    Pulse  compression  is  a  method  of 
achieving  most  of  the  short  pulse  benefits  outlined  in  para  19  while  keeping  within  the  practical 
constraints of peak-power limitations. 
16.  The degree to which the pulse is compressed is called pulse compression ratio.  It is defined as 
the  ratio  of  uncompressed  pulse  width  to  the  compressed  pulse  width.    The  pulse  compression  ratio 
might  be  as  small  as  10  or  as  large  as  105.    Values  from  100  to  300  might  be  considered  as  more 
typical.    There  are  many  types  of  modulation  used  for  pulse  compression,  but  two  that  have  wide 
applications are: 
a. 
Linear frequency modulation. 
b. 
Phase-code pulse. 
17.  Linear Frequency Modulation In this version of a pulse compression radar the transmission is 
frequency  modulated  and  the  receiver  contains  a  pulse  compression  filter.    The  transmitted  waveform 
consists  of  a  rectangular  pulse  of  constant  amplitude.    The  frequency  increases  linearly  from  f1  to  f2
over  the  duration  of  the  pulse.    On  reception,  the  frequency-modulated  echo  is  passed  through  the 
pulse  compression  filter,  which  is  designed  so  that  the  velocity  of  propagation  through  the  filter  is 
proportional to frequency.  The effect is to produce a narrow pulse output from a wide pulse input. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
18.  Phase-code Pulse.  In this form of pulse compression, a long pulse is divided into a number of 
sub-pulses.  The phase of each sub-pulse is chosen to be either 0 or π radians.  The choice of phase 
for each sub-pulse may be set out as code. 
Application of Short Pulses 
19.  The radar may require short pulse widths for the following purposes: 
a. 
Range Resolution.  It is usually easier to separate targets in the range co-ordinate than in angle. 
b. 
Range  Accuracy.    If  a  radar  is  capable  of  good  range  resolution it is also capable of good 
range accuracy. 
c. 
Clutter Reduction.  A short pulse increases the target to clutter ratio by reducing the clutter 
contained in the resolution cell with which the target competes. 
d. 
Glint Reduction.  In a tracking radar, the angle and tracking errors introduced by a finite size 
target  are  reduced  by  increased  range  resolution  since  it  permits  individual  scattering centres to 
be resolved. 
e. 
Multipath  Resolution.    Sufficient  range  resolution  permits  the  separation  of  the  desired 
target echo from echoes that arrive via scattering from longer paths, or multipath. 
f. 
Minimum Range.  A short pulse width allows a radar to operate with a short minimum range. 
g. 
Target  Classification.    The  characteristic  echo  signal  from  a  target  when  observed  by  a 
short pulse can be used to distinguish one class of target from another. 
h. 
Electronic  Protective  Measures.    A  short  pulse  radar  can  negate  the  operation  of  certain 
electronic  counter  measures  (ECM)  such  as  range  gate  stealers  and  repeater  jammers,  if  the 
response time of the ECM is greater than the radar pulse duration.  The wide bandwidth of a short 
pulse radar also has some advantage against noise jammers. 
The Radar Equation 
20. The  radar  equation  provides  the  basis  for  analysing  radar  system  performance,  and  in  its 
fundamental  form  it  expresses  the  echo  signal  power  (S)  as  a  function  of  the  system  and  target 
parameters: 
P G
σ
S =
×
× A watts
2
2
4 R
π
4 R
π
21.  Fig 4 illustrates the composition of the first group of terms: 
P G
2
4 R
π
which represents the power density in the transmitted wavefront as it passes over the target. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
11-2 Fig 4 Power Density of Transmitted Wavefront 
Transmit ed
Wavefront
P wat s
T
Target
R
Ae
R
P G 
Power Density =  4 π R 
Within the term, the radar pulse peak power P (in watts) is multiplied by the transmitting gain of the 
aerial G, and then divided by the surface area of a sphere of radius R (metres). 
22.  When  the  first  term  is  multiplied  by  the  second  term,  the  result  is  the  power  density  in  the  echo 
wavefront as it returns to the radar aerial (Fig 5).  This assumes that the target re-radiates isotropically 
the whole of the power intercepted over its cross-sectional area of σ.  The power returning to the aerial 
is therefore: 
P G
σ
Power at Echo front =
×
2
2
4 R
π
4 R
π
11-2 Fig 5 Power Density of Returned Echo 
Echo
Wavefront
Ae
T
R
Target 
(o  square
R
    metres)
S wat s
Power Density
P G 
o
of Echo wavefront  = 4 π 
×

4 π R
   
Finally,  multiplication  by  the  effective  receiving  aperture  of  the  aerial,  in  square  metres  (A)  gives  the 
amount of echo power intercepted by the radar.  The received power (S) is therefore: 
P G
σ
S =
×
× A watts
2
2
4 R
π
4 R
π
PGAσ
  or,  S =
watts
(4 )
π 2 R4
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
23.  The maximum detection range of a radar system will correspond to the smallest signal which can 
be satisfactorily recognized.  Expressing this as Smin it follows that: 
4
PGA σ
Rmax = (4 )2
π
m
S in
In  a  pulse  radar  the  factors  G  and  A  are  applicable  to  the  same  aerial  and  are  related  by  the 
expression: 
     G = 4πA/λ2 
It is therefore possible to put the radar equation into two other forms: 
4
2 2
PG λ σ
R max = (4 )3
π Smin
or
4
2
PA σ
R max =
2
4πλ
m
S in
24.  The following observations need to be made on the parameters used in the radar equation: 
a. 
Power.  Detection range depends on the fourth root of transmitted peak power.  Doubling the 
power  therefore  increases  range  by  4 2   (that  is,  by  only  19%),  while  to  double  range  it  is 
necessary to raise the power by 24, ie 16 times. 
b. 
Aerial.  For long range operation the radiated energy must be concentrated into a narrow beam 
for high aerial gain and the received echo must be collected with a large aerial aperture (synonymous 
with high gain).  However, for airborne systems, the increase in aerial size may be unacceptable. 
c.
Wavelength.  Wavelength does not directly influence detection range except in the sense that it 
determines the aerial gain for a given area, or conversely, the area required for a given gain.  Indirectly, 
however,  wavelength  has  a  considerable  bearing  on  the  matter  because  it  sets  an  upper  limit  to  the
peak power which can be handled.  The smaller the wavelength, the smaller the peak power. 
d. 
Minimum  Detectable  Signal.    The  size  of  the  minimum  detectable  signal  depends  on  a 
number of factors, of which the following are the most important: 
(1)  Receiver  Noise.    The  greater the noise in the receiver, the greater must be the signal 
for a given probability of detection. 
(2)  Scanning  Parameters.    The  smaller  the  angular  volume  through  which  the  radar  is 
required to scan, the greater is the proportion of the radiated power which falls on the target 
and  the  greater  is  the  extent  to  which  enhancement  of  the  signal  can  take  place  due  to 
integration of successive pulses. 
(3)  Display Parameters.  The skill of the operator and the persistence of the CRT screen 
both affect the minimum signal that can be detected visually. 
e.
Target Echoing Area.  In the derivation of the radar equation it was assumed that the target re-
radiated isotropically the whole of the energy intercepted over its cross-sectional area.  This is only true 
for a large spherical target; normal targets are complex in shape and do not re-radiate isotropically.  For 
example, a flat-sided target at right angles to the incident wave would reflect nearly all of the intercepted 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-2 - Pulse Radar 
energy back towards the radar, but if slightly inclined from the right angle most of the energy would be 
reflected away from the radar.  Thus for practically no change in the true cross-sectional area the echo 
signal would change drastically.  In order to describe the reflective properties of targets it is necessary to 
adopt a fictitious quantity cal ed echoing area (σ).  For a particular aspect of a target it is the cross-
sectional  area  it  would  need  to  have  in  order  to  account  for  its echo signal, assuming it to re-radiate 
isotropically.  The echoing area of aircraft targets may vary with aspect over very wide limits and give 
differences in echo power of as much as 40 to 1 for as little as 0.3º change of aspect.  Since the aspect 
of a target is continually changing with respect to the radar, partly due to changing position and partly to 
flight  oscillations  and  vibrations,  the  echo  signal  may  fluctuate  at  some  characteristic  period  or 
combination of periods. 
25.  Modifications  of  the  Radar  Equation.    The  simple  radar  equation  discussed  above  does  not 
predict the full range performance of actual radar equipments to a satisfactory degree of accuracy.  It 
assumes free space propagation and takes no account of the effects of ground reflection, atmospheric 
refraction,  absorption  or  diffraction  around  the  Earth’s  surface.    It  also  fails  to  take  into  account  the 
various losses that can occur throughout the system.  It is possible to develop a more complex form of 
the  radar  equation  to  include  these  and  other  factors  which  influence radar range performance.  The 
simple equation, which is applicable to pulse systems, may also be modified to cover the operation of 
any radar system (CW, FMCW, Pulse Doppler, Secondary, Semi-active etc).  A more detailed study of 
the radar equation is, however, outside the scope of this chapter. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 11-3 - Anti-Clutter Noise Techniques 
CHAPTER 3 - ANTI-CLUTTER/NOISE TECHNIQUES 
Introduction 
1. 
In  theory  the  maximum  range  at  which  a  target  can  be  detected  by  radar  could  be  extended 
almost  indefinitely  by  adding  more  and  more  amplifier  stages  to  the  receiver.    The  existence  of 
background noise, both man-made and natural, prevents this in practice, since a stage is reached at 
which  the  level  of  signal  falls  below  the  background  noise  level  and  becomes  obscured  by  it.    If  the 
receiver gain is increased, both signal and noise are amplified equally. 
2. 
Another limiting factor on the performance of a radar receiver is the presence of clutter.  Clutter 
may be defined as any unwanted radar echo.  Its name is descriptive of the fact that such echoes can 
'clutter' the radar output and make it difficult to detect wanted targets.  Examples of unwanted echoes 
include the reflections from land, sea, rain, birds, insects and chaff. 
3. 
This chapter deals with some of the devices and techniques used in radar to limit the effect of noise 
and clutter on receiver performance.  These devices range from such simple circuit refinements as swept 
gain  to  more  complex  systems  such  as  Moving  Target  Indication,  Pulse  Integration  and  Constant  False 
Alarm Rate receivers. 
CLUTTER 
Circuit Refinements 
4. 
Modifications  and  additions  that  can  be  made  to  the  circuits  of  a  normal  radar  receiver  in  an 
attempt to reduce clutter include the following: 
a. 
Swept  Gain.    Clutter  is  worst  at  short  ranges  and  diminishes  along  the  time  base.    The 
swept  gain  control  makes  use  of  this  fact  and  causes  the  receiver  gain  to  be  lowered  at  the 
commencement  of  the  time  base  as  each  pulse  is  fired,  and  thereafter  increases  the  gain 
exponentially with time.  In this way, saturation of the receiver is avoided without the elimination 
of  weaker  signals  from  more  distant  ranges.    In  American  terminology  this  facility  is  called 
Sensitivity Time Control.  (Not to be confused with Fast or Short Time Constant-see para 4b.) 
b. 
Fast  (or  Short)  Time  Constant  (FTC),  (STC).    A  differentiating  circuit  which  only  has  an 
output  when  there  are  increases  in  the  level  of  incoming  signals.    As  a  result,  only  the  leading 
edges of long pulses are displayed. 
c. 
Instantaneous  Automatic  Gain  Control  (IAGC).    A  fast-acting  AGC  circuit  which  lowers 
the receiver gain two or three pulse lengths after receipt of an incoming signal.  Short pulses are 
therefore unaffected and only the leading edges of long pulses are displayed. 
d.
Pulse  length  Discrimination.    Echo  signals  from  wanted  targets  are  rarely  of  greater 
duration than a pulse length or so and this provides a basis for rejecting a large proportion of clutter 
signals, the majority of which are of considerable duration.  Certain types of jamming may also be 
attenuated in this way.  A number of anti-clutter devices discriminate on the basis of pulse length, 
although they may differ considerably in detail, complexity and effectiveness.  The main difficulty is 
that  wanted  signals  of  short  duration  occurring  within  the  period  of  a  rejected  pulse  must  still  be 
displayed.    By  the  use  of  storage  techniques  all  incoming  signals  are  delayed  sufficiently  before 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-3 - Anti-Clutter Noise Techniques 
display  to  permit  their  lengths  to  be  measured.    Those  exceeding  a  few  pulse  lengths  are  totally 
suppressed. 
e
Pulse Interference  Suppression.  This device operates on the  incoming signals in such a 
way that only those occurring at the transmitter repetition frequency are passed to the display.  It 
is,  therefore,  effective  against  interference  from  other  radars  operating  at  different  PRFs  and  to 
non-synchronous pulse jamming. 
f
Dicke Fix.  This is a technique that is designed to protect the receiver from fast sweep noise 
jamming.  It consists of a broad-band limiting IF amplifier followed by an IF amplifier of optimum 
signal bandwidth for the known transmitted frequency.  The wide band amplifier amplifies both the 
noise and the signal.  The limiter which follows cuts the peak noise amplitude associated with the 
signal,  with  the  following  narrow  band  amplifier  limiting  the  bandwidth  to  that  of  the  signal,  thus 
further  excluding  the  unwanted  noise  (Fig  1).    The  reduction  in  noise/jamming  that  can  be 
achieved is in the order of 20 to 40 dB ( 1
1
th to
th ). 
100
10 0
, 00
11-3 Fig 1 Dicke Fix Receiver 
Wide
Noise
Narrow
Maximum
Signal + Noise
Band
Limiter
Band
Signal/Noise
Amp
Amp
Ratio
Noise
f
f
f
f
Signal
Logarithmic Amplifiers 
5. 
The  normal  radar  receiver  has  a  linear  response,  its  output  being  proportional  to  the  received 
signal level.  Once the limit of the output is achieved, further increases in the input can have no effect 
and the receiver is said  to  be saturated.   Saturation can be brought about  by strong responses from 
PEs,  cloud  and  many  types  of  jamming.    Under  these  conditions  wanted  signals  may  either  be 
swamped,  or,  if  the  receiver  gain  is  lowered  in  an  attempt  to  accommodate  the  large  signals,  the 
wanted  signals  may  fall  below  the  visibility  threshold.    An  alternative  receiver  which  may  be  used  in 
these  circumstances  is  one  having  an  amplifier  giving  a  logarithmic  response,  the  output  being 
proportional  to  the  log  of  the  input  amplitude.    This  makes  it  possible  to  receive  even  the  strongest 
signals without saturation and it is an effective way of countering clutter and certain types of jamming.  
Because  the  logarithmic  receiver  amplifies  small  signals  more  than  large  ones  it  has  the  effect  of 
reducing the signal to noise ratio and so reduces the detection range of the radar.  (But this is a small 
price to pay for the ability to see through clutter.) 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-3 - Anti-Clutter Noise Techniques 
Circular Polarization 
6. 
An interesting method of attenuating returns from rain and heavy cloud is to make use of the fact 
that rain-drops,  unlike other targets, are  nearly  perfect spheres  and so return incident  waves  without 
change of polarization whereas complex targets always depolarize signals to some degree.  To exploit 
this fact, it is necessary to radiate circularly-polarized waves.  If the rotational sense of the waves as 
seen  from  the  aerial  is  right-handed,  then  waves  reflected  from  rain  and  cloud  will  be  wholly  left-
handed when seen from the point of reflection.  Returns from complex targets on the other hand, will 
be partly right-handed and partly left-handed.  Now, the characteristics of the aerial are such that it will 
totally reject circularly-polarized  waves of the opposite rotational sense to  that  which  it radiates, thus 
none  of  the  energy  returned  from  rain  and  cloud  should  ever  enter  the  receiver.    In  practice,  some 
energy  does  enter  because  rain-drops  are  not  perfect  spheres  and,  in  addition  to  this,  returns  from 
other  targets  are  weaker  than  would  have  been  the  case  with  plane  polarization.    The  net  result, 
however,  is  a  significant  improvement  in  the  ratio  of  the  amplitudes  of  wanted  to  unwanted  signals.  
Circular polarization is normally brought into action, when required, by interposing a grid (known as a 
quarter-wave  plate)  between  the  aerial  feed  and  the  reflector.    Its  action  is  to  split  the  electric  field 
vector  into  two  equal  components  at  right  angles  to  one  another,  and  to  advance  (or  retard)  one  of 
these by a quarter of a wavelength.  The addition of the two components is then a vector of constant 
amplitude rotating  at the  wave frequency.  In some cases, the transition from plane polarization may 
be progressively through elliptical to circular. 
Moving Target Indication (MTI) 
7. 
Any  target  which  moves  in  relation  to  a  ground  radar  is  likely  to  be  of  interest,  whereas  those 
which do not are normally unwanted.  As the frequency of echoes from moving targets is shifted by the 
Doppler  effect,  this  provides  a  powerful  basis  for  distinguishing  between  wanted  and  unwanted 
targets.    To  recognize  echoes  containing  a  frequency  shift,  a  coherent  frequency  reference  must  be 
established in the radar.  When incoming signals are mixed with this reference, the components from 
moving  targets  vary  in  amplitude  from  pulse  to  pulse  at  the  Doppler  frequency  corresponding  to  the 
relative velocity of the target.  The components of the incoming signals returned from fixed targets do 
not  vary  in  frequency.    By  feeding  signals  which  are  the  algebraic  difference  of  the  outputs  from 
successive  pulses  to  the  display,  the  fixed  echo  components  cancel,  whereas  the  moving  echo 
components always leave a residual signal.  This is achieved by dividing the receiver output into two 
channels.  In one channel the signals are delayed for an interval equal to the pulse period.  The lines 
re-unite at a subtraction unit, the output being the difference between two successive trains of pulses. 
8. 
Application of MTI.  The effectiveness of MTI increases with the number of pulses-per-scan and it 
is  therefore  more  worthwhile  to  apply  MTI  to  a  broad  beamed  radar  than  to  a  narrow  one.    The 
effectiveness may also be increased by employing double or triple cancellation, the cancellation circuits 
being connected in series.  Yet another method is to eliminate the possibility of mis-match between the 
pulse  period  and  delay  line  interval  by  using  the  latter  to  control  the  PRF.    A  refinement  which  may 
sometimes be added is the means of applying Doppler compensation to selected areas of a PPI display 
so as to attenuate returns from moving clouds or rain storms.  (When this is done, fixed echoes within 
the compensated area will re-appear.) The same device is effective against moving 'Chaff' clouds. 
9. 
Blind  Speeds.    A  disadvantage  of  MTI  radars  is  the  existence  of  blind  speeds.    When  the 
component  of  a  target’s  velocity  towards  or  away  from  the  radar  is  equal  to  either  zero,  half 
(wavelength × PRF) or any multiple of that speed, the signals returned from it will not vary from pulse 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-3 - Anti-Clutter Noise Techniques 
to pulse with the result that they will cancel when subtracted.  The lowest blind speed in an MTI radar 
is given by: 
Wavelength (cm)× PRF (pulses per s
  ec) (kt)
103
It is desirable that the first blind speed should be as high as possible but the presence of the PRF in the 
numerator means that this condition is incompatible with a large unambiguous range.  Fig 2 shows the 
relationship  between  blind  speed  and  unambiguous  range  for  representative  wavelengths.    The 
superiority of the longer wavelengths is apparent.  Blind speeds can be avoided by using multiple PRFs 
as discussed in Volume 11, Chapter 5. 
11-3 Fig 2 First MTI Blind Speed as a Function of Unambiguous Range 
10,000
λ =10
λ
0
=
cm
30
λ
c
=
m
t)
1
1,000
0
λ
(k
c
=
m
d
3
e
cm
e
p
S
d
lin
B
t
irs
100
F
10
1
10
100
1,000
Maximum Unambiguous Range (Nautical Miles)
10.  Airborne  MTI.    MTI  has  possible  applications  in  airborne  early  warning,  ASW  radars, 
reconnaissance  radars  and  AI.    The  broad  principles  of  airborne  MTI  do  not  differ  from  those 
described  but  the  methods  of  implementation  may  vary  considerably.    In  order  to  be  able  to  see 
targets which move with respect to the Earth it is first necessary to compensate for the velocity of 
the  radar  carrier.    This  requires  a  false  Doppler  shift  in  the  reference  signal  proportional  to  the 
component  of  aircraft  velocity  along  the  radar  beam.    If  it  is  a  scanning  beam  the  compensation 
must be continually changing. 
NOISE 
False Alarm Rates 
11.  Whenever  the  noise  level  envelope  of  a  receiver  exceeds  the  receiver  threshold,  a  target 
detection is considered to have taken place, by definition (see Fig 3). 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-3 - Anti-Clutter Noise Techniques 
11-3 Fig 3 False Alarms Due to Noise 
)
lts
o
(V
e
Threshold
is
o V
N
T
f
o
e
p
lo
e
Threshold
Rms Noise
v
n
Voltage
Voltage
E
Time
12.  The average time between false alarms, and therefore the rate, is a function of: 
a. 
The threshold level voltage. 
b. 
The receiver bandwidth. 
c. 
The root-mean-square (rms) noise voltage. 
That  is  to  say,  increases  in  threshold  voltage  reduce  the  rate  and  increases  in  bandwidth  and  noise 
voltage increase the rate.  These relationships are depicted in the graphs shown in Fig 4. 
11-3 Fig 4 Average Time Between False Alarms 
100
z
3 days
s
H1
2 days
z
rm
H
la
01
1 day
A
z
e
H
12 h
ls
10
0
a
0
F
1
z
n
)
Hk
e
rs
e
1
u
o
z
tw
H
e
(H
k
B
0
e
1
1
z
1 h
im
H
T
k0
e
0
z
g
1
H
z
ra
M
H
15 min
e
1
M
v
0
A
0.1
1
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Threshold-to-Noise Ratio
Constant False Alarm Rate (Receivers) 
13.  The  false  alarm  rate  is  quite  sensitive  to  receiver  threshold  voltage  level.    For  example,  a  1dB 
change in threshold can result in three orders of magnitude change in false alarm probability.  It does 
not take much of a drift in receiver gain, a change in receiver noise, or the presence of external noise 
or clutter echoes to inundate the radar display with extraneous responses. 
14.  If the changes in false alarm rate are gradual, an operator viewing a display can compensate with 
manual gain adjustment.  It is said that the maximum increase in noise level that can be tolerated with 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-3 - Anti-Clutter Noise Techniques 
a manual system using displays is between 5 dBs and 10 dBs.  But with an automatic detection and 
tracking  system,  the  tolerable  increase  is  less  than  l  dB.    Excessive  false  alarms  in  an  ADT  system 
cause the computer to overload as it attempts to associate false alarms with established tracks or to 
generate  new,  but  false,  tracks.    Manual  control  is  too  slow  and  imprecise  for  automatic  systems.  
Some  automatic,  instantaneous  means  is  required  to  maintain  a  constant  false  alarm  rate.    Devices 
that accomplish this purpose are called CFAR. 
Pulse Integration 
15.  The number of pulses returned from a point target as a radar aerial scans through its beam width 
is a function of the aerial beam width, the scanning rate and PRF.  Typical parameters for a ground-
based  search  radar  might  be  a  PRF  of  300  Hz,  1.5º  beam  width,  and  a  scan  rate  of  5  rpm.    These 
parameters result in 15 hits from a point target per scan.  By summing these returns through a process 
of  integration  the  signal/noise  ratio,  and  therefore  the  detection,  can  be  improved.    All  practical 
integration techniques use some sort of storage device. 
16.  Integration may be accomplished in a radar receiver either before the second detector (in the IF) 
or after the second detector (in the  video).  Integration before  the detector  is called pre-detection, or 
coherent  integration,  while  integration  after  the  detector  is  called  post  detection,  or  noncoherent 
integration.    If  n  pulses,  all  of  the  same  amplitude  would  be  integrated  by  an  ideal  pre-detection 
integrator, the resultant signal/noise ratio would be exactly n times that of a single pulse.  If the same n 
pulses were integrated by an ideal post detection device, the resultant signal/noise ratio would be less 
than n times that of a single pulse.  This loss in integration efficiency is caused by the nonlinear action 
of the second detector, which converts some of the signal energy into noise energy in the rectification 
process.  Although pre-detection integration is more efficient than post detection, the latter is easier to 
implement in most applications. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-4 - Continuous Wave Radar 
CHAPTER 4 - CONTINUOUS WAVE RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
A pulse transmission gives the inherent ability to measure range, permits the use of a single aerial and 
eliminates  the  possibility  that  transmitter  noise  will  interfere  with  the  detection  of  weak  echo  signals.    The 
disadvantages are the breadth of the transmitted spectrum, which necessitates a large receiver bandwidth, 
the finite minimum range, and the need to handle high peak powers in order to achieve the required mean 
power. 
2. 
In  continuous  wave  radar,  the  transmitted  spectrum  is  a  single  frequency  and  the  receiver 
bandwidth may therefore be very narrow.  Moreover, as the duty cycle is unity, the mean power can be 
as high as the available transmitter will permit.  The absence of timing marks in the transmission of a 
pure CW radar means that the ability to measure range is lost but in place of this the coherence of the 
transmission makes it possible to exploit the Doppler shift in the echo signal to resolve target velocity.  
Unlike  pulse  radar,  the  transmitter  is  never  silent,  and  except  at  very  low  power  levels  where  single 
aerial  CW  working  is  possible,  it  is  necessary  to  employ  separate  aerials  for  transmission  and 
reception in order to isolate the receiver from the transmitter. 
Pure CW Radar 
3. 
In  a  pure  CW  radar,  both  the  transmitted  and  received  signals  consist  (for  practical  reasons)  of  a 
single frequency component, but if there is relative velocity between the target and radar, the echo signal 
will  differ  in  frequency  from  the  transmitted  signal  due  to  the  Doppler  effect.    The  magnitude  of  the 
Doppler shift, which is positive for closing velocities and negative for opening velocities, is given by: 
2V
f = ±
d
λ
where: 
fd = Two-way Doppler shift. 
 
 
V = Radial velocity component between target and radar. 
 
 
λ = Transmitted wavelength. 
4. 
A plot of doppler shift as a function of radar frequency and target relative velocity is shown in Fig 1. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-4 - Continuous Wave Radar 
11-4 Fig 1 Doppler Shift 
10,000
knots
5,000
z
1,000
H
2,000
y,
c
1,000
n
e
500
u
q
200
re
F
r
100
le
50
p
p
o
20
D
100
10
knots
5
10
10
100
1,000
10,000
100,000
Radar Frequency, MHz
5. 
The existence of an echo is detected by mixing the incoming signal with an attenuated portion of the 
transmitted signal to produce the difference frequency fd.  The frequency of the output from the mixer is 
therefore  proportional  to  the  radial  velocity  of  the  target,  and  is  zero  for  non-moving  targets.    This  fact 
gives the CW radar the outstanding characteristic of being able to discriminate between fixed and moving 
targets.  A simplified block diagram of the system is shown at Fig 2. 
11-4 Fig 2 Simple CW Radar 
f
Transmitter
f
f + fd
Mixer
fd
6. 
Velocity Resolution.  In order to resolve target velocity it is necessary to determine the sense of 
the  Doppler  shift  fd  and  to  measure  its magnitude.  One way of measuring fd is shown in Fig 3.  The 
output of the mixer is passed to a bank of Doppler filters, each of which is tuned to accept a discrete 
band of frequencies within the Doppler range.  The filter bank is arranged to cover the whole range of 
possible Doppler frequencies and an output from a particular filter indicates the existence of a target at 
the  corresponding  velocity.    The  precision  with  which  velocity  can  be  resolved  is  determined  by  the 
bandwidths of each particular filter in the filter bank, and hence depends on the complexity which can 
be  tolerated  in  the  system.    For  example,  in  order  to  resolve  velocity  to  within  4  kt over a range 0 to 
20,000  kt  it  would  be  necessary  to  employ  500  filters.    The  outputs  of  the  filters  are  interrogated 
sequentially  by  a  fast-acting  electronic  switch  which  looks  across  the  entire  filter  bank  several  times 
during the time required for the radar beam to scan through its beamwidth.  The means of determining 
the sense of the Doppler shift is not shown in Fig 3. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-4 - Continuous Wave Radar 
11-4 Fig 3 Velocity Resolution by Doppler Filters 
fd (1)
fd (2)
fd (3)
fd
To Display or
fd (4)
From
Data Processing
Mixer
fd (n)
7. 
Bandwidth.  The overall bandwidth of a CW radar must be wide enough to encompass the range 
of Doppler frequencies it is required to measure and this will amount to several kilohertz at the most.  
If,  however,  a  Doppler  filter  bank  is  used  to  provide  the velocity resolution, the effective bandwidth is 
that  of  the  individual  filters.    In  an  I-band  radar  capable  of  resolving  velocity  to  4  kt,  the  filters  would 
have a bandwidth of about 125 Hz, which is at least four orders of magnitude less than is the case for a 
pulse radar.  An example is shown in Fig 4. 
11-4 Fig 4 IF/Filter Bandwidths 
Filter No 1
Det
Filter No 2
Det
IF
Filter No 3
Det
Indicator
Amplifier
Filter No 4
Det
Filter No n
Det
IF Bandwidth
f
f
f
f
f
1
2
3
4
n
Frequency
8. 
Characteristics  and  Applications.    The  outstanding  characteristic  of  CW  radar  is  its  ability  to 
see  moving  targets  in  the  presence  of  large  echoes  from  fixed  targets,  to  which  it  is  blind.    It  is  a 
powerful device for the detection of low flying targets and for discriminating against chaff jamming.  It 
will not, however, see moving targets which cross its beam at right angles.  Because of its inability to 
measure range, its use is confined to applications in which this can be provided by separate means, or 
where  range  measurement  is  non-essential,  as  in  ground-to-air  and  air-to-air  guidance  by  active  and 
semi-active means.  Other advantages of the CW radar are its basic simplicity, its ability to utilize high 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-4 - Continuous Wave Radar 
mean  power  and  the  fact  that  it  is  not  subject  to  a  minimum  range  of  operation.    In  airborne 
applications, CW is used for doppler navigation and rate-of-climb in VTOL aircraft. 
Frequency Modulated CW Radar 
9. 
If timing marks are introduced into the transmission of a CW radar by modulating the frequency it 
becomes possible to measure range, but accuracy comparable to pulse radar ranging is only possible 
over very short distances.  Radio altimeters employing FMCW transmissions are a familiar example of 
this  technique  applied  over  distances  of  up  to  5,000  feet  or  so.    In  many  radar  applications  it  is 
sufficient  to  be  able  to  obtain  an  approximate  target  range,  eg in  order  to  establish  when  a  target 
comes within the launch range of a missile.  For such applications, an FMCW radar may be used. 
10.  A  common  form  of  transmission  for  an  FMCW  radar  is  shown  in  Fig  5.    The  frequency  of  the 
transmitted signal (represented by the full line in the upper diagram) is swept linearly with time back and 
forth over the band B.  An echo signal (represented by the broken line) received from a stationary target at 
range R will be of exactly similar form but displaced in time by the interval 2R/C.  The difference frequency 
fR between the transmitted and received signals can be measured and is proportional to the time interval 
2R/C and hence to the target range.  This is the basis of the FMCW ranging technique. 
11-4 Fig 5 Range Measurement of a Stationary Target 
2R
C
T
f
Frequency
R
B
Time
Difference
Frequency
fR
11.  In  the  more  general  case  of  a  moving  target  the  echo  signal  still  has  the  same  form  as  the 
transmitted  signal  but,  in  addition  to  being  displaced  in  time,  it  is  also  displaced  in  frequency  by  the 
Doppler shift fd.  Fig 6 shows the relationship between the transmitted and received signals in the case 
of  a  target  with  a  closing  velocity.    During  the  first  half  of  the  modulation  period  the  frequency 
difference fR due to range is reduced by the Doppler shift fd, while during the second half of the cycle it 
is  increased  by  the  same  amount.    If  the  transmitted  and  received  signals  are  mixed,  as  in  the  pure 
CW radar, the difference frequency will alternate between fR + fd and fR # fd as shown in the lower half 
of Fig 6.  In order to extract both the range and velocity of the target this signal must be processed in 
such a way as to produce the sum and difference of the two components since: 
    (fR + fd) + (fR - fd) = 2fR is proportional to target range, 
and (fR + fd) - (fR - fd) = 2fd is proportional to target velocity. 
12.  Ranging Accuracy.  Ranging accuracy in an FMCW radar is a function of the rate of change of 
frequency in the transmitted signal which, as can be seen from Fig 5, must be high in order to produce 
a  large  change  in  the  difference  frequency  f R   for  a  corresponding  increment  in  range.    This  in  turn 
calls  for  the  swept  frequency  B  to  be  large  or  the  modulation  period  T  to  be  short.    The  former  is 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-4 - Continuous Wave Radar 
undesirable beyond limits because of the spread in the transmitted spectrum which is reflected in the 
receiver bandwidth, and the latter is controlled by range ambiguity considerations.  Only if the ranging 
is  to  be  carried  out  over  short  distances  can  the  modulation  period  be  sufficiently  short  to  permit  the 
accuracy to be comparable to that of a pulse radar. 
11-4 Fig 6 Range Measurement of a Moving Target 
10
10
GHz
KHz
10
20
30 Milli-Seconds
10
Difference
f
Frequency
5
R + fd
(KHz)
0
f

R   fd
The FMCW Altimeter 
13.  The FMCW radar principle is used in the aircraft low-level radio altimeter to measure height above 
the  surface  of  the  earth.    The  relatively  short  ranges  required  permit  low  transmitter  power  and  low 
aerial  gain.    Since  the  relative  motion  between  the  aircraft  and  ground  is  small,  the  effect  of  the 
Doppler frequency shift may usually be neglected. 
14.  The absolute accuracy of radar altimeters is usually of more importance at very low altitudes than at 
high altitudes.  Errors of a few feet might not be significant when operating at 4,000 feet, but are important 
if  the  altimeter  is  part  of  a  blind  landing  system.    Errors  can  be  introduced  into  the  system  if  there  are 
uncontrolled  variations  in  the  transmitter  frequency  and  modulation  frequency.    Multipath  signals  also 
produce errors.  Fig 7 shows some of the unwanted signals that might occur in an FMCW altimeter.  The 
wanted signal is shown by the solid line, while the unwanted signals are shown by broken arrows. 
11-4 Fig 7 Unwanted Signals in an FMCW Altimeter 
Transmitter
Receiver
Aircraft Structure
Wanted
Signal
Ground
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-5 - Pulse Doppler Radar and MTI 
CHAPTER 5 - PULSE DOPPLER RADAR AND MTI 
Introduction 
1. 
Pulse Doppler radar is an attempt to combine, in a single system, the attributes of both pulse and 
CW  radars.    It  employs  a  coherent,  pulsed  transmission  of  high  duty  cycle,  sometimes  described  as 
interrupted  CW,  which  gives  it  the  ability  to  resolve both range and velocity.  Unfortunately, however, 
there  is  an  inherent  incompatibility  between  the  two  processes  which  makes  it  impossible  to  avoid 
ambiguity  in  both  range  and  velocity  at  the  same  time,  and  the  successful  implementation  of  the 
principle hinges on how effectively this incompatibility can be resolved. 
2. 
A  Moving  Target  Indicator  (MTI)  radar,  which  in  the  broadest  sense  is  a  form  of  pulse  Doppler 
radar,  normally  operates  at  a  sufficiently  low  PRF  to  avoid  range  ambiguity,  and,  as  a  result,  suffers 
from blind speeds within the velocity range of interest.  If the Doppler shift could be measured, it would 
be found to correspond to any one of a number of possible target speeds, separated from one another 
by  half  the  interval  between  the  blind  speeds.    In  other  words,  the  velocity  resolution  would  be 
ambiguous.    In  the  true  pulse  Doppler  radar,  the  reverse  situation  applies.    In  this  case,  the  PRF  is 
normally high enough to avoid blind and ambiguous velocities, but, as a consequence, it suffers from 
both blind and ambiguous ranges.  A blind range occurs whenever the pulse transit time is such that 
the echo arrives back during the transmission of a pulse, and, under these conditions, the radar cannot 
be aware of the existence of the target.  There are a number of possible ways in which the blind ranges 
may be alleviated and the ambiguity resolved. 
3. 
The pulse Doppler radar employs a single aerial and the coherent transmission is obtained from a 
power- amplified master oscillator output.  The pulses may be of comparable length to those used in an 
equivalent pulse radar, but the PRF is many times greater and permits a high duty cycle which may well 
approach ½, ie pulse length equal to separation time.  This fact means that it possesses the attribute of  
the CW radar and that it can utilize high mean power without the problem of handling high peak power 
which  occurs  in  pulse  radar.    The  Doppler  information  is  obtained  by  beating  the  echo  signal  with  a 
sample of the transmitter oscillator signal, and velocity resolution is performed by means of filters.  The 
resolution of range, which is fundamentally a timing process, may be performed in one of several ways 
and depends mainly on the method used to sort out the ambiguities.  To appreciate the extent of the latter 
problem it is necessary to examine the overall question of ambiguity in greater detail. 
Range and Velocity Ambiguity 
4. 
The  maximum  range  which  can  be  measured  without  ambiguity  in  a  pulse  radar  is  discussed in 
Volume 11, Chapter 2.  The equation to calculate it is: 
c
R
=
unamb
2 × PRF
Examination of this equation shows that, for a given time interval measured between a returning radar 
echo  and  the  preceding  transmitted  pulse,  the  corresponding  target  range  could  be  any  one  of  a 
number of possible target ranges separated from one another by the distance c/(2 × PRF). 
5. 
There  is  no  equivalent  to  this  situation  in  a  pure  CW  radar  which  can,  theoretically,  measure 
unlimited  velocity.    However,  in  a  pulse  Doppler  radar,  velocity  ambiguity  occurs  because  the 
transmitted  spectrum,  unlike  that  of  a  pure  CW  transmission,  consists  of  a  number  of  discrete 
frequency components centred on the carrier frequency and separated from one another by the PRF.  
As a Doppler shift affects all components alike, the echo pulse consists of an exactly similar spectrum 
in  which  all  components  have  been  translated  to  a  higher  or  lower  frequency  by  the  extent  of  the 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 11-5 - Pulse Doppler Radar and MTI 
Doppler  shift.    If  the  Doppler  frequency  is  detected  by  beating  the  echo  spectrum  with  a  pure  CW 
signal  from  the  master  oscillator,  the  result  is  the  same  whether  the  shift  is  positive  or  negative,  and 
the  highest  fundamental  beat  frequency  which  can  be  produced  is  that  which  occurs  whenever  the 
reference  frequency  lies  mid-way  between  two  of  the  components  of  the  echo  spectrum.    In  other 
words, velocity measurement will become ambiguous if the Doppler frequency shift (2V/λ) is more than 
half the PRF.  The avoidance of this situation requires that the operating PRF should be at least twice 
the highest Doppler frequency which the system must be capable of measuring. 
6. 
Since  the  maximum  unambiguous  velocity  occurs  when  the  Doppler  shift  (2V/λ)  =  PRF/2,  it 
follows that: 
PRF × λ
V
=
unamb
4
which  is  half  the  interval  between  blind  speeds.    To  illustrate  the  mutual  incompatibility  of  high 
unambiguous velocity and range, consider the case of a three centimetre radar (λ = 0.03 m) required 
to resolve velocity unambiguously up to a speed of 1,000 kt (514.8 m/s).  Substituting these values in 
the above equation gives: 
PRF × 0.03
514.8 =
4
514.8× 4
∴ PRF =
0.03
= 68,640 pulses per s econd (pps)
Putting this value of PRF into the equation in para 4: 
3×108
300,000,0 0
0
R
=
=
unamb
2 × 68,640
137,280
= 2185.3 m = (2185.3×5.399×10−4) nm
= 1.18 nm
This result shows that the range information in such a radar would be ambiguous in steps of just over 
one nautical mile.  Moreover, this would also be the interval between the blind ranges. 
Resolution of Velocity Ambiguity 
7. 
The  blind  speeds  of  two  independent  radars  operating  at  the  same  frequency  will  be  different  if 
their pulse repetition frequencies are different.  Therefore, if one radar was 'blind' to moving targets, it 
would  be  unlikely that the other radar would be blind also.  Instead of using two separate radars, the 
same result can be obtained with one radar which 'time-shares' its pulse repetition frequency between 
two or more different values (multiple PRFs).  The pulse repetition frequency might be switched every 
other scan or every time the aerial has scanned a half beamwidth, or the period might be alternated on 
every other pulse.  When the switching is pulse to pulse, it is known as 'Staggered PRF'. 
8. 
An  example  of  the  composite  response  of  a  radar  operating  with  two  separate  pulse  repetition 
frequencies on a time-shared basis is shown in Fig 1. (Tl = 1/PRF1 and T2 = 1/PRF2.)  The pulse repetition 
frequencies  are  in  the  ratio  5:4.    Note  that  the  first  blind  speed  of  the  composite  response  is  increased 
several times over that what it would be for a radar operating on only a single PRF. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 11-5 - Pulse Doppler Radar and MTI 
11-5 Fig 1 Frequency Response for Time-shared PRFs 
1.0
0.8
e
e
s
n
o
0.6
tiv
p
la
s
e
e
0.4
R
R
0.2
0 0
1
2
3
4




T
T
T
T
1
1
1
1
Frequency PRFI
1.0
0.8
e
e
s
n
o
0.6
tiv
p
la
s
e
e
0.4
R
R
0.2
0 0
1
2
3
4
5





T
T
T
T
T
2
2
2
2
2
Frequency PRF2
1.0
0.8
e
e
s
n
o
0.6
tiv
p
la
s
e
e
0.4
R
R
0.2
0 0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
5
4







— —
T
T
T
T
T
2
T
2
T
2
T
2
2
T
1
1
1
1
Frequency Composite
9. 
The closer the ratio Tl:T2 approaches unity, the greater will be the value of the first blind speed.  
However, the first null becomes deeper.  Thus the choice of Tl/T2 is a compromise between the value 
of the first blind speed and the depth of the nulls.  The depth of the nulls can be reduced and the first 
blind speed increased by operating with more than two interpulse periods. 
Resolution of Range Ambiguity 
10.  The recovery of target information in the range gaps is the first step which has to be taken to make a 
practical  pulse  Doppler  system.    This  may  be  done  by  varying  the  PRF  continuously  or  between  discrete 
values, or by transmitting simultaneously at more than one PRF.  The recovery of signal by these means is 
at  the  expense  of  the  signal  outside  the  gaps.    The  same  devices  may  also  be  used  as  the  basis  for 
resolving range ambiguity. 
11.  Another  method  of  resolving  the  ambiguity  is  by  coding  the  transmission  at  a  much  lower 
repetition  frequency,  possibly  by  modulating  the  frequency  as  in  the  FMCW  radar.    Over  long 
distances,  such a system would provide only crude ranging and the fine ranging would be performed 
by  the  pulse  modulation.    Yet  another  method,  is  to  give  the  radar  an  alternative  mode  of  operation 
which can be brought into action periodically, or whenever it is required, to obtain the range of a target.  
In essence, this would consist of reverting to a conventional pulse radar transmission. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 11-5 - Pulse Doppler Radar and MTI 
Applications of Pulse Doppler Radar 
12. The principle attraction of pulse Doppler radar is its ability to combine most of the advantages of 
pulse and CW radars.  These include the ability to resolve both range and velocity, the ability to utilize 
high  mean  power  and  the  fact  that  it  requires  only  one  aerial.    The  advantage  that  echo  detection  is 
carried out while the transmitter is silent, is largely nullified by the loss of signals in the range gaps.  On 
the other hand, the use of a coherent transmission permits the adoption of techniques for the pulse-to-
pulse enhancement of weak echoes, which results in greater detection ranges. 
13.  The  possible  applications  for  pulse  Doppler  radar  cover  a  wide  field;  including  the  long  range 
detection  of  ballistic  missiles,  the  detection  of  low  flying  targets  and  all  MTI  applications.  One  of  the 
most  promising  spheres  is  in  airborne  MTI  systems.    Despite  the  complexity  of  pulse  Doppler  it  is 
probable that it has a greater operational potential than any other radar system yet devised. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
CHAPTER 6 - TRACKING RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
Tracking  radars  are  used  in  applications  demanding  a  continuous  flow  of  target  data  concerning 
discrete targets.  Such a requirement exists in such functions as ballistic missile and satellite tracking, and 
in  active  and  semi-active  guidance  from  ground-to-air,  air-to-air,  and  air-to-ground.    Even  when  an 
operator is involved, as in AI radar, it may be advantageous to employ a radar which is able to follow a 
selected target automatically. 
2. 
The data flow from a tracking radar consists of angle and range information in the case of a pulse 
radar, and angle and velocity in the case of a CW radar.  Angle tracking is performed by slaving the aerial 
to follow the selected target, the echo signals from which are processed so as to provide the controlling 
signals  for  the  steering  servo-motors,  and  the  angle  information  is  derived  from  the  aerial  direction.  
Range tracking is achieved by causing an electronic switching circuit, called a range gate, to operate in 
synchronism with the arrival of echo pulses from the selected target.  The range information is taken from 
the signal controlling the time of opening of the gate in the pulse cycle.  Velocity tracking is carried out by 
means of a tuneable oscillator which is constrained to oscillate at a frequency bearing a fixed relationship 
to that of the selected Doppler echo signal.  The velocity information is obtained from the signal controlling 
the oscillator frequency. 
3. 
Before  it  can  track,  the  tracking  radar  must  first  acquire  its  target.    The  initial  search  may  be 
performed by a separate radar which determines the target’s coordinates with sufficient accuracy to put 
the tracking radar on to it, or the tracking radar may perform its own search by operating in a scanning 
mode.    Neither  arrangement  is  ideal,  the  former  because  of  its  inconvenience  and  complication 
(particularly in an airborne system) and the latter because the narrow pencil beam required to track in 
two coordinates is unsuitable for searching a large angular volume. 
Angle Tracking 
4. 
In order to track a target in two angular coordinates, as defined by the aerial steering axes, error 
signals  must  be  generated  proportional  to  the  two  components  of  its  angular  displacement  from  the 
tracking axis.  These signals may then be used to activate the corresponding steering servos so as to 
drive the tracking axis into coincidence with the line to the target.  The required signals may either be 
generated  sequentially  by  conical  scanning  or  sequential  lobing  techniques,  or  they  may  be  obtained 
simultaneously by the monopulsing technique. 
5. 
Conical Scanning.  In conical scanning, the beam axis is displaced through a small angle from 
the  tracking  axis  and  is  rotated  in  such  a fashion that it describes a cone, as depicted in Fig 1.  The 
effect may be produced by rotating an offset feed in a concentric reflector, in which case the plane of 
polarization rotates with the beam; or by wobbling the reflector behind a stationary feed, in which case 
the polarization is unaffected.  In the direction of the rotation axis (A in the figure) the gain of the beam 
is  constant  irrespective  of  its  position,  but  in  any  other  direction  the  gain  of  the  beam  varies  as  the 
beam rotates.  Thus, a target which does not lie in the direction of the tracking axis, for example in the 
directions  B  or  C,  will  give  rise  to  echo  signals  which  vary  in  amplitude  within  the  corresponding 
envelopes shown in the lower part of the figure.  The amplitude of the echo modulation is proportional 
to  the  displacement  of  the  target  from  the  tracking  axis,  and  the  sense  of  the  displacement,  and  is 
determined  by  relating  the  phase  of  the  modulation  to  a  reference  signal,  shown  in  the  centre  of  the 
figure, generated by the beam rotating mechanism.  The two signals are processed in such a way as to 
produce error signals proportional to the two components of angular displacement and these cause the 
appropriate steering servo-motors to drive the aerial so as to reduce the error to zero.  Once the aerial 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
is  tracking  the  target,  its  direction  is  a  mechanical  analogue  of  the  required  angular  information  and 
may be converted into electrical signals for subsequent processing. 
11-6 Fig 1 Conical Scanning 
Beam Position at t1
Antenna
B
A
C
Beam Position at t2
Scanner
Signal
t2
Reference
t1
t
Amplitude
B
Detector
Output
A
t
C
6. 
Sequential  Lobing.    Sequential  lobing  is  a  less  common  technique  in  which  the  beam  is 
generated  sequentially  in  each  of  four  directions  symmetrically  disposed  about  the  tracking  axis,  as 
shown  in  Fig  2.    The  effect  may  be  produced  by  means  of  a  single  reflector  and  four  offset  feeds  to 
which the receiver is connected in sequence.  The transmission may also take place sequentially or it 
may  be  made  in  all  four  beams  simultaneously.    Fig  3  illustrates  the  principle  applied  in  a  single 
coordinate.    As  in  conical  scanning,  the  echo  from  a  target  not  lying  on  the  tracking axis varies from 
beam to beam and may be processed in a similar fashion to obtain the error signal needed to drive the 
aerial  into  coincidence  with  the  target.    The  reference  signal  in  this  case  is  taken  from  the  beam-
switching device and each opposite pair of beams is placed in the plane of an aerial steering axis. 
11-6 Fig 2 Beam Configuration for Sequential Lobing and Monopulsing 
Tracking
Point
Antenna
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
11-6 Fig 3 Sequential Lobing 
Switching Axis
Target
Target
Lobe 1
Lobe 2
Angle
Polar
Rectangular
Representation
Representation
e
d
litu
p
m
A
Time
Error Signal
Lobe 1 Signal
Lobe 2 Signal
7. 
Both conical scanning and sequential lobing systems suffer from the limitation that any modulation 
in  the  echo  signal  occurring  during  the  scanning  cycle  will  cause  false  signals  to  be  passed  to  the 
steering servos.  This can arise because of signal amplitude changes due to changes of target aspect, 
and  if  this  modulation  coincides  with  a  harmonic  of  the  scanning  frequency,  may  cause  the  tracking 
system to unlock.  The same effect can be produced by a form of repeater jammer which senses the 
scanning  rate  and  sends  back  false  echoes,  amplitude  modulated  at  the  scanning  rate,  which  may 
cause  the  aerial  to  be  steered  away  from  the  target.    The  susceptibility  of  conical  scanning  and 
sequential lobing systems to this defect may be reduced by employing variable PRF in a pulse radar, 
or variable scanning rate in either pulse or CW radars. 
8. 
Monopulse  Tracking.    Monopulse  tracking,  also  called  simultaneous  lobing,  is  achieved  by  a 
similar beam configuration to that used in sequential lobing, but with the important difference that both 
transmission and reception take place in all four beams simultaneously.  The error signals, proportional 
to  the  differences  in  the  outputs  of  opposite  beams,  are  derived  directly  by  suitable  waveguide 
connections at the aerial.  As these signals are generated with each successive pulse (or continuously 
in a CW radar) the monopulse system is not susceptible to the effects of amplitude fluctuation due to 
target  aspect  changes  or  deceptive  repeater  jamming.    Further,  since  all  the  tracking  information  is 
gained from one pulse as compared with four pulses for a typical sequential lobe system, the data rate 
for a monopulse system is higher. 
Range Tracking 
9. 
Range tracking might be required to provide data for trajectory computation, a guidance system, 
weapon release information or merely for the purpose of confining the angle tracking circuits to echoes 
coming from the range of the selected target in a multiple target situation. 
10.  The  range  gates  which  perform  the  tracking  are  electronic  switching  circuits  which  sample  the 
time base once during each pulse cycle.  There are usually two such gates, each about a pulselength 
in duration, which operate in sequence; the late gate opening as the early gate closes.  Fig 4 will serve 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
to illustrate the principle of operation.  When the gates are placed in the vicinity of the selected target 
echo,  which  may  be  achieved  manually  or  by  automatic  search,  the  energy  contents  of  the  echo 
components in the gates are compared in the tracking circuits.  The difference is used to generate an 
error signal which causes the gates to be driven in the appropriate direction to straddle the target echo.  
Thereafter the gates will follow the movement of the echo on the time base and the signal controlling 
the time of opening of the gates in the pulse cycle provides an electrical analogue of range.  Memory 
circuits are normally provided to keep the gates moving at the last target velocity in the event that the 
echo  should  temporarily  fade.    Provision  may  also  be  made  to  prevent  the  tracking  circuits  from 
responding to excessive changes in target velocity simulated by false signals returned from a form of 
deceptive repeater jammer called a 'gate stealer'. 
11-6 Fig 4 Range Tracking by Split Range Gate 
Echo Pulse
Time
Early
Late
Gate
Gate
Time
Early
Gate
Signal
Time
Late
Gate
Signal
Velocity Tracking 
11.  Velocity  tracking  in  a  CW  radar  is  performed  by  means  of  a  frequency  comparator.    This  may 
consist  of  a  voltage-tuned  oscillator  and  a  frequency  discriminating  device  which  generates  an  error 
signal whenever the frequency of the oscillator differs from that of the selected Doppler signal, or from 
some fixed relationship with it.  The error signal causes the oscillator frequency to change in the sense 
needed  to  reduce  the  error  signal  to  zero,  and  the  voltage  controlling  the  oscillator  frequency  then 
provides the required analogue of target velocity.  The tracking oscillator must be manually adjusted to 
establish the initial lock onto the selected signal, or it must be capable of searching across the Doppler 
spectrum  automatically.    Memory  circuits  are  required  to  prevent  the  oscillator  unlocking  during 
temporary fading of the target signal, and the system must be made insensitive to excessive changes 
in frequency falsely simulated by deceptive jamming. 
Track-While-Scan 
12.  An  alternative  method  of  target  tracking  is  to  employ  a  radar  which  scans  continuously  within  a 
defined angular volume, and a computer which memorizes the coordinates of targets and anticipates their 
positions on successive scans.  This technique, called track-while-scan, is capable of providing multiple 
target tracking and is therefore suitable for command guidance. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
13.  With  track-while-scan  techniques  the  tracking  function  is  performed  by  the  computer,  and  the 
special  characteristic  of  the  radar  which  distinguishes  it  from  a  conventional  search  radar  is  its  high 
data  rate  which,  in  some  applications,  may  be  of  the  order  of  hundreds  of  scans  per  minute.    Such 
scanning rates can only be achieved by electronic or electro-mechanical means and, depending on the 
angular coverage, it may also be necessary to employ a multiplicity of beams. 
14.  High  Speed  Scanning.    High  speed  scanning  is  achieved  by controlling the relative phase of the 
radiated signal across the aerial aperture in such a way that the wave front is inclined from the parallel.  
The total angle through which the beam can be steered is less than 180º.  True electronic scanning can 
be achieved by use of a multiple element phased array, or planar array, in which the control of the relative 
phases of the radiated signals is achieved by purely electronic means.  Such techniques permit more than 
one beam to be generated at any time and there is no limit to the scanning rate possible.  Electronic beam 
steering techniques are not confined to track-while-scan radars. 
15.  Electro-mechanical  Track-while-scan.    The  term  track-while-scan  is  sometimes  used  to 
describe those first-generation radars, predominantly electro-mechanical devices, which use twin radar 
beams set mutually at 90º to search in azimuth and elevation simultaneously.  When a target is found, 
the aerials can be rotated mechanically to centre the target in the middle of each beam, and thus track 
its movement (Fig 5).  However, the term 'track-while-scan' is a misnomer for these systems because, 
during target tracking, search capability is either inhibited totally or restricted to a small area centred on 
the  single  discrete  target  already  being  tracked.    A  refinement  to  this  elementary  system  was  to  add 
extra  aerials  to  deal  with  tracking  only.    Although  limited  in  their  effectiveness,  large  numbers  of  this 
early radar type remain in service. 
11-6 Fig 5 Electro-mechanical Track-while-scan Radar 
Overlap Area
Tracks Target
Elevation
Beam
Azimuth
Aerials
Beam
Acquisition 
16.  A tracking radar must first find and acquire its target before it can operate as a tracker.  Therefore, it is 
usually  necessary  for  the  radar  to  scan  an  angular  sector  in  which  the  presence of a target is suspected.  
Most tracking radars employ a narrow pencil beam aerial.  Searching a volume in space for an aircraft target 
with  a narrow pencil beam would be somewhat analogous to searching for a fly in a darkened auditorium 
with  a  hand  torch.    It  must  be  done  with  some  care  if  the  entire  volume  is  to  be  covered  uniformly  and 
efficiently.  Examples of the common types of scanning patterns are illustrated in Figs 6 to 8.  A Palmer scan 
is  a  conical  scan  superimposed  onto  another  pattern.    Fig  9  illustrates  a  Palmer-Raster  scan  pattern.  
Similarly, it is possible to have Palmer-Helical and Palmer-Spiral scan patterns. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
11-6 Fig 6 Helical Scan Pattern 
11-6 Fig 7 Spiral Scan Pattern 
11-6 Fig 8 Raster Scan Pattern 
11-6 Fig 9 Palmer-Raster Scan Pattern 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-6 - Tracking Radar 
Tracking Errors 
17.  The accuracy of a tracking radar is influenced by such factors as the mechanical properties of the 
radar  aerial  and  mounting,  the  method  by  which  the  angular  position  of  the  aerial  is  measured,  the 
quality  of  the  servo  system,  the  stability  of  the  electronic  circuits,  the  noise  level  of  the  receiver,  the 
aerial  beamwidth,  atmospheric  fluctuations,  and  the  reflection  characteristics  of  the  target.    These 
factors can degrade the tracking accuracy by causing the aerial beam to fluctuate in a random manner 
about the true target path.  These noise-like fluctuations are sometimes called tracking noise, or jitter. 
18.  A  simple  radar  target  such  as  smooth  sphere  will  not  cause  degradation  of  the  angular  tracking 
accuracy.  The radar cross section of a sphere is independent of the aspect at which the sphere is viewed; 
consequently, its echo will not fluctuate with time.  However, most targets are of a more complex nature than 
a sphere.  The amplitude of an echo signal from a complex target may vary over wide limits as the aspect 
changes with respect to the radar.  In addition, the effective centre of the radar reflection may also change.  
Both these effects - the amplitude fluctuations and the wandering of the radar centre of reflection (glint) - as 
well as the limitation imposed by the receiver noise, can limit the tracking accuracy. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
CHAPTER 7 - DOPPLER NAVIGATION RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
Doppler navigation radar is an airborne radar which relies on the Doppler effect to determine the 
aircraft’s  ground  speed  and  drift.    The  values  may  be  continuously  displayed,  or  transmitted  to  other 
equipment such as a navigation computer. 
The Doppler Effect 
2. 
The  Doppler  effect  describes  the  apparent  change  in  pitch  that  occurs  when  a  sound  source  is 
moving relative to an observer.  The same effect occurs with electromagnetic waves.  
3. 
Fig 1 shows a stationary transmitter transmitting a signal of f Hz towards a stationary receiver, the 
circles  representing  successive  wavefronts.    Providing  that  the  medium  of  transmission  is 
homogeneous, the wavefronts will be equally spaced and the receiver will detect a frequency identical 
to that transmitted. 
11-7 Fig 1 Stationary Transmitter and Receiver 
Tx
Rx
4. 
Fig 2 shows the situation where the transmitter is moving towards the receiver at a velocity of V m/s.  
The first wavefront is centred on position 1, the second on position 2 and so on.  The overall effect is to 
decrease the wavefront spacing in front of the transmitter, which will appear to the receiver as an increase 
in the received frequency.  Behind the transmitter the wavefront spacing is increased and so a receiver 
placed there would experience a reduced frequency. 
11-7 Fig 2 Transmitter Moving Successive Wave-Fronts 
Tx →
Rx
1 2 3 4
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
5. 
The  change  in  frequency,  known  as  the  Doppler  shift  (fd),  is  proportional  to  the  transmitter’s 
velocity such that: 
Vf
f
=
d
c
where c is the speed of propagation of the electromagnetic waves (approx 3 × 108 m/s for radio waves 
in air).  Since the transmitted frequency, f, and wavelength, λ, are related by: 
λ = c/f 
fd may be written as V/λ. 
6. 
The same Doppler shift is apparent with a stationary source and a moving receiver.  In the case 
of an airborne radar, the transmitter and receiver are collocated and the radar energy is reflected by 
the  ground.    When  the  energy  reaches  the  ground  from  the  moving  transmitter  it  undergoes  a 
Doppler shift to produce a frequency of (f + Vf/c) and it is this frequency which is reflected back to 
the aircraft.  The situation is now that of a stationary transmitter (the ground) and a moving receiver 
which therefore detects a further Doppler shift of Vf/c.  Thus compared to the transmitted frequency, 
f,  the  receiver  detects  a  total  frequency  change  of  2Vf/c.    Since  both  f  and  c  are  known,  if  the 
change in frequency can be measured a value for V can be determined and it is this principle which 
is used in Doppler navigation radars to determine groundspeed.  
Doppler Measurement of Groundspeed 
7. 
Fig 3 illustrates the general principle of groundspeed measurement in which a narrow radar beam 
is transmitted forwards and downwards from the aircraft at an angle, θ, cal ed the depression angle.  In 
this  situation,  the  difference  in  frequency  between  the  transmitted  signal  and  the  echo  received  from 
2Vf
the ground will be 
cos θ , where V is the aircraft groundspeed. 
c
11-7 Fig 3 Principle of Doppler Groundspeed Measurement 
Depression
Angle θ
Echoes
Tx Pulses
Scattered Energy
Surface
8.  The choice of depression angle for the beam is a matter of compromise.  If θ is small, the beam 
strikes the terrain at a shallow angle and less energy will be reflected back to the aircraft than would 
be the case with a steeper beam.  Conversely, if θ is made large its cosine becomes small and the 
2Vf
value of 
cos θ  may become too small for accurate measurement.  In practice the value of θ is 
c
usually between 60º and 70º. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
9. 
Operating Frequency.  The Doppler frequency to be measured, fd, equates to about 34 Hz per 
100  MHz  of  transmitter  frequency  per  100  knots,  multiplied  by  the  cosine  of  the  depression  angle.  
Since this represents a very small proportion of the transmitted frequency, it is necessary for this to 
be high in order to obtain a value for fd which can be measured with sufficient accuracy.  In practice, 
two frequency bands have been allocated to Doppler systems, one centred on 8.8 GHz generating a fd
of  about  1.5  KHz  per  100 kt,  and  the  other  on  13.3  GHz  giving  a  fd  of  about  2.3  KHz  per  100  kt 
(assuming a depression angle of 60º). 
Single Beam Systems 
10.  So  far  the  system  described  has  used  a  single  fixed  beam  radiating  forwards  and  downwards 
from  the  aircraft  as  shown  in  Fig  3.    The  Doppler  shift  would be the same if the beam were directed 
rearwards  and  downwards,  although  the  received  frequency  would  in  that  case  be  less  than  the 
transmitted  frequency  i.e.  –fd.    However,  such  a  single  beam  system  would  have  a  number  of 
disadvantages: 
a. 
Transmitter  Instability.    High-powered  I/J-band  transmitters  tend  to  suffer  from  some 
instability of frequency and if the frequency should drift between the time of transmission and the 
time of reception of the reflected signal an incorrect fd would be measured leading to an error in 
measured groundspeed. 
b. 
Pitch  Error.    Unless  the  aerial  was  stabilized  in  the  pitching  plane,  the  depression  angle 
would be dependent on the attitude of the aircraft.  Thus deviations from level flight would result in 
changes  to  fd  even  if  the  horizontal  velocity  of  the  aircraft  remained  constant.    The  consequent 
errors in computed groundspeed would be significant, typical values being 3% for 1º of pitch and 
15% for 5º of pitch. 
c. 
Vertical  Motion.    Any  vertical  motion  of  the  aerial  would  generate  a  Doppler  shift  not 
associated with a change in groundspeed.  
d. 
Drift Error.  In a fixed single aerial system the Doppler shift would be measured horizontally 
along  the  direction  of  the  beam,  thus  velocity  would  be  calculated  along  heading,  whereas 
groundspeed is measured along track.  This error could be eradicated by rotating the aerial until a 
maximum Doppler shift was obtained, at the same time determining the drift angle by the amount 
of  aerial  rotation.    However,  this  technique  is  imprecise  in  practice  and  is  not  used  any  longer 
even in multiple beam systems. 
Two Beam Systems 
11.  Some of the errors inherent in a single beam system can be significantly reduced by employing 
two beams, one directed forward and the other rearward; the multiple beam arrangement is shown 
in Fig 4, in which both beams are depressed with respect to the horizontal.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
11-7 Fig 4 Two Beam System 
Depression
Depression
Angle θ
Angle θ
Surface
12.  The  frequency  of  the  signal  received  from  the  forward  beam,  fr,  is  higher  than  the  transmitted 
frequency, f, by an amount equal to the Doppler shift, fd, i.e.: 
fr = f + fd
The frequency received from the rearward beam has a negative Doppler shift of the same magnitude, i.e.: 
fr = f − fd
In a two beam system these two received signals can be mixed together and the difference frequency 
extracted as a beat frequency, fb, such that: 
fb = (f + fd) − (f – fd) = 2fd
4Vf
ie
cos θ
c
13.  The  beat  frequency  produced  by  a  two  beam  system  has  twice  the  value  of  that  from  a  single 
beam  allowing  greater  precision  in  the  measurement  of  groundspeed.    Variations  in  transmitter 
frequency  become  less  important  as  such  changes  affect  the  forward  and  rearward  echo  signals 
equally,  and  are  therefore  cancelled  when  taking  the  difference frequency.  Similarly, any changes in 
the aircraft’s vertical speed will be sensed by both beams and will be cancelled.  Pitch errors will cause 
an increase in depression angle for one beam and a decrease in depression angle for the other beam, 
which  although  not  providing  complete  compensation  does  reduce  the  errors  significantly;  5º  of  pitch 
will cause an error of around 0.38%.  However, such a two beam system cannot be used to determine 
drift accurately and most modern systems use four or three beam arrangements.  
Four and Three Beam Systems 
14.  Four  beam  systems,  known  as  Janus  arrays,  provide  for  the  accurate  measurement  of  both 
groundspeed and drift.  Consider a rotatable system of 4 beams arranged as in Fig 5a, radiating alternately 
in pairs, e.g. A and A1 for a half second, B and B1 for the next, and so on.  In this example there is zero drift 
and the beams are disposed symmetrically about the aircraft heading which is also the track, i.e.: 
fd (A + A1) = fd (B + B1)            (see Fig 5b) 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
11-7 Fig 5 Four Beam System - Zero Drift 
Fig 5a Plan View 
Fig 5b Frequency Spectra 
Aircraft Heading
and Track
Amplitude 
of Received
f
B
A
Signals
d from A & A1
fd from B & B1
Aircraft with
Identical Spectra
Zero Drift
from Both Beams
A
Frequency
1
B1
15.  Fig  6a  illustrates  the  case  when  the  aircraft  has  port  drift.    Before  the  drift  angle  has  been 
resolved, the two sets of beams A and A1 and B and B1 are, as before, positioned symmetrically about 
the aircraft heading.  Under these conditions the Doppler shift obtained from beams B and B1 is greater 
than that from beams A and A1, as shown in Fig 6b. 
11-7 Fig 6 Four Beam System - Port Drift 
Fig 6a Plan View 
Fig 6b Frequency Spectra 
Aircraft
Aircraft
Track
Heading
Amplitude 
fd from A & A1
B
A
of Received
Signals
fd from B & B1
Uncorrelated Spectra
due to Drift
Wind
Frequency
A1 B1
The difference in frequency is converted into an error voltage which rotates the aerial assembly to the 
null position in which A and A1 and B and B1 are symmetrical about the aircraft track, and the Doppler 
shifts  from  each  set  are  the  same  (Fig  7).    The  angle  of  movement  of  the  aerial  assembly  is  then 
reproduced as a drift indication. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
11-7 Fig 7 Four Beam System - Port Drift but with Aerial Aligned with Track 
Fig 7a Plan View 
Fig 7b Frequency Spectra 
Aircraft
Aircraft
Track
Heading
Amplitude 
A
f
B
of Received
d from A & A1
Signals
fd from B & B1
Spectra merge after
Aerial alignment with Track
Wind
Frequency
B 1
A 1
16.  Most modern lightweight systems in fact use a fixed aerial system with only 3 beams in which the 
Doppler  shifts  are  derived  individually,  and  mixed  electronically  to  resolve  the  horizontal  and  vertical 
velocities.  Such a system is illustrated in Fig 8. 
11-7 Fig 8 Three Beam Fixed Aerial Arrangement 
Heading
Heading
Transmission Types 
17.  Either  pulsed  or  continuous  wave  (CW)  transmissions  can  be  used  in  Doppler  equipments.    CW 
equipments have the advantage that less power is required (typically 100 mW), but they may be affected 
by  misleading  signals  reflected  from  vibrating  parts  of  the  aircraft  structure,  or  more  commonly  from 
appendages  such  as  weapons  and  fuel  tanks.    This  problem  is  overcome  in  some  systems  by  using 
frequency modulated CW (FMCW), which permits the rejection of signals which have been reflected from 
nearby objects. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
18.  In pulsed systems the pulse recurrence frequency (PRF) must not be allowed to produce spurious 
signals in the Doppler frequency band and is therefore made very high, usually at least twice as high as 
the highest expected Doppler frequency. 
Beam Shapes 
19.  The  analysis  so  far  has  assumed  that  the  radar  energy  is  transmitted  in  pencil  beams,  each  of 
which is reflected at any instant from a single point on the ground.  However, in reality the beams must 
have a finite width and must illuminate a finite area of ground.  The total reflected signal at each aerial 
is therefore composed of the vector sum of signals from a very large number of reflecting points.  The 
Doppler  frequency  shift  from  any  reflecting  point  is  proportional  only  to  the  speed  of  the  aircraft,  the 
angle between the line of flight and the transmitted beam, and the frequency.  It is independent of the 
distance  of  the  reflecting  point  from  the  aircraft  and  so  the  same  Doppler  shift  is  produced  over  flat 
terrain as over more mountainous country.  
20.  The Doppler frequency change is proportional to the cosine of the angle between the line of flight 
and the beam and thus al  reflecting points which lie on the surface of a cone of semi-angle θ, whose 
fV
axis  coincides  with  the  direction  of  motion,  produce  a  Doppler  frequency  of  2
cos θ.     Thus  if  the 
c
transmitted beams are so shaped as to form parts of conical surfaces, a groundspeed measurement 
may  be  obtained  as  accurate  and  unambiguous  as  that  from  pencil  beams.    This  arrangement  is 
illustrated in Fig 9 and the beams are achieved by an aerial system known as a 'squinting linear array'. 
11-7 Fig 9 A Practical Doppler Beam Shape 
21.  The areas of ground illuminated by the beams lie on hyperbolae (Fig 10).  The width of a beam 
along such a hyperbola is known as the broadside beamwidth and is commonly of the order of 9º or 
10º.  The depression beamwidth is the nominal beamwidth of the cone measured in a vertical plane 
through  the  aerial  axis  and  is  normally  around  5º.    Smaller  depression  beamwidths  result  in  more 
accurate  Doppler  shift  measurement,  and  make  the  system  less  susceptible  to  sea  bias  error 
(see para  27).    The  angle  in  the  rolling  plane  between  the  vertical  and  the  beams  is  known  as  the 
broadside angle.  Although a large broadside angle allows sensitive drift measurement, if it is made 
too large there will be an unacceptable decrease in the power of return signals. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
11-7 Fig 10 Beam Parameters 
Aircraft
Depression
Heading
Angle
Broadside
Angle
Depression
Beamwidth
Broadside
Beamwidth
Beam C
90°
Beam B
Aircraft
Beam A
Heading
Hyperbolic Lines of Constant
Doppler Frequency
Frequency Spectrum 
22.  Although the beams have been described as forming part of the surface of a cone, they do in fact 
have some thickness represented by the depression beamwidth.  Each part of the beam therefore has 
a  different  depression  angle,  and  since  the  Doppler  shift  is  proportional  to  the  cosine  of  depression 
angle,  the  reflected  signal  does  not  have  a  single  frequency,  but  is  composed  of  a  spectrum  of 
frequencies.    Fig  11  shows  an  idealized  spectrum  with  the  signal  strength  plotted  against  a  range  of 
Doppler frequencies.  Steeper depression angles result in broader spectra, and the shape depends on 
the  polar  diagram  of  the  beam.    A  frequency  tracker  is  used  to  determine  the  mid-point  of  the 
frequency spectrum.  
11-7 Fig 11 Idealized Doppler Spectrum 
Signal
Measured fd
Strength
Frequency
Spectrum
Over Land
9.4
9.6
9.8
10.0
10.2 10.4
10.6
f  (kHz)
d
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
Frequency Tracking 
23.  The determination of fd from the spectrum of Doppler frequencies is accomplished by a frequency 
tracker  device,  which  is  electro-mechanical  in  older  equipments,  and  electronic  in  more  modern 
lightweight 3-beam systems. 
24.  Electro-mechanical Frequency Tracking.  Electro-mechanical systems employ a device known 
as a phonic wheel oscillator which produces an oscillatory output voltage.  The frequency can be varied 
over the range of the Doppler spectrum by varying the speed of rotation of the phonic wheel shaft.  In 
older 'two-window' systems two oscillators are used, the output frequencies of each differing by a fixed 
amount.  The incoming Doppler signal is fed to two discriminator circuits, to one of which is also fed the 
lower phonic wheel frequency and to the other the higher.  The output of each discriminator is a measure 
of  the  energy  contained  in  a  narrow  window  of  the  Doppler  spectrum  centred  on  the  phonic  wheel 
frequency.  If the two discriminator outputs are equal, the two windows contain equal amounts of energy, 
and must therefore be symmetrically disposed around the centre frequency as in Fig 12a.  If the outputs 
are different, the windows are displaced from the symmetrical position as in Fig 12b, and the difference in 
outputs  is  used  as  an  error  signal  to  realign  the  phonic  wheel  frequencies  until  parity  is  achieved.    In 
single line tracking systems a single phonic wheel oscillator is used.  The Doppler spectrum is applied to 
two  mixer  circuits,  each  of  which  is  also  fed  with  the  phonic  wheel  frequency,  but  with  a  90º  phase 
difference to each.  The output of the mixers is fed to a two phase motor (integrator motor), which turns in 
one  direction  if  the  phonic  wheel  frequency  is  higher  than  the  mid  Doppler  frequency,  and  in  the  other 
direction if it is lower.  The movement of the integrator motor is used to vary the phonic wheel frequency 
until there is no movement from the integrator motor.  The phonic wheel shaft speed is then proportional 
to the Doppler mid frequency and may be used to drive indicators and computers. 
11-7 Fig 12 Two-window Frequency Tracking 
Fig 12a Discriminator Outputs Equal 
Output No 1
Signal
= Output No 2
Amplitude
f
No 1
No 2
d
Fig 12b Discriminator Outputs Diifer 
Output No 1
Signal
 Output No 2
Amplitude
No 1
No 2
fd
25.  Electronic Frequency Tracking.  In a 3-beam fixed aerial system, as shown diagrammatically in 
Fig 13, the Doppler shift in each beam is detected independently in a different channel.  It is possible to 
determine aircraft velocity along all 3 axes by subsequent Doppler mixing.  In Fig 13, the aircraft has its 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
horizontal velocity split into 2 positive perpendicular components V1 and V2.  FA , FB  and FC equal the 
Doppler shifts observed in each beam A, B and C respectively.  θ is the angle between the fore and aft 
axis and each beam in the horizontal plane.  Then FB – FC ∝ V1 and FB – FA ∝ V2.  Modern frequency 
trackers  are  able  to  determine  whether  the  Doppler  shift  seen  by  each  beam  is  positive  or  negative.  
The vectors are thus resolved algebraically and displayed or used in a navigation computer. 
11-7 Fig 13 Transmitting/Receiving Beam Pattern 
F
FB
C
B
Be
Beam
am C
V2
θ
Aircraft and Aerial
θ
V1
Fore and Aft Axis
Beam A
FA
Potential Errors 
26.  Height Hole Error.  A pulsed Doppler radar cannot transmit and receive signals at the same time 
and it is therefore possible for a reflected signal to be lost if it arrives back at the receiver at the same time 
as a pulse is being transmitted.  The effect, known as height hole error, occurs at certain aircraft heights 
dependent on the pulse recurrence frequency (PRF) of the radar.  Over uneven ground the slant range of 
the  illuminated  area  of  ground  is  continually  varying  and  is  unlikely  to  remain  at  a  critical  value  long 
enough for height hole error to be significant.  Over the sea however the aircraft height is liable to remain 
constant for a longer period and prolonged loss of signal may occur.  A similar effect occurs with FMCW 
transmissions when the aircraft is at such a height that the reflected signal at the instant of reception, is in 
phase with the transmitter and is therefore rejected.  Height hole error is usually avoided by varying the 
PRF of a pulsed system, or the modulation frequency of a FMCW system. 
27.  Sea  Bias.    The  amount  of  energy  reflected  back  to  the  aircraft  depends,  among  other  things, 
upon  the  angle  of  incidence,  such  that  more  energy  will  be  received  from  the rear edge of a forward 
beam  than  from  its  front  edge.    Over  land,  the  irregularities  of  the  surface  mask  these  variations  in 
energy level, but over a smooth sea the reflection is more specular in character.  As a consequence, 
not  only  is  a  larger  proportion  of  the  total  energy  reflected  away  from  the  aircraft,  but  because  the 
leading edge of a forward beam has a lower grazing angle, more higher frequency energy is lost than 
is  lower  frequency  energy  from  the  trailing  edge.    The  resulting  change  to  the  Doppler  spectrum  is 
shown  in  Fig  14  and  this  distortion  leads  to  the  determination  of  a  value  for  fd  which  is  too  low.  The 
consequent  error  in  calculated  groundspeed  is  known  as  sea  bias  error  and  typically  results  in 
groundspeeds which are between 1% and 2% too low.  Most systems incorporate a LAND/SEA switch 
which, discriminate between Doppler frequencies over water (fdw) and over land (fdl) and when switched 
to SEA, alters the calibration of the frequency tracker so as to increase the calculated groundspeed by 
a nominal 1% or 2%.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
11-7 Fig 14 Sea Bias and Spectrum Distortion 
Measured f
Correct f f
  or
d
d
Beam Centre Line
Sea Bias Error
Signal
Amplitude
Land
Spectrum
Water
Spectrum
f
f
f
dw
dl
d
28.  Sea Movement Error.  Doppler equipments measure drift and groundspeed relative to the terrain 
beneath the aircraft which, if moving, will induce an error into the results.  There are two causes: 
a. 
Tidal  Streams.    The  speed  of  tidal  streams  is  generally  greatest  in  narrow  waterways and, 
since  the  time  during  which  an  aircraft  is  likely  to  be  affected  is  small,  the  effect  is  minimal.  
Ocean currents occupy much larger areas but their speed is low and so cause little error. 
b. 
Water Transport.  Wind causes movement in a body of water and, although wave motion is 
quite complex, the net effect so far as Doppler systems are concerned is a down-wind movement 
of the surface.  The resultant error is an up-wind displacement of a Doppler derived position.  An 
approximate value for the error can be derived by considering an error vector in the measured drift 
and groundspeed which has a direction in the up-wind direction of the surface wind, and a length 
equal to about one fifth of the surface wind speed, with a maximum of approximately 8 kt.  
29.  Flight Path and Pitch Error.  In climb and descent a true speed over the ground will be calculated 
only  if  the  Doppler  aerial  is  maintained  horizontal.    Partial  compensation  for  pitch  is  inherent in multiple 
beam systems (see para 13) and errors can be further reduced, if necessary, by gyro-stabilizing the aerial 
to  the  horizontal,  or  by  correcting  the  errors  using  attitude  information  in  the  groundspeed  computer.  
Without  these  facilities,  and  with  the  aerial  slaved  to  the  aircraft’s  flight  path  or  to  the  airframe,  a  small 
error will be introduced. 
30.  Roll Error.  Theoretically a combination of drift and roll can cause axis cross-coupling errors, but 
these are transient and too small to be of significance.  However, signals may be lost in a turn if one 
beam, or a pair of beams, is raised clear of the ground. 
31.  Drift Error.  Large drift angles will have no effect on accuracy provided that: 
a. 
In a moving aerial system the aerial can rotate to the same degree as the drift. 
b. 
In  a  fixed  aerial  system  a  small  broadside  beamwidth  can  be  obtained  to  prevent  adverse 
widening of the frequency spectrum. 
In both cases a large area in the aircraft is needed, since a moving aerial needs room in which to turn, 
and  a  fixed  aerial  needs  to  be  large  to  obtain  a  small  broadside  beamwidth.  (Beamwidth  is  inversely 
proportional to aerial dimension.) 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
32.  Computational  Errors.    Doppler  systems  are  mechanized  on  the  assumption  than  1  nm  is 
equivalent to 1' of latitude.  However, the actual change of latitude in minutes, equating to a distance of 
one  nautical  mile  measured  on  the  Earths  surface  along  a  meridian,  ranges  from  1.0056'  at  the 
Equator  to  0.9954'  at  the  poles,  and  is  only  correct  at  47º  42'  N  and  S.    Furthermore,  1'  of  latitude 
change  equates  to  a  greater  distance  at  height  than  on  the  surface.    Fig  15  illustrates  error  due  to 
height,  by  showing the comparable distance at sea level.  Errors due to latitude and height are small 
and are not normally corrected for in navigation.  Additional small errors can be introduced into position 
calculations.  Since the aircraft never flies in a straight line, but rather weaves slowly from side to side 
of track, the calculated distance gone will exceed the distance directly measured on a map.  Doppler 
drift is added to heading to deduce track and so any error in the heading input will result in an error in 
any computed position.  
11-7 Fig 15 Height Error 
(R+h)θ
Height above
Surface (h)
Error due 
to Height
Surface

of Earth
Radius of 
Earth (R)
θ
Computer Display 
33.  The two basic outputs from a Doppler system, as described, are groundspeed and drift angle, and 
these  can  be  combined  in  a  computing  system  with  aircraft  heading  and  desired  track  to  produce  a 
display  which  may  include  along  and  across  track  indications,  computed  position  in  a  selected 
reference frame, distance and time to go, etc.  Fig 16 illustrates a typical Doppler computer chain for 
the navigation function.  The Doppler velocities may also be used in a mixed inertial/Doppler navigation 
and weapon aiming system in which the Doppler velocities are used to dampen the Schuler oscillations 
of the IN system (see Volume 7, Chapter 11). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 12 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-7 - Doppler Navigation Radar 
11-7 Fig 16 Typical Doppler Navigation Computer Chain 
Groundspeed
LEFT 0 0 3
Doppler
Inputs
Across 
Drift Angle
Indicator
Track
2 3
Error
Track
Combining
Combining
Distance to go
Unit
Unit
Track Error
to Autopilot
Heading
1
6
4
Input
Desired Track
(from Compass)
Desired Track
Along/Across Display
34.  For  rotary  wing  aircraft  applications,  the  vertical  component  of  velocity  can  also  be  derived  by 
Doppler and Fig 17 illustrates a hover meter.  The cross pointers show movement, in knots, forwards 
and backwards on the vertical scale, and left and right on the horizontal scale.  The vertical scale at the 
extreme left of the display shows vertical velocity in feet/minute. 
11-7 Fig 17 Hover Meter 
Ft/min
F
40
U 500
30
30
100 L
Knots
D
R
B
20
Revised Jun 10   
Page 13 of 13 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
CHAPTER 8 - GROUND MAPPING RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
Ground Mapping Radar (GMR) carried in aircraft will present the operator with an image of terrain 
features,  which  can  then  be  used  to  aid  navigation,  locate  targets  and  determine  weapon  aiming 
parameters.  In addition, the skilled operator will be able to interpret terrain relief, including those hills 
whose elevation is higher than the aircraft’s altitude. 
2. 
From even the most basic radar mapping display, the operator will be able to define a range and 
relative  bearing  to  a  recognizable  ground  feature,  and  then  plot  the  reciprocal  to  obtain  a  'range  and 
bearing' fix (Volume 9, Chapter 2). 
3. 
A GMR is often one component of an integrated navigation and weapon aiming system, such that 
data derived from the radar can be used directly to update the aircraft’s present position.  Conversely, 
data  from  the  rest  of  the  system  can  be  used  to  enhance  the  radar  facilities  (e.g.  Doppler  or  inertial 
velocities may be used to stabilize the radar image and superimpose electronic cursors).  
4. 
Radar can provide a means of navigation which is independent of ground beacons.  The operator 
can acquire information from the radar display in all but the most extreme weather conditions.  Radar 
also  has  a  relatively  long-range  capability,  only  limited  by  the  equipment  parameters  and  Earth 
curvature.    It  is  therefore  possible  to  find  distinctive  ground  features,  such  as  coastlines,  at  extreme 
range.  However, it is important to note that the information received and displayed by a radar may be 
ambiguous  to  the  unskilled,  or  ill-prepared  operator.   Hence, accurate interpretation of radar displays 
requires some knowledge of basic radar principles, and the nature of reflectors. 
BASIC RADAR PRINCIPLES 
Basic Principles of Pulse Radar 
5. 
A GMR uses pulse radar techniques, which are explained fully in Volume 11, Chapter 2.  A short 
résumé  of  the  pertinent  aspects  of  pulse  radar  theory  is  repeated  to  assist with the understanding of 
radar display interpretation skills. 
6. 
Determination  of  Range.    Pulse  Radar  determines  the  range  of  a  target  by  'pulse/time' 
technique.  The airborne radar fires a pulse of energy, which is reflected by the target, and returns to 
the  radar  aerial  (see  Fig  1).    The  range  from  the  aerial  to  the  target  is  measured  by  observing  the 
elapsed  time  (t)  between  the  leading  edge  of  the  pulse  being  transmitted  from  the  aerial,  and  the 
leading edge of the associated return (known as an 'echo'), arriving back at the aerial.  The range of a 
target can therefore be expressed as: 
t × c
Range =
2
where c = the velocity of propagation of the pulse (3 × 108 metres per second).  The range of a target 
may be measured on the radar display by eye, or by electronic means. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 1 Measuring Range by Pulse/Time Technique 
Fig 1a Transmitted Pulse Outbound 
Leading Edge
Target
Fig 1b Return of Reflected Pulse 
Leading Edge
Target
7. 
Determination of Bearing.  To detect the bearing of a target, the aerial beam is moved in azimuth.  
This  aerial  movement  (known  as  'scanning')  is  synchronized  with  the  radar  display  such  that  when  an 
echo is received from a target, the radar time base is at the correct bearing on the radar display. 
8. 
Radar Displays.  There are some airborne installations which have a 360º Plan Position Indicator (PPI) 
display (see Volume 11, Chapter 1).  More commonly, however, the radar is mounted in the aircraft nose and 
scans a sector ahead of the aircraft, typically 60º either side of the aircraft heading or track.  In this case, the 
ground mapping picture will be presented on a Sector PPI display as illustrated in Fig 2. 
11-8 Fig 2 Layout of a Sector PPI Display 
Heading or 
Track Datum
Azimuth
 0 
10
10
Angle
20
20
3
30
0
4
40
0
Time Bases
50
50
Return 
Signal
Range
Aircraft’s Position 
  (point of origin)
Representation of Terrain Features 
9. 
A radar map of an area of the terrain is achieved by scanning the radar beam in azimuth, either 
mechanically  (by  moving  the  aerial)  or  electronically  (by  using  a  phased  array  antenna).    The  radar 
display picture is built up from a series of time bases (Fig 2), which sweep in synchronization with the 
radar beam.  The persistence of the CRT phosphor ensures that a continuous image of the ground is 
maintained between sweeps. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 21 


AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
10.  The time base is intensity modulated in response to the signal strength of received echoes.  Those 
radar targets that are highly reflective will return a greater proportion of the original transmitted energy 
than  poor  reflectors  and  will  thus  be  the  brightest  objects  on  the  display.    In  practical  terms,  the 
human eye can only make out 3 or 4 shades of brightness of return echoes (Fig 3) on a mono-colour 
display.    However,  operator  fatigue  or  unsuitable  lighting  conditions  might  diminish  this  capability.    In 
general, the ground features will be represented by: 
a. 
The  brightest  returns  from  highly  reflective  targets,  typical  of  town  centres  and  industrial 
complexes. 
b. 
Medium intensity returns from targets of average reflectivity. 
c. 
Low  intensity  returns  (darker  than  the  previous  two  categories)  from  flat  terrain  and  water 
features. 
d. 
Areas containing no radar returns ('no show' areas). 
11-8 Fig 3 Levels of Brightness 
Radar Returns
Maximum 
 ‘Bloom’
Visibility level
Brightness of radar 
returns depend upon 
reflective properties 
of targets.
Visibility 
Threshold Level
Radar ‘no show’
11.  Above  the  maximum  visibility  level,  signals  will  'bloom'  or  'flare'.    The  visibility  threshold  of  the 
radar  display  is  the  lower  limit  of  brightness  distinguishable  by  the  operator’s  eye.    Very  weak  return 
signals will remain below the visibility threshold, unseen.  
12.  A typical GMR display from medium altitude is shown at Fig 4a.  Fig 4b shows a map of the same 
area for comparative purposes. 
11-8 Fig 4 A Typical Medium Level Radar Display 
Fig 4a Medium Level Radar Picture 
Fig 4b Map of the Same Area 
Gt Yarmouth
Lowestoft
Spurn Head
Norwich
Skegness
 The
Wash
Boston
Kings
Lynn
Peterborough
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
Radar Parameters 
13.  Operating Frequency.    As  explained  in  Volume  9,  as  with  all  radar  parameters,  the  choice  of 
operating frequency is inevitably a compromise between conflicting requirements.  High frequencies 
allow  narrow  beamwidths  to  be  achieved  with  relatively  small  aerials,  and  pulse  lengths  to  be 
relatively  short  -  both  attributes  leading  to  improved  resolution.    Additionally,  high  frequency 
equipment  tends  to  have  size  and  weight  advantages.    Conversely,  high  frequency  radar  is 
restricted  in  the  power  that  can  be  employed,  and  consequently  in  its  maximum  effective  range.  
Furthermore,  the  higher  the  frequency,  the  more  the  radar  will  be  susceptible  to  interference  and 
atmospheric  attenuation.    In  practice,  the  majority  of  airborne  mapping  radars  operate  in  the  I or J 
band with frequencies around 10 GHz (wavelengths around 3 cm). 
14.  Pulse  Width  and  Pulse  Length.    The  duration  of  a  transmitted  pulse  can be measured in time 
(pulse width (PW)) or distance (pulse length (PL)).  As both terms are interrelated, either may be used 
to describe this parameter.  
a. 
The  energy  content  of  a  pulse  is  directly  proportional  to  its  length  (Fig  5).    Thus,  a  longer 
pulse  will  give  a  stronger  return  echo  from  targets  at  long  range.    However,  shorter  pulses  will 
enable  the  radar  to  resolve  (separate)  closely  spaced  targets  in  range.    This  point  will  be 
discussed in detail at a later stage within this chapter. 
11-8 Fig 5 Pulse Parameters 
Pulse Width
(Pulse Length
Power
  if measured 
  in Distance)
Peak
     Pulse of
Electromagnetic
Power
      Energy
Time
b. 
The PL will determine the minimum range that the radar can measure.  The leading edge 
of  the  echo  cannot  be  received  until  the  trailing  edge  of  the  pulse  has  left  the  transmitter  and 
must  therefore  travel  a  return  distance  at  least  equal  to  the  distance  occupied  by  a  pulse.    A 
pulse occupies 300 m for every microsecond of duration and so, for a typical PW of 2 µsec, the 
return  distance  will  be  600  m,  giving  a  minimum  range  of  300  m.    In  practice  the  minimum 
range  will  be  greater  than  this  since  some  finite  time  will  be  necessary  for  the  aerial to switch 
from transmission to reception. 
The PW for a GMR is usually between 0.5 and 5 µsec. 
15.  Pulse  Recurrence  (or  Repetition)  Frequency  (PRF).    The  PRF  is  defined  as  the  number  of 
pulses  occurring  in  one  second  and  must  be  sufficiently  high  to  ensure  that  at  least  one  pulse  of 
energy  strikes  a  target  while  the  scanner  is  pointing  in its direction.  A very narrow radar beamwidth, 
with a high rate of scanner rotation therefore needs a high PRF.  In practice, the relationship between 
scanner rate, beamwidth and the PRF is adjusted such that any target will receive between 5 and 25 
pulses  each  time  it  is  swept  by  the  beam.    However,  if  the  PRF  is  too  high,  it  will  limit  the  radar’s 
maximum  unambiguous  range.    The  PRF  of  a  GMR  is  typically  between  200  and  5,000  pulses  per 
second and is normally determined by the range scale selected. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
16.  Aerial Stabilization.  The radar aerial must be stabilized, within limits, to the true horizontal both 
in roll and pitch to avoid distortion of the ground image.  This is normally achieved by using inputs from 
the aircraft attitude system - the degree of roll and pitch for which compensation can be provided will 
vary between aircraft types.  In addition to the radar image, it is possible to superimpose electronically 
produced symbols and cursors on to the display.  In some systems a topographical map can also be 
projected onto the display (see Volume 7, Chapter 30). 
Beam Characteristics 
17.  Vertical  Beamwidth.    The  beam  of  a  GMR  must  be  broad  in  the  vertical  plane  in  order  to 
illuminate all of the ground between a point beneath the aircraft and the horizon (or effective range).  A 
pencil beam, as produced by a parabolic aerial (Fig 6), is not ideal for mapping purposes since it does 
not  illuminate  sufficient  area  of  ground.    Instead,  a  diffuse  beam  known  as  a  cosecant²  (or  'spoiled') 
beam is used. 
11-8 Fig 6 A Pencil Beam used for Ground Mapping 
Pencil Beam
Area of useable returns
18.  The  Cosecant2  Beam.    The  main  advantage  of  the  cosecant2  beam  is  that  greater  power  is 
transmitted to greater ranges in order to compensate for range attenuation.  In this way, similar targets 
will give similar return strength regardless of range (Fig 7). 
11-8 Fig 7 A Cosecant2 Beam used for Ground Mapping 
Cosecant Beam
Area of useable returns
The cosecant² beam dilutes the power per unit area of ground coverage (Fig 8) and therefore is ideal 
for comparison of ground returns over short and medium ranges.  However, at extremely long range, 
reversion  to  a  pencil  beam  is  necessary,  in  order  to  ensure  that  maximum  energy  is  reflected  from 
distant targets. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 8 The Cosecant2 Beam 
θ
h
Beam
R
1
At slant range R, power density received
R2
power density transmit ed must be          R2
2
h
sin θ
h  
2 cosec  2θ
19.  Azimuth Beamwidth.  The beam of a GMR must be narrow in azimuth so that the bearing of any 
echo can be defined accurately.  It is impossible to produce a beam in which all of the radar energy is 
distributed  and  confined  within  a  finite  beam.    However,  with  a  well-designed  antenna,  most  of  the 
radiated power can be constrained to a given direction as illustrated by a typical polar diagram (Fig 9).  
It is impossible to eradicate the side lobes completely, but it is desirable to minimize them since they 
represent wasted power, and their presence makes the radar more vulnerable to interference. 
11-8 Fig 9 Half Power Beam Width 
Side Lobes
Main Lobe
C
A
θ
D
Half Power Points
20. Nominal Beamwidth.  The nominal beamwidth (NBW) is defined as the angle subtended at the 
source by the lines joining the two points on the radiation diagram where the power has fallen to a 
certain  proportion  (usually  a  half)  of  its  maximum  value.    Radiation  patterns  are  normally  plotted 
showing relative field strengths, and, since field strength is proportional to the square root of power, 
the corresponding half power points C and D on the field strength diagram shown in Fig 9 are where 
the  field  strength  has  fallen  to 
0.5 ,  ie  0.707,  of  the  maximum  value  AB.    Conversely,  the  power 
radiated in the direction AC and AD = 0.7072 = .5 of the power transmitted along the centreline AB.  
The  angle  θ  is  the  NBW  and  is  proportional  to  the  wavelength  (λ)  of  the  radiation  and  inversely 
proportional to the size of the aerial: 

NBW ∝
degrees
Dish Diameter
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
where  λ  is  the  wavelength  and  K  is  a  constant  which  varies with the side lobe level, but for a simple 
parabolic aerial is typically 70. 
21.  Effective Beamwidth.  From an operator’s perspective, the apparent, or effective beamwidth (EBW) 
is  of  more  concern  than  the  NBW  since  it is one factor which influences the accuracy with which radar 
returns are displayed.  The EBW is the angle through which the beam rotates whilst continuing to give a 
discernible image from a point response.  Fig 10 illustrates the effect of a radar beam with an EBW of 4º 
scanning clockwise through a point target, due north of the aircraft.  Fig 10b shows that the target will be 
displayed on the CRT once the leading edge (LE) of the beam intercepts it.  In this instance, it will not be 
portrayed on its correct bearing of 360º, but in the direction in which the aerial centreline and time base is 
pointing, ie along 358º.  The target continues to be displayed until the trailing edge (TE) of the beam has 
passed  through  it  (Fig  10d).    The  effect  is  to  spread  the  image  of  the  point  target  response  across  the 
EBW - in this case 4º.  It is possible to calculate the resultant distortion.  In the example used, if the point 
target (treated as zero width) was at a range of 60 nm, it would appear on the displays to be 4 nm wide (1 
in 60 rule), i.e. 2 nm either side of the correct bearing.  
11-8 Fig 10 Effective Beamwidth 
Fig 10a 
Fig 10b 
Fig 10c 
Fig 10d 
Beam CL at 356° 
Beam CL at 358° 
Beam CL at 360° 
Beam CL at 002° 
CL
TE
LE
TE
LE
TE
LE
TE
LE
Target
EBW = 4o
Clockwise
 scan
Timebase 
aligned with
CL of beam
Target remains
Target not yet 
Target appears on
Target remains
il uminated until TE
on Display
Timebase at 358o
il uminated
of beam is clear
22.  Use  of  Receiver  Gain  Control.    The  EBW  is  largely  a  function  of  receiver  gain.    Both  transmitted 
power  and  receiver  sensitivity  are  maximum  along  the  beam  centre  line,  decreasing  towards  the  beam 
margins.    The  receiver  gain  control  determines  the  overall  amplification  of  the  received  signal.    This 
amplification may be reduced, by the operator, until the signals near to the centreline of the beam are only 
just above the visibility threshold.  This will produce an extremely narrow EBW.  Fig 11 shows a cross-section 
of signal strength across the beam, in Cartesian co-ordinates.  The comparison between high and low gain 
settings  demonstrates  resulting  change  in  EBW.    Alternatively,  receiver  gain  may  be  increased  so  that 
signals at the edge of the beam are amplified sufficiently to exceed the visibility threshold. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 11 Gain Level and Effective Beam Width 
  EBW at 
High Gain
 EBW at 
Low Gain
Maximum
Visibility Level
High Gain
Receiver
Amplification
Visibility
Level
Threshold
Low Gain
CL
Beam Angular Displacement
RADAR DISTORTIONS 
Distortions Inherent in Radar 
23.  A  radar  reflective  target  will  not  be  portrayed  accurately  in  size  and  shape  on  the  CRT  due  to  a 
combination  of  distortions  that  are  inherent  in  radar.    The  size  of  a  received  signal  is  always 
exaggerated.  The distortions applicable to each radar return are: 
a. 
Beamwidth distortion. 
b. 
Pulse length distortion. 
c. 
Spot size distortion. 
24.  Beamwidth  (BW)  Distortion.    The  cause  of  BW  distortion  has  already  been  explained  in  Para 
21.  The effect is to add one half of the EBW to each side of the target as shown in Fig 12.  The size of 
BW distortion can be determined using 1 in 60 calculations. 
Example:  In Fig 12, if the EBW is 3º, and the target is at 60 nm range, then the BW distortion will 
extend the width of the target by ½ × EBW on each side of the target. 
At 60 nm range, 1º subtends 1nm (6076 ft) 
EBW     =   3º   =   3 nm   =   18,228 ft 
∴ ½ EBW = 9,114 ft on each side of the target. 
In this example, when at 30 nm range, ½ EBW would equal 4,557 ft. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 12 Beamwidth Distortion 
½ 
EBW
Radar
Ta rget
Beamwidth
½ 
Distortion
EBW
25.  Pulse Length (PL) Distortion.  The range to the near edge of a target is correctly determined by half 
the time taken for the leading edge of the pulse to reach the target and return, multiplied by the propagation 
speed.  However, although the range to the far side of target is similarly determined by the leading edge of 
the pulse, the CRT continues to 'paint' until the whole PL has completely returned from the far side of the 
target.  The effect is to extend the far edge of the target by an amount equivalent to ½ × PL.  PL distortion is 
added to the target and also to the BW distortion, as shown in Fig 13. 
Example:    A  radar  with  a  PW  of  1  µsec  (which  gives  a  PL  of  approximately  300  metres)  will 
produce a PL distortion of 150 metres. 
11-8 Fig 13 Pulse Length Distortion 
Pulse Length
Distortion
Radar
Targ et
   ½
Pulse
Length
26.  Spot Size (SS) Distortion.  The electron beam which produces the image on the CRT has a finite 
size, and nothing less than a minimal 'spot size' can be displayed.  The radar will try to paint the outside 
edges of a response with the centre of the spot.  This will draw the correct outline, but the image is blurred 
by  the  addition  of  a  margin  with  a  thickness  equal  to  the  radius  of  the  spot  size  (i.e.    ½  ×  SS),  as 
illustrated in Fig 14.  Adjustments to focus and brilliance will affect the SS.  However, SS is a function 
of  the  physical  size  of  the  radar  display  screen,  so  its  real  dimension  does  not  change.    The  main 
factor affecting the size of the distortion due to SS distortion is therefore the range scale selected.  SS 
distortion is relatively greater on smaller scales (i.e. on greater ranges).  SS distortion is added to the 
combined effects of BW and PL distortions as shown in Fig 15.  On synthetic radar displays, there will 
still be a minimum size for any time base illumination.  This minimum size may be defined in pixels or 
some other value.  However, a distortion akin to SS distortion will remain present. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 14 Spot Size Distortion 
Spot
Size
Spot Size
Distortion
Image Distortion 
27.  Radar  Distortions  Combined.    The  total  of  all  three  radar  distortions,  for  a  given  target,  will 
combine in the manner illustrated in Fig 15. 
11-8 Fig 15Total Radar Distortions for a Reflecting Target 
Pulse Length
Distortion
Beamwidth
Distortion
Target
Radar
Spot Size
Distortion
28.   Effect of Radar Distortions on 'No-show' Targets.  The radar distortions increase the size of 
return  echoes.    However,  it  should  be  noted  that  targets  that  do  not  reflect  radar  energy  back  to  the 
aircraft, e.g. lakes, will be decreased in size, as a result of distortion of the surrounding ground returns 
(Fig 16).    In  practical  terms,  at  longer  ranges,  small  coastal  estuaries,  and  small  inland  lakes  are 
generally indiscernible, and islands often appear as joined onto the mainland.  However, resolution will 
improve as range decreases. 
11-8 Fig 16 Total Radar Distortions for a Non-reflecting Target 
Resultant size of 'no-show' 
Radar
Original outline of 'no-show' Target
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
29. Height  Distortion.    The  range  measured  by  a  mapping  radar  is  slant  range,  whereas  for  a 
completely  accurate  display,  plan  range  is  needed.    If  such  accuracy  is  necessary  (e.g.  for  high 
altitude, close range radar interpretation) the CRT time base can be made non-linear, i.e.  the electron 
beam producing the time base moves faster at the start of its movement from the point of origin, and 
slows  gradually  towards  maximum  range.    Even  so,  it  is  not  possible  to  remove  all  of  the  distortion 
close to the point of origin. 
30.  Minimizing the Effect of Radar Distortions.  The combined distortions produced by a radar will 
be minimized if the operator obeys the following rules: 
a. 
Once the fix has been positively identified, reduce the gain setting in order to reduce EBW. 
b. 
Take the fix at close range, using the smallest range scale practicable (to minimize EBW, SS 
and PL). 
c. 
An isolated target can be assumed to lie at the centre of the response (see Fig 15). 
The Resolution Rectangle 
31.  As  a  result  of  radar  distortions,  radar  targets  separated  in  azimuth  by  less  than  EBW  +  SS  will 
merge together on the radar display (Fig 17). 
11-8 Fig 17 Target Resolution in Azimuth 
½ SS ½ SS
½ EBW
½ EBW
Targets
Radar Beam
Aerial
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
Similarly, echoes separated in range by less than ½ PL + SS will merge (Fig 18).   
11-8 Fig 18 Target Resolution in Range 
½ SS
½ SS
Targets
½ PL
Radar Beam
Aerial
32.  The  area  defined  by  the  two  dimensions  (EBW  +  SS)  and  (½ PL  +  SS),  is  known  as  the 
'Resolution Rectangle' (Fig 19).  Any two reflecting objects on the ground, lying within an area the size 
of the resolution rectangle will not resolve into separate images on the radar display. 
11-8 Fig 19 The Resolution Rectangle 
Targets
½ PL 
 EBW  + SS
 + SS
Revised Jun 10   
Page 12 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
33.  When  a  radar  response  consists  of  several  buildings  in  a  group,  the  operator  can  determine 
whether  they  will  remain  as  one  response,  or  resolve  into  individual  responses,  by  use  of  simple 
calculation based on the Resolution Rectangle. 
Example 1:  Two targets are 1,500 ft apart in azimuth.  If EBW = 2º and SS (of the chosen range 
display scale) = 400 ft, at what range will they resolve into two? 
Resolution will occur when EBW + SS is less than 1,500 ft. 
1,500 – 400 = 1,100 ft 
∴ EBW will need to be less than 1,100 ft 
Using 1 in 60, at 60 nm range, 2º EBW subtends 2 nm (12,152 ft), so: 
x
60
=
1
,
1 00
12 1
, 52
1
,
1 00
∴ x =
× 60 = 5 4
. 3nm
12 1
, 52
Therefore, resolution will occur at ranges closer than 5.43 nm. 
Example 2:  Two targets are 900 ft apart in range.  Will they resolve on a display, assuming that 
SS = 300 ft and PL = 600 ft? 
Resolution in range will occur when separation is greater than SS + ½ PL. 
SS + ½ PL   =   300 ft + 300 ft =   600 ft. 
Therefore, these two targets will resolve on the 20 nm range scale display. 
RADAR REFLECTORS 
34.  The creation of a map-like image on a radar display relies on the relative strengths of the reflected 
energy  returned  from  the  various  terrain  features.    In  turn,  the  amount  of  reflected  energy  depends 
upon  the  material  of  the  target,  and,  even  more  so,  on  the  direction  in  which  the  radar  energy  is 
reflected. 
Reflectivity of Materials 
35.  All  objects  will  simultaneously  reflect  and  absorb  electro-magnetic  energy.    In  general,  the  more 
electrically conductive the material, the higher the ratio of reflection to absorption.  An indication of the 
reflective potential for various materials is illustrated in Fig 20.  The list is not exhaustive, but it can be 
seen that man-made structures contain materials that are more reflective than natural substances. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 13 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 20 Reflectivity of Materials 
Metal
Concrete
Masonry
Earth
Wood
Reflectivity
Specular Reflectors 
36.  Radar  energy  is  reflected  in  the  same  manner  as  other  electromagnetic  waves,  such  as  light.  
Two types of reflection situations may be recognized, specular and diffuse. 
37. Specular Reflection.  If the radar energy impinges on a smooth surface the reflection is known 
as specular and is the same as light being reflected from a mirror, ie with the angle of reflection equal 
to the angle of incidence (Fig 21).  A surface may be considered smooth if is approximately planar and 
contains no irregularities comparable in size with, or larger than, the wavelength of the radar.  From a 
horizontal surface, specular reflection causes the energy to be directed away from the receiver.  Such 
a surface will therefore appear dark on the display.  Specular reflection is typical of smooth water and 
fine sand.  For a specular surface to give a good reflection back to the aircraft, it must be at, or near to 
the normal (ie 90º) to the radar beam.  
11-8 Fig 21 Specular Reflection 
Normal
Reflected Ray
Angle of
Angle of
Incident Ray
Incidence
Reflection
Reflecting Surface
38. Multiple Specular Reflectors.  A pair of specular reflecting surfaces, mutually at right angles, will 
return  a  signal  at  the  same  angle  of  elevation  as  the  incident  energy,  but  not  necessarily  at  the  same 
angle in azimuth.  This scenario is shown in Fig 22, with a concrete surface area and a factory wall.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 14 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 22 Reflection from Two Specular Surfaces 
Fig 22a Elevation 
Fig 22b Plan 
Reflection at
Radar
Same Elevation Angle
Reflection Away 
Energy
From Aircraft
From
z
Aircraft
Building
y
z
y
Building
Radar Energy
x
x
from Aircraft
Surface
39. Corner Reflectors.  Where three mutually perpendicular, specular surfaces exist, the geometry is 
such  that  energy  is  reflected  back  to  the  source  regardless  of  the  angle  of  incidence.    This 
arrangement is known as a corner reflector.  Although rare in natural terrain features, corner reflectors 
frequently occur in built-up areas, as in Fig 23, and are largely responsible for the bright display of such 
areas.    Radar  reflectors  employing  this  principle  are  widely  manufactured  to  enhance  the  radar 
reflectivity of, for example, runway thresholds, small boats and targets on bombing ranges. 
11-8 Fig 23 Corner Reflector in Built-up Area 
Diffuse Reflectors 
40.  Diffuse Reflection.  When a reflecting surface is rough, i.e. when its irregularities are comparable in 
size with, or larger than, the radar wavelength, then that surface acts as a mosaic of randomly orientated 
specular  reflecting  surfaces.    As a result, the reflected energy is diffused in all directions (Fig 24).  The 
amount of energy reflected in any direction is less than would occur in a single specular reflection.  Diffuse 
reflection is uncommon in man-made structures but is typical of normal undeveloped land and accounts 
for the intermediate tone of such terrain on the display.  The proportion of the energy which is reflected 
back to the receiver depends largely on the angle of incidence. 
11-8 Fig 24 Examples of Diffuse Reflection 
Fig 24a Small Angle of Incidence 
Fig 24b Large Angle of Incidence 
Incident Energy
Reflected Energy
Reflected Energy
Incident Energy
Revised Jun 10   
Page 15 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
Change of Aspect 
41.  The Cardinal Effect.  The approach direction towards a target can greatly influence the strength 
of  returns.    Even  large  complexes  may  give  only  poor  reflection  when  the  angle  of  incidence  of  the 
transmitted energy is away from the normal.  This phenomenon was first noticed with towns and cities 
in the USA, which tend to be laid out on a N/S and E/W orientated grid.  This is therefore known as the 
'cardinal effect' (Fig 25). 
11-8 Fig 25 The Cardinal Effect 
Town or 
Industrial 
Complex
Good Radar 
Response
Fair or Little
Good Radar 
Radar Response
Response
42.  Aspect Change.  When flying past a target complex, the availability of reflectors will change as a 
result of the changing incident angle of transmitted energy.  As the aircraft proceeds along its track, the 
different  reflectors  found  within  the  complex  will  produce  echoes  of  varying  strengths.    In  Fig  26,  the 
aircraft at point 1 will receive good echoes from surfaces A and B.  However, by point 2, surface A can 
be almost discounted, and point B has developed into a strong corner reflector.  On the radar display, 
the  brightness  level  from  each  part  of  the  target  group  will  appear  to  change  continually  (known  as 
'glinting'), due to this series of different centres of reflection. 
11-8 Fig 26 Aspect Change 
  Target 
Complex
A
B
1
2
INTERPRETATION OF GROUND MAPPING RADAR 
Introduction 
43.  Map  reading  from  a  radar  display  requires  skill,  and  care.    The  normal  technique  requires  the 
operator  to  identify  pre-selected  fix  points  from  which  present  position  can  be  determined,  or  targets 
located.  In modern integrated systems it is possible to place electronic cursors over the fix point.  By 
knowing  the  fix  point’s  co-ordinates,  and  the  relative  range  and  bearing  from  the  aircraft,  the  system 
can then calculate the aircraft’s present position. 
44.  Target Ambiguity.  A radar will display all received echoes with a signal strength greater than the 
visibility  threshold.    A  small  town,  an  industrial  complex  and  an  airfield  may  all  look  similar  in 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 16 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
brightness,  and  if  close  together,  an  element  of  ambiguity  may  exist.    The  skill  of  the  operator  is 
required  to  determine  which  response,  within  a  series  or  group,  is  that  of  the  required  fix  point,  and 
which other echoes may be ignored. 
High/Medium Level Radar Interpretation 
45.  Selection  of  Fix  Points.    When  selecting  fix  points  for  radar  interpretation  at  high  or  medium 
level, the following factors should be considered: 
a. 
Material.    The  fix  point  should  be  a  good  reflector,  and  therefore  probably  a  man-made 
structure. 
b. 
Size.  The size of the reflecting object will affect the size and brightness of the response on 
the radar screen.  A larger target will probably be easier to identify, but due to distortions, it may 
be more difficult to determine a point on it with any precision. 
c. 
Contrast.    Contrast  between  the  received  radar  return  and  its  adjacent  background  will  aid 
identification.    The  table  below  shows  the  3  main  groups  of  reflecting  ground  surfaces  and  the 
strength of their return signals. 
Type of Surface 
Strength of Echo 
Water 
Weak 
Terrain 
Medium 
Cultural 
Strong 
Since water, in general, reflects little or no energy back to the receiver, the best contrast is usually 
afforded by a cultural return against a water background.  Examples of fix points in this category 
include large bridges (such as the Severn, Forth and Humber Bridges), coastal refineries and oil 
rigs.    The  contrast  between  water/terrain  is  better  than  terrain/cultural,  therefore  the  second 
choice  should  be  coastlines  or  large  water  features.    Finally,  if  the  preceding  options  are  not 
available,  then  a  fix  can  be  obtained  from  terrain/cultural  contrast.    Fix  points  in  this  category 
include towns/cities, power stations, large industrial complexes and airfields. 
d. 
Isolation.  A target that is isolated should prove easier to identify than a target within a group. 
e. 
Ambiguity.  When the target is adjacent to, or surrounded by other reflective complexes, it may 
be difficult to identify.  The operator can use patterns of responses to assist with this process. 
f. 
Transmitted Power.  The higher the amount of transmitted power, the stronger the reflected 
echoes will be.  It must be remembered that if the transmitted power is increased by selecting a 
longer PL, then the PL distortion will be greater. 
g. 
Range.    At  longer  range,  smaller  isolated  targets  may  not  show.    Also,  at  long  range,  BW 
distortion  is  greater,  and  depending  upon  the  radar  parameters  set,  PL  distortion  is  probably 
greater also.  It is therefore more accurate to fix at close range. 
h. 
Aspect.  The angle of approach will influence the strength of the return signals (the cardinal 
effect).  In addition, by selecting a fix point ahead of the aircraft, and close to track, aspect change 
can be avoided. 
i.
Terrain Screening.  The short wavelength radar energy travels in straight lines.  Therefore, 
any solid obstruction, such as a hill, will cast a 'radar shadow' on the far side.  Any objects in the 
shadow area will not receive radar energy (Fig 27a) and cannot therefore reflect any. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 17 of 21 


AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 27 Terrain Screening 
Fig 27a Cross-section 
Fig 27b Radar Display 
    Hill
Shadow
Radar Shadow
caused by Hill
High
Ground
Industrial
Complex
Hill Tops
On the radar display, an area of terrain screening will appear as a dark 'shadow' area containing 
no  radar  returns  (Fig  27b).    If  approaching  a  target  which  is  behind  a  hill,  it  is  possible  to 
determine,  by  trigonometry,  at  what  range  the  target  will  appear  out  of  hill  shadow  (over  small 
distances, Earth curvature can effectively be ignored in the calculation). 
In summary, the 'ideal' radar fix point should be sufficiently large, a good reflector, unique, and exhibit 
good contrast against its background.  
46.  Identification of Fix Points.  To identify a specific target on a radar screen, the operator should: 
a. 
Use larger, easily identified responses to help identify the smaller, unknown responses. 
b. 
Having  decided  which  response  is  likely  to  be  the  target,  make  a  positive  cross-check  by 
confirming the relationship with surrounding responses. 
47.  Pre-flight  Study.    Sound  pre-flight  study  can  help  overcome  much  of  the  ambiguity  present  in 
radar  ground  mapping  displays.    Most  fix  points  are  unlikely  to  be  truly  unique,  and  confident 
identification must be achieved by relating the radar returns one to another.  Coastal features are often 
easily identified.  However, they must be used with some caution since their appearance can vary with 
tide changes, especially in shallow and estuarine waters.  Precipitous and rocky coastlines (particularly 
small  islands)  are  more  reliable  than  sandy  or  muddy  ones.    Man-made  coastal  features  such  as 
harbours and piers usually show significantly, regardless of tide state.   
48.  Radar  Manipulation.    As  the  range  from  aircraft  to  target  changes,  it  is  important  to  keep  the 
target  illuminated  with  the  maximum  amount  of  radar  energy.    This  requires  the  operator  to  make 
continual adjustment to the Aerial Tilt control, to keep the aerial pointing at the best depression angle.  
In addition, the operator will have to adjust the Gain control frequently, to maintain a useable amount of 
radar  returns  above  the  visibility  threshold.    It  is  important not to attempt radar interpretation with too 
many or too few responses on the display. 
Low Level Radar Interpretation 
49.  The factors discussed in paras 45 to 48 are equally applicable to operation at low level.  However, 
the following points should also be noted: 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 18 of 21 


AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
a. 
Transmitter  Power.    As  the  aircraft  is  closer  to  ground  features,  more  energy  will  be 
returned,  and,  therefore,  lower  transmitter  power  can  be  selected.    In  addition,  the  radar  gain 
levels should be reduced to prevent the stronger signal returns from 'flooding' the radar display. 
b. 
Target Size.  Being closer to the targets, echoes from small objects, not visible at high level, 
will now be above the visibility threshold.  Smaller fix points may therefore be utilized. 
c. 
Aspect.    At  very  low  level,  the  radar  echo  is  probably  reflected  by  the  leading  edge  of  a 
structure, rather than the roof.  In addition, many line features, such as railway embankments and 
facing river banks will be evident as a result of the changed angle of incidence. 
d. 
Contrast.    Level  ground  (eg  prairie)  will  present  a  specular  reflector  at  a  higher  angle  of 
incidence.  Under this circumstance, even small cultural returns may give good contrast. 
e. 
Use of Terrain Features.  Well-defined ridge lines will give sharp contrast between the bright 
return  on  the  nearside,  and  shadow  on  the  far  side.    Such  features  might  be  used  for  navigation 
check points, although they will not give the same precision fix as a discrete, man-made structure. 
f. 
Terrain Screening.  At low level, terrain screening becomes of utmost importance, and must 
be fully understood by the operator.  Recognition of different stages of hill shadow can be used as 
a method of ground avoidance. 
g. 
Radar Controls.  Variations in tilt and gain settings will each make significant impact on the 
radar picture displayed.  
50.  Hill  Shadows.    Fig  27  showed  a  terrain  cross-section,  whereby  a  hill  produces  a  radar  shadow 
area.  Fig 28a shows a more complex cross-section, typical of flight over a series of undulating ridges 
and hills.  This will result in a radar display similar to that illustrated in Fig 28b.  It should be noted that 
the area of radar shadow originates at the top of the hill or ridge and extends away from the aircraft. 
11-8 Fig 28 Hill Shadow from Undulating Terrain 
Fig 28a Simplified Cross-section 
Fig 28b Radar Display 
Hill Shadow
Ridge Line 2
Hill
Shadow
Hill Shadow
Ridge Line 1
Ridge Line 2
Ridge Line 1
51.  Radar Cut-off.  If the terrain elevation is equal to, or greater than the aircraft altitude, the radar will 
no longer 'see' over the hill (Fig 29a).  The shadow will extend to the maximum range of the radar screen 
and  is  now  termed  'cut-off'.  Fig 29b illustrates radar cut-off originating from a hill directly in front of the 
aircraft.    In  this  instance,  for  safety,  the  aircraft  should  either  climb  to  be  higher  than  the  hill,  or  turn 
approximately 30º to the left, towards the low-lying terrain. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 19 of 21 


AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
11-8 Fig 29 Radar 'Cut-off' 
Fig 29a Cross-section 
Fig 29b Radar Display 
Point of Radar 'Cut-off'
Low-lying
Terrain
Radar Shadow extends
   to maximum range
Cut-off
Hill Top
52.  'Hill  behind  a  hill'.    Radar  cut-off,  as  explained  in  para  51,  gives  a  clear  warning  of  the 
relationship  between  aircraft  altitude  and  terrain  elevation.    However,  a  potentially  dangerous 
situation can occur in hilly regions, when there may be some ambiguity between radar shadow and 
radar  cut-off.    Fig  30a  shows  a  terrain  cross-section  with  a  series  of  hills  (A,  B,  and  C),  each 
successively higher than the previous one.  Although hill B is higher than the aircraft, the shading at 
point 'X' will appear as normal shadow.  However, if hill C was omitted from the diagram, it can be 
seen  that  Pt  'X'  would  be  recognized  as  cut-off.    As  the  aircraft  progresses  at  the  same  altitude 
(Fig 30b)  the  relationship  between  the  peaks  and  shadows  changes,  until  the  cut-off  from  hill  B 
become apparent.  However, if the final hill (C) is significantly higher than hill B, the cut-off might not 
become  apparent  until  it  is  too  late  to  climb  over  hill  B.    This  scenario  based  on  ascending  hills 
behind  hills  can  be  encountered  in  the  foothills  of  major  mountain  ranges.    The  relative  elevations 
and  distance  between  peaks  will  make  each  case  unique.    It  is  therefore  vitally  important  that  the 
operator maintains excellent situational awareness, in order to not confuse merely undulating terrain 
(as  in  Fig  28)  with  the  'hill  behind  a  hill'  scenario.    In  addition,  good  visual  contact  should  confirm 
each  hill  or  ridge  in  the  progression.  If  visual  confirmation  is  not  available,  then  the  aircraft  should 
commence a climb to safety.  
11-8 Fig 30 Ambiguity from the 'Hill Behind a Hill' Situation 
Fig 30b Development of Cut-off as Range 
Fig 30a Shadow and Potential Cut-off Mixed 
 
Decreases 
Pt 'X'
Aircraft's Flightpath
C
C
B
B
A
A
Cut-off from Hill B
Hill
Potential
Cut-off from
  now apparent
Shadow
Cut-off
Furthest Hill
Radar Interpretation in Winter  
53.  The effects of snow and ice lying on the ground will have an effect on the quality and appearance 
of the radar display. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 20 of 21 



AP3456 – 11-8 - Ground Mapping Radar 
54.  Snow  Covered  Ground.    A  deep  covering  of  snow  will  act  as  a  specular  reflector.   The overall 
effect will be to reduce the strength of the echoes from the ground. 
55.  Ice.  The effect of ice upon the radar display will depend upon its roughness.  If an ice coating on 
a  body  of  water  remains  smooth,  the  return  will  appear  approximately  the  same  as  a  water  return.  
However, if the ice is formed from a broken and irregular surface, it will reflect echoes comparable to 
terrain features (see Fig 31).  Two distinct examples are worthy of mention: 
a. 
Offshore  Ice.    Offshore  ice  will  present  a  diffuse  reflecting  surface,  and  may  return  strong 
echoes,  and  subsequently  disguise  the  true  shape  of  a  coastline.    In  the  appropriate  season, 
therefore, the coastline may appear to extend in a seaward’s direction, sometimes for tens of miles. 
b. 
Picture  Reversal.    It  is  possible,  for  an  inland  lake,  with  a  broken,  irregular  ice  surface,  to 
return echoes which are stronger than those of the snow-covered land surrounding it.  This extreme 
scenario  results  in  a  'picture  reversal'  effect.    In  arctic  regions,  a  picture  reversal  can  be  obtained 
from rapidly formed and irregular river ice. 
11-8 Fig 31 Radar Returns from a Lake 
Fig 31a Summer 
Fig 31b Winter 
Surface: Water - Specular Reflector
Surface: Broken Ice - Diffuse Reflector
Revised Jun 10   
Page 21 of 21 

AP3456 – 11-9 - Terrain Following Radar 
CHAPTER 9 - TERRAIN FOLLOWING RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
To avoid detection by enemy radars, strike/attack aircraft need to fly at very low altitudes when in, 
or  approaching,  defended  airspace.    The  day/night,  all-weather  capability  of  strike/attack  aircraft  has 
been greatly enhanced by terrain following radars. 
Height/Speed Considerations 
2. 
Height.  The optimum height to fly is a balance between being so low that collision with the ground is 
a real risk and being so high that the aircraft is vulnerable to interception by the enemy.  Fig 1 shows how 
the  risk  of  collision  with  the  ground  increases  with  decreasing  height,  and  exposure  to  enemy  action 
increases  with  increasing  height.    This  does  not  apply  in  all  cases;  the  detection  distance  of  a  ground-
based radar over a flat desert or on a coastline is virtually independent of height and is mainly limited by 
range and the curvature of the Earth.  Excluding these cases, the resulting curve of total risk shows that 
200 feet is the optimum operating level. 
11-9 Fig 1 Optimum Height to Fly 
Probability of
Hit ing Ground
Total Risk
k
is
R
g
in
s
a
re
c
In
Probability 
of Enemy Hit
0
200 Ft
Increasing Height
3. 
Speed.  The faster an aircraft can fly, the safer it is from enemy attack.  However, there is a point 
where  the  penalty  of  increased  fuel  consumption  in  flying  at  supersonic  speed  at  low  level  is  hardly 
compensated  for  by  a  reduction  in  vulnerability.    Therefore,  the  highest  sustainable  subsonic  cruise 
speed is regarded as the optimum at low level. 
Safety Factors 
4. 
The  safety  requirement  for  a  terrain  radar  system  is  that  no  single  failure  should  endanger  the 
safety of the aircraft.  Any failure must result in a safe pull-up manoeuvre.  From the fail-safe aspect, 
duplication, where feasible, is adopted. 
Terms 
5. 
The following terms describe the capabilities of particular systems: 
a.
Terrain  Warning  (TW).    A  TW  system  warns  the  crew  of  terrain  which  lies  directly  in  their 
flight  path.    Virtually  any  airborne  radar  can  be  used  for  this  purpose,  provided  the  operator  is 
skilled in interpreting hilly terrain. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-9 - Terrain Following Radar 
b.
Terrain Clearance (TC).  A TC system enables the aircraft to fly 'peak-to-peak', rather than 
accurately following the terrain contours. 
c.
Terrain  Avoidance  (TA).    A  specialist  TA  radar  will  usually  only  display  terrain  which 
penetrates higher than a pre-set clearance level. 
d.
Terrain  Following  (TF).    A  TF  system  enables  the  aircraft  to  closely  follow  all  ground 
contours in elevation and it is the most effective of all terrain radar systems. 
Monopulse Radars 
6. 
In a non-monopulse radar, the aerial produces a single beam with a width dependent on the size 
of the aerial and the frequency used.  A typical beamwidth in an airborne radar is 4º, and any ground 
within this beam will give a return, the range of which can be measured.  However, since the strength 
of  the  return  can  have  any  value,  depending  on  the  reflecting  properties  of  the  particular  piece  of 
ground,  its  position  within  the  beam  cannot  be  determined.    The  angular  accuracy  would  therefore 
be 4º or more which is inadequate for terrain following (see Fig 2a). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-9 - Terrain Following Radar 
11-9 Fig 2 Comparison of Transmitted Beams 
a  Non-monopulse Radar
Datum
 Poorly-defined Angle
Beam
Ground
Range to Nearest
Point in Beam
Range to Furthest 
Point in Beam
b  Monopulse Radar
Datum
Accurately 
Defined Angle
Beam B
Beam A
Ground
Range Zero
Boresigh
Range to 
t
nearest point
in Beam
'Sum' Signal =
Output A + Output B
Signal from
Beam A
Signal from
Beam B
'Difference' Signal =
Output A   
− Output B after
Phase Detection
Exact Range
Along Boresight
7. 
The  single-plane  monopulse  aerial  has  two  feeds  (see  Fig  2b),  simultaneously  producing  two 
slightly divergent and overlapping beams.  The area in which the beams overlap is known as the radar 
boresight.    The  ground  returns  illuminated  by  these  beams  are  simultaneously  processed  in  two 
different ways.  A 'sum' signal is formed by adding together the returned signals of each beam.  This 
gives the effect of a single beam, equal in width to that of the sum of both beams.  At the same time, a 
'difference'  signal  is  formed  by  subtracting  the  returned  signal  of  one  beam  from  the  other.    The 
difference  signal  has  a  phase  which  may  be  compared  with  that  of  the  sum  signal  and  it  also  has  a 
minimum  amplitude  where  the  beams  are  equal,  ie  along  the  boresight.    The  phase  and  amplitude 
relationships  between  sum  and  difference  signals  are  such  that  returns  from  above  the  boresight 
produce  a  positive  output  whilst  those  from  below  give  a  negative  output.    Where  the  boresight 
intersects  the  ground,  the  output  is  zero;  the  exact  range  along  the  boresight  to  the  ground  can 
therefore be accurately determined. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-9 - Terrain Following Radar 
SCANNING MONOPULSE RADAR 
General 
8. 
A  scanning  monopulse  radar  system  scans  the  terrain  ahead  of  the  aircraft  and  determines  the 
elevation profile which the aircraft must follow to clear the ground by the required height. 
Principle of Operation 
9. 
Guidance information for manual flying is produced by the radar on a head-up display (HUD), or 
the output can be coupled directly to the autopilot. 
10.  Fig 3 illustrates a simple HUD.  The target 'dot' on the flight director symbology represents the TFR 
demand, which the aircraft should be following to clear the ground ahead by the required amount.  The 
aircraft symbol indicates the aircraft’s present flight path.  The situation illustrated in Fig 3 indicates that 
the pilot needs to pitch the aircraft’s nose down, to follow the TFR demand. 
11-9 Fig 3 HUD - TFR Presentation 
Aircraft Symbol
Horizon Bars
Flight Director 
symbology 
with target dot
11.  Other sources of information, which are necessary in a sophisticated TFR system, are provided by 
the  radar  altimeter  and  airstream  direction  detector  (ADD).    Attitude  reference  is  also  required  to 
provide signals for radar roll axis stabilization. 
12.  The  radar  aerial  scans  in  the  vertical,  +8º  to  –22º,  about  the  radar  roll  axis.    As  the  aircraft 
manoeuvres, the radar roll axis changes to ensure that the beam covers the ground at all times.  The 
range to the ground along the aerial boresight for each pulse is measured and range to the ground at 
all  scanner  angles  is  therefore  known.    The  ground  profile  is  compared  with  a  computer  generated 
'ideal  flight  path',  called  the  zero  command  line  (ZCL),  shown  in  Fig  4.    The  ZCL  is  made  up  of  two 
parts,  the  ski  toe  and  the  base  line  (not  shown).    The  effect  of  various  parameters  on  the  ZCL  is 
summarized as follows: 
a.
Set Clearance Height.  The ZCL moves downwards with increased set clearance height to 
keep the aircraft further from the terrain. 
b.
Flight  Vector.    The  ZCL  is  moved  downward  with  increased  climb  angle  but  there  is  little 
movement of the ZCL during a dive. 
c.
Groundspeed.  The flat portion of the ZCL is elongated and the curved portion flattened with 
increased groundspeed. 
d.
Ride  and  Weather  Mode.    The  flat  portion  of  the  ZCL  is  elongated  and  the  curved  portion 
flattened with the selection of soft ride or weather mode (used in normal/heavy rain conditions). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-9 - Terrain Following Radar 
11-9 Fig 4 Flight Path Indications 
Ground Returns
Ground Returns
Radar 
Penetrate 
On
Display
Ski Toe
Ski Toe
33 1
2
4 6
33
1
2
4 6
Pull-up Command
Command Satisfied
Head-up 
Display
(HUD)
Head Down 
Display
(ADI)
1
2
3
4
2
A/C Flight Paths
1
Zero Command Line
(Ski Toe)
Scan Limits
Terrain
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Range in Nautical Miles
3
4
Ground Returns
Ground Returns
Below
Penetrate 
Ski Toe
Ski Toe
33
1
2
4 6
33
1
2
4 6
Push Over Command
Pull-up Command
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-9 - Terrain Following Radar 
The 'Ski' in Action 
13.  The  overall  principle  of  the  system  is  illustrated  in  Fig  4.    Over  reasonably  smooth  terrain,  the 
aircraft flies straight and level and the base line (not shown) 'rests' on the terrain.  On approaching an 
obstacle  (position  1),  the  terrain  profile  penetrates  the  ski  toe  generating  a  pull-up  command.    The 
command  is  satisfied  at  position  2.    At  position  3,  the  aircraft  pushes  over  into  a  shallow  dive.    By 
position 4, the terrain profile again penetrates the ski toe generating a pull-up command.  The speed at 
which  this  happens  is  controlled  so  that,  by  keeping  the  target  dot  within  the  circle  of  the  aircraft 
symbol, the pilot should not experience uncomfortable g forces. 
14.  When  the  elevation  is  zero,  the  base  line  must  be  parallel  to  the  direction  of  aircraft  flight,  ie 
parallel to the velocity vector.  The ADD is used to measure the difference between the radar roll angle 
and the velocity vector.  This angle is fed to the computer to position the ZCL correctly. 
15.  The  height  measured  by  the  radar  altimeter is compared with the selected clearance height and 
an up or down command is generated.  This command is fed to the terrain radar computer and then 
onto the head-up display or autopilot. 
OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 
Radar Returns 
16.  Radar returns from built-up areas and isolated buildings can be very much stronger than those from 
sand or arid ground, therefore the strength of the return is not a measure of its importance, since the top 
of  a  hill  may  be  a  poor  reflector.    If  the  receiver  is  sensitive  enough  to  see  such  weak  signals,  strong 
reflections to one side may swamp or break through the main signal and appear at the output as ground 
at a higher angle than in reality.  Automatic gain control (AGC) minimizes this problem. 
High Speed, Low Level Scanning 
17.  The  equipment  has  to  provide  safe  steering  signals  in  elevation,  while  the  aircraft  navigation 
system demands a turn either via the autopilot or the head-up display.  A bank angle of 45º at 0.9 M 
has  to  be  tolerated.    To  satisfy  this  requirement  the  aerial  scan  pattern  changes,  from  being  purely 
vertical, to one which 'leans over' into the Terrain Following Radar turn.  The angle of lean is a function 
of aircraft bank angle and speed, thereby ensuring that the terrain inside the turn is scanned sufficiently 
early to generate any necessary climb demand. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 11-10 - Sideways Looking Airborne Radar 
CHAPTER 10 - SIDEWAYS-LOOKING AIRBORNE RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
Conventional  airborne  radars  used  for  ground  mapping  or  reconnaissance  use  either  a 
mechanically scanning, or a planar phased array aerial, to produce a PPI display.  In order to achieve 
good resolution it is desirable to have an azimuth beamwidth that is as narrow as possible, but since 
beamwidth is inversely proportional to aerial size, this implies the use of large aerials.  Unless the radar 
is mounted in a large external radome with the attendant weight and aerodynamic penalties, the size of 
a forward facing aerial will be restricted by the frontal area of the carrying aircraft, and in the case of a 
mechanically  scanning  aerial,  there  must  also  be  room  to  accommodate  the  aerial  movement.    A 
further  disadvantage  of  forward  facing  transmissions  is  that  they  give  advance  notice of the aircraft’s 
approach to the enemy’s electronic scanners. 
2. 
Sideways-Looking  Airborne  Radar  (SLAR)  is  used  for  reconnaissance,  and  overcomes  these 
disadvantages  by  looking  sideways  and  downwards  from  the  aircraft  using  a  non-scanning  aerial 
mounted  parallel  to  the  aircraft  fuselage.    This  arrangement  allows  the  aerial  to  be  made  long,  so 
giving a narrow azimuth beamwidth and good resolution in that plane. 
3. 
The  aerial  is  normally  of  the  slotted  waveguide  type  where  one  or  more  slotted  waveguides  are 
physically attached parallel to the fore-and-aft axis of the aircraft, either along the side of the fuselage 
or  in  an  underslung  pod.    A  SLAR  aerial  for  a  fighter-type  aircraft  would  typically  be  3  to  5  m  long 
compared  to  a  maximum  size  of  about  2  m  for  a  circular  scanning  aerial  in  a  large  aircraft.    The 
equipment is normally designed for two aerials, one looking to port and the other to starboard. 
Operation 
4. 
A  beam  of  radar  pulses  is  transmitted  at  90º  to  the  aircraft’s  fore-and-aft  axis,  the  number  of  pulses 
transmitted being proportional to the ground speed of the aircraft to maintain a series of overlapping scans.  
The  radar  transmission  is  switched  from  one  aerial  to  the  other  on  a  pulse  to  pulse  basis to produce two 
maps of parallel strips of ground, equally spaced either side of the aircraft, as illustrated in Fig 1. 
11-10 Fig 1 Radar Ground Cover 
Area of Image Extends 
Proportionally as
 Aircraft Height Increases
Radar
Shadow
Aircraft 
Flight Path
Aircraft
Track
5. 
The  output  from  the  receiver  can  be  displayed  on  a  CRT,  processed  by  an  optical  system  to 
produce a film record, stored on magnetic tape for post-flight display and analysis, or telemetered to a 
ground receiving station. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 – 11-10 - Sideways Looking Airborne Radar 
6. 
SLAR typically operates in the K or L band and uses pulse compression techniques to retain good 
range  resolution  while  transmitting  sufficient  energy  to  achieve  a  satisfactory  range  performance.    In 
elevation, the beams are cosec2 in shape and are adjustable in depression angle so as to obtain the 
optimum ground illumination with changing aircraft height. 
7.  The  beamwidth  of  a  linear  array  aerial  may  be  determined  approximately,  in degrees, by 50λ/D 
where λ is the operating wavelength and D is the aerial array length.  Using this approximation for a 
fighter-type aircraft installation with an aerial length of 3m, and assuming a wavelength of 1 cm, yields 
a beamwidth of about 0.16º.  On a large aircraft where an aerial length might be 10 m the beamwidth 
would be 0.05º at the same wavelength, which at a range of 10 nm equates to a linear beamwidth of 
some  16  m  (50  ft).    Although  this  may  be  adequate  for  some  situations,  many  reconnaissance 
applications  require  a  narrower  beamwidth.    However,  since  there  is  clearly  a  practical  limit  to  the 
length of the aerial which can be accommodated on an aircraft, an alternative approach is needed - a 
technique known as synthetic aperture. 
8. 
Synthetic Aperture.  The synthetic aperture technique relies on the aircraft movement to simulate an 
aerial array much longer than the physical installation.  The parameters (including phase) of the radar returns 
from a pulse are recorded, and then combined and processed together with returns from subsequent pulses 
transmitted from different aircraft positions.  The effect is to synthesize an aerial with a length equal to the 
distance flown during the period in which the data is collected.  Synthetic aperture techniques achieve useful 
improvements,  typically  yielding  linear  resolutions  an  order  smaller  than  a  conventional  linear  array.  
However, this improvement is at the expense of considerable processing complexity, which, particularly if a 
near  real-time  performance  is  needed,  would  preclude  their  use  on  other  than  large  aircraft.    There  is  a 
further requirement to stabilize the antenna to a high degree of accuracy. 
Image Quality 
9. 
SLAR  systems  use  high  frequency  transmissions  with  high  pulse  recurrence  frequencies  which, 
together  with  pulse  compression  techniques  and  narrow  beamwidths,  enable  high  quality,  good 
resolution images to be obtained; Fig 2 shows an example low altitude SLAR image together with the 
equivalent Ordnance Survey map for comparison. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 3 


AP3456 – 11-10 - Sideways Looking Airborne Radar 
11-10 Fig 2 SLAR Map 
10.  Distortions.    Uncompensated  deviations  from  the  planned  flight  profile  can  cause  distortions  in 
the image: 
a. 
Height  and  Ground  Speed.    Any  variation  in  planned  height  or  ground  speed  will  cause 
distorted scales across the map. 
b. 
Roll.    If  the  aerial  is  not  roll  stabilized,  rolling  will  cause  uneven  illumination  of  the  ground 
which  will  be  apparent  on  the  resulting  imagery  but  may  not  produce  distortion.    However,  large 
roll angles may result in complete loss of the picture. 
c. 
Drift.    Without  drift  stabilization  of  the  aerial  or  drift  compensation  in  the  display  system, 
parallelogram distortion will result as shown in Fig 3. 
11-10 Fig 3 Parallelogram Distortion 
Y nm
Y nm
Planned 
Target Area 
Coverage
X nm
X nm
d
Echo-map
SLAR Beam
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 – 11-11 - Weather Radar 
CHAPTER 11 - WEATHER RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
A  weather  radar  is  an  airborne  pulse  radar  designed  to  locate  turbulent  clouds  ahead  of  the 
aircraft  so  that, in the interests of safety and comfort, they may be circumnavigated either laterally or 
vertically,  or  penetrated  where  the  turbulence  is  likely  to  be  least.    The  radar  beam  is  conical,  and 
typically scans in azimuth 75º to 90º either side of the aircraft’s heading (see Fig 1). 
11-11 Fig 1 Conical Beam Scanning in Azimuth 
Conical
Beam
scan
Some systems can scan vertically (typically ± 25º) to give a profile display.  Cloud returns are displayed 
as bright areas on a sector PPI display equipped with either fixed or electronically generated range and 
bearing markers as shown in Fig 2.  The scanner has limited stabilization in pitch and roll so that the 
scan remains horizontal and with a steady tilt angle relative to the horizon during aircraft manoeuvre. 
11-11 Fig 2 Cloud Formation on a Sector PPI Display 
Azimuth
0
Markers
Range
Markers
'Bright-up'
Returns from
Clouds
Zero
Open
Range
Centre
2. 
Most weather radars have a secondary ground mapping application and, in this mode, the radar 
transmission  is  often  converted  to  a  cosecant2  beam  –  this  type  of  beam  is  described  in  Volume  11, 
Chapter 8. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-11 - Weather Radar 
Principle of Operation 
3. 
Cumuliform clouds are associated with rising and descending currents of air leading to turbulence, 
which  can  be  severe in the case of cumulo-nimbus clouds.  The turbulence tends to retain the water 
droplets  within  the  cloud  which  increase  in  size  until  they  fall  as  heavy  precipitation.    It  is  this 
precipitation,  and  in  particular  the  large  water  drops,  which  reflect  the  radar  energy  and  from  which 
turbulence can be inferred.  Hailstones are normally covered with a film of water and tend to produce 
the  strongest  echoes;  gentle  rain,  snow,  and  dry  ice  produce  the  weakest  echoes.    Non-turbulent, 
principally stratiform, clouds are not usually detected by the radar as the water droplet size is too small, 
neither  can  the  radar  detect  clear  air  turbulence.    Normally  the  radar  energy  will  penetrate  the 
precipitation of one cloud so as to be able to display echoes from clouds beyond.  However, extremely 
heavy precipitation may attenuate the radar to an extent that this penetration is not achieved. 
Iso-echo Contour Display 
4. 
The  strength  of  the  returned  radar  signals  varies  according  to  the  precipitation  rate  and,  by 
inference, reflects the degree of turbulence.  However, a normal monochrome CRT display is unable to 
discriminate  between  these  different  signal  amplitudes;  clouds  with  significantly  different  degrees  of 
turbulence would appear the same on the display. 
5. 
In order to overcome this shortcoming, a system known as Iso-echo Contour has been developed.  
In this system an amplitude threshold level is established, and all signals which exceed this level are 
switched to earth (see Fig 3).   
11-11 Fig 3 Generation of Iso-echo Display 
This Part of
Iso-echo Contour 
Signal Switched
Switching Level
to Earth
e
l
d
a
n
litu
ig
p
Areas of
S
m
‘Bright-up’
A
Video
Threshold
Time
Normal
Display
Cloud
Return
'Black Hole'
The effect is to create a 'black hole' on the display corresponding to those parts of the cloud return with 
the greatest precipitation rate (Fig 4).  The outer and inner edges of the surrounding return correspond 
to  two  contours  of  precipitation  rate,  and  the  width  of  the  'painted'  return  reflects  the  precipitation 
gradient  in  the  area;  the  narrower  the  paint,  the  steeper  the  gradient,  and  therefore  the  more  severe 
the turbulence. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 5 


AP3456 – 11-11 - Weather Radar 
11-11 Fig 4 Weather Radar Colour Display 
Screen Brightness
ON
Control Knob
TST
Radar Function
SBY
Selector Switch
OFF
Weather/
Weather Alert
Wx
WxA
RNG
Toggle Select Button
Range Selector
RNG
Buttons
VP Mode Select
Button
Ground Mapping
MAP
Mode Selector
Button
NAV
NAV Map Selector
(Requires Optional
Equipment) 
UP
Antenna Tilt
0
TILT
DN
Control
Selected Weather
GAIN
Mode 
Multi-threshold Colour Displays 
6. 
An extension of the Iso-echo Contour system is to have a number of threshold levels in order to 
generate  a  series  of  precipitation  rate  bands.    It  is  necessary  to  have  a  colour  CRT  to  display  these 
gradations,  with  a  different  colour  used  for  each  precipitation  rate  band.    Conventionally,  the  colours 
range  from  black,  indicating  no  or  very  light  precipitation,  through  green  and  yellow  to  red,  which 
corresponds  approximately  to  the  traditional  Iso-echo  Contour  threshold.    Increasingly,  new  systems 
add  another  colour,  magenta,  to  indicate  areas  of  most  intense  precipitation.    One  such  display  is 
shown in Fig 4. 
Sensitivity Time Control 
7. 
As well as the nature of the cloud target, the strength of the returning radar signal is dependent on 
the range of the cloud.  In order to eliminate this variable, sensitivity time control (STC), or swept gain, 
techniques are used in which the receiver gain is lowered at the instant each pulse is fired, and then 
progressively  increased  according  to  a  predetermined  law.    This  ensures  that  echoes  from  distant 
ranges are amplified more than those from close range. 
8. 
At long ranges a cloud is likely to fill the radar beamwidth only partially and the echo signal will 
vary  inversely  as  the  fourth  power  of  range  whereas  at  lesser  ranges,  where  the  beamwidth  is 
completely  filled,  the  reflected  signal  varies  inversely  as  the  square  of  the  range.    There  is, 
therefore, no universal law for all ranges to which STC can be made to conform and any installation 
will have a display that is compensated only over a limited, fairly short, range (e.g. 25 nm). 
Display Interpretation 
9. 
Radar  is  only  reflected  by  cloud  if  there  are  water  droplets  above  a  certain  size,  or  hail,  but 
rapidly  building  storms  will  typically  contain  ice  in  their  upper  levels  which  reflects  very  little  radar 
energy.    When  cruising  at  high  altitude  it  is  therefore  important  to  use  the  tilt  control  to  scan 
downwards or to use the 'profile' capability of some radars to intercept the lower portion of the storm 
containing the water droplets.  A 'profile' scan is shown in Fig 5. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 5 



AP3456 – 11-11 - Weather Radar 
11-11 Fig 5 'Profile' Scan 
ON
TST
SBY

Vertical PROFILE
OFF
Mode Annunciation
Plus & Minus
Wx
WxA
RNG
Thousands of Feet
from Relative
Left or Right Track
RNG
Altitude.  Will vary
Annunciation
with Selected
Range
Degrees of Track
MAP
Left or Right of
Relative Altitude
Aircraft Nose
NAV
Reference Line
Vertical Scan 
Angle    ± 25°
UP
0
TILT
DN
GAIN
10.  Having  detected  a  cloud  which  is  likely  to  be  turbulent,  a  course  of  action  must  be  determined.  
The best option would be to avoid the cloud altogether, however this may not be possible in practice, 
and consideration must be given as to the best part of the cloud to penetrate.  Fig 6 shows a typical Iso-
echo display cloud return diagrammatically.  There are two areas (marked W) where the amplitude of 
the  received  signal  has  exceeded  the  threshold  level,  and  these,  therefore,  show  as  'black  holes'.  
Although  these  areas  can  be  assumed  to  be  areas  of  high  precipitation  and  therefore  of  turbulence, 
greater  consideration  should  probably  be  given  to  areas  where  the  precipitation  gradient  is  highest.  
This  is  indicated  by  the  width  of  the  'paint'.    The  upper  part  of  Fig  6  illustrates  the  returning  signal 
strength and it will be seen that the gradient is steeper to the left than to the right.  On the display this 
variation  is  shown  by  the  band  at  A  being  narrower than at B.  By implication, the particularly narrow 
band at Y can be considered to be the area of greatest turbulence. 
11-11 Fig 6 Diagram of Typical Cloud Return Indicating Zones of Differing Turbulence 
e
d
Iso-echo 
litu
p
Contour Level
m
lA
a
Video
n
ig
Threshold
S
X
Plan
A
B
Display
W
Y
11.  Area Y should, therefore, be the first priority for avoidance.  The two areas labelled W represent 
returns  above  the  Iso-echo  threshold  level  and  are,  therefore,  areas  of  high  precipitation  and 
turbulence.    Although  area  X,  between  these  'holes',  is  of  a  lower  level,  the  degree  to  which  the 
amplitude has dipped below that of W is not apparent from the display; it may easily be very nearly as 
turbulent.  The best area for penetration is likely to be B where the paint is wide (wider than A), and the 
amplitude continues to fall to below the video threshold level on the right. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-11 - Weather Radar 
Determining Cloud Vertical Extent 
12.  The vertical extent of cloud is most simply determined on screen if the equipment has a profile scanning 
capability (Fig 5).  On azimuth only systems it is possible to make an approximate estimation of the vertical 
extent of a cloud by tilting the aerial both above and below the horizontal until the echo just disappears as 
shown in Fig 7. 
11-11 Fig 7 Cloud Height Measurement 
Fig 7a Tilt Up Until Echo Just Disappears 
Radar Beam
0o
Tilt Angle
Fig 7a Tilt Down Until Echo Just Disappears 
0o
Tilt Angle
Radar Beam
The  solution  to  the  trigonometrical  equation  involving  the  tilt  angles  and  range  is  normally  solved  using  a 
table or a graph, such as that shown in Fig 8. 
11-11 Fig 8 Cloud Height Measurement Graph 
25
2.5o
3.0o
2.0o
)
20
0
0
ft
0
ra
1
1.5o
x
irc 15
A
(ft
e
p
ft
v
1.0o
o 10
U
ra
b
ilt
T
irc
A
0.5o
A
5
to
e
0o
tiv
0
la
e
R
5
0.5o
d
n
u
ft
w
o
lo
ra
D
C
10
1.0o
f
irc
ilt
o
T
t
A
h
w 15
1.5o
ig
lo
e
e
H
B 20
2.0o
3.0o
2.5o
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Range (nm)
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
CHAPTER 12 - AIR INTERCEPT RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
The principle purposes of airborne intercept (AI) radar are to detect and identify airborne targets 
(including  those  below  the  radar  horizon  of  ground-based  installations)  to  enable  the  timely  use  of 
appropriate tactics and weapons.  Ideally, AI radar should be able to track, measure flight parameters 
of, and predict flight paths for multiple targets simultaneously, so as to provide the fighter crew with an 
overall air picture. 
2. 
The  radar  will  also  be  required  to  provide  the  necessary  cueing  and  guidance  signals  for  air 
launched weapons such as radar guided missiles.  At closer range, the radar should provide accurate 
steering and range information so that a visual identification of a target can be accomplished.  In close 
combat,  the  radar  may  be  required  to  provide  range  and  angle  rate  data  for  gun  aiming,  and  range 
cueing  for  infra-red  (IR)  homing  missiles.    Radar  angle  data  may  also  be  used  to  slave  IR  missile 
heads onto a target to facilitate IR lock before missile launch. 
3. 
Such  diverse  requirements  cannot  be  met  with  one  type  of  radar  transmission,  and  modern  AI 
radars  are  able  to  operate  in  a  number  of  modes,  the  most  appropriate  being  selected  for  any 
particular  situation.    The  capabilities  of  these  various  modes  can  only  be  realized  with  the  aid  of  an 
airborne  computer  capable  of  processing  the  signals  and  of  providing  the  necessary  inputs  to  a 
synthetic display. 
Operating Modes 
4. 
Whereas  a  non-coherent  pulse  radar  can  readily  be  used  to  determine  the  range  of  a  target,  it 
cannot  determine  velocity.    Furthermore,  it  is  not  suitable  for  detecting  airborne  targets  against  a 
terrestrial  background,  since  the  target  echo  would  be  indistinguishable  from  the  ground  returns.  
Conversely,  a  pure  CW  radar  cannot  be  used  to  determine  range  but  can  be  used  to  determine  the 
radial velocity of a target by measuring the Doppler shift in the radar echo.  Since only the Doppler shift 
(ie  not  the  absolute  frequency)  of  the  returning  signal  is  measured,  a  simple  CW  radar  cannot 
discriminate  between  multiple  targets  which  occur  in  the  beam  at  the  same  time.    Another 
disadvantage of pure CW is that it requires separate transmitting and receiving aerials.  Thus, although 
pure CW on its own is not a suitable transmission type for an AI radar, an AI radar will usually have a 
CW mode, which is used to illuminate a target for missile guidance.  In this mode the aircraft radar only 
transmits, the receiver being in the missile seeker head. 
5. 
Clearly  some  combination  of  the  characteristics  of  both  pulse  and  CW  is  desirable  and  this  is 
achieved  in  a  type  of  transmission  known  as  pulsed  Doppler  (PD)  or  interrupted  continuous  wave 
(ICW).  In this transmission type, the pulses are coherent with respect to each other, i.e. they have a 
constant  phase  relationship.    The  coherency  allows  a  Doppler  shift  (and  consequently  velocity)  to  be 
measured; the pulse characteristic means that range can be determined, although, in practice, not as 
easily as in a simple pulse radar. 
Clutter 
6. 
One  of  the  desirable  features  of  AI  radar  is  the  ability  to  detect  targets  against  a  terrestrial 
background.  This ability is conferred by the CW element of the transmission.  However, in addition to 
the  Doppler  shift  in  the  received  echo  generated  by  the  target,  there  will  also  be  a  spectrum  of 
frequencies returned from the ground as a result of the carrier’s speed.  As well as the main beam, all 
radars produce a number of sidelobes which, since they intercept the terrain at a variety of angles, will 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
detect varying Doppler shifts (Fig 1a).  The sidelobes reaching the ground immediately underneath the 
aircraft generate clutter (altitude returns) centred on the transmission frequency (since the range rate is 
essentially  zero)  but  with  some  frequency  spread  due  to  terrain  variation  and  aircraft  climb  and 
descent.    The  Doppler  frequency  sensed  by  the  main  beam  will  vary  with  radar  angle,  terrain profile, 
and, of course, with the carrier aircraft’s velocity.  The result, in the case of a simple CW transmission, 
is  to  produce  a  clutter  spectrum  similar  to  that  shown  in  Fig  1b.    In  some  systems  the  peaks  due  to 
altitude  and  Mainlobe  Clutter  (MLC)  can  be  removed  using  filters,  to  leave  a  band  of  clutter  of  fairly 
level amplitude extending either side of the central frequency by an amount equivalent to groundspeed 
Doppler shift.  In the 'look-up' situation, MLC is eliminated but Sidelobe Clutter (SLC) is still present. 
11-12 Fig 1 Generation of Clutter in a CW Radar 
Fig 1a Radar Transmission Main and Side Lobes 
Sidelobes
Altitude
Return
Sidelobes
Main Lobe
Ground
Fig 1b Received Frequency Spectrum of a CW Radar 
Altitude Return
Mainlobe
& Transmit/Receive
Clutter (MLC)
e
Leakage
d
litu
p
Sidelobe
Sidelobe
m
Clutter (SLC)
Clutter (SLC)
A
–V
f
V
0
(Zero Doppler 
(Aircraft’s
Doppler
Shift)
Groundspeed)
Frequency
7. 
In order to detect a target readily, its Doppler shift must lie outside of the clutter region.  Whether 
this will be the case depends on the target’s radial velocity which, in addition to its actual speed, is a 
function of the intercept geometry.  In the head-on case (Fig 2a) the radial velocity will be the sum of 
the target’s and the carrier’s speeds, and the Doppler shift will always be outside the clutter region.  In 
the beam and stern chase cases however (Fig 2b and 2c), the radial velocity is likely to be low giving a 
Doppler shift inside the clutter region, thereby making detection more difficult. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
11-12 Fig 2 Effect of Intercept Geometry on Target/Clutter Interference 
Fig 2a Head-on Chase 
Fig 2b Beam Chase 
Fig 2c Stern Chase 
8. 
The  clutter  problem  is  complicated  once  a  pulsed  transmission  is  considered  since  the 
transmission  comprises  several  spectral  lines  which  can  be  determined  by  Fourier  Analysis  to  be 
multiples  of  the  Pulse  Repetition  Frequency  (PRF),  as  shown  in  Fig  3a.    The  clutter  spectrum  is 
superimposed on each of these spectral lines (Fig 3b) and this is significant when choosing the PRF, 
since the higher the chosen PRF, the wider will be the clutter free regions. 
11-12 Fig 3 Clutter in an ICW Transmission 
Fig 3a Frequency Spectrum of ICW Transmission 
Centreline
Frequency (fo)
Frequency Components
Separated by PRF
Frequency
Fig 3b ICW Received Signal – Clutter Superimposed over each PRF Line 
Clutter Free
Region
fo
PRF
PRF
PRF
PRF
Clutter
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
Eclipsing and Blind Ranges 
9. 
Since a common aerial is used for transmission and reception, the receiver is only able to accept 
returning  echoes  for  a  proportion  of  the  time.    As  a  consequence,  many  returning  echoes  will  be 
partially  cut  off,  an  effect  known  as  eclipsing;  at  certain  ranges  the  echoes  will  be  completely  cut  off 
giving rise to blind ranges (see Fig 4). 
11-12 Fig 4 Eclipsing and Blind Ranges 
Transmitted
Signal
This Part
of Signal
Eclipsed
Eclipsing
Target 
Echoes
Signal Completely
Cut off
Blind Ranges
Target
Echoes
T
Time
0
10.  The  problem  of  blind  ranges  can  be  alleviated  by  jittering  or  staggering  the  PRF  so  that  no 
particular  range  remains  blind  permanently.    The  technique  also  helps  to  spread  the  eclipsing  effect 
more  uniformly  over  different  target  ranges.    In  very  high  PRF  systems  the  loss  of  received  power 
caused by eclipsing can be compensated for in the signal processing by integrating pulses. 
Velocity and Range Ambiguities - The Influence of PRF 
11.  In  any  pulsed  radar  system  it  is  essential,  if  ambiguities  are  to  be  avoided,  for  each  echo  to  be 
associated with its own transmitted pulse. 
12.  Velocity  Ambiguity.    In  the  example  of  a  received  spectrum  of  an  interrupted  continuous  wave 
radar at Fig 3b, the pulse repetition frequency is sufficiently high to allow clutter free regions to exist, 
and  if  the  target’s  Doppler  shifted  frequency  falls  into  this  clear  region  it  is  relatively  easy  to  detect 
since  it  is  competing  only  with  noise.    If,  however,  the  pulse  repetition  frequency  is  reduced,  the 
spectral  lines  become  closer  together  until,  at  some  point, the clutter spectra overlap (see Fig 5).  In 
addition  to  the  increased  problem  of  detecting  the  wanted  return  against  the  clutter  background,  it  is 
also impossible to determine to which particular spectrum the return belongs and it is therefore not 
possible  to  measure  velocity  unambiguously.    A  sufficiently  high  PRF  must  be  used  to  prevent  the 
maximum Doppler shift from appearing in the adjacent spectrum. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
11-12 Fig 5 Reduction of PRF Leading to Overlap of Clutter Spectra and Frequency Ambiguity 
Centreline
Mainlobe Clutter
Frequency
PRF
PRF
PRF
PRF
Tgt
Tgt
Tgt
Tgt
Sidelobe Clutter
13.  Range  Ambiguity.    Although  the  problem  of  velocity  ambiguity  can  be  avoided  by  employing  a 
sufficiently  high  PRF,  this  approach  will  lead  to  an  increased  likelihood  of  range  ambiguity.    Radar 
range is determined by timing the radar echo with respect to its transmitted pulse and, in order to avoid 
range ambiguities, the echo must be received before the next pulse is transmitted.  Using a high PRF 
reduces the time available for this to be possible, and therefore reduces the maximum range at which 
the radar can be used without incurring ambiguities in range measurement. 
Medium PRF Radars 
14.  If a target is in sidelobe clutter, as in Fig 6a, the likelihood of detection is low.  The situation would 
not appear to improve at a lower, medium PRF if the target remains in the SLC (see Fig 6b), but this 
allows time for the use of a number of range bins, as illustrated in Fig 7.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
11-12 Fig 6 High/Medium Doppler Spectra 
Fig 6a High PRF 
f
f
f
0
0
0
Tgt
Tgt
Tgt
f
Fig 6b Medium PRF 
f
f
f
0
0
0
Tgt
Tgt
Tgt
f
11-12 Fig 7 High/Medium Pulse Spacing 
Fig 7a High PRF 
time
Fig 7b Medium PRF 
Range Bins
1
2
3
n
time
These range bins act effectively as separate radar receivers, each dealing with a different range band, 
enabling the clutter to be divided between them.  It is useful to consider the derivation of SLC - in the 
high PRF mode it is generated from horizon to horizon; in the medium PRF mode it is generated within 
annular rings as shown in Fig 8. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
11-12 Fig 8 Sidelobe Clutter Regions in Medium PRF Mode 
5
Range Bins
4
3
2
1
1
2
3
4
5
15.  A medium PRF mode requires processing for each range bin and is therefore more complex than 
a high PRF mode.  This complexity is further increased by the need to resolve both velocity and range 
ambiguities.    Moreover,  there  are  no  clutter  free  regions  such  as  those  shown  in  Fig  3b,  and  so 
approaching  targets  are  more  difficult  to  detect  than  in  the  high  PRF  mode.    The  ideal  solution  is  to 
provide operator choice of high or medium PRF modes. 
16.  Many AI radars can use a medium PRF mode, typically in the range 10 kHz to 30 kHz.  Although a 
medium  PRF  system  suffers  from  both  range  and  velocity  ambiguities,  neither  is  particularly  severe 
and they can be resolved using the technique of multiple PRFs. 
17.  Range  Resolution.    The  principle  involved  in  multiple  PRF  ranging  is  shown  in  Fig  9.    The 
transmission is first made at PRF 1 which generates a series of ambiguous range values.  The PRF is 
then altered to PRF 2 and a further set of ambiguous ranges obtained.  A coincident range value from 
each PRF indicates the true range. 
11-12 Fig 9 Two-PRF Ranging Techniques 
Coincident 
Range
PRF 1
PRF 2
True Range
= Ambiguous Returns
= Unambiguous Return
18.  Velocity  Resolution.    Fig  10  shows  a  typical  medium  PRF  radar  frequency  spectrum  in  the 
presence of ground clutter; the PRF is selected so that the MLC is at the PRF line.  The target return is 
repeated  for  every  PRF  line.    The  area  for  detection  is  limited  to  the  frequency  range  between  the 
centre  line  and  the  first  PRF  line  and  detection  filters  are  arranged  to  cover  this  space.    In  modern 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
systems the task of the array of filters will be carried out by the computer software.  Ambiguity arises 
since  a  target  detected  by  the  filters  may be due either to the centre line, or to one or more PRFs 
before the centreline. 
11-12 Fig 10 Medium PRF Frequency Spectrum with Ground Clutter - Location of Detection Filters 
Centre Line
Mainlobe
Frequency
 Clutter
PRF
PRF
PRF
PRF
Tgt
Tgt
Tgt
Tgt
Usable 
Detection Filters
Detection
Filters
Fig  11  shows  the  situation  when  two  PRFs  are  used  (15  kHz  and  12  kHz).    The  dots  represent  the 
detection filters.  Consider a target detected by the 7th filter using the 15 kHz PRF and by the 10th filter 
using  the  12  kHz  PRF.    The  correct  value  for  the  Doppler  shift  is  found  by  repeatedly  adding  the 
corresponding PRF increment to the filter number until a matching value is found.  In this example: 
Filter Value +
PRF  +
PRF  +.........

+
15 
+
= 22
10 
+
12 
+
= 22
i.e., the correct Doppler shift is 22 kHz. 
11-12 Fig 11 Two-PRF Velocity Resolution 
PRF = 15 kHz
PRF
Centre
PRF
Line
Line
Line
15 kHz
Tgt
Detection
5
10
15
20
Filters
PRF = 12 kHz
PRF
Centre
PRF
Line
Line
Line
12 kHz
Tgt
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
19.  In practice three PRFs are normally used for velocity resolution in order to cater for positive and 
negative relative velocities, and a further two PRFs for range resolution.  Both the ranging and velocity 
PRFs must be transmitted during the period of target illumination. 
High PRF Radar - FM Ranging 
20.  Whereas  a  medium  PRF  radar  is  usually  considered  the  better  option  in  an  agile  close  combat 
situation, a high PRF radar is generally a better choice when the task is to detect and engage fast, low-
flying  aircraft  at  maximum  missile  range.    By  using  a  high  PRF,  at  least  twice  that  of  the  highest 
Doppler frequency shift expected, velocity ambiguity can be avoided, but the system would suffer from 
multiple  ambiguities  in  range.    Unfortunately,  the  technique  of  using  multiple  PRFs  to  resolve  the 
ambiguities is impractical at PRFs above about 20 kHz as it is difficult to provide a sufficient number of 
range bins and high PRF radars typically employ PRFs in excess of 200 kHz.  An alternative ranging 
technique  is  therefore  necessary  and  the  method  employed  is  that  of  frequency  modulation  (FM).  
Since  the  transmission  type  is  interrupted  continuous  wave  (ICW),  this  mode  of  operation  is  often 
known as FMICW. 
21.  The  principle  is  illustrated  in  Fig  12  which  shows that the transmission frequency is first ramped 
up, and then down, followed by a period of zero modulation. 
11-12 Fig 12 Principle of FM Ranging 
Recei
y
ve
c
d
n
Si
e
gn
u
al
q
Signal
re
f  
itted
d + fr
F
f  
d    fr
Transm
} fd
Time
At any instant, the difference between the transmitted and received frequency is due to a combination 
of  range  delay  and  Doppler  shift.    During  the  up  ramp  the  difference  between  the  transmitted  and 
received frequencies (∆f) is the Doppler shift, fd, minus the change due to the range delay, fr; during the 
down ramp, ∆f = fd + fr.  During the zero modulation phase the difference is solely due to the Doppler 
shift.    Thus  three  frequencies  are  generated,  the  Doppler  shift  and  two  frequencies  equally  spaced 
either  side  of  the  Doppler  frequency  and  separated  from  it  by  an  amount  which  is  a  function  of  the 
target’s  range  (Fig  13).    These  frequencies  are  detected  in  the  computer  software  using  fast  Fourier 
transform  (FFT)  techniques,  and  the  target’s  range  and  velocity  is  computed.    A  target  is  only 
recognized if all three frequencies are present. 
11-12 Fig 13 FM Ranging Frequency Triplet 
fd
fd    fr
fd + fr
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
22.  Ghosting.  When more than one target is present there is a possibility of false targets, known as 
ghosts, being generated as the software searches for the pattern of three equally spaced frequencies.  
Consider the situation in Fig 14 where there are two real targets, X and Y, each generating a frequency 
triplet.  The computer will recognize a further target composed of the centre and lower frequency of X, 
together with the upper frequency of Y.  The more real targets there are, the greater is the potential for 
ghosts. 
11-12 Fig 14 Generation of Ghost Target Triplet 
Y
Y X
Y
X
X
Ghost Target
Triplet
Low PRF Mode 
23.  Some radars have the option of using a low PRF mode which is sometimes known as Pulse mode 
since,  although  the  transmission  is  still  ICW,  the  severity  of  velocity  ambiguity  is  such  that  Doppler 
detection is impractical, and the radar acts in a similar manner to a simple non-coherent pulse radar.  
The low PRF mode would typically be used in a stern attack situation where it has the advantages of 
providing  a  relatively  tenacious  lock-on and accurate unambiguous ranging down to close range; it is 
usually the most appropriate mode for the visual identification task and for close range gun attacks. 
Scanning and Tracking 
24.  The aerial of an AI radar may be scanned either mechanically or electronically, and the degree of 
scan,  together  with  the  scan  pattern,  is  normally  variable  and  under  the  control  of  the  crew.    Some 
typical  scan  patterns  are  shown  in  Fig  15.    In  some  systems  the  PRF  is  switched  between  high  and 
medium  on  alternate  bars,  the  pattern  reversing  with  each  scanning  frame  (Fig 15e).    This  gives  the 
ability to detect both nose (high PRF) and tail (medium PRF) targets at nearly maximum ranges within 
a single scan.  However, since the scan frame time is divided between the two modes, neither mode 
provides its maximum potential detection performance. 
11-12 Fig 15 Typical AI Radar Scan Patterns 
d  Eight Bar Scan
a  Single Bar Scan
b  Two Bar Scan
c  Four Bar Scan
e  Four Bar Scan with Interleaved PRF
High
High
Medium
Medium
High
High
Medium
Medium
Frame 1
Frame 2
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-12 - Air Intercept Radar 
25.  Tracking  techniques  are  outlined  in  Volume  11,  Chapter  6;  monopulse  tracking  is  usually 
employed  for  angle  tracking  in  AI  radars.    Range  and  velocity  tracking  is  accomplished  using  gating 
techniques,  although  the  problem  is  complicated  in  the  FMICW  mode  by  the  necessity  to  have three 
gates to track the triplet of frequencies. 
26.  Track-While-Scan  (TWS).    Track-while-scan  (TWS)  is  a  facility  generally  available  in  AI  radar 
systems,  the  capability  being  determined  more  by  the  computing  power  available  than  by  the  radar 
parameters.    A  detected  target  is  analysed  to  determine  its  velocity  and  on  this  basis  the  computer 
predicts its position for the time of the next radar scan.  If the target is detected within a small search 
area around the predicted position a track is established.  If the target is not detected the search area 
is  enlarged  for  the  next  scan  until  the  target  is  either  detected  or  declared  lost.    The  computer  will 
smooth  the  calculated  track  over  a  number  of  detected  positions.    Since  a  TWS  system  can  track  a 
number of targets simultaneously it can provide the crew with a good overall 'air picture'. 
Displays 
27.  AI  radars  will  usually  provide  the  operators  with  a  selection  of  head-up  and  head-down  display 
formats. 
28.  Head-up  displays  for  pilot  use  may  show,  in  addition  to  some  basic  flight  parameters  (e.g. TAS, 
heading,  altitude),  the  relative  position  of  targets,  an  aiming  mark,  and  maximum  and  minimum 
engagement ranges. 
29.  The  head-down  display  may  be  a  plot  of  either  range  or  velocity  against  azimuth.    A  typical 
range/azimuth  TWS  display  is  illustrated  in  Fig  16  and  shows  friendly  (numeric  labels)  and  hostile 
(alphabetic  labels)  targets  with  their  predicted  tracks.    The  relative  elevation  of  a  target  is  shown  by 
means of the target label against a vertical scale on the right hand side of the display. 
11-12 Fig 16 Typical Range/Azimuth TWS Display Format 
Speed
Heading
Altitude
435 KT
311
28100
A
A
C
Elevation
Scale
B
C
4
B
Elevation
Scan Limits
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 – 11-13 - Maritime Radar 
CHAPTER 13- MARITIME RADAR 
Introduction 
1. 
The principal task of a maritime radar is to search an expanse of ocean for maritime targets which 
may  range  in  size  from  a  submarine  periscope  to an aircraft carrier.  Ideally the system should allow 
friendly and hostile targets to be distinguished, and may have the capability to identify surface vessels 
broadly.  The radar performance should be such that the aircraft can remain outside the engagement 
envelope of any hostile vessel’s weapon systems. 
2. 
Having  located  a  target,  the  system  should  be  capable  of  tracking  it  and,  if  necessary,  of 
prosecuting an attack either directly or by relaying target information to other units.  In anti-submarine 
operations  the  radar  transmissions  may  be  employed  to  deter  an  enemy  from  surfacing,  thus 
frustrating  attempts  at  using  its  periscope  for  target  identification,  raising  communication  masts, 
recharging batteries, or firing surface launched missiles. 
3. 
In  addition  to  its  primary  role,  a  maritime  radar  will  typically  be  able  to  operate  in  weather 
avoidance and ground mapping (navigation) modes, and will usually have IFF interrogation facilities. 
Radar Type and Parameters 
4. 
Maritime radars are invariably pulsed radars and, in common with the majority of airborne radars, 
usually operate in I, or occasionally J, band.  Although using higher frequencies would permit smaller 
aerials  or  better  resolution,  in  the  maritime  environment  there  would  be  an  unacceptable  increase  in 
clutter returns from water droplets in the atmosphere, such as from blown spray. 
5. 
In order to achieve an acceptable level of resolution, while still being able to operate at long range 
when necessary, the technique of pulse compression using linear frequency modulation is often used.  
Pulse compression techniques are explained in Volume 11, Chapter 2.  Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) 
technology is employed in many maritime radars to achieve pulse compression. 
6. 
Pulse  compression  techniques  using  linear  frequency  modulation  make  the  radar  resilient  to 
broadband  noise  jamming  since  the  receiver  tends  to  ignore  any  signals  which  are  not  appropriately 
coded.  In addition, most radars use frequency agility as a further EPM measure. 
7. 
The maritime radar environment can be very noisy and cluttered since, in addition to internal and 
external  noise,  clutter  returns  may  be  produced,  for  example,  from  sea  movement,  waves,  flocks  of 
birds,  and  porpoises.    Such  returns  can  easily  mask  the  desired  returns  from  small  targets  such  as 
periscopes  and  masts  and  thus,  although  much  of  the  external  noise  is  filtered  out  in  the  pulse 
compression  process,  only  rarely  are  unprocessed  radar  returns  displayed.    Instead,  the  majority  of 
systems  employ  one  or  more  filtering  or  integrating  techniques  to  'clean-up'  the  radar  picture 
(see Volume 11, Chapter 3). 
8. 
In  constant  false  alarm  rate  (CFAR)  receivers  a  voltage  threshold  level is set, and returns are 
only  processed  as  targets  if  their  signal  strength  exceeds  this  level.    The  threshold  level  is 
constantly adjusted in line with a running average value of the received signal.   
9. 
Integration may be applied on a pulse-to-pulse or on a scan-to-scan basis.  The technique relies 
on  the  premise  that  whereas  a  target  return  will  be  fairly  constant  in  position  and  strength,  clutter 
returns tend to be more transient.  It is therefore possible to set a threshold level so that, for example, 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 11-13 - Maritime Radar 
a return is only processed as a target if it persists for, say, six pulses out of ten on a single scan pass, 
and  on  a  minimum  number  of  successive  scans.    Unfortunately,  small  targets  such  as  submarine 
masts and periscopes may often fail to clear these threshold levels since they will often be physically 
masked in a rough sea.   
Scanning 
10.  The scan pattern of a maritime radar may be either a forward hemisphere sector scan, or a 360º 
scan.    However,  in  the  latter  case  only  rarely  is  a  full  360º  achieved  since  in  virtually  all  installations 
there will be some screening by the aircraft fuselage or components.  In addition where a 360º scan is 
available it is normally possible to restrict transmissions to certain sectors, either to increase the data 
rate  from  an  area of interest, or to deny an enemy any EW information from the transmissions.  The 
radar scanner will usually be stabilized in the horizontal and vertical planes to compensate for aircraft 
manoeuvre  and  in  some  systems  the  scanner  tilt  may  be  controlled  automatically  to  restrict 
transmissions in accordance with the selected range scale.   
Target Tracking 
11.  One of the facilities of a maritime radar is the ability to track a number of targets automatically.  In 
a  typical  system  the  radar  computer  divides  the  search  area  into  a  matrix  of  cells,  into  which  targets 
are allocated.  Once a target has been identified by the operator a computer file is opened, and as the 
target  moves  from  one  cell  to  another  the  track  and  speed  are  calculated  and  the  file  updated.  
Problems  can  occur  with  rapidly  manoeuvring  targets  and  with  large  targets  where  the  radar  return 
occupies  more  than  one  cell.    In  these  cases  it  may  be  preferable  for  the  operator  to  allocate  a 
manually assessed track and speed to the target.  The efficiency of an auto-tracking system is highly 
dependent on the suppression of unwanted returns since these can cause the computer to overload as 
it attempts to associate false targets with established tracks or to generate new, but false, tracks. 
Displays 
12.  Maritime radars usually employ 360º or sector PPI displays in their normal operating mode and in 
the case of a 360º display it may be heading or north orientated.  In addition to the PPI display, some 
systems will have high resolution displays using an A- or B-scope which enable selected targets to be 
investigated more thoroughly by scanning through a narrow angle.  It may be possible to achieve some 
degree  of  target  identification  using  these  displays  but  this  is  largely  dependent  on  operator  skill  and 
experience. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 2 

Document Outline