This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
CHAPTER 1 - THE EARTH, DISTANCE, AND DIRECTION 
THE EARTH 
The Form of The Earth 
1. 
For most navigational purposes the Earth is assumed to be a perfect sphere, although in reality it 
is not.  For many centuries man has been concerned about the shape of the Earth; the early Greeks in 
their  speculation  and  theorizing  ranged  from  the  flat  disc  to  the  sphere,  and  even  cylindrical  and 
rectangular Earths have been propounded. 
2. 
The basic shape of the Earth is almost spherical, being slightly flattened at the poles.  This shape 
is more properly termed an oblate spheroid, which is the figure generated by the revolution of an ellipse 
about its minor axis.  Because of this flattening, the Earth’s polar diameter is approximately 27 statute 
miles shorter than its average equatorial diameter. 
3. 
The  ratio  between  this  difference  and  the  equatorial  diameter  is  termed  the  compression  of 
the  Earth,  and  indicates  the  amount  of  flattening.    This  ratio  is  approximately 1/300 but geodetic 
information  obtained  from  satellite  measurements  indicates  that  the  Earth  is  very  slightly  'pear-
shaped', the greater mass being in the southern hemisphere. 
4.
The  Poles.    The  extremities  of  the  diameter  about  which  the  Earth  rotates  are  called  poles.    In 
Fig 1a these are represented by P and P1. 
5. 
East and West.  East is defined as the direction in which the Earth is rotating.  This direction, anti-
clockwise to an observer looking down on the pole P, is shown by the arrows in Figs 1a and b.  West is 
the direction opposite to East. 
9-1  Fig 1 Earth References 
a
b
North Pole
P
Observer Directly
Above The Pole
P
W
E
W
E
P1
6. 
North and South.  The two poles are distinguished arbitrarily; the North Pole (P in Fig 1a) is said 
to be the pole which lies to the left of an observer facing East.  North is therefore that direction in which 
an observer would have to move in order to reach the North Pole; it is at right angles to the East-West 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
direction.  The other pole (P1 in Fig 1a) is known as the South Pole.  The directions East, West, North 
and South are known as the cardinal directions. 
Lines Drawn on the Earth 
7. 
The  shortest  distance  between  two  points  is  the  length  of  the  straight  line  joining  them.    It  is, 
however, impossible to draw a straight line on a spherical surface and so all lines drawn on the Earth 
are  curved,  some  regularly  and  others  irregularly.    The  regularly  curved  imaginary  lines  on  the  Earth 
which are of interest to the navigator are described below. 
8. 
Great  Circle.    A  great  circle  is  a  circle  on  the  surface  of  a  sphere  whose  centre  and  radius  are 
those  of  the  sphere  itself.    Because  its  plane  passes  through  the  centre  of  the  sphere,  the  resulting 
section is the largest that can be obtained, hence the name great circle.  Only one great circle may be 
drawn  through  two  places  on  the  surface  of  a  sphere  which  are  not  diametrically  opposed.    The 
shortest  distance  between  any  two  points  on  the  surface  of  a  sphere  is  the  smaller  arc  of  the  great 
circle joining them (see Fig 2). 
9-1  Fig 2 Great Circle 
Great Circle
B
A
Shortest Distance
9. 
Small Circle.  A small circle is a circle on the surface of a sphere whose centre and radius are not 
those  of  the  sphere.    All  circles  other  than  great  circles  on  the  surface  of  a  sphere  are  small  circles 
(see Fig 3). 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
9-1  Fig 3 Small Circle 
Small Circle
10.  The Equator.  The equator is the great circle whose plane is perpendicular to the axis of rotation 
of the Earth.  Every point on the equator is therefore equidistant from both poles.  The equator lies in 
an East-West direction and divides the Earth into northern and southern hemispheres. 
11.  Meridians.  Meridians are semi-great circles joining the poles; every great circle joining the poles 
forms a meridian and its anti-meridian.  All meridians indicate North-South directions. 
12.  Parallels  of  LatitudeParallels  of  latitude  are  small  circles  on  the  surface  of  the  Earth  whose 
planes are parallel to the plane of the equator.  They therefore lie in an East-West direction (see Fig 4). 
9-1  Fig 4 Equator, Meridians and Parallels 
North Pole
Meridians 
of Longitude
Equator
Parallels
of Latitude
South Pole
13.  Rhumb  Line.
A  rhumb  line  is  a  regularly  curved  line  on  the  surface  of  the  Earth  cutting  all 
meridians at the same angle.  Only one such line may be drawn through any two points.  Parallels of 
latitude are rhumb lines as are the meridians and the equator, though the latter two are special cases 
as they are the only examples of rhumb lines which are also great circles.  Thus, when two places are 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
situated  elsewhere  than  on  the  equator  or  on  the  same  meridian,  the  distance  measured  along  the 
rhumb  line  joining  them  is  not  the  shortest  distance  between  them.    However,  the  advantage  of  the 
rhumb line is that its direction is constant, therefore the rhumb line between two points may be followed 
more  conveniently  than  the  great  circle  joining  them  since  the  direction  of  the  latter  changes 
continuously  with  reference  to  the  meridians.    The  saving  in  distance  effected  by  flying  a  great  circle 
rather  than  a  rhumb  line  increases  with  latitude  but  it  is  appreciable  only  over  great  distances, 
consequently flights of less than 1,000 miles are usually made along the rhumb line.  Rhumb lines are 
convex towards the equator (excepting parallels of latitude, the equator and meridians) and lie nearer 
the equator than the corresponding great circles (see Fig 5). 
9-1  Fig 5 Rhumb Line 
0
0
Great Circle
0
0
Rhumb Line
0
Equator
Earth Convergence 
14.  From Fig 5 it can be seen that the meridians are only parallel to one another where they cross the 
equator,  elsewhere  the  angle  of  inclination  between  selected  meridians  increases  towards  the  poles.  
This angle of inclination between selected meridians at a particular latitude is known variously as Earth 
convergence, true convergence, meridian convergence and convergency.  
UNITS OF MEASUREMENT 
Angular Measurement 
15.  The sexagesimal system of measuring angles is universally employed in navigation.  In this system 
the  angle  subtended  at  the  centre  of  a  circle  by  an  arc  equal  to  the  360th  part  of  the  circumference  is 
called a degree; each degree is subdivided into 60 minutes (') and each minute into 60 seconds (").  Thus 
the size of any angle may be expressed in terms of degrees, minutes and seconds. 
16.  In spherical calculations it is frequently convenient to express spherical distances (ie great circle 
distances) in terms of angular measurement rather than in linear units.  This is possible because of a 
simple relationship between the radius, arc, and angle at the centre of a circle.  Thus the length of the 
arc of a great circle on the Earth might be expressed as 10º 38'; this would convey little unless there 
were  some  ready  means  of  converting  angular  units  to  linear  units.   This difficulty of converting from 
angular to linear units has been overcome by the definition of the standard unit of linear measurement 
on the Earth, the nautical mile. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
Measurement of Distance 
17.  Assuming  the  Earth  to  be  a  true  sphere,  a  nautical  mile  is  defined  as  the  length  of  the  arc  of  a 
great  circle  which  subtends  an  angle  of  one  minute  at  the  centre  of  the  Earth.    Thus  the  number  of 
nautical miles in the arc of any great circle equals the number of minutes subtended by that arc at the 
centre  of  the  Earth.    The  conversion  of  an  angular  measurement  of  spherical distance to linear units 
requires  only  the  reduction  of  the  angle  to  minutes  of  arc;  the  number  of  minutes  is  equal  to  the 
spherical distance in nautical miles. 
18.  In Fig 6a, if ABthe arc of a great circle, subtends an angle at the Earth’s centre of 40º 20', AB is 
said to be 40º 20' in length.  Forty degrees 20 minutes is equivalent to 2,420 minutes of arc which is 
equal to a length of 2,420 nautical miles. 
9-1  Fig 6  Angular Distance and the Nautical Mile 
Fig 6a  Angular Distance 
NP
Great Circle
nms B
o 20' =24 20
40
o 20'
40
A
E
Centre of
Q
The Earth
Equator
SP
19.  Because  of  the  Earth’s  uneven  shape  the  actual  length  of  the  nautical  mile  is  not  constant,  but 
varies  with  latitude  from  6,046  feet  at  the  equator  to  approximately  6,108  feet  at  the  poles.    A  more 
accurate definition of the nautical mile than that given in para 17 is that it is the length of the arc on the 
Earth’s surface that subtends an angle of one minute at its own centre of curvature.  In Fig 6b the arc 
BC is  on  a  comparatively  flat  part  of  the  spheroid  and  the  distance  to  the  centre  of  curvature  is 
relatively long (AB or AC); therefore an angle φ is subtended by a comparatively long arc BC.  The arc 
YZ is at a comparatively curved part of the spheroid, the distance to the centre of curvature (XY or XZ) 
is shorter and the angle φ is subtended by a shorter arc length.  However, for the purpose of navigation 
a fixed unit of measurement is helpful.  Until 1 March 1971 this was the UK Standard Nautical Mile of 
6,080 feet.    Since  that  time  the  International  Nautical  Mile  of  1,852  metres  (6,076.1 feet)  has  been 
adopted as the standard unit of distance for air navigation. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
Fig 6b  Nautical Mile 
B
C
φ
Y
X
φ
Z
A
20.  The other mile unit in common use is the statute mile (so called because its length, 5,280 feet, is 
determined  by  law).    The  statute  mile  evolved  from  the  Roman  "milia  passuum"  (1,000  paces  - 
approximately  4,860  feet).    Unlike  the  nautical  mile,  the  statute  mile  is  not  readily  converted  into 
angular measurement terms. 
21.  Metric Units The SI unit of distance is the kilometre.  One kilometre is the length of 1/10,000th 
part of the average distance between the equator and either pole; it is equivalent to 3,280 feet. 
Speed 
22.  Speed is a rate of change of position.  It is usually expressed in linear units per hour.  As there are 
three main linear units, there are three expressions of speed: 
a. 
Nautical miles per hour, stated as "knots" (kt). 
b. 
Miles (ie statute miles) per hour (mph). 
c. 
Kilometres per hour (km/hr). 
DIRECTION 
Direction on the Earth 
23.  In  order  to  fly  in a given  direction  it  is  necessary  to  be  able  to  refer  to  a  datum  line  or  fixed 
direction  whose  orientation  is  known  or  can  be  determined.    The  most  convenient  datum  is  the 
meridian  through  the  current  position,  since  it  is  the  North-South  line.    By  convention,  direction  is 
measured clockwise from North to the nearest degree, i.e. from 000º to 360º.  It is always expressed 
as a three-figure group; thus East, which is 90º from North, is written 090º, and West is 270º. 
24.  True  Direction.    Direction  measured  with  reference  to  True  North,  the  direction  of  the  North 
geographic pole, is said to be the True direction.  True direction has the following advantages: 
a. 
It is a constant directional reference (ie True direction about a point does not change with time). 
b. 
It is the basis of nearly all maps and charts. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
c. 
It is the direct and continuous output from inertial systems. 
However,  magnetic  direction  continues  to  be  used  as  an  aircraft  heading  reference  and  as  the  basic 
direction reference in non-inertial systems. 
25.  Magnetic Direction.  The Earth acts as though it is a huge magnet whose field is strong enough 
to influence the alignment of a freely suspended magnetic needle any where in the world.  The poles of 
this  hypothetical  magnet  are  known  as  the  North  and  South  magnetic  poles  and,  like  those  of  any 
magnet,  they  can  be  considered  to  be  connected  by  lines  of  magnetic  force.    Although  the  magnetic 
and  geographic  poles  are  by  no  means  coincident  (the  respective  North  poles  are  separated  by 
approximately 900 nm), the lines of force throughout the equatorial and temperate regions are roughly 
parallel  to  the  Earth’s  meridians.    A  freely  suspended  magnetic  needle  will  take  up  the  direction 
indicated  by  the  Earth’s  lines  of  force  and  thus  assume  a  general  North-South  direction;  the  actual 
direction  in  which  it  points,  assuming  no  other  influences  are  acting  upon  it,  is  said  to  be  Magnetic 
North.  With such a datum available it is possible to measure magnetic direction.  If, at any given point, 
the  angular  difference  between  the  directions  of  Magnetic  North  and  True  North  is  known,  then  it  is 
possible to convert Magnetic direction to True direction. 
Variation 
26.  The angular difference between the direction of True North and Magnetic North at any given point, 
and therefore between all True directions and their corresponding Magnetic directions at that point, is 
called  Variation.    Variation  is  measured  in  degrees  and  is  named  East  (+)  or  West  (–)  according  to 
whether the North-seeking end of a freely-suspended magnetic needle, influenced only by the Earth’s 
field, lies to the East or West of True North at any given point.  The algebraic sign given to Variation 
indicates  how  it  is  to  be  applied  to  magnetic  direction  to  convert  it  to  True  direction.    At  any  point, 
therefore, the True direction can be determined by measuring Magnetic direction and then applying the 
local Variation (see Fig 7).  A useful mnemonic is: 
"Variation East, Magnetic least, 
  Variation West, Magnetic best." 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
9-1  Fig 7 Variation 
In Fig 7a it can be seen that:
In Fig 7b it can be seen that:
 
Magnetic direction 

100º (M) 
 
 
Magnetic direction 

100º (M) 
 
Variation 

  10º E (+) 
 
 
Variation 

10º W (–) 
∴ True direction  

110º (T) 
 
∴ True direction 

090º (T) 
a
b
North
North
North
(True)
North
(Magnetic)
(Magnetic)
(True)
Variation
Variation
10o E
10o W
o
o
110  (T)
90  (T)
100o (M)
100o (M)
Isogonals 
27.  Variation is not constant over the Earth’s surface, but varies from place to place.  This change 
is gradual and follows a more or less regular pattern.  By means of a magnetic survey, the variation 
at  numerous  points  is  accurately  measured  and  tabulated.    From  such  a  survey,  it  is  possible  to 
discover a number of points where variation has the same value.  Lines joining these points of equal 
variation are known as isogonals, and these lines are printed on maps and charts. 
28.  The variation at any given point is not a fixed quantity, but is subject to gradual change with the 
passage of time because the magnetic axis of the Earth is constantly changing.  This change, which 
is indicated in the margin of the chart, is not large but, in certain places, may amount to as much as 
one  degree  in  five  years.    It  is  important,  therefore,  that  charts  indicate  the  date  to  which  variation 
values apply, and also the annual change, so that the isogonal values may be updated. 
Deviation 
29.  When  a  freely-suspended  magnetic  needle  is  influenced  only  by  the  Earth’s  magnetic  field,  the 
direction it assumes is known as Magnetic North.  If such a needle is placed in an aircraft, it is subject 
to a number of additional magnetic fields created by various electrical circuits and magnetized pieces 
of metal within the aircraft; consequently its North-seeking end deviates from the direction of magnetic 
North and indicates a direction known as compass North. 
30.  The  angular difference between the direction of Magnetic North and that of Compass North, 
and  therefore  all  Magnetic  directions  and  their  corresponding  Compass  directions,  is  called 
Deviation.    Deviation  is  measured  in  degrees  and  is  named  East  (+)  or  West  (–)  according  to 
whether  the  North-seeking  end  of  a  compass  needle,  under  various  disturbing  influences, lies to 
the  East  or  West  of  Magnetic  North.    The  algebraic  sign  given  to  deviation  indicates  how  it  is  to 
be applied to compass direction to convert it to Magnetic direction. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
31.  Deviation  is  not,  as  might  be  imagined,  a  constant  value  for  a  given  compass;  instead  it  varies 
with the heading of the aircraft.  Nor is the deviation experienced by two different compasses likely to 
be  the  same  under  identical  conditions  (see  Volume  5,  Chapter  15).    Thus,  in  order  to  convert  the 
directions  registered  by  a  particular  compass  to  Magnetic  directions,  a  tabulation  of  the  deviations  of 
that compass, found on various headings, is required.  Such a tabulation of the deviation, usually in the 
form  of  a  card,  must  be  provided  and  placed  near  the  compass  to  which  it  applies.    The  method  by 
which  compass  cards  are  produced  (known  as  'compass  swinging')  is  covered  in detail in Volume 5, 
Chapter 16. 
32.  The  deviation  of  a  compass  will  change  as  its  position  in  the  aircraft  is  changed.    Deviation  will 
also change, over a period of time, due to changing magnetic fields within the aircraft.  Moreover, as 
the  aircraft  flies  great  distances  over  the  Earth,  changes  occur  in  deviation  because  of  the  Earth’s 
changing magnetic field.  It is not sufficient, therefore, to prepare a deviation card and expect it to last 
indefinitely,  the  card  must  be  renewed  at  frequent  intervals  in  order  that  it  may  always  record  the 
deviation as accurately as possible.  A useful mnemonic for the application of deviation is: 
"Deviation East, compass least, 
  Deviation West, compass best." 
Figure 8 illustrates the two cases, Deviation East and Deviation West, for the following values: 
9-1  Fig 8 Deviation 
Fig 8a 
Fig 8b 
Compass direction 100º (C) 
Compass direction 100º (C) 
Deviation 
 
4º E (+) 
Deviation 
 
4º W (–) 
Magnetic direction  104º (M) 
Magnetic direction  096º (M) 
a  Deviation East
b  Deviation West
North
North
(Magnetic)
(Compass)
North
North
(Compass)
(Magnetic)
Deviation
4o E
Deviation
4o W
104  
o (M)
096o (M)
100  
o (C)
100o (C)
Derivation of True Direction 
33.  It is possible, therefore, to express a direction given with regard to a particular compass needle as 
True  direction,  provided  that  deviation  and  variation  are  known.    To  avoid  the  complications  arising 
from  the  changing  values  of  variation  and  deviation  during  flight,  plotting  is  usually  carried  out  using 
true directions.  An example is shown in Fig 9: 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-1 - The Earth, Distance and Direction 
9-1  Fig 9 Three Expressions for Direction 
Compass direction 
225º (C) 
Deviation 
    2º W (–) 
Magnetic direction 
223º (M) 
Variation 
  12º W (–) 
True direction 
211º (T) 
C M
T
Deviation
2  
o W
Variation 12  
o W
211  
o T
223  
o M
225o C
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
CHAPTER 2 - POSITION 
Introduction 
1.
Since air navigation is the process of directing an aircraft from one point to another, it is essential to 
be able to define these points as positions on the Earth’s surface. 
LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE 
General 
2. 
On the Earth, position is normally defined by a reference system known as latitude and longitude. 
Latitude 
3. 
Latitude  is  defined  as  the  angular  distance  from  the  equator  to  a  point,  measured  northward  or 
southward along the meridian through that point.  This quantity is expressed in degrees, minutes and 
seconds and is annotated N or S according to whether the point lies North or South of the equator (see 
Fig 1). 
9-2  Fig 1 Latitude 
N
Parallel of
Latitude
W
E
0
Latitude
Equator
S
Longitude 
4. 
The longitude of any point is the shorter angular distance along the equator between the meridian 
running  through  Greenwich  (the  Greenwich  or  Prime  Meridian)  and  the  meridian  through  the  point 
(Fig 2).    It  is  expressed  in  degrees  minutes  and  seconds,  and  is  annotated  E  or  W  according  to 
whether the point lies to the East or West of the Greenwich Meridian.  As the plane of the Greenwich 
Meridian bisects the Earth, longitude cannot be greater than 180º East or West (Fig 3)
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 2 Longitude 
N
Greenwich
W
E
Z
Equator
Longitude(E)
S
9-2  Fig 3 Extremes of Longitude 
Equator
o
Meridian of 180
N Pole
Greenwich
West
Z
Longitude (E)
A
B
East
Recording Position 
5. 
In air navigation, it is usually sufficient to express latitude and longitude in degrees and minutes only.  By 
convention,  the  group  of  figures  representing  latitude  is  always  written  first  and  is  followed  by  the  figures 
expressing longitude.  To avoid ambiguity, there are always two figures used to denote degrees of latitude, 
those  below  ten  being  preceded  by  the  digit  0.    Similarly,  three  figures  are  used  to  denote  degrees  of 
longitude,  employing  leading  zeros  as  necessary.    The  letters  N,  S,  E,  and  W  are  used  to  indicate  the 
hemisphere.  Thus the position of a point situated in latitude 53 degrees 21 minutes North and in longitude 
zero degrees 5 minutes East, is written: 53 21 N 000 05 E, the spaces being optional. 
Change of Latitude 
6. 
The change of latitude (ch lat) between two points is the arc of a meridian intercepted between their 
parallels of latitude.  It is annotated N or S according to the direction of the change from the first point to 
the  second.    By  convention,  northerly  latitudes  are  considered  positive,  while  southerly  latitudes  are 
considered negative. 
7. 
If  the  two  points  are  on  the  same  side  of  the  equator,  and  thus  have  the  same  sign  (as  in 
Fig 4a), the ch lat is found by subtracting the lesser latitude, that of A, from the greater, that of B.  If A 
and B are on opposite sides of the equator, and thus have the different signs (as in Fig 4b), the ch lat 
is equal to the sum of the latitudes of A and B.  In Fig 4a the ch lat of point B from an observer at point 
A is annotated N, in Fig 4b the ch lat of point B from point A is annotated S. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 4 Change of Latitude 
a
b
N
N
B
Ch Lat
A
A
E
West
East
West
O
East
Ch Lat
Equator
Equator
B
S
S
Change of Longitude 
8.
The change of longitude (ch long) between two points is the smaller arc of a parallel intercepted 
by the meridians through the two points.  It is annotated E or W according to the direction of the change 
from the first point to the second.  By  convention, easterly longitudes are considered positive, while 
westerly longitudes are considered negative. 
9. 
In Fig 5a, the points A and B are in the same hemisphere and so have the same sign.  The change 
in longitude is the difference between them.  The ch long from A to B is westerly, while the ch long from B 
to A is easterly.  In Fig 5b, the points A and B  are in different hemispheres and so have different signs.  
The change in longitude is the sum of their longitudes.  The ch long from A to B is westerly, while the ch 
long from B to A is easterly.  When considering the example in Fig 5c, it is vital to remember the definition 
of ch long given in para 8.  Points A and B are in different hemispheres and so have different signs.  By 
calculating  their  sum,  the  derived  ch  long  would  be  a  measurement  of  the  larger  arc  of  the  parallel 
intercepted  by  the  meridians  through  the  two  points.    Thus,  in  this  situation,  ch  long  is  derived  by 
subtracting the sum of the longitudes of the points from 360º. 
9-2  Fig 5 Change of Longitude 
a
b
c
Westerly
Easterly
Longitudes
Longitudes
180o
180o
180o
B
A
Ch Long
B
o
Ch Long
o
o
A
Greenwich
Ch Long
B
A
0o
Westerly
0o
Easterly
0o
Westerly
Easterly
Longitudes
Longitudes
Longitudes
Longitudes
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
Departure 
10.  The  distance  between  two  given  meridians,  measured  along  a  stated  parallel  and  expressed  in 
nautical miles, is called departure.  In general terms, it is defined as the East-West component of the 
rhumb  line  distance  between  two  points.    The  value  of  departure  between  two  meridians  varies  with 
latitude, decreasing with increasing latitude (Fig 6); the change of longitude between these meridians 
remains the same, irrespective of the latitude. 
9-2  Fig 6 Departure and Change of Longitude 
A
B
70 N
d
10 N
A1
B1
d  = 410 nm   West   (A from B)
30 W
d1
10 W
d1 = 1181 nm West  (A1 from B )
1
Ch Long
11.  The departure between any two points is a function of their latitudes and the change of longitude.  
The relationship is given by: 
Departure (nm) = ch long (mins) × cos (mean lat) 
lat A  +  lat B
where mean lat = 
2
Disadvantages of the Latitude and Longitude Reference System 
12.  The latitude and longitude method of reporting position suffers from certain disadvantages: 
a. 
The possibility of confusion in areas close to the equator and the prime meridian. 
b. 
The necessity of giving an 11 character group to obtain positional accuracy of 1 min e.g. 5136 N 
00125 W. 
c. 
One minute of latitude and one minute of longitude represent different distances on the earth, 
except  at  the  equator,  and  the  distance  represented  by  one  minute  of  longitude  decreases  with 
increasing latitude. 
13.  To  overcome  these  disadvantages,  military  forces  use  reporting  systems  based  on  networks  of 
lines  (grids)  which  are  a  fixed  distance  apart  and  cut  each  other  at  right  angles.    Examples  of  these 
systems discussed in this chapter are: 
a. 
The British National Grid System (covering Great Britain and the Isle of Man). 
b. 
The Irish Grid (covering Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland). 
c. 
The Universal Transverse Mercator Grid (UTM) (covering the latitudes between 80º S and 84º N). 
d. 
The Universal Polar Stereographic Grid (covering the north and south polar regions). 
e. 
The Geographic Reference System (GEOREF).  Note that this system is based on graticule 
lines (latitude and longitude), and is not a true grid system. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
THE BRITISH NATIONAL GRID SYSTEM 
Description of the Grid 
14.  The British National Grid is the national grid for Great Britain and is a unique system for use by both 
civilian and military authorities.  It is based on the Transverse Mercator projection with a central meridian 
at 2º W, to which all grid lines are parallel or perpendicular.  The origin of the grid is at 49º N 2º W, with a 
false origin located 100 km north and 400 km west of the grid origin to ensure that all coordinates on the 
grid  are  positive  (see  Fig  7).    British  National  Grid  coordinates  are  given  in  terms  of  metres  east  and 
metres  north  of  the  false  origin.    Depending  on  the  scale  of  the  chart,  the  distance  between  grid  lines 
shown  on  the  chart  is  10,000  metres,  1,000  metres  or  100  metres.    The  distance  between  grid  lines 
shown on the chart is termed the 'grid interval'. 
The British National Grid Reference System 
15.  The British National Grid Reference System is the means by which national grid references are given 
using the British National Grid.  The British National Grid is first divided into 500 km grid squares.  Each 
500 km square is assigned a letter, referred to as the 500 km 'square identification', as shown in Fig 8.  
Each  500 km  square  is  subdivided  into  100  km  squares,  each  of  which  is  assigned  a  'square 
identification'  letter.    The  100 km  squares  are  lettered  A  to  Z  (omitting  I),  starting  in  the  top  left  of  the 
whole 500 km grid square, as shown in Fig 7.  It can be seen from Fig 7, that by combining the square 
identification  letters,  each  100 km  square  has  a  unique  identifier.    The  100  km  squares  can  be  further 
sub-sub-divided  into  10  km,  1  km,  and  100  metre  squares,  depending  on  the  scale  of  the  chart  in  use 
(see  para  14).    Each  grid  square  within  the  100  km  square  is  designated  by  the  respective  metric 
distances of its South-West corner from the West and South margins of the 100 km square.  The user 
can extract these distances from the figures printed in the margins of the maps against the grid lines. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 7 The National Grid showing the Grid Origin and False Origin 
10OW
8OW
4OE
6OW
4OW
0O
2OE
62O
2OW
62ON
HL
HM
HN
HO
HP
JL
JM
60O
HQ HR
HS
HT
HU
JQ
JR
60ON
HV
HW HX
HY
HZ
JV
JW
NA
NB
NC
ND
NE
OA
OB
58O
58ON
NF
NG
NH
NJ
NK
OF
OG
NL
NM
NN
NO
NP
OL
OM
56O
56ON
NQ NR
NS
NT
NU
OQ OR
NV
NW NX
NY
NZ
OV
OW
54O
54ON
SA
SB
SC
SD
SE
TA
TB
SF
SG
SH
SJ
SK
TF
TG
52O
52ON
SL
SM
SN
SO
SP
TL
TM
SQ
SR
SS
ST
SU
TQ
TR
50O
SV
SW SX
SY
SZ
TV
TW
50 N
O
False
Grid Origin
Origin
490N20W
10OW
8OW
4OE
2OE
6OW
4OW
0O
2OW
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 8 The 500 km Grid Squares of the British National Grid 
H
J
N
O
S
T
2W
16.  A full grid reference consists of the two letters representing the square identifications, followed by 
a  numerical  element  to  identify  a  position  within  the  square.    The  numerical  part  of  a  grid  reference 
consists of an even number of digits in two equal groups.  The first group represents the eastings and 
the second group the northings.  Each group is made up as follows: 
a. 
Principal Digits.  Principal digits label the grid lines and are shown on the chart.  For a chart 
with  a  100  metre  grid,  each  grid  line  has  three  principal  digits  (Fig  9a).    For  a  1,000  metre  grid, 
each  grid  line  has  two  principal  digits  (Fig  9b).    For  a  10,000  metre  grid,  each  grid  line  has  one 
principal digit (Fig 9c). 
b. 
Estimated  Tenths.    A  'standard  reference'  obtained  from  a  chart  is  a  grid  reference  to  a 
precision of one tenth of the grid interval of the chart.  The grid square is divided into tenths, either by 
measurement or estimation, in an easterly and northerly direction and counted respectively from the 
left and south grid lines. 
An eight figure reference identifies a point to a precision of 10 metres.  A six figure reference identifies 
a point to a precision of 100 metres.  A four figure reference identifies a point to a precision of 1,000 
metres.    This  can  be  seen  in  Fig  9.    In  Fig  9a,  the  grid  interval  is  100  metres  and  so  the  estimated 
tenths  gives  a  precision  of  10  metres.    Grid  references  always  read  right  (eastings) first and then up 
(northings).  A grid reference is written without any spaces. 
17.  Examples of standard grid references, appropriate to various scales, are illustrated in Fig 9. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 7 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 9 Grid References on Various Scale Charts 
a  1:2,500
b  1:50,000
c  1:250,000
263
264
265
25
26
27
28
29
30
732
75
8
P
74
P
P
TQ 26437315
73
TQ 2673
731
TQ 264731
7
72
71
70
6
730
2
3
4
THE IRISH GRID 
Description of the Grid 
18.  The Irish Grid is shown on military maps and charts that cover Northern Ireland and the Republic 
of Ireland.  It is based on the Transverse Mercator projection with a central meridian at 8º W to which 
all grid lines are parallel or perpendicular.  The origin of the grid is 53º 30' N and 8º W, with a false origin 
250 km south and 200 km west of the grid origin. Irish grid coordinates are given in terms of metres east 
and  metres  north  of  the  false  origin.    Depending  on  the  scale  of  the  chart,  the  distance  between  grid 
lines shown is 10,000 metres, 1,000 metres or 100 metres.  The distance between grid lines shown on 
the chart is termed the 'grid interval'. 
The Irish Grid Reference System 
19.  The system for reporting grid references on the Irish Grid is almost identical to the British National 
Grid Reference System (para 16).  The difference is that the whole of the island of Ireland falls within a 
single 500 km square which is designated by the letter 'I'.  This letter is not used anywhere else, either 
in the reference system used with the Irish Grid, or in the British National Grid Reference System.  As 
with  the  British  National  Grid  Reference  System,  a  full  grid  reference  consists  of  two  letters,  the  first 
identifying the 500 km square in which the point lies, and the second identifying the 100 km square in 
which the point lies.  Grid letters are followed by the numerical part of the grid reference that identifies 
a position within a grid square. 
THE UNIVERSAL TRANSVERSE MERCATOR GRID 
Introduction 
20.  Any  rectangular  grid  system  must  be  based  on  a  flat  projection  of  the  Earth’s  surface.  However, 
because the Earth’s surface is curved, any flat projection will become increasingly distorted as the area of 
projection is extended.  Therefore, the area covered by one particular grid must not be extended beyond 
the limits at which its distortion becomes excessive. 
Description of the Grid 
21.  The Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) Grid is a world-wide grid extending from 80º S to 84º N.  It is 
based  on  sixty  separate  grid  zones,  each  one  covering  six  degrees  of  longitude  and  each  with  its  own 
projection.    The  UTM  Grid  is  based  on  the  Transverse  Mercator  Projection  with  each  grid  zone  having  a 
central meridian, central to that zone, to which all grid lines are parallel or perpendicular.  The origin of each 
of the grid zones is the intersection of its central meridian with the equator.  Each grid origin is assigned false 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 8 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
coordinates which are 500,000 metres east and 0 metres north for the northern hemisphere, and 500,000 
metres east and 10,000,000 metres north for the southern hemisphere.  This effectively creates false origins 
500 km west of the true origins on the equator, for the northern hemisphere, and 500 km west and 10,000 
km  south  of  the  true  origins  for  the  southern  hemisphere.    UTM  Grid  coordinates  are  given  in  terms  of 
metres east and metres north of the false origin in the hemisphere of the UTM grid zone in which the point 
falls.    Some  UTM  grid  zones  are  extended  at  the  expense  of  others.    These  are  shown  in  Table  1.  
Depending  on  the  scale  of  the  chart,  the  distance  between  the  grid  lines  shown  is  10,000,  1,000  or  100 
metres.  The distance between the grid lines shown is termed the 'grid interval'. 
9-2  Table 1 Extended UTM Grid Zones 
Latitude Band 
Zone 
Width 
55º N to 64º N 
31 
3º (0º to 3º E) 
32 
9º (3º E to 12º E) 
72º N to 84º N 
31 
9º (0º to 9º E) 
32 
Eliminated 
33 
12º (9º E to 21º E) 
34 
Eliminated 
35 
12º (21º E to 33º E) 
36 
Eliminated 
37 
9º (33º E to 42º E) 
22.  The  UTM  grid  is  further  divided  into  twenty  bands  of  latitude.    Each  band  covers  eight  degrees  of 
latitude, (except for the most northerly band which covers the twelve degrees between 72º N and 84º N).  
Each band of latitude is given a designation letter from C to X (omitting letters I and O) starting at 80º S 
and continuing to 84º N. 
23.  Grid Zone Designation Areas are formed by the intersection of the UTM Grid Zones and the latitude 
bands.    Each  Grid  Zone Designation Area is identified by a unique Grid Zone Designation (GZD).  The 
GZD consists of the number of the UTM grid zone followed by the designation letter of the latitude band.  
Grid Zone Designation Areas are illustrated in Fig. 10. 
9-2  Fig 10 The UTM Grid 
84º
X
31
33
35
37
72º
64º
32
56º
48º
40º
32º
24º
16º
08º
00º
08º
16º
24º
32º
40º
48º
56º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
º
0
4
8
2
6
0
4
8
2
6
0
4
8
2
6
0
4
8
2
6
0
8
2
6
0
4
8
2
6
0
6
2
8
4
0
6
2
8
4
0
4
6
2
8
4
0
6
2
8
4
0
6
2
8
4
0
6
2
8
4
0
8
7
6
6
5
5
4
3
3
2
2
1
0
0
9
9
8
7
7
6
6
5
4
4
3
3
2
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
2
3
3
4
4
5
6
6
7
7
8
9
9
0
0
1
2
2
3
3
4
5
5
6
6
7
8
E
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
64º
72º
80º
24.  Each  Grid  Zone  is  sub-divided  into  columns  and  rows  to  form  100,000  metre  (100  km)  squares 
(Fig 11).    Each  column  and  row  is  given  an  identifying  letter.    Thus,  each  100,000  metre  square  is 
identified by two letters corresponding to its column and row respectively.  This pair of letters is termed the 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 9 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
100,000 metre square identification.  Because the UTM Grid covers much of the Earth’s surface, 100,000 
metre  square  identifications  will  be  repeated.    To  identify  individual  100,000  metre  squares,  the  square 
identification  is  preceded  by  the  grid  zone  designation.    In  Fig  11,  it  can  be  seen  that  there  are  two 
100,000  metre  squares  designated  YA  but  they  are  differentiated  by  the  prefix  of  their  UTM  Grid  Zone 
Designation Area, (in this case 3Q and 3N).  The 100,000 metre squares are fitted into each 6º zone so 
that they are uniformly spaced about the central meridian of the zone and along the equator.  As a result, 
the 'grid squares' along the borders of the 6º zones do not form squares. 
9-2  Fig 11 Identification of 100 km Squares on the UTM Grid 
180º
162º
174º
168º
24º
24º
BG
CG
DG
EG
FG
GG
YG
KM
LM
MM
NM
PM
QM
TG
UG
VG
WG
XG
AG
ZG
HG
JM
RM
SG
BF
CF
DF
EF
FF
GF
KL
LL
ML
YF
NL
PL
QL
TF
UF
VF
WF
XF
AF
ZF
HF
JL
RL
SF
BE
CE
DE
EE
FE
YE
GE
KK
LK
MK
NK
PK
QK
TE
UE
VE
WE
XE
AE
ZE
HE
JK
RK
SE
XD
YD
BD
CD
DD
ED
FD
HD
KJ
LJ
MJ
NJ
PJ
QJ
TD
UD
VD
WD
AD
ZD
HD
JJ
SD
RJ
BC
CC
DC
EC
FC
YC
GC
KH
LH
MH
NH
PH
QH
TC
UC
VC
WC
XC
AC
ZC
HC
JH
RH
SC
BB
CB
DB
EB
FB
GB
PG
TB
YB
KG
UB
LG
VB
MG
WB
NG
XB
QC
ZB
AB
HB
JG
RG
SB
BA
CA
DA
YA
EA
FA
GA
KF
LF
XA
NF
PF
QF
TA
UA
VA
WA
MF
2,000,000 m
ZA
AA
JF
RF
SA
2,000,000 m
HA
BV
CV
DV
EV
FV
XV
GV
YV
KE
LE
ME
NE
PE
QE
TV
UV
VV
WV
ZV
AV
RE
SV
HV
JE
BU
CU
DU
EU
FU
YU
GU
QD
TU
XU
KD
UU
LD
VU
MD
WU
ND
PD
AU
ZU
16º
HU
RD
SU
JD
16º
BT
CT
DT
YT
ET
XT
FT
GT
KC
LC
PC
QC
TT
UT
MC
VT
NC
WT
AT
ZT
ST
HT
RC
JC
BS
CS
DS
ES
FS
YS
GS
KB
LB
MB
NB
PB
QB
TS
US
VS
WS
XS
AS
ZS
SS
HS
JB
RB
BR
CR
DR
ER
FR
YR
GR
KA
XR
LA
MA
NA
PA
TR
UR
VR
WR
QA
AR
ZR
SR
HR
RA
JA
BQ
CQ
DQ
EQ
XQ
FQ
YQ
GQ
KV
TQ
LV
UQ
MV
VQ
NV
WQ
PV
QV
AQ
ZQ
HQ
JV
RV
SQ
BP
CP
DP
EP
FP
GP
KU
XP
YP
LU
MU
NU
PU
QU
TP
UP
VP
WP
AP
ZP
HP
JU
RU
SP
BN
CN
DN
EN
VN
WN
XN
FN
YN
GN
KT
PT
TN
LT
UN
MT
NT
QT
AN
ZN
HN
JT
SN
RT
BM
CM
DM
WM
EM
XM
YM
FM
GM
KS
LS
MS
NS
PS
QS
TM
UM
VM
AM
ZM
HM
JS
RS
SM
AL
ZL
BL
CL
DL
EL
UL
VL
WL
XL
FL
YL
HL JR
GL
KR
LR
MR
NR
PR
QR RR SL
TL
ZK
AK
BK
CK
DK
EK
FK
VK
WK
XK
YK
HK JQ
RQ SK
GK
KQ
LQ
MQ
NQ
PQ
QQ
TK
UK


AJ
ZJ
BJ
CJ
DJ
EJ
FJ
WJ
XJ
YJ
HJ JP
RP SJ
GJ
KP
LP
MP
NP
PP
QP
TJ
UJ
VJ
AH
ZH
BH
CH
DH
EH
FH
VH
WH
XH
YH
HH JN
RN SH
GH
KN
LN
MN
NN
PN
QN
TH
UH
AG
ZG
BG
CG
DG
EG
FG
HG JM
XG
YG
RM SG
GG
KM
LM
MM
NM
PM
QM
TG
UG
VG
WG
AF
ZF
BF
CF
DF
EF
XF
FF
YF
HF JL
RL SF
GF
KL
LL
ML
NL
PL
QL
TF
UF
VF
WF
AE
ZE
BE
CE
DE
EE
FE
YE
HE
JK
RK
GE
KK
LK
MK
WE
XE
SE
NK
PK
QK
TE
UE
VE
AD
ZD
BD
CD
DD
ED
XD
FD
YD
HD
WD
JJ
RJ
SD
GD
KJ
LJ
MJ
NJ
PJ
QJ
TD
UD
VD
AC
ZC
BC
CC
DC
EC
XC
FC
YC
HC
JH
RH SC
GC
KH
LH
MH
NH
PH
QH
TC
UC
VC
WC
AB
ZB
BB
CB
DB
EB
FB
XB
YB
GB
HB
JG
RG
SB
KG
LG
MG
NG
PG
QG
TB
UB
VB
WB
AA
ZA
BA
CA
DA
EA
XA
YA
HA
JF
FA
GA
KF
WA
RF
SA
TA
UA
VA

LF
MF
NF
PF
QF

180º
162º
174º
168º
25.  Starting at the 180º meridian and moving eastwards for 18º along the equator, the 100,000 metre 
columns (including those along 6º zone borders) are lettered alphabetically from A to Z (with I and O 
omitted).  This is repeated at 18º intervals. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 10 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
26.  In  odd  numbered  UTM  Grid  Zones,  the  rows  of  100,000  metre  squares  are  lettered  northwards 
alphabetically from A to V (with I and O omitted), the partial alphabet being repeated every 20 rows.  In even 
numbered UTM Grid Zones, starting at the equator, the rows are lettered F to V (omitting I and O) followed 
by A to V (omitting I and O).  This is done to increase the distance between 100,000 metre squares with the 
same square identification.  Below the equator, the 100,000 metre rows are lettered northwards in such a 
way that they fit into the sequence of letters above in the same zone. 
THE UNIVERSAL POLAR STEREOGRAPHIC GRID 
Description of the Grid 
27.  The Universal Polar Stereographic Grid consists of two grids - one covering the North Polar area, 
(north of 84º N), and the other, the South Polar area (south of 80º S).  These grids are based on a polar 
stereographic projection with the origin of each at the respective pole.  The Northern and Southern UPS 
grids extend to 83º 30' N and 79º 30' S respectively to provide a 30' overlap with the UTM grid.  Easting 
grid  lines  are  parallel  to  the  Greenwich  Meridian  (0º)  and  the  180º  meridian.    Northing  grid  lines  are 
parallel to the 90º W and 90º E meridians.  The grid origins are assigned false coordinates of 2,000,000 
metres  east  and  2,000,000  metres  north.    When  used  in  conjunction  with  the  UTM  grid the UPS Grids 
provide world-wide coverage. 
28.  The North polar area is divided into two parts by the Greenwich and 180º meridians (Fig 12).  The 
half containing the West longitudes is given the grid zone designation Y whilst that containing the East 
longitude  is  given  the  grid  designation  Z.    Similarly,  the  South  polar  area  (Fig  13)  is  divided  into  two 
halves.  The half containing the West longitudes is lettered A, whilst the other half, containing the East 
longitudes, is lettered B.  No numbers are used in conjunction with these letters. 
9-2  Fig 12 The UPS Grid - North Polar Area 
WEST
EAST
180°
174°
174°
168°
168°
162°
162°
156°
15
ZP
AP
6
XP
YP
BP
°
CP
150°
150°
E
144°
144°
XN
YN
ZN
m AN
BN CN
UN
0
0
FN
138°
13
2,500,000 m N
GN 8
TN
°
,0
0
8
0
4
84°
°
132°
132
,0
°
UM
XM YM ZM 2AM BM CM
FM
TM
GM HM
126°
126°
°
0
1
2
2
SL TL
UL
XL
YL
ZL
AL
GL
1
BL
FL
0
CL
HL °
°
1
4
1
1
4
1
°
°
SK
TK
UK
XK
YK
GRID ZONE DESIGNATIONS
ZK
AK
BK
CK
FK
GK
HK
8 RK
1
0
JK 0
1

180°
°
YJ
2
BJ
1
0
0
RJ SJ
TJ
8
UJ
CJ
FJ
GJ
1
ZJ
HJ
2
XJ
AJ
8
JJ
88°
°
°
°
6
9
9
6
°
RH SH
TH
UH XH
YH ZH
AH
BH CH
FH GH
HH JH
°
0
°
2,000,000m N
NORTH POLE
9
2,000,000m N
0
9
Y
Z
8
4
RG
E
YG
ZG
CG
FG GG
°
SG
TG
UG XG
AG
BG
HG JG
°
E
4
8
m
m
0
0
7
0
0
8
8
,0
8
,0
°
°
0
°
RF
0
0
88°
8
0
JF
7
SF
TF
UF
XF
ZF
AF
CF
FF
GF
HF
,5
,5
7
1
W
YF
BF
2
EST
2
°

EAST
°
2
RE
7
JE
6
SE
TE
UE
XE
YE
ZE
AE
BE
CE
FE
GE HE
6
°
°
66
60
°
SD
HD
°
0
TD
UD
XD
YD
ZD
AD BD
CD
FD
GD
6
54°

SC
5
TC
GC HC
4
E
8
UC
XC
YC
ZC
AC BC
CC FC
° 84
m
°
0
0
1,500,000m N
84°
48°
42
,0
° TB
0
0
42°
3
UB
FB GB
6
,0
°
XB
YB
ZB
2 AB
BB
CB
36°
30°
30°
2
XA

YA
AA
BA CA
1
ZA
24°

12
18°
°

12°


WEST
EAST
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 11 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 13 The UPS Grid - South Polar Area 
WEST
EAST
ZZ
AZ
YZ


6°BZ 1
12°

18
18°
°
XY
YY
ZY
AY
BY
CY
2
24°
UY
FY

TY
GY
30
30°
°
RX
TX
UX
XX
SX
YX
ZX
AX
BX
CX
FX
GX HX
JX
36
36°
°
RW
SW
TW
UW XW
YW
ZW AW BW
CW
FW GW HW
JW
42
42°QW
°
KW
80
80º
º 4
QV
8
48°
RV
SV
TV
UV
XV
YV
ZV
AV
BV
CV
FV
GV
HV
JV
KV
°
PU
LV
54
54° PU QU TU
SU
TU
UU
XU
YU
ZU
AU
BU
CU
FU
GU
HU
JU
KU
LU
° PU
LU
°
6
0
0
6 LT PT
QT
°
RT
ST
TT
UT
XT
YT
ZT
AT
BT
CT
FT
GT
HT
JT
KT
LT PT
°
8
6
6
4
6
6
º
LS
PS
84º
QS
RS
SS
US
XS
YS
ZS
AS
BS
HS
JS
KS
LS
PS
°
KS
TS
CS
FS
GS
QS
GRID ZONE DESIGNATIONS
°
7
2
LR
7
PR
QR
RR
SR
TR
UR
XR
ZR
YR
AR
BR
2
CR
FR
GR
HR
JR
KR
LR
PR
KR
QR °

°
7
8 KQ
LQ
PQ
QQ
RQ
SQ
TQ
UQ
XQ
YQ
ZQ
AQ
BQ
CQ
FQ
GQ
HQ
JQ
KQ
LQ
PQ
QQ 8
7
°
YP
JP
BP
° KP
LP
PP
QP
RP
8
RP
SP
TP
UP
XP
ZP
AP
8
CP
FP
GP
HP
JP
KP
LP
PP
QP
8
4
88º
º
4
8
°
ZN
AN
JN
KN
LN
PN
QN
°
RN
TN
SN
UN
XN
YN
BN
RN
CN FN
GN
HN
JN
KN
LN
PN
QN
°
0
SOUTH POLE
0
9
9
A
B
JM
KM
LM
PM QM
RM
SM
TM
UM
XM
YM
ZM
AM
BM
CM
FM
GM
RM
HM
JM
KM
LM
PM
QM
RM
9
°
6
8
6
°

88º
9
JL
KL
LL
PL
QL
RL
SL
TL
UL
XL
ZL
AL
YL
BL
CL
FL
GL
HL
JL
KL
LL
PL
QL RL
1
°
0
2
2
KK
LK
PK
°
QK
RK
SK
TK
UK
XK
YK
ZK
AK
BK
CK
FK
GK
HK
JK
KK
LK
PK
QK
01
WE
1
ST
0
KJ
QJ
°
180º EAST
8
LJ
PJ
QJ
RJ
SJ
TJ
UJ
XJ
YJ
ZJ
AJ
BJ
CJ
FJ
8
GJ
HJ
JJ
KJ
LJ
PJ
0
°
1
KH
K1
TH
GH
QH
1
LH
PH
QH
RH
SH 8
UH
XH
YH
ZH
AH
BH
CH
4
FH
HH
JH
KH
LH
PH
°
4
4
°
º
84º
11
1 LG
PG
°
2
PG
QG
RG
SG
TG
UG
XG
ZG
AG
YG
BG
CG
FG
GG
HG
JG
KG
LG
0
0
2
°
1
LF
LF
PF
12 PF QF RF SF TF
UF
XF
YF
ZF
AF
BF
CF
FF
GF
HF
JF
KF
LF
°

126
PE
LE
13
QE
RE
SE
TE
UE
XE
YE
ZE
AE
BE
CE
FE
GE
HE
JE
KE
2° 80
132°
º
1
80º
QD
KD
38
RD
SD
TD
UD
XD
YD
ZD
AD
BD
CD
FD
GD
°
HD
JD
138°
144° SC
HC
RC
JC
TC
UC
XC
YC
ZC
AC
BC
CC
FC
GC
144°
150°
TB
GB
150°
15
UB
FB

XB
YB
ZB
AB
BB
CB
1
156°
62°
162°
168° YA
BA
174 ZA
AA
°
168°
180° 174°
WEST
EAST
29.  Both polar regions are divided into 100,000 metre squares in a similar manner to the UTM system.  
Columns are defined to be parallel to the 180º /0º meridian and rows parallel to the 90º W/90º E meridian.  
In the eastern hemisphere, columns are lettered consecutively eastwards, starting at the 180º/0º meridian 
with A and omitting the letters D, E, I, M, N and O.  In the western hemisphere, the columns start at the 
180º/0º meridian with Z and the lettering proceeds backwards through the alphabet omitting W, V, O, N 
and M.  The omission of the letters shown ensures that there is no duplication with UTM references within 
18º  in  any  direction.    In  the  North  polar  region,  rows  start  with  A  at  84º  N  0º  E,  the  letters  increasing 
northwards  to  the  Pole,  then  southwards  finishing  with  P  at  84º  N  180º  E  and  omitting  I  and  O.    In  the 
South polar region, rows start with A at 80º S 180º E, the letters increasing southwards to the Pole, then 
northwards finishing with Z at 80º S 0º E and omitting I and O. 
THE MILITARY GRID REFERENCE SYSTEM 
Description of the System 
30.  The Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) is a grid reference system designed to be used with 
the UTM and UPS grids.  It is a method of defining any point by means of a Grid Reference.  A full grid 
reference is reported in the same way as that for the British National Grid (see para 16), and consists 
of the Grid Zone Designation (see para 23 for the UTM Grid and para 28 for the UPS Grid), followed by 
two letters representing the square identifications, followed by an even number of digits that identify a 
position within the grid square. 
31.  Most  military  maps  and  charts  that  carry  the  UTM  Grid  have  a  grid  reference  box  in  the  margin 
that  explains  how  to  report  a  grid  reference.    The  grid  reference  box  will  indicate  the  Grid  Zone 
Designation(s)  applicable  to  the  map  or  chart.    On  larger  scale  products,  the  grid  reference  box  will 
also show the grid square identifications that fall on the map or chart. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 12 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
32.  The  MGRS  Grid  reference  of  the  point  marked  Guernsey  Airport  in  Fig  14  is  obtained  in  the 
following manner: 
9-2  Fig 14 Example Grid Reference 
1
V A  W A
0
V V W V
9
0
1
2
3
4
548
8
Guernsey
   Airport
7
Latitude
Value  - 49° 20’ N
Longitude - 3° W
50
52
54
Value
Grid Zone Designation   
 
     30U* 
*(This can be found from the grid reference box on the chart, ONC E1 in this example) 
100 km square identifier 
      W V 
Easting    2 followed by 9 (estimated tenths) 
Northing  7 followed by 5 (estimated tenths) 
Full grid reference 
Guernsey Airport   
 
     30UW V2975 
This four figure reference defines the point to a precision of 1,000 metres. 
WORLD GEOGRAPHIC REFERENCE SYSTEM (GEOREF) 
Introduction 
33.  The use of latitude and longitude as a method for reporting position suffers from the disadvantages 
stated in para 12.  These disadvantages can be overcome by the use of a reporting system based on a 
lettered  rectangular  grid.    However,  rectangular  grids  which  ignore  the  curvature  of  the  earth,  while 
satisfactory over a limited area, become excessively distorted with any great extension of the area of 
use.    To  avoid  this  distortion,  any  reference  system  which  is  to  have  universal  coverage,  must  be 
based on the graticule of meridians and parallels. 
34.  The World Geographic Reference System (GEOREF) was introduced with the object of providing a 
simple,  speedy,  unambiguous  method  of  defining  position  which  is  capable  of  universal  application.    It 
incorporates the best of both systems by utilizing the orthodox graticule of meridians and parallels and by 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 13 of 20 


AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
expressing the position of any point, in relation to it, by a system of alphanumeric references.  In this way, 
the disadvantages of latitude and longitude (stated in para 12 sub-paras a and b) are overcome. 
35.  It  is  emphasized  that  the  GEOREF  system  replaces  neither  the  latitude  and  longitude  nor  the 
rectangular grid methods of reporting positions.  However, it provides a convenient means of reporting 
position within the framework of the latitude and longitude system. 
Description of the System 
36.  The  GEOREF  system  divides  the  surface  of  the  Earth  into  quadrangles,  the  sides  of  which  are 
specific  arc  lengths  of  longitude  and  latitude.    Each  quadrangle  is  then  identified  by  a  simple, 
systematic, lettered code. 
37.  The  first  division  of  the  Earth’s  surface  is  into  24  longitudinal  zones,  each  15º  wide,  which  are 
lettered  A  to  Z  inclusive  (omitting  I  and  O),  commencing  eastwards  from  the  180º  meridian.    A 
corresponding  division  is  made  of  the  Earth’s  surface  into  12  latitudinal  bands,  each  15º  wide,  which 
are lettered A to M inclusive (omitting I), commencing northwards from the South Pole.  The Earth is 
therefore  divided  into  288  quadrangles,  of  15º  sides,  each  of  which  is  identified  by  a  unique 
combination  of  two  letters.    The  first  letter  is  always  that  of  the  longitude  zone  or  easting,  and  the 
second that of the latitude band or northing.  In this respect, the system differs from that of latitude and 
longitude  in  which  the  latitude  is  always  given  first.    For  example,  in  Fig  15,  it  can  be  seen  that  the 
majority of the UK is in the 15º quadrangle MK. 
9-2  Fig 15 GEOREF System of 15º Identification Letters 
38.  Each  15º  quadrangle  is  now  sub-divided  into  15  one-degree  longitudinal  zones  and  latitudinal 
bands,  lettered  A  to  Q  inclusive  (omitting  I  and  O),  commencing  eastwards  and  northwards 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 14 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
respectively  from  the  South-West  corner  of  the  15º  quadrangle.   Thus, the 15º quadrangles are sub-
divided into 225 one-degree quadrangles, each being identified by means of four letters.  The first two 
letters  identify  the  15º  quadrangle,  the  third  letter  the  one-degree  zone  of  longitude,  and  the  fourth 
letter the one-degree band of latitude. 
39.  Salisbury, in the County of Wiltshire, therefore lies in the one-degree quadrangle MK PG (see Fig 16). 
9-2  Fig 16 One-degree Quadrangles 
20o
16o
12o
8o
4o
0o
4o
8o
60o
M
Q
L
N
P
o
N
56
M
L
K
J
o
52
H
MKPG
G
F
MK
E
D
48o
SALISBURY
C
A
B
C
44o
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M

P
Q
12o
8o
4o
0o
4o
40.  Each one degree quadrangle is divided into sixty minutes of longitude, numbered eastwards from 
its  western  meridian,  and  sixty  minutes  of  latitude,  numbered  northwards  from  its  southern  parallel.  
This  method  of  numbering  is  used  no  matter  where  the  one  degree  quadrangle  is  located, and does 
not vary even though the location may be west of the Prime Meridian or south of the equator. 
41.  A unique reference defining the position of a point to a precision of one minute in latitude and longitude 
(a precision of 2 km or less) can now be given by quoting four letters and four numerals.  The four letters 
identify the one degree quadrangle.  The first two numerals are the number of minutes of longitude by which 
the point lies eastward of the western meridian of the one degree quadrangle.  The second two numerals are 
the number of minutes of latitude by which the point lies northward of the southern parallel of the one degree 
quadrangle.  If the number of minutes for either of the longitude or latitude values is less than ten, the first 
numeral  of  the  pair  will  be  zero  and  must  be  written.    Thus  the  reference  of  Salisbury  Cathedral 
(51º 04' N 001º 48' W) is MKPG 1204 (see Fig 17). 
42.  Occasions may arise (very infrequently) when it is necessary to define a position to an accuracy 
greater than one minute.  The GEOREF system can be expanded to allow for this.  A reference to one 
tenth  of  a  minute  of  longitude  and  latitude  is  obtained  by  a  further  sub-division  of  the  one-minute 
quadrangle  into  tenths  of  a  minute  of  longitude  eastwards  and  into  tenths  of  a  minute  of  latitude 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 15 of 20 


AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
northwards  from  the  bottom  left-hand  corner  of  the  minute  quadrangle.    The  accuracy  is  now 
approximately  608  ft,  and  the  reference  is  given  by  quoting  six  numerals  instead  of  four.    A  further 
refinement  to  an  accuracy  of  approximately  61  ft  is  obtained  when  the  eastings  and  northings  are 
given additional figures.  In this case, the first four numerals represent the eastings in minutes and 
hundredths  of  a  minute  of  longitude  and  the  remaining  four  numerals  represent  the  northings  to  a 
similar  accuracy.    Thus  the  GEOREF  of  Salisbury  Cathedral,  to  an  accuracy  of  one-tenth  of  a 
minute, is MKPG 122039 and to a hundredth of a minute, MKPG 12250386 (see Fig 17). 
9-2  Fig 17 Part of the One-degree Quadrangle containing Salisbury Cathedral in detail 
400
51 10’N
51 10’N
400
400
400
400
51 00’N
51 00’N
002 00’W
001 50’W
001 40’W
43.  On  local  operations,  where  the  risk  of  ambiguity  with  a  neighbouring  15º  quadrangle  is  unlikely, 
the  first  two  letters  of  the  reference  may  be  dropped.    The  reference  given  in  para  41  would  then 
become PG 1204. 
44.  When a position lies on a dividing meridian of two longitudinal zones, or a dividing parallel of two 
bands  of  latitude,  the  reference  letters  quoted  are  for  the  most  easterly  zone  or  the  most  northerly 
band; e.g. the GEOREF of 50º N 00º W is NKAF 0000 (see Fig 16). 
Use of GEOREF 
45.  The GEOREF system is used specifically in: 
a. 
The control and direction of forces engaged in the air defence of the United Kingdom and the 
countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. 
b. 
The coastal defence of the United Kingdom. 
46.  Although  the  system  has  a  restricted  use,  it  is  available for universal application should the occasion 
arise.  Whenever security demands, it is a simple operation to change the code letters periodically. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 16 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
Conversion of Latitude and Longitude to GEOREF Co-ordinates 
47.  Using  the  description  of  the  GEOREF  system  (para  36)  and  Fig  15,  a  method  of  deriving  a 
GEOREF  coordinate  from  a  latitude  and  longitude  position  can  be  determined.    It  must  be 
remembered,  when  following  the  example  below,  that  in  the  latitude  and  longitude  system, 
latitude  is  always  written  before  longitude,  but,  in  the  GEOREF  system,  the  longitude  value  is 
written before the latitude value. 
Example: 
To convert 55º 05' N 010º 29' W  to GEOREF 
a. 
Apply  the  conventional  signs  for  N(+),  S(–),  E(+)  and  W(–)  to  the latitude and longitude 
position.    Thus,  55º  05'  N  010º  29'  W  becomes  +55º  05'  –10º  29'    (The  preceding  zero  can 
dropped from the longitude degree value). 
b. 
Add 90º to the latitude and 180º to the longitude. 
   90º 00' 
180º 00' 
+55º 05' 
–10º 29' 
145º 05' 
169º 31' 
c. 
Divide both of the whole degree portions (145 and 169) by 15: 
       9                      11                  (This gives respective quotients of 9 and 11) 
15 145
15 169
     135   
        165 
       10   
            4                        (This gives respective remainders of 10 and 4) 
d. 
Add 1 to the quotients: 9 + 1 = 10 and 11 + 1 = 12. 
e. 
Write down the letters corresponding to these numbers, omitting I and O in the count. 
A  B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J











W












1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2















The longitude value (12) gives M and the latitude value (10) gives K. 
f. 
Combine the letters to give MK; this is the 15º quadrangle identifier. 
g. 
Add 1 to each remainder: 10 + 1 = 11 and 4 + 1 = 5. 
h. 
Write down the letters corresponding to these numbers, omitting I and O in the count. 
The longitude value (5) gives E and the latitude value (11) gives L. 
i. 
Combine the letters to give EL; this is the 1º quadrangle identifier. 
j. 
The  numerical  portion  of  the  GEOREF  is  taken  from  the  minutes  part  of  the  latitude  and 
longitude  values  after  the  sum  in  sub-para  b.    The  longitude  minutes  are  31  and  the  latitude 
minutes are 05. 
k. 
Thus 55º 05' N 010º 29' W  corresponds to MKEL 3105 in GEOREF. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 17 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
Advantages and Disadvantages of the GEOREF System 
48.  Advantages.
a. 
GEOREF provides an easy and quick method of position reference. 
b. 
There is no risk of ambiguity. 
c. 
It is eminently suitable for use over R/T or telephone. 
d. 
It is capable of universal application. 
e. 
For purposes of security, it is comparatively simple to change the code letters periodically. 
f. 
To provide a reference to a precision of l minute, the group is smaller than the corresponding 
reference by latitude and longitude. 
49.  Disadvantages
a. 
Like  the  latitude  and  longitude  system,  it  compares  unfavourably  with  a  rectangular  grid, 
since a different scale has to be used for the measurement of the number of minutes of longitude 
and latitude. 
b. 
The  system  can  be  confusing  because,  contrary  to  latitude  and  longitude  procedures,  the 
minutes of longitude are given before the minutes of latitude.  Similarly, the method of reporting a 
GEOREF in the southern and western hemispheres is the same as for the northern and eastern 
hemispheres. 
LOCAL DATUMS 
Introduction 
50.  A datum can be considered as a set of mathematical constants that define the size and shape of the 
ellipsoid  and  how  that  ellipsoid  is  fixed  to  the  geoid.    It  is  used  in  conjunction  with  the  production  of  a 
particular  map.    Despite  the  introduction  of  world-wide  standards  such  as  WGS  84,  many  nations  still 
produce maps and charts using local datum references.  Provided that all references to position are based 
upon the same datum, little confusion will ensue.  However, co-ordinates for a point on the Earth’s surface 
using one datum will, in most cases, not match the co-ordinates for the same point using another datum. 
Error Potential 
51.  Fig  18  shows  two  maps  of  the  same  area  but  bearing  differing  grid  overlays.    Fig  18a  is  based 
upon  WGS  84  and  Fig  18b  on  the  European  Datum  (ED)  50.    The  position  of  the  centre  of  the 
runway  at  BROCZYNO  can  be  identified  by  the  co-ordinates  851308  under  W GS 84  and  as 
852310  under  ED  50.    If  this  airfield  were  to  be  a  target,  provided  that  both  the  target  planner 
and  the  tasked  aircrew  were  using  maps  with  the  same  datum,  there  would  be  no  problem.    If 
not, the position tasked would not be the position attacked. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 18 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
9-2  Fig 18 Grid Position Comparison
a  WGS 84 Grid - Target Position 851308 
150 32
5 4 1
Broczyno
162
1
153
50
140
150
31
Broczyno
140
152
0 5 1
1
5
50
4
14
1
145
30
5
145
145
141
83
84
85
Athletic Field
87
88
86
Trzciniec
1
Jezioro Siemiecin
5
Distillery
150
0
145
163
b  ED 50 Grid - Target Position 852310 
150
32
5 4 1
Broczyno
162
1
153
50
140
150
Broczyno
140
31
152
0 5 1
1
5
50
4
14
1
145
5
145
145
30
141
83
84
85
At
A hletic Field
l
87
88
86
Trzciniec
15
Je
J z
e io
i r
o o
r  
o Si
S e
i m
e i
m ec
e i
c n
i
Distillery
150
0
145
163
OTHER METHODS OF EXPRESSING POSITION 
Introduction 
52.  The  methods  so  far  discussed  have  defined  position  relative  to  a  pair  of  reference  lines.  
However, there are occasions when simpler methods will suffice. 
Pin-points 
53.  The  simplest  method  of  reporting  an  aircraft’s  position  is  to  name  the  point  directly  beneath  the 
aircraft at  that  time.    This  is  known  as  a  'pin-point',  and  may  be  a  town,  airfield,  radio  beacon 
etc.  However this may be an imprecise method because: 
a. 
Easily recognized features are rarely small. 
b. 
It is difficult for the pilot to determine, and view, the position vertically beneath the aircraft. 
c. 
It relies on the receiving agency’s knowledge of the area, and is therefore open to some confusion. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 19 of 20 

AP3456 - 9-2 - Position 
Range and Bearing 
54.  An  alternative  method  is  to  express  the  aircraft’s  position  as  a  range  (distance  in  nautical 
miles) and bearing (angular relationship) from an easily identified datum or feature.  This method 
is sometimes referred to as a rho-theta (ρ, θ) system. 
55.  Fig 19 illustrates three expressions of bearing for the same aircraft position: 
a. 
Fig 19a shows the relative bearing (measured from the fore-and-aft axis of the aircraft) of the 
feature from the aircraft.  The receiving agency must know the aircraft’s heading to interpret this 
message. 
b. 
Fig 19b shows the true direction of the line joining the feature and the aircraft, measured at 
the feature.  This is known as a 'true' bearing. 
c. 
Fig 19c shows the magnetic direction of the line joining the feature and the aircraft, measured at 
the feature (known as a 'magnetic' bearing).  This method is often used in conjunction with TACAN 
and  VOR/DME  beacons,  which  provide  this  information  directly.    When  obtained  from  beacons, 
magnetic  bearings  are  normally  referred  to  as  'radials',  e.g.  "I am on the 180 radial from Wallasey 
VOR", indicates that the aircraft is on a line drawn at 180º (M) from Wallasey VOR. 
9-2  Fig 19 Range and Bearing 
A  Spurnhead is 090º Relative at 10 nm 
B  The Aircraft is 10 nm on 310º (T) from Spurnhead 
TN
TN
090  o(R)
10 nm
10 nm
310  (
o T)
C  The Aircraft is 10 nm on 320º (M) from Spurnhead 
MN
TN
o
10  W
10 nm
o
320  (M)
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 20 of 20 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
CHAPTER 3 - MAP PROJECTIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  Earth  is  an  irregularly  shaped  solid  figure  whose  surface  is  largely  water,  out  of  which  the 
various land masses rise.  A map or chart is a representation of this surface at some convenient size 
on a flat sheet.  The term 'map' is generally taken to be a representation of land areas while 'chart' is 
traditionally  reserved  for  sea  area  representation.    The  aviator  is  not  always  concerned  with  this 
distinction and the air chart covers both.  Other terms used are 'plan', to describe a bird’s-eye view of a 
small area, and 'graphic', to describe maps which vividly portray topography. 
2. 
A map projection is a systematic laying down of the meridians and parallels on to a flat sheet in 
such  a  way  that  the  result  displays  certain  features  of  the  actual  surface.    There  are  many  ways  in 
which this can be done and clearly a way must be chosen which generates a useful product.  However, 
just  as  it  is  meaningless  to  try  to  represent  a  circle  by  a square, so it is not feasible to represent the 
Earth’s three-dimensional shape on a flat plane in a wholly accurate manner. 
3. 
It would, however, be possible to construct a square which had some features in common with a 
circle,  e.g.  the  same  area,  the  same  perimeter,  or  the  diagonal  equal  to  the  diameter.    In  order  to 
represent all of the circle’s features, many different squares would be necessary.  Similarly, not all of 
the  Earth’s  features  can  be  represented  accurately  on  a  single  map  projection.    The  user  must 
therefore select the correct projection to meet a specific use. 
4. 
For navigation purposes it is important that bearings and distances are correctly represented and 
easily  measured;  for convenience the path which is flown should be shown as a straight line and the 
plotting  of  radio  and  other  bearings  should  be  straightforward.    In  order  to  achieve  these 
characteristics,  other  properties  must  be  sacrificed;  areas  may  be  out  of  proportion  and  it  may  be 
necessary to restrict the area of coverage of any single map. 
5. 
Before looking at projections and properties closely, the shape of the Earth deserves some more 
attention.    The  true  topographic  surface,  with  mountains,  valleys  and  oceans,  is  too  irregular  for  any 
simple treatment, and it is easier to deal with if approximated by less complicated shapes.  There are 
various  possibilities.    The water surface (the mean sea surface together with the outline which would 
be traced if frictionless canals were let into the land masses) is known as the 'geoid'.  The geoid is also 
an  irregular  surface,  but  it  can  be  well  represented  by  the  smooth  surface  of  an  oblate  spheroid  (or 
ellipsoid), which is a regular mathematical figure.  For many charting purposes, a further simplification 
can  be  made  by  replacing  the  oblate  spheroid  by  a  sphere  of  the  same  general  size.    These  are  all 
shown in Fig 1. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 1 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 1 Shape of the Earth 
Ellipsoid or
Sphere
Geoid
Oblate Spheroid
Ellipsoid
Geoid
Topographical
Mountain
    Surface
Geoid
Ellipsoid
Ocean Bed
The Vertical Datum 
6. 
The zero surface to which elevations or heights are referred is called the Vertical Datum.  Because it 
is  available  worldwide,  traditionally,  surveyors  and  mapmakers  have  taken  sea  level  as  the  definition of 
zero elevation.  The Mean Sea Level (MSL) is determined by continuously measuring the rise and fall of 
the  oceans  at  'tide  gauge'  stations  on  sea  coasts.    This  averages  out  the  highs  and  lows  of  the  tides 
caused  by  the  changing  effects  of  the  gravitational  forces  from  the  sun  and  moon,  which  produce  the 
tides.    It  is  evident,  however,  that  there  can  be  a  considerable  variation  in  the  average  of  the  local  sea 
level for a particular ocean and that of another.  MSL, therefore, becomes more properly defined as the 
zero  elevation  for  a  local  or  regional  area.    The  heights  of  mountains  or  structures  on  locally  produced 
maps  of  the  area  are  determined  by  using  the  local  MSL  as  the  datum.    With  the  advent  of  satellite 
navigational  systems,  which  compute  heights  against  a  worldwide  standard  datum,  some variation may 
be observed between heights depicted on the map and those calculated by the instrumentation.  If such 
instrumentation  (e.g.  Global  Positioning  System)  is  being  used  to  provide  height  information  for  an 
instrument approach, it is of paramount importance that the height being presented to the pilot is based 
upon the same datum as the radar picture being monitored by the approach controller. 
Zero Surfaces of Height Systems 
7. 
The  differences  encountered  in  height  measurements  and  their  representation  on  maps  or 
equipment displays can be attributed to the differences between the topographic surface of the Earth, the 
associated flattened spheroid (ellipsoid) and the geoid as described in para 5 and illustrated in Fig 1. 
8. 
Topographic  Surface.    The  topographic  surface  is  the  actual  surface  of  the  Earth  tracing  the 
ocean floors to the tops of mountains. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 2 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9. 
Geoid.    The  geoid  is  the  physical  model  of  the  Earth  and  approximates  MSL.    It  is  the  zero 
surface as defined by the Earth’s gravity.  The direction of gravity is perpendicular to the geoid at every 
point.    Variations  in  the  topography  and  the  different  densities  within  the  Earth’s  crust  produce  slight 
variations  in  the  gravity  field,  described  by  the  dips  and  peaks  of  the  geoid.    Since  the  sea  surface 
conforms  to  this  gravity  field,  sea  level  also  contains  slight  hills  and  valleys  similar  to,  but  much 
smoother than, the topographical surface.  At any one point on the ocean, therefore, the sea level may 
be closer to, or farther from, the centre of the Earth than another such point and this variation may be 
as much as 5 metres. 
10.  Spheroid or Ellipsoid.  The ellipsoid is a smooth representation of the oblate spheroidal shape of 
the Earth and is used as its geometric model.  An ellipsoid is generated by the revolution of an ellipse 
about one of its principal axes.  The ellipsoid which approximates the geoid is an ellipse rotated about 
its minor axis.  In some texts describing the Earth, the term oblate spheroid is abbreviated to spheroid 
and is synonymous with ellipsoid.  The term ellipsoid will be used in this chapter hereafter. 
Height Calculation 
11.  Any zero surface can be used as a datum to express height, even the centre of the Earth.  Fig 2 is 
an  enlargement  of  detail  from  Fig  1  and  shows  how  each  datum  discussed  may  be  used  to  express 
height. 
9-3 Fig 2 Detail from Fig 1 - Representation of Height 
Topographic
Surface
H
h
Geoid
N
Ellipsoi
To centre of
d
the Earth
H = Orthometric Height (approx AMSL)
h  = Ellipsoid Height (approx N+H)
N = Geoid Height
12.  Orthometric Height.  Height above MSL is approximately the same as orthometric height (H), the 
technical name for height above the geoid.  There are a few points on land which fall below the geoid, 
and in such cases,  H can be negative. 
13.  Geoid Height.  Geoid height (N) is the separation between the geoid and the ellipsoid.  It can be 
plus or minus depending upon whether the geoid is further from, or closer to, the centre of the Earth 
than  the  ellipsoid.    N  is  positive  where  the  geoid  is  further  from  the  centre  of  the  Earth  than  the 
ellipsoid, zero when they are coincident and negative when the geoid is closer to the Earth’s centre. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 3 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
14.  Ellipsoid Height.  Ellipsoid height (h) is a measure of distance above or below the ellipsoid (plus 
or minus).  h is also called geodetic height.  h is approximately equal to N + H. 
Height Interpretation by Global Positioning System (GPS) 
15.  GPS receivers normally output elevations based upon the ellipsoid.  However, the system has the 
capability  to  output  height,  on  demand,  converted  to  MSL  and  most  modern  receivers  are  able  to 
access that option.  GPS MSL height is based on the best geoid information available for the area in 
question  and  this  is  being  continually  improved  with  technological  advances  in  geodesy  and 
instrumentation. 
Map Projections 
16.  Many  maps  are  drawn  on  projections  of  the  ellipsoid.    As  stated  in  para  10,  the  ellipsoid  is  the 
solid  figure  generated  by  rotating  an  ellipse  about  its  minor  axis,  Fig  3,  and  lends  itself  to a tolerably 
simple  mathematical  treatment.    The  minor  axis  PP′  is  the  polar  axis  and  the  major  axis  EE′  is  the 
a − b
equatorial  axis;  an  ellipsoid  can  be  defined  by  stating  one  radius  and  the  ratio 
,  known  as  the 
a
flattening (f).  A single mean ellipsoid can be used to represent the whole Earth, but because the geoid 
is irregular an ellipsoid can be found which represents one part of the world with fair precision and yet 
is unsuitable in another part.  Some of the ellipsoids in use are listed in Table 1 below. 
9-3 Fig 3 The Ellipsoid 
3a – Examples of Flattening 
3b – Earth Flattening is Approx 1/300 
Minor
P'
Axis
b
f=0
(A circle) f= f= f= f= f=
Major
E'
1
1
1
1
1
Axis
E
a
50 10 5
3
2
Major
Axis
a = ½ of the Major Axis
P
b = ½ of the Minor Axis
Revised Feb 16  Page 4 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Table 1 Examples of Ellipsoids in Use 
Radius 
Flattening 
Area 
Ellipsoid Name 
km 
nm 
Russia 
Krassovsky 
6378.250 
3443.98 
1/298.3 
N America 
Clarke 1866 
6378.206 
3443.96 
1/295.0 
Europe 
International 1909 
6378.388 
3444.05 
1/297.0 
Japan 
Bessel 1841 
6377.397 
3443.52 
1/299.2 
Africa 
Clarke 1880 
6378.249 
3443.98 
1/293.5 
India 
Everest 
6377.276 
3443.46 
1/300.8 
World Geodetic System 1972 (WGS72) 
6378.135 
3443.55 
1/298.3 
World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS84) 
6378.137 
3443.56 
1/298.3 
17.  Because of the difference between the ellipsoids, the position discrepancies between maps based 
on  neighbouring  ellipsoids  can  give  errors  as  great  as  1500 m.    However,  it  is  possible  to  select  the 
correct datum in advanced navigation systems to alleviate this. 
18.  The  ultimate  simplification  of  the  figure  of  the  Earth  is  the  sphere.    The  geometry  is  easy,  and 
projections  can  be  reduced  very  often  to  ruler  and  compass  constructions.    In  the  chapters  which 
follow,  projections  of  the  sphere,  which  are  often  used  in  practice,  are  described;  projections  of  the 
ellipsoids follow similar patterns but are very much more complicated.  From a practical point of view 
no projection allows precise measurement of bearing and distance, and there is little advantage to be 
gained  from  complexity.    When  great  precision  is  required  the  quantities  are  best  calculated,  rather 
than measured, from the appropriate ellipsoid. 
19.  Summary.  The points which this introduction has attempted to make are as follows: 
a. 
The Earth’s figure can be described in order of reducing precision as the geoid, an ellipsoid 
(sometimes  called  a  spheroid)  or  a  sphere.    Map  projections  are  drawn  using  a  sphere  or  an 
ellipsoid as the figure of the Earth. 
b. 
A  map  projection  is  not  in  general  a  picture  of  the  Earth.    It  is  a  plane  drawing  on  which 
certain  distances,  areas,  directions,  or  other  features  on  the  Earth  required  for  navigation 
purposes are reproduced. 
Classification of Map Projections 
20.  A  simple  insight  into  the  problems  of  representing  the  Earth  on  a  flat  surface  can  be  gained  by 
imagining a balloon blown up to some manageable size to make a model of the Earth.  Having drawn 
all  the  shapes  and  lines  on  the  balloon,  it  could  be  deflated,  and  the  piece  required  cut  out  and 
stretched  to  make  it  flat.    Of  course,  it  could  be  stretched  more  in  one  direction  than  another  and  a 
great variety of shapes obtained.  Each time the flat elastic plane was altered, another map projection 
would result.  Fig 4 illustrates some of the many possibilities. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 5 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 4 Elastic Projections 
21.  Most of the projections obtained in this way would not be very useful.  It would be more convenient 
if the meridians were straight lines for example, and this could be obtained by suitably manoeuvring the 
material; also, by sticking down parts of the rubber the amount of stretch in a given direction could be 
varied  along  that  direction.    But  it  would  be  difficult  to  control  the  rubber  to  give  any  predetermined 
projection and this model is not used in practice. 
22.  In  actual  map  projections  a  relationship  between  points  on  the  surface  of  the  Earth  and  the 
corresponding point on the plane is formulated mathematically.  For each of the odd-looking diagrams 
in Fig 3 some such point-to-point relationship exists.  The relationship may be a complicated formula 
involving many variables, or it may be extremely simple. 
23.  Perspective  Projections.    The  simplest  relationships  are  those  which  can  be  reproduced  by 
simple  geometric  construction.    They  are  called  perspective  projections  since  they  are  nothing  more 
than  drawings  of  the  shadows  which  would  be  cast  by  the  meridians  and  parallels  on  a  transparent 
model Earth on to a plane surface, or on to a surface which can be made plane.  One example of this 
is given in Fig 5 where a point source of light at the North Pole of the model Earth (usually called the 
reduced Earth) projects the meridians and parallels on to a plane tangential at the South Pole.  Variety 
is obtained by moving the light and the plane. 
9-3 Fig 5 A Perspective Projection 
NP Light Source
Reduced Earth
E
Q
Plane Surface
Q'
E'
Equator (Projected)
24.  Non-perspective Projections.  When the relationship is such that simple geometric construction is 
impossible  the  projection  is  designated  non-perspective.    The  majority  of  map  projections  are  non-
perspective, but every non-perspective projection can be thought of as perspective projection which has 
been adjusted in some way.  Hence a study of the simple projections leads without too much difficulty to 
Revised Feb 16  Page 6 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
the  more  complicated  ones.    In  this  section  each  of  the  non-perspective  projections,  which  comprise 
nearly  all  the  most  useful  ones,  will  be  dealt  with  under  a  generic  title  which  really  describes  its 
perspective primitive. 
Types of Perspective Projections 
25.  The  surface  on  to  which  the  shadows  described  in  para  23  are  cast  need  not  be  a  simple  flat 
surface, and any surface which can be subsequently opened out and laid flat will do.  For example a 
cone (Fig 6) can be placed over the reduced Earth, the projections carried out, and then the cone can 
be cut and opened (the technical expression is 'developed') to lie flat. 
9-3 Fig 6 Development of a Cone 
A
C
B
A
B
C
26.  A  cylinder  can  also  be  wrapped  around  the  reduced  Earth  and  developed  after  projection  as 
shown in Fig 7. 
9-3 Fig 7 Development of a Cylinder 
C
A
A C
D
B
B D
27.  These three projection surfaces provide the generic titles as follows: 
a. 
Azimuthal projections are perspective projections on to a plane surface, together with certain 
associated non-perspective projections. 
b. 
Cylindrical  projections  are  perspective  projections  on  to  a  cylinder,  together  with  the 
associated non-perspective projections. 
c. 
Conical  projections  are  perspective  projections  on  to  a  cone,  together  with  the  associated 
non-perspective projections. 
28.  Variety in each group is obtained by varying the light source position.  In fact the classification is 
somewhat  artificial  since  a  cylinder  is  a  cone  whose  apex  angle  is  0º,  and  a  plane  is  a  cone  whose 
apex angle is 180º.  The cylinder and the plane are therefore limiting cases of the cone. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 7 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Representation of Scale 
29.  The balloon model of the Earth in para 20 was impractical because it would be difficult to control 
the  stretching  of  the  rubber  to  obtain  a  particular  projection.    However,  one  point  was  quite  clear  - 
stretching was required to lay it absolutely flat.  This point is vital.  It is not possible to project a sphere 
on to a plane without at least some elongation taking place. 
30.  Scale is defined as the ratio of chart length to Earth length; because of the distortion which takes 
place it is impossible for this ratio to be constant all over any projection and small lengths only can be 
considered.  The rubber can be stretched to make the scale constant along one line for example, or it 
can expand in all directions from a point; it cannot be arranged to have the same value everywhere. 
31.  On  a  great  many  charts  scale  changes  by  different  amounts  in  different  directions  from  a 
point.  It is usual therefore when stating scale to quote where it exists. 
32.  Methods of Expressing Scale.  Three methods of expressing scale are in general use: 
1
a. 
The representative fraction, e.g. 
 or 1 in 500,000, or 1: 500,000. 
50 ,
0 000
b. 
The plain statement,  
e.g. "2 cm to 1 km". 
c. 
The graduated scale, as shown in Fig 8. 
In most calculations it is convenient to use the representative fraction; note that 1:500,000 is referred to 
as a larger scale than 1: 1,000,000. 
9-3 Fig 8 The Graduated Scale 
Scale of Nautical Miles
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
85°
89°
75°
80°
65°
70°
55°
60°
50°
100
0
100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000
Scale of Statute Miles
5
0
5
10
15
20
33.  Scale Factor.  Mention has been made already of the reduced Earth.  Since this is a model of the 
Earth its scale can be expressed as a ratio of Reduced Earth length to Actual Earth length and will be 
constant.  In map projections a reduced Earth of given scale is used as the basis of a given projection; 
somewhere  on  each  projection  a point or line (or lines) will exist with the same scale as the reduced 
Earth.  This is the scale usually printed on maps and charts and scale at other points is determined with 
the aid of a ratio known as scale factor. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 8 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Scale factor is defined as: 
Chart Scale 
Scale Factor =
Reduced Earth Scale 
or 
Chart Length 
Scale Factor =
Reduced Earth Length 
the length being those of a given distance element on Earth. 
34.  Scale Deviation.  The stated scale of a chart is usually the reduced Earth scale, hence at a point 
where stated scale is correct (ie where Chart scale equals Reduced Earth scale), Scale Factor = 1.  At 
other places the scale factor will be other than unity, it may be more if the scale has expanded, or less 
if  there  has  been  compression.    The  difference  between  scale  factor  and  unity  describes  the  scale 
deviation and is expressed as a percentage change, i.e., 
Scale Deviation % = (Scale Factor – 1) × 100. 
As an example, suppose it is necessary to find the scale and scale deviation at a point, B, where the 
scale factor is 1.01, and where the stated scale of the map is 1: 1,000,000. 
Scale at B = Scale factor at B × Reduced Earth Scale 
1
=  1.01× ,100 ,0000
1
= 990,099
or 1 in 990,099 
Scale Deviation at B = (1.01 – 1) × 100 = 1% 
35.  Measurement of Distance.  One of the prime requirements of a map projection is that distance 
measurement  should  be  simple  and  accurate.    Since  a  constant  scale  is  impossible  throughout  any 
projection  the  demand  is  realized  by  using  charts  on  which  the  pattern  of  scale  expansion  is  well 
defined in any direction from a point, or by using only those small sections of a given projection over 
which  scale  expansion  is  so  small  that  the  chart  can  be  regarded  as  having  a  constant  scale  (for 
practical purposes a limit of ± 1% scale deviation is accepted). 
Conformal Projections 
36.  For  navigation  purposes  it  is  important  that  a  chart  should  give  an  accurate  representation  of 
bearings;  the  bearing  of  one  point  from  another  on  the  Earth’s  surface  should  be represented by the 
same  angle  on  the  chart.    This  requires  that  at  a  given  point  on  the  chart  the  scale expansion is the 
same in all directions.  A projection which has this property is called conformal or orthomorphic.  Some 
of the features of conformal projections are discussed below. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 9 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
37.  Representation of Great Circles.  The sum of the angles of a plane triangle is 180°, but the sum 
of  the  angles  of  a  spherical  triangle,  whose  sides  are  great  circles,  is  always  in  excess  of  180°;  the 
triangle  contained  by  two  meridians  and  an  arc  of  the  equator  has  two  right  angles.    Hence  it  is  not 
possible  to  project  all  great  circles  as  straight  lines  on  a  conformal  projection  (Fig  9).   As with scale, 
however,  it  is  often  possible  to  use  a  restricted  section  of  a  projection  in  which  all  great  circles  are 
approximately straight lines. 
9-3 Fig 9 Great Circle as Straight Lines 
Great Circle Arcs
B'
B
A'
A
C'
C
^
^
^
If A + B + C > 180°, then   A' B' C' is impossible
38.  Representation  of  Rhumb  Lines.    Since  rhumb  lines  cut  successive  meridians  at  the  same 
angle they can be represented by straight lines.  Of course, this does not mean that they are straight 
lines on all charts; indeed, as a general rule they are not. 
39.  Meridians and Parallels.  Since the meridians and parallels intersect at right angles on the Earth, 
they  must  intersect  at  right  angles  on  a  conformal  projection.    They  need  not  be  straight  lines  and 
Fig 10 illustrates some of the possibilities. 
9-3 Fig 10 Meridians and Parallels 
Meridians
Parallels
Meridians
Parallels
Meridians
Parallels
40.  Scale at a Point.  By definition scale at a point must be the same in all directions.  If a point, P, 
and a small area around it is considered, (so small that the Earth is sensibly flat) then if 100 m to the 
North of P is represented by 1 mm so also must 100 m in any direction be represented by 1 mm if the 
compass  rose  at  P  is  not  to  be  distorted.    The  result  of  different  scales  in  various  directions  is 
illustrated in Fig 11.  It is not always possible to check scale in all directions, but if the meridians and 
parallels are orthogonal and scale is the same along both at a point then the chart is conformal. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 10 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 11 Scale of a Point 
N
100 m
D
A
100 m
D
A
100
P
100
45° 45°
m
m
100
P
100
m
m
45° 45°
C
B
C
B
100 m
100 m
Bearings from P are all correct 
Bearings from P are not correct 
41.  A  Meaning  for  'Same  Scale'.    Since  there  has  to  be  a  scale  expansion  it  is  a  useful  starting 
point to define what it will be in one direction and then to see what must happen in other directions if 
the chart is to be conformal.  Suppose that scale along a meridian on a given projection follows the 
pattern  shown  in  Fig  12,  let  the  mean  scale  over  CD  be  1:500,  and  the  mean  scale  over  AB  be 
1:1000.    Since  these  values  apply  exactly  only  at  points  somewhere  in  CD  and  AB,  suppose  they 
apply  at  E  and  F  (not  necessarily  the  mid-points).    If  the  chart  is  conformal  the  scales  in  any 
direction at the points E and F must be 1:1000 and 1:500, and in particular these scales apply in the 
directions  East  and  West.    Applying  this  pattern  to  a  larger  area  of  the  chart, if on this conformal 
projection  the  parallels  are  concentric  then  the  meridians  must  be  radii  of  those  circles.    In  other 
words  the  scale  expansion  along  GH  must  be  the  same  as  that  along  EF.    The  scale  at  G  must 
equal the scale at E, and that at H equal that at F, and so for all points on the parallels EG and FH.  
There can only be one conclusion, the scale must be constant along each parallel and have the value 
given  by  the  expanding  meridian  scale  at  its  latitude.    Thus,  the  apparent  paradox  that  while  scale 
expansion  differs  about  a  point,  nevertheless  the  scale  about  the  point  is  the  same,  is  seen  to  be 
meaningful.  Parallels and meridians have been considered here for simplicity.  In some projections it 
is convenient to define different co-ordinate systems, but the same rules will apply. 
9-3 Fig 12 Same Scale in all Directions 
N
G
A
E
E
B
H
C
F
F
D
Non-conformal Projections 
42.  For  many  purposes,  outside  navigation,  charts  having  properties  other  than  orthomorphism  are 
required.    In  atlases  it  is  often  useful  to  have  a  map  on  which  areas  are  shown  in  their  correct 
Revised Feb 16  Page 11 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
proportion.    This  property  is  obtained  by  elongation,  or  shearing,  so  that  scale  is  not  the  same  in  all 
directions  at  a  point,  but  the  product  of  the  scales  in  two  perpendicular  directions  is  the  same 
everywhere.  A typical equal area, or equivalent, projection is shown in Fig 13. 
9-3 Fig 13 Bonnes Equal Area Projection 
20
20
40
40
0
60
60
0
180
180
80
80
160
160
North Pole
80
140
140
120
60
120
Paris
100
40
100
80
80
20
60
60
Equator
40
40
20
20
0
43.  Very few non-conformal projections are useful for navigation, but it is clearly useful to have charts 
on which all great circles are straight lines, or on which distances from a specified place (and no other) 
can  be  precisely  measured  using  a  constant  scale.    These  properties  can  be  obtained  on  non-
conformal projections known as the gnomonic and azimuthal equidistant projections respectively. 
Earth Convergency 
44.  The angle which one meridian on the Earth makes with another is known as Earth convergency.  
At the poles its value is ch long (Fig 14a), but it reduces away from the pole until, at the equator where 
the  meridians  are  parallel  to  one  another,  its  value  is  0º.    If  the  Earth  is  considered  as  a  sphere  its 
value is given by: 
Earth convergency = ch long sin lat 
45.  More  generally  this  term  applies  to  the  difference  in  great  circle  bearing  over  two  meridians.  
The angle (β – α) in Fig 14b is Earth convergency given approximately by: 
Earth convergency = ch long sin mean lat. 
9-3 Fig 14 Earth Convergency 
a
b
Ch Long
P
P
β
C
( β – α )
B
Equator
α
A
Meridians Parallel
Revised Feb 16  Page 12 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
46.  Convergency, as defined in para 45, is one feature which can never be faithfully projected, for, like 
scale,  it  is  a  property  inherent  in  the  sphere.    It  describes  the  shape  of  the  Earth’s  surface,  and  any 
map on which it is correctly shown must itself be a spherical surface. 
Chart Convergence 
47.  The angle which one meridian makes with another on a projection is known as chart convergence.  
If  the  meridians  are  represented  by  straight  lines,  then  chart  convergence  will  be  a  constant;  if  the 
meridians are curved, it will differ from one point to another. 
Definitions and Dimensions 
48.  Depending on the degree of simplification which is applied to the shape of the Earth, so different 
definitions of latitude arise.  These are illustrated in Fig 15 as follows: 
a. 
Astronomical  Latitude.    On  the  geoid,  the  astronomic  latitude  is  the  angle  between  the 
vertical (the direction of gravity) at a place and the plane of the equator.  It is therefore indicated 
by the normal to the geoid at the place. 
b. 
Geodetic  (or  Geographic)  Latitude.    On  an  ellipsoid,  the  geodetic  latitude  is  the  angle 
between  the  normal  to  the  ellipsoid  meridian  at  a  place  and  the  plane  of  the  ellipsoidal  equator.  
This is the latitude plotted on navigation charts. 
c. 
Geocentric  Latitude.    The geocentric latitude at a point is the angle made with the Earth’s 
equatorial plane by the radius from the Earth’s mass geocentre through that point. 
9-3 Fig 15 Definitions of Latitude 
Earth’s Axis
of Rotation
Geoid
Earth
Centred
Ellipsoid
Astronomic
Latitude
Geodetic Latitude
Geocentric Latitude
49.  In practice, when using astro, the astronomic latitude is determined (for example when a Polaris 
sight is taken), but the difference between this and geodetic latitude is so small that a correction is not 
usually  applied.    Geocentric  latitude  is  useful  in  certain  problems.    If  the  Earth  is  considered  as  a 
sphere, then geodetic and geocentric latitude coincide. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 13 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
50.  Reduced Earth.  The first stage in map projection is the making of a reduced Earth to the scale 
required.    This  model  can  be  ellipsoidal  or  spherical.    If  it  is  spherical  then,  in  effect,  the  projected 
latitudes  which  result  are  corrected  by  the  difference  between  the  geodetic  and  geocentric  latitudes.  
This  difference  is  known  as  reduction  of  latitude;  it  is  a  quantity  which  also  occurs  when  certain 
navigation tables based on the sphere are used.  Reduction is maximum at latitude 45º when its value 
is about 11.6 minutes. 
51.  Length of a Parallel of Latitude.  By considering the Earth as a sphere, a simple expression for 
the  length  of  a  parallel of latitude can be found.  In Fig 16, the length of the parallel of latitude is the 
circumference of the circle, centre B, radius BA swept through ADC.  Since: 
Circumference
= 2πr 
∴ length of parallel = 2πBA 
= 2πOA cos φ
= 2πR cos φ
= 2πR sin (90 – φ) 
= 2πR sin κ
where R is the radius of the sphere, φ is the latitude and κ the co-latitude.  By substituting R = reduced 
Earth’s radius, the length on the model Earth can be found. 
9-3 Fig 16 Length of Parallel of Latitude 
P
C
B
A
D
φ
E
O
R
Equator
52.  Arc of a Meridian - The Nautical Mile.  The nautical mile, at a given place on the Earth’s surface, is 
the length of an arc of the meridian subtended by an angle of 1' at the centre of curvature at that place.  If the 
Earth were a sphere, this distance would be constant, but because of the ellipticity it must clearly vary with 
latitude, being shorter at the equator than at the poles.  An expression for the nautical mile is: 
Length of nautical mile = 1852.9 m (9.3 cos 2φ metres) 
or   6079.2 ft  (30.6 cos 2φ feet) 
Revised Feb 16  Page 14 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
In  practice,  a  mean  figure  is  convenient,  and  the  standard  adopted  since  1  Mar  1971  is  the 
International Nautical Mile = 1,852 m (6,076.1 ft) - (prior to that date the UK Standard Nautical Mile was 
taken to equal 6,080 ft).  The 1,852 m standard is correct at about 42º 08' on the International Ellipsoid, 
on which the true nautical mile varies from 1,843.6 m (6,048.5 ft) at the equator to 1,862.3 m (6,109.8 
ft) at the poles.  When a standard unit is adopted for use within automatic instruments, some errors 
will accrue, as discussed below. 
53.  Latitude Error.  For most practical purposes, an aircraft which flies one nautical mile is assumed 
to have changed its position by the length of an arc which subtends an angle at the centre of the Earth 
of one minute.  This is not strictly accurate as the relationship between a standard nautical mile and the 
angle  subtended  at  the  Earth’s  centre  varies  with  latitude.    A  graph  of  the  difference  between  the 
International Nautical Mile and the true nautical mile is at Fig 17. 
9-3 Fig 17 Errors in the Length of a Nautical Mile 
90
80
70
e 60
d 50
titu
a 40
L
or 6076.1 ft DATUM
30
1852m
20
10
0
−8 −6 −4
2

0
+2 +4 +6 +8 +10 m
3
− 0 −20
1
− 0
0
+10
+20
+30
ft
Error
54.  Height  Error.  Since an aircraft will fly at a height above the surface of the earth, instruments will, in 
general, indicate too great a distance flown between two points as measured on the map.  The discrepancy 
will  increase  with  increasing  height.    From  Fig  18  it  will  be  seen  that  an  arc  S  (representing  the  ground 
distance to be flown) subtended by an angle θ radians at the centre of the Earth of radius R is equal to R θ.  
For an aircraft flying at a height (h), there is a smal  increase in arc flown equal to δ S such that: 
S +  δ S = (R + h) θ 
= R θ + h θ 
∴ δ S = h θ 
as θ = S / R 
h S
δ S = R
Revised Feb 16  Page 15 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 18 Height Error 
S
S
h
S
R
A graph of the height error values for heights between 0 ft and 60,000 ft is given in Fig 19. 
9-3 Fig 19 Height Error Values 
60
)
0
0
50
,0
1
×
40
t
e
e
30
(F
t
h
20
ig
e
H
10
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
0.30
% Overread
Some Map Projections Compared 
55.  In  Fig  20,  a  sphere  has  been  projected  by  various  devices.    On  the  sphere,  a  man’s  face  is 
outlined, and his appearance is seen to alter from one projection to the next. 
56.  If  the  sphere  is  seen  from  an  infinite  distance  (i.e.  it  is  projected  by  parallel  rays  on  to  a  flat 
surface) the face has the podgy look of Fig 20a.  This particular projection is known as orthographic, it 
is  neither  conformal,  nor  equal  area,  nor  has  it  any  other  particularly  useful  property,  but  it  can  be 
regarded as a starting point since it is how the face would appear if viewed through a telescope from a 
great distance. 
57.  Figs 20b and e are conformal projections.  The bearing of one place from another (measured from 
the local meridian) is the same on each projection and is the same as that obtained on the surface of 
the sphere.  It should be noted that the meridians are curved in e and straight in b, and that the face is 
quite  different  in  each;  Fig  20b  is  a  polar  stereographic  projection,  and  e  is  a  transverse  Mercator 
projection. 
58.  Figs  20c  and  20d,  (the  azimuthal  equidistant  and  gnomonic  respectively),  are  non-conformal 
projections.    In  c  the  scale  is  constant  along  all  meridians,  in  d  it  expands  very  rapidly  along  the 
Revised Feb 16  Page 16 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
meridians,  so  much  so  that  the  equator  cannot  be  shown  -  it  is  at  an  infinite  distance  from  the  pole.  
Once again, the face changes. 
59.  These drawings illustrate the important point that none of the projections reflects what the face is 
really  like.    Each  face  is  different,  yet  the  similarities  are  sufficient  to  show  that  the  same  face  is 
portrayed on each.  In the same way a map projection will illustrate all the topographical features of the 
Earth’s surface - and yet it cannot show what the surface really looks like. 
9-3 Fig 20 Projections of a Sphere 
a  Orthographic
b  Stereographic
c  Azimuthal Equidistant
Equator
Equator
Equator
Pole
Pole
Pole
d  Gnomonic 
e  Transverse Mercator
Equator
30° Parallel  
Pole
Pole
Equator
Revised Feb 16  Page 17 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
AZIMUTHAL PROJECTIONS 
Introduction 
60.  This  chapter  deals  with  one  of  the  limiting  cases  of  the  conic  projections;  the  azimuthal 
(or zenithal) projection.  Unless otherwise specified, the Earth is treated as a sphere for simplicity. 
61.  In this case the apex angle of the cone is 180°, i.e. the projection is on to a plane tangential at a 
point to the reduced Earth.  All projections of this type have the property that bearings from the point of 
tangency are correctly represented.  Three types of azimuthal projection are discussed: 
a. 
The  Gnomonic  Projection.    The  gnomonic  projection  is  a  perspective,  non-conformal 
projection, on which great circles are straight lines. 
b. 
The Stereographic Projection.  The stereographic projection is conformal and perspective. 
c. 
The Azimuthal Equidistant.  The azimuthal equidistant projection is a non-conformal, non-
perspective  projection  on  which  distances  from  the  point  of  tangency  are  represented  at  a 
constant scale. 
The  plane  can,  in  each  type,  be  orientated  to  be  tangential  at  a  pole,  or  at  the  equator,  or  more 
generally in an oblique attitude as shown in Fig 21. 
9-3 Fig 21 Azimuthal Projections 
21a - Polar 
21b - Equatorial 
21c - Oblique 
NP
NP
NP
T
T
EQ
T
EQ
EQ
SP
SP
SP
THE GNOMONIC PROJECTION 
General 
62.  The gnomonic projection is perspective; the meridians and parallels being projected on to the plane 
surface  from  the  centre  of  the  sphere.    It  has  the  unique  property  of  representing  all  great  circles  as 
straight lines.  Scale increases away from the point of tangency, but as the scale is not the same along 
the meridians and the parallel at any point (except the point of tangency) the projection is not conformal. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 18 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
The Polar Gnomonic 
63.  The point of tangency in this case is at one of the poles.  The graticule is projected from the centre 
of the Earth (Fig 22); the parallels appear on the projection as concentric circles about the pole and the 
meridians are radials from the same point. 
9-3 Fig 22 Polar Gnomonic 
Projection Plane
NP
X1
T
Parallel of
X
Latitude
φ
0
Equator
75
60
45
30
64.  Scale.  Scale increases away from the pole of tangency, but the rate of change along the meridians 
differs  from  that  along  the  parallels.    At  a  latitude  φ,  the  scale  factor  along  the  parallel  is  given  by 
sec (90° – φ) and the scale factor along the meridian by sec2 (90° – φ). 
65.  Coverage.    This  projection  is  limited  in  extent  to  less  than  90°  from  the  point  of  tangency;  the 
equator cannot be shown since it would project as a plane parallel to the tangent plane. 
The Equatorial Gnomonic 
66.  The  principle  of  projection  is  the  same  as  for  the  polar  gnomonic  but  in  this  case  the  point  of 
tangency  is  on  the  equator  (Fig  23).    The  meridians  appear  on  the  projection  as  parallel  straight  lines 
perpendicular to the equator, and the parallels as curves concave to the nearer pole, as shown in Fig 24. 
9-3 Fig 23 Equatorial Gnomonic Projection 
NP
X1
X
φ
0
T
Equator
SP
Revised Feb 16  Page 19 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 24 Equatorial Gnomonic Graticule 
50
50
40
40
Central
30
Meridian
30
20
20
10
10
0
0
Equator
67.  Scale.  Scale increases away from the point of tangency with the same pattern as the polar case. 
The Oblique Gnomonic 
68.  The oblique gnomonic projection uses a point of tangency at any point on the Earth other than a 
pole or on the equator (Fig 25).  The graticule appears on the projection with the meridians as radial 
straight lines from the nearer pole and the parallels as curves concave to the same pole. 
9-3 Fig 25 Oblique Gnomonic Projection 
X1
NP
X
T
Point of
Tangency
0
Equator
T
SP
69.  Scale, as before, expands away from the point of tangency. 
Properties of Gnomonics 
70.  The properties of all gnomonic charts are as follows: 
a. 
Any straight line on the projection exactly represents a great circle. 
b. 
Bearings  are  correctly  represented  from  the  point  of  tangency,  but  not  otherwise.    The 
projection is not conformal. 
c. 
Rhumb lines are curves concave to the nearer pole. 
d. 
Coverage is limited to less than 90° from the point of tangency. 
e. 
Scale increases away from the point of tangency. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 20 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Uses of Gnomonics 
71.  Great  Circle.    Great  circle  tracks  can  be  found  on  the  gnomonic  chart  and  transferred  to  the 
plotting  chart.    A  chart  designed  with  this  purpose  in  view  is  the  Meade’s  Great  Circle  Diagram 
(Admiralty Chart 5029) discussed in para 75. 
72.  Radio  Bearings.    Gnomonic  charts  are  sometimes  used  for  D/F  triangulation.    The  bearings 
(which are great circles) are passed to the master station where they are plotted on a gnomonic chart.  
An oblique gnomonic is used, the point of tangency being the position of the master station.  The slave 
stations  are  plotted  in  their  correct  positions  on  the  chart  and  offset  compass  roses are drawn about 
them to allow for distortion. 
World Projection on to a Cube 
73.  Gnomonic  projections  can  be  used  to  obtain  complete  coverage  of  the  world  by  arranging 
orthogonal  planes  around  the  sphere.    The  cube  formed  can  be  orientated  to  produce  two  polar  and 
four equatorial projections, or six oblique projections. 
74.  The  oblique  case  is  illustrated  in  Fig  26.    Care  is  required  in  using  such a chart since a straight 
line joining positions in adjacent projection squares represents two great circle arcs which intersect on 
the boundary, and not the great circle joining the places. 
9-3 Fig 26 Projection of the World on a Cube 
North
Pole
Equator
Equator
Equator
Equator
South
Pole
Revised Feb 16  Page 21 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Meade’s Great Circle Diagram (Admiralty Chart 5029) 
75.  Meade’s Great Circle Diagram, (Admiralty Chart 5029), is a chart on which the blank graticules of polar 
and equatorial gnomonic projections are shown.  The polar gnomonic extends from lat 60° N or S to 83° N 
or S, and the equatorial gnomonic from the equator to 65° N or S.  Both graticules cover 150° ch long and 
are graduated in degrees.  The meridians on both graticules can be renumbered to any required longitude. 
76.  Since a straight line on either graticule represents a great circle, positions may be plotted on this 
chart and the great circle track between them transferred to the plotting chart.  Full directions for use 
are provided on the actual diagram. 
THE STEREOGRAPHIC PROJECTION 
General 
77.  The stereographic projection is also perspective but differs from the gnomonic by having the point 
of projection diametrically opposite the point of tangency instead of at the centre of the sphere (Fig 27).  
As with all other azimuthal projections there are three cases but only the polar case is extensively used 
in  navigation.    In  the  final  presentation  of  the  polar  graticule,  the  meridians  are  represented by radial 
straight  lines  from  the  point  of  tangency  (the  pole)  and  the  parallels  of  latitude  by  concentric  circles 
about it.  The polar stereographic projection can be extended to cover points more than 90° from the 
point  of  tangency  and  the  equator  can  be  shown.    Scale  expands  away  from  the  point  of  tangency 
along the meridians, and scale along a parallel is equal to the meridian scale at that latitude; scale is 
therefore  the  same  in  all  directions  at  a  point  and  the  projection  is  conformal.    A  graph  of  polar 
stereographic scale factor is shown in Fig 28.  
9-3 Fig 27 South Polar Stereographic Projection 
NP
E
Q
T
E
Q
Great Circle
Revised Feb 16  Page 22 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 28 Stereographic Projection Scale Factor 
2.25
r 2.00
to
c
a
F 1.75
le
a
c 1.50
S
1.25
1.00
80°
60°
40°
20°

Latitude (Polar Projection)
Properties 
78.  The properties of the polar stereographic are as follows: 
a. 
Scale expands along the meridians with distance from the point of tangency. 
b. 
The  scale  at  any  point  is  the  same  along  its  meridian  and  parallel;  the  projection  is  therefore 
conformal. 
c. 
All meridians are projected as straight lines; all other great circles are represented by arcs of 
circles,  but  because  of  the  large  radii  they  are  not  usually  easy  to  plot.    Near  the  pole  the  great 
circle and the straight line are almost coincident. 
d. 
A rhumb line is a curve concave to the pole of tangency. 
e. 
Scale may be taken to be constant near the pole of tangency (scale deviation is less than 1% 
above latitude 78.5°). 
f. 
It can be extended to cover a whole hemisphere or more. 
g. 
The constant of the cone (n) = 1. 
Plotting of Radio Bearings 
79.  The  plotting  of  radio  bearings  on  a  polar  stereographic  is  simple  near  the  pole  since  the 
divergence of the straight line from the great circle is very small.  This divergence, ∆, is given by: 
∆   = ½ ch long (sin mean lat – n) 
Typical values of ∆ are: 
ch long 
mean lat 

10º 
75º 
0.17º 
20º 
75º 
0.34º 
35º 
85º 
0.066º 
These  divergences  are  too  small  to  be  of  any  significance  using  ordinary  plotting  instruments,  and, 
providing the chart is not used below, say, 75° no correction need be applied. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 23 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Uses 
80.  The common uses of the polar stereographic are: 
a. 
Polar plotting charts. 
b. 
Topographical maps of polar regions. 
THE AZIMUTHAL EQUIDISTANT PROJECTION 
General 
81.  This is not a perspective projection; it is drawn so that all distances from the point of tangency are 
correct  to  scale.    On  this  type  of  projection,  the  bearing  and  distance  of  any  point may be measured 
correctly from the point of tangency.  Only the polar and oblique projections of this type are discussed; 
remarks made on the oblique case apply equally to the equatorial case. 
The Polar Equidistant 
82.  The point of tangency is the pole and the graticule presents the meridians as radial straight lines 
from  the  point  of  tangency  and  the  parallels  as  equally  spaced  concentric  circles  about  that  point 
(Fig 29).  The scale along the meridians is constant but along the parallels is given by: 
К radians    Where К= co - lat 
sin К
9-3 Fig 29 Polar Equidistant Projection 
T
X1
180
NP
X
κ
90W
90E
0
83. Properties
a. 
The  scale  along  the  parallels  increases  with  distance  from  the  pole.    Scale  along  the 
meridians is correct.  Scale errors are small provided the projection does not extend far from the 
pole (1% scale deviation at about 84°). 
b. 
It is not conformal. 
c. 
Except for meridians, a straight line does not represent a great circle. 
d. 
The whole world can be represented on a single projection. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 24 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
84.  Uses.
a. 
Admiralty maps of polar regions. 
b. 
Star maps, including Sky diagrams of Air Almanacs. 
Oblique Azimuthal Equidistant 
85.  The  graticule  for  the  oblique  azimuthal  equidistant  projection  is  difficult  to  construct  and 
complicated  in  appearance  (Fig  30).    The  chart  is  constructed  using  the  bearings  and  distances  of 
required points from the point of tangency. 
9-3 Fig 30 Oblique Azimuthal Equidistant Projection 
86.  Properties
a. 
Scale along radials from the point of tangency is constant.  In other directions, scale variation 
is complicated and measurement very difficult. 
b. 
Straight  lines  passing  through  the  point  of  tangency  are  great  circles.    A  straight  line 
elsewhere does not represent a great circle. 
c. 
It is not conformal. 
d. 
The whole world can be shown on the projection. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 25 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
87.  Uses.
a. 
Maps  for  Strategic  Planning.    The  projection  is  based  on  a  point  of  importance.  
Concentric circles from this point show correct ranges which could represent, for example, radii 
of action. 
b. 
Civil Uses.  For example, a projection based on the position of a radio transmitter will show 
the great circle distance and bearing of any receiver in the world. 
CYLINDRICAL PROJECTIONS 
Introduction 
88.  The  cylindrical  projections  are  those  in  which  the  apex  angle  of  the  cone  is  zero;  the  cone 
becomes a cylinder tangential to the reduced Earth along a great circle and the meridians and parallels 
are projected onto it.  When developed the great circle of tangency is shown as a straight line as are all 
great  circles  orthogonal  to  it.    The  poles  of  the  projection,  those  points  removed  90°  from  the  great 
circle of tangency, cannot be shown on most projections of this type. 
89.  When the great circle of tangency is the equator the projection is known as a normal cylindrical; 
when it is other than the equator it is a skew cylindrical. 
SIMPLE NORMAL CYLINDRICALS 
General 
90.  Two simple normal cylindrical projections are discussed; the first is perspective, the second non-
perspective. 
Geometric Cylindrical Projection 
91.  The  geometric  cylindrical  projection  is  provided  by  a  light  source  at  the  centre  of  the  reduced 
Earth  which  projects  the  parallels  and  meridians  on  to  a  cylinder  wrapped  around  the  reduced  Earth 
and tangential at the equator.  The developed projection shows the equator as a straight line of length 
equal to the equatorial circumference of the reduced Earth.  The meridians are parallel straight lines at 
right angles to the equator while the parallels of latitude are straight lines parallel to the equator and of 
length equal to it.  The general appearance is shown in Fig 31, where it can be seen that the meridian 
spacing at the equator is the actual reduced Earth spacing. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 26 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 31 Geometrical Cylindrical Projection 
70°
R Tan 60°
60°
40°
20°
60°

R
20°
40°
60°
70°
2 πR
92.  Since  the  equator  of  the  reduced  Earth  has  length  2πR,  so  the  equator  and  al   paral els  are  of 
length 2πR on the chart.  The paral els are drawn (Fig 1) at heights above or below the equator given 
by R tan φ, and it is clear from this, and from Fig 30, that latitudes 90° N and 90° S cannot be shown. 
93.  Scale.  Scale factor along the parallels is equal to the secant of the latitude.  Along the meridians 
scale factor can be shown to equal the square of the secant of the latitude. 
94.  Properties.    Since  scale  increases  at  one  rate  along  the  meridians  and  at  another  along  the 
parallels  the  projection  is  not  conformal.    Further,  the  difference  in  scale  expansion  means  that  it  is 
very  difficult  to  measure  intercardinal  directions.    The  chart  is  not  equal  area,  nor  indeed  has  it  any 
useful property beyond its simplicity. 
Equidistant Cylindrical Projection 
95.  The  equidistant  cylindrical  projection,  also called the Plate Carree, is non-perspective, but is like 
the geometric cylindrical in some ways.  The equator is represented by a straight line of length 2πR.  
The meridians are shown as parallel straight lines at right angles to the equator, at intervals on it equal 
to the reduced Earth interval.  The parallels of latitude are straight lines parallel to the equator and of 
length 2πR. 
96.  The difference between the two charts lies in the heights above or below the equator at which the 
parallels  of  latitude  are  drawn.    In  the  equidistant  cylindrical,  they  are  erected  at  their  actual  reduced 
Earth  distance  from  it;  thus  40°  N  is  drawn  at  a  scale  distance  of  2,400  nm  from  the  equator.    The 
complete sphere can be projected, the poles being represented by straight lines at a scale distance of 
5,400 nm from the equator.  The graticule appearance is shown in Fig 32. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 27 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 32 Equidistant Cylindrical 
90
60
40
20
0
20
40
60
90
0
97.  Scale.    Scale  factor  along  the  meridians  is  clearly 1,  since  the  parallels  are  laid  down  at  correct 
distances  from  the  equator.    Along  the  parallels  scale  factor  is  the  same  as  that  on  the  geometric 
cylindrical, sec φ. 
98.  Properties.  This chart was much used by navigators prior to the sixteenth century.  Scale is correct 
and constant along the equator and meridians and is reasonably constant between 8° N and 8° S; beyond 
this the expansion along the parallels exceeds 1%, and the measurement of distance is difficult.  The chart is 
neither conformal nor equal area, but it has the advantage of projecting the complete sphere. 
MERCATOR’S PROJECTION 
Orthomorphic Cylindrical Projection 
99.  An  orthomorphic,  or  conformal,  projection  is  one  on  which  angles,  and  therefore  the  shapes  of 
elementary areas, are correct.  Such a projection will result if the meridians and parallels are drawn at 
right angles and if the scale along the meridians is made to be the same as that along the parallels. 
100. On the geometric cylindrical and on the equidistant cylindrical, the meridians and parallels are at 
right angles and the scale factor along the parallels in each case is sec φ.  If the scale factor can be 
made  to  equal  sec  φ  along  the  meridians, the new projection will be conformal.  This is precisely the 
method adopted in Mercator’s projection which, because it provides straight rhumb line tracks, remains 
one of the most important projections for navigation charts (see Fig 33). 
9-3 Fig 33 Rhumb Line 
Meridians
Rhumb Line cuts Meridians
      at a Constant Angle
Revised Feb 16  Page 28 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
101. Appearance of Graticule.  The final projection is very like the geometric cylindrical projection.  T 
e equator is a straight line equal in length to the reduced Earth equator; the meridians are straight lines 
mounted on the equator at right angles to it and spaced upon it at reduced Earth spacing; the parallels 
of latitude are straight lines parallel to the equator and of length equal to it.  The parallels are drawn in 
at heights above and below the equator which are a little less than on the geometric projection, but the 
poles remain at infinity and cannot appear on the projection. 
Scale 
102. Scale  factor  along  the  parallels  of  latitude  can  be  derived  as  sec  φ.    A  graph  of  Mercator  scale 
factor is shown in Fig 34. 
9-3 Fig 34 Scale Factor 
6.0
5.0
r
to 4.0
c
a
F 3.0
le
a
c
S 2.0
1.0
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
Latitude
103. The distortion of areas and the excessive scale expansion away from the equator, characteristic 
of the Mercator projection, are illustrated in Fig 35. 
9-3 Fig 35 Distortion of Mercator Projection 
W
E
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
165
150
135
120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135 150
160
A
R
T
I
C
A
R
C
T
I
C     O
C
E
A
N
o
o
75
O C E A N
75
2400 nm
o
o
60
60
o
o
45
45
EQUAL
o
o
30
AREAS
30
A T L A N T I C
P A C I F I C
o
o
15
O C E A N
15
N
o
P
A
C
I
F
I
C
o
0
0
I N D I A N
EQUAL
o
o
15
15
S
AREAS
O C E A N
o
O
C
E
A
N
O C E A N
o
30
30
o
o
45
45
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
165
150
135
120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135 150
160
W
E
Revised Feb 16  Page 29 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
Great Circles 
104. Only the equator and the meridians are projected as straight lines; all other great circles appear as 
curves concave to the equator.  Some examples are shown in Fig 36. 
9-3 Fig 36 Great Circle and Rhumb Lines 
W
E
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
165
150
135
120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135 150
160
A
R
T
I
C
A
R
C
T
I
C     O
C
E
A
N
o
o
75
O C E A N
75
GreatCir
o
c
o
60
l
60
e
o
o
Rh
45
um
45
b Line

A T L A N T I C
o
o
30
30
P A C I F I C 
o
o
N 15
O C E A N
15
N
o
P
A
C
I
F
I
C
o
0
0
I N D I A N
o
O C E A N
o
S 15
15
S
o
O
C
E
A
N
O C E A N
o
30
30
o
o
45
45
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
165
150
135
120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135 150
160
W
E
105. Conversion  Angle.    In  Fig  36,  the  angle  (∆)  between  the  straight  line  and  the  great  circle  is 
known as conversion angle.  The projected great circle is not an arc of a circle, and strictly speaking, 
the angle ∆ is not the same at each end, unless the end points are at the same latitude.  Nevertheless, 
if the change of latitude is small they can be assumed to be equal and can be given the value  
½ ch long × sin mean lat 
106. Great Circle Tracks.  The great circle route is, of course, a shorter distance than the straight rhumb 
line route, but the difference is small enough to be ignored in equatorial regions (12° N to 12° S).  In other 
latitudes, when the distance exceeds about 1,000 nm it is best to examine the great circle by transferring 
points from a gnomonic projection or by calculation, to discover if a significant economy can be made. 
Measuring Distances 
107. Distances must be measured using the scale at the given point, since scale expands with latitude.  
Acceptable results are obtained by splitting the line to be measured into 100 to 200 nm sections and 
using the latitude scale at the midpoint of each section for its measurement.  
Uses 
108. The main feature of the Mercator is that straight lines are rhumb lines. For this reason, the Mercator 
will probably remain one of the most popular plotting and topographical charts in equatorial regions. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 30 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
109. Near the equator the Mercator chart is the optimum projection.  Scale may be considered constant 
within 8° of the equator, and a straight line in any direction, although still a rhumb line, is almost a great 
circle.  
110. In  middle  and  high  latitudes,  the  Mercator  projection  is  not  the  best  available,  because  of  the 
difficulty  of  precise  distance  measurement,  the  extravagance  of  rhumb  line  flight  paths,  and  the 
problem of determining great circles.  It is impossible to use the Mercator projection for polar flights. 
Summary of Properties 
111. The properties of the Mercator may be summarized as follows: 
a. 
Scale is correct only along the equator; elsewhere it increases as the secant of the latitude. 
b. 
Because the secant of 90° is infinity, the poles cannot be shown. 
c. 
A straight line represents a rhumb line. 
d. 
A  great  circle  (apart  from  the  equator  and  the  meridians)  is  represented  by  a  curved  line 
convex to the nearer pole.  Great circles near the equator are satisfactorily represented by straight 
lines. 
e. 
The  projection  is  conformal.    It  is  not  equal  area  and  areas  are  greatly  exaggerated  in  high 
latitudes. 
SKEW CYLINDRICALS 
Technique of Construction 
112. Skew  cylindrical  projections  are  the  derivatives  of  the  perspective  projections  which  would  be 
obtained  using  a  light  source  at  the  centre  of  the  reduced  Earth  to  cast  shadows  onto  cylinders 
wrapped around it, and tangential at great circles other than the equator.  The simplest interpretations 
of such projections is obtained by erecting a false graticule of meridians and parallels on the reduced 
Earth; the great circle of tangency becomes the false equator, and false meridians are drawn as great 
circles at right angles to the false equator.  The false meridians intersect at false poles. 
113. The  false  graticule  is  projected  onto  the  cylinder  which  is  then  developed.    Some  points  of 
intersection of geographical latitude and longitude with the false graticule are computed, plotted on the 
projection and joined by smooth curves.  These are labelled in geographical coordinates and the false 
graticule erased.  The process is illustrated in Fig 37.  
Revised Feb 16  Page 31 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 37 Construction of a Skew Cylindrical 
NP
False
Pole A
A
0
0
Equator
B False
B
Pole
alse
lse tor
F
a
quator
F
ua
E
q
E
SP
Equator
NP
0
eridian
M
False Equator
SP
False Graticule
Some True Meridians and Parallels
114. The type of projection required will determine the method of transformation of the false graticule 
onto the flat sheet, but whatever type is required the relationship between points on the geographical 
graticule and on the false graticule will be the same. 
115. The  false  latitude  is  measured  along  the  false  meridian  from  the  false  equator  to  the  point;  the 
false ch long is measured from some convenient datum false meridian (the false meridian through the 
intersection of the equators is often chosen with the alternative of that joining the false and geographic 
poles). 
116. The skew cylindrical projections which are important in navigation are the Mercator projections of 
the  false  graticule.    Referred  to  this  graticule  they  have  exactly  the  same  properties  as  the  normal 
Mercator,  but  when  referred  to  the  geographical  graticule  the  picture  changes  and  extra  care  is 
needed.  The projections considered here are: 
Revised Feb 16  Page 32 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
a. 
The Oblique Mercator. 
b. 
The Transverse Mercator. 
The Oblique Mercator 
117. A diagram of an oblique Mercator projection is shown in Fig 38.  Considering the false graticule, at any 
point, scale is the same in all directions (scale factor is the secant of the false latitude) and the rectangular 
spherical graticule is transformed to a rectangular plane graticule.  Hence the projection is orthomorphic. 
9-3 Fig 38 Oblique Mercator Projection 
118. Analogously  with  the  normal  Mercator,  scale  can  be  considered  constant  within  a  false  latitude 
band  ±  8°  about  the  false  equator  (the  light  red  band  in  Fig  38).    Since  the  false  graticule  does  not 
appear  on  the  final  chart  it  is  more  usual  to  talk  of  a  distance  band  of  960  nm  within  which  scale  is 
almost constant. 
119. Because the projection is almost constant scale in this band, and is in any case conformal, it makes 
a useful chart for navigation along established great circle routes.  Another common use is the mapping of 
countries of considerable length but of limited width, whose longitudinal axis does not run north/south or 
east/west.    However,  the  complicated  appearance  of  the  geographical  graticule,  together  with  the  large 
scale expansion away from the great circle of tangency, limits the use of this chart. 
120. Great  circles  are  curved  lines  concave  to  the  great  circle  of  tangency,  unless  they  happen  to 
coincide  with  that  great  circle  or  are  at  right  angles  to  it  (false  meridians).    Rhumb  lines  are 
complicated  curves.    Straight  lines  on  the  chart  represent  lines  along  which  heading  measured  from 
the  false  meridians  is  constant.    Straight  lines  within  about  500  nm  of  the  false  equator  are  roughly 
great circles. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 33 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
The Transverse Mercator 
121. The  Transverse  Mercator  is the special case of the oblique Mercator in which the great circle of 
tangency  is  a  meridian.    The  general  appearance  of  the  geographical  graticule  is  less  complicated 
(Fig 39) and it is easier to use for general navigation.  The chart is conformal and the scale expansion 
varies (for a spherical Earth) with the secant of the false latitude, ie the angular distance east or west of 
the selected meridian of tangency. 
9-3 Fig 39 Transverse Mercator Projection 
122. The projection is often used to map countries of considerable latitude extent but of little girth.  If the 
meridian of tangency is chosen to be the mean longitude of the country then in a band some 960 nm wide 
disposed about this meridian, all the useful features of a normal Mercator about the equator appear.  In 
this  band  the  scale  deviation  does  not  exceed  1%,  great  circles  are  almost  straight  lines  and  area 
distortion is minimal; add these properties to conformality and a fairly regular geographical lattice and the 
result is an almost ideal chart. 
123. The latitude extent which can be projected with these almost ideal properties is not limited.  Both 
geographical poles and the 960 nm 1% scale deviation band about any meridian and its anti-meridian 
can be projected onto one sheet of paper.  Some of the charts in common use are discussed below. 
124. Polar Charts.  Transverse Mercator projections in the polar regions appear very similar to the polar 
azimuthal  charts  since  near  the  pole  the  parallels  are  nearly  circular  and  the  meridians  almost  straight 
lines (see Fig 40).  Comparison with Fig 39, however, identifies both the parallels and the meridians as 
Revised Feb 16  Page 34 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
elliptic.  Polar sheets on this projection are often rectangular, the greater length being provided along the 
line of tangency; scale errors limit the extent of the sheet at right angles to this direction. 
9-3 Fig 40 Polar Chart on Transverse Mercator Projection 
125O
120O
110O
105O 100O
95O
90O
85O
80O
75O
70O
65O
60O
55O
55O
130O
50O
60O
45O
135O
65O
140O
40O
70O
145O
35O
150O
30O
75O
155O
25O
80O
160O
20O
165O
15O
85O
170O
10O
175O
5O
7
7
8
8
O
0
5
0
5
5
O
0
O
5
O
0
180O
0O
O
O
O
O
8
8
7
7
185O
5O
10O
170O
85O
15O
165O
160O
20O
80O
155O
25O
75O
150O
30O
145O
35O
70O
40O
140O
65O
45O
135O
60O
130O
50O
55O
125O
120O
115O
110O
105O 100O
95O
90O
85O
80O
75O
70O
65O
60O
55O
125. Ordnance Survey Maps of UK.  Topographic maps of the British Isles are available at scales of 
1:250,000 and 1:50,000 based on the Ordnance Survey (OS) maps.  The scales are adjusted so that 
they are correct, not at the meridian of tangency (2° W), but at some distance on either side of it.  The 
scale at 2° W is 0.9996 of the stated scale; at the east/west extremities of the map cover the scale is 
about  1.0004  of  the  stated scale.  Had the scale been made correct at 2° W, then scale deviation of 
the order of 8 parts in 10,000 would have occurred at the east/west extremities; this mean scale device 
balances  the  overall  scale  deviation  and  hence  halves  its  effective  magnitude.    The  stated  scale  is 
correct  along  two  lines  parallel  to  the  meridian  of  tangency,  one  180  km  east  of  it,  the  other  180  km 
west.  The OS map projection is illustrated in Fig 41. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 35 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 41 OS on Transverse Mercator Projection 
55  
° N
Scale Correct
Scale
Expands
50  
° N
6 W
°
4 W
°
2°W
0 W
°
(Meridian of
Tangency)
126. Joint  Operations  Graphics.    The  1:250,000  Joint  Operations  Graphic  (JOG)  is  a  series  of 
topographical charts (Fig 42) which provide almost worldwide coverage of the land areas from latitude 
80°  S  to  latitude  84°  N.    Each  sheet  of  the  series  covers  1°  in  latitude  and  between  1.5°  to  8°  in 
longitude  (depending  on  latitude)  and  is  constructed  on  its  own  individual  transverse  Mercator 
projection of the International Ellipsoid with meridian of tangency at the centre of the sheet.  The scale 
deviation  of  the  projected  graticule  of  a  sheet  does  not  exceed  0.01%.    Adjoining  sheets  fit  exactly 
along  north  and  south  edges  and  although,  in fact, they do not fit exactly along east and west edges 
the discrepancies are so small as to be unnoticeable.  Charts of this series carry a reference grid, such 
as the British National Grid or one of the zones of the UTM Grid appropriate to the country or region 
covered.  These reference grids may be based on different projections, ellipsoids or points of tangency 
but are designed so that the scale deviation is usually less than 0.15% within the grid area.  Although, 
strictly, the projected graticule of a sheet and the projected grid are independent of each other, either 
may be used for positioning and navigation purposes. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 36 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 42 Joint Operations Graphic (JOG) Projection System 
20°
15°
10° 5  
° W

5  E
°
10°
15°
20° 25°
30°
35°
40°
45
60°
Central Meridians
55°
50°
45°
40°
127. Summary of Properties.  The properties of the transverse Mercator are summarized below. 
a. 
Scale is constant along the meridian of tangency but expands (for a spherical Earth) with the 
secant of the false latitude. 
b. 
Since the false meridians and parallels are projected by Mercator’s method the projection is 
orthomorphic. 
c. 
The  meridian  of  tangency  and  all  great  circles  at  right  angles  to  it  (i.e.  false  meridians)  are 
straight lines.  All other great circles are curves concave to the meridian of tangency. 
d. 
Rhumb lines are curves. 
e. 
Near  the  meridian  of  tangency  scale  is  almost  constant  (1%  error  480  nm  removed  from  it), 
great  circles  are  almost  straight  lines,  area  distortion  is  minimal,  and  the  graticule  appearance  is 
regular.  Charts do not, of course, fit along east and west edges if based on different meridians of 
tangency, but provided the separation of these meridians is small (as with the JOG) the discrepancy 
is not inconvenient. 
128. Gridded  Transverse  Mercator  Charts.    Transverse  Mercator  charts  are  often  provided  with  an 
overprint of the false graticule, to be used with some form of grid navigation.  By analogy with the normal 
Mercator,  the  grid  is  of  approximately  square  appearance  within  about  500  nm  of  the  great  circle  of 
tangency.    Grid  north  is  the  direction  of  the  false  pole  and  a  gyroscope  device  initially  aligned  with  grid 
north  will maintain this datum direction if suitable torquing terms are applied to it.  A word of warning is 
necessary when convergence is considered.  The geographical meridians are curved, even though on a 
small part of a chart they appear to be straight lines; hence the angle between true north and grid north is 
not constant along a given geographical meridian (as it is on a gridded conical chart).  It is of importance, 
Revised Feb 16  Page 37 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
for example, when converting true heading to grid heading for checking purposes, to apply convergence 
for the particular position: various tables have been drawn up for this purpose and values are printed on 
some charts.  A gridded polar chart and a convergence correction chart are illustrated in Figs 43 and 44.  
When using gridded transverse Mercator charts, it is possible, if false north can be accurately defined, to 
steer  false  rhumb  line  track;  such  a  system  is  the  same  as  navigation  on  a  normal  Mercator  if  false 
latitude and longitude are substituted for their geographical counterparts. 
9-3 Fig 43 Grid on Polar Transverse Mercator 
125O
120O
110O
105O 100O
95O
90O
85O
80O
75O
70O
65O
60O
55O
55O
130O
50O
60O
45O
135O
65O
140O
40O
70O
145O
35O
150O
30O
75O
155O
25O
80O
160O
20O
165O
15O
85O
170O
10O
175O
5O
7
7
8
8
0
5
0
5
O
5
O
0
O
5
O
0
180O
0O
O
O
O
O
8
8
7
7
185O
5O
10O
170O
85O
15O
165O
160O
20O
80O
155O
25O
75O
150O
30O
145O
35O
70O
40O
140O
65O
45O
135O
60O
130O
50O
55O
125O
120O
115O
110O
105O 100O
95O
90O
85O
80O
75O
70O
65O
60O
55O
Revised Feb 16  Page 38 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 44 Convergence Correction Chart 
Revised Feb 16  Page 39 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
CONICAL PROJECTIONS 
Introduction 
129. The cylindrical projection is best suited to the representation of a single great circle (such as the 
equator) and the band of the Earth’s surface close to it, while the azimuthal projections depict very well 
the area surrounding a point.  The conic projections fill the gap by best projecting small circles and the 
bands of surface close to them. 
130. From  a  navigation  point  of  view,  the  conformal  conics  are  the  most  important  members  of  the 
group, and most of this chapter is devoted to them.  However, some discussion of perspective conics 
may be found helpful. 
General Description 
131. All  the  conic  projections  described  in  detail  are  normal  to  the  equatorial  plane;  oblique  conics  are 
sometimes drawn but they are not often found to be useful in navigation.  The simplest arrangement is that 
of a cone, tangent at a parallel of latitude (Fig 44a), onto which the meridians and parallels are projected. 
132. The projection can be perspective or non-perspective.  In the perspective case, the graticule is 
a  linear  projection,  usually  from  the  centre  of  the  sphere,  as  in  Fig  45a.    In  the  more  general  non-
perspective  case,  the  graticule  is  positioned  mathematically  on  a  cone  which  may  touch,  or  cut 
through, the sphere as shown in Fig 45b. 
9-3 Fig 45 Conical Projections 
45a – Perspective Projection 
45b – Non-perspective (Lambert’s) Projection 
T
133. Appearance of Graticule.  After projection, the cone is cut and unrolled (Fig 46a).  This is known 
as the development of the cone.  The meridians appear as straight lines radiating from a point, which, 
in all normal projections, represents the geographic pole.  The parallels of latitude are arcs of circles, 
concentric at this point.  The developed cone is illustrated in Fig 46b. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 40 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 46 Development of the Cone 
46a 
46b 
60°E
90°E
30°E
A Lat 4
120°E
Lat 3
150°E
0
Lat 2
Lat 1
180°
Lat 1
Lat 2
X
0
150°W
Lat 3
A
B
Lat 4
120°W
90°E
30°W
60°E

90°W
B
60°W
30°E
30°W

134. Standard  Parallels.    A  'standard'  parallel  of  latitude  is  one  which  is  projected  at  reduced  Earth 
scale.    It  is  possible  to  have  more  than  one  standard  parallel  and  one-  and  two-standard  parallel 
projections  are  discussed.    On  a  one-standard  parallel  projection,  the  standard  parallel  is  also  the 
parallel of origin (λ0). 
135. Scale Expansion.  On all the conformal conics, and on all the perspective conics, the pattern of 
scale change is that shown in Fig 47.  Scale is correct along the standard parallels and increases away 
from them; in the two-standard case it decreases between them.  
9-3 Fig 47 Conformal Conic Scale 
47a – One Standard Parallel 
47b – Two Standard Parallels 
Standard Parallel
Standard Parallels
Scale Increases
Scale Increases
Scale Decreases
Scale Increases
Scale Increases
Constant of the Cone 
136. When the cone is developed, the reflex angle at the centre of the sector (x in Fig 46b) represents 
360° of longitude.  The ratio of x° to 360° is known as the 'constant of the cone' (or the convergence 
factor) and is denoted by n.  Its value is normally printed on a conic projection, and chart convergence 
can be obtained from the formula: 
n × ch long 
Revised Feb 16  Page 41 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
CONFORMAL CONIC PROJECTIONS 
Conformal One-Standard Conic Projection 
137. A  geometric  conic  is  a  perspective  projection  onto  a  cone  at  a  parallel  of  latitude,  which  is  the 
standard parallel for a one-standard conic projection.  The point of projection is the centre of the Earth.  
The conformal version of the one-standard conic is derived from the geometric conic by adjusting the 
radii  of  the  parallels  to  make  the  scale  at  any  point  the  same  in  all  directions.    The  standard  parallel 
and the parallel of origin (λ0) are also coincident on this projection. 
138. The  projection  is  non-perspective  on  to  a  cone  tangent  at  the  latitude  chosen  as  the standard 
parallel.    The  meridians  are  drawn  exactly  as  in  the  geometric  case,  but  the  parallels  (see  Fig  48) 
are  moved  slightly  nearer  the  standard  parallel.    The  pole  remains  at  the  apex  of  the  cone  and 
represents the oddity of the projection, for it is not conformal at that point.  This is evident from the 
angle  between  two  meridians;  at  the  pole  this  angle  should  be  ch  long  but  on  the  chart  it  is  n × ch 
long (the projection is everywhere else conformal, even at latitude 89º 59').  Scale factor is 1 on the 
standard parallel and increases with distance from the standard parallel. 
9-3 Fig 48 One Standard Conformal Conic 
Geometric Conic
Conformal Conic
Actual
Extent of
Projections
180W
180E
P
90W
90E
0
0
Lambert Conformal Conic Projection 
139. The Lambert conformal is a non-perspective projection with two standard parallels.  It is obtained 
by simply declaring the scale to be correct (i.e. equal to reduced Earth scale) along two parallels which 
are approximately equally spaced about λ0.  The scale factor at these standard parallels is 1, varying at 
other latitudes, as illustrated in Fig 49. 
9-3 Fig 49 Lambert Conformal Scale Factor 
1.4
r
to
c
a
F 1.2
le
a
c
S
Latitude
1.0
0.8
C
λ
λ
λ C'
1
0
2
Revised Feb 16  Page 42 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
140. Description.  The projection can be regarded as the projection of a slightly larger reduced Earth onto 
the original cone, which is so placed as to cut it at two parallels, λ1 and λ2, as in Fig 50.  The meridians are 
straight  lines  radiating  from  the  pole  and  inclined  to  each  other  at  n × ch  long,  where  n  is  sin  λ0.    For  all 
practical purposes, λ0 is the mean of the two standard parallels, λ1 and λ2, and is, of course, the latitude of 
minimum scale factor. 
9-3 Fig 50 Approximate Projection Description 
N Pole
λ2
λ0
λ1
Equator
λ0
S Pole
141. Advantage  of  Two  Standard  Parallels.    The  advantage  of  a  projection  with  two  standard 
parallels is to give an increase of the area of the Earth within which the scale deviation of the projection 
will not exceed a given amount, i.e. in the example at Fig 49, if a straight edge calibrated to the scale at 
λ1 or λ2 is used, the error is within 20% at λ0, C and C′.  Thus, by choosing a scale factor at λ0 for the 
Lambert  projection,  all  other  scale  factors  can  be  determined.    The  scale  factor  at  λ0  is  sometimes 
called the scale reduction factor (SRF). 
142. Standard Parallel Separation.  The shape of the scale factor graph fixes a relationship between 
SRF  and  the  distance  apart  of  the  standard  parallels.   The choice of one determines the other.  The 
actual connection depends upon latitude, but over a wide range (up to about 80º N), Table 2 below is a 
useful guide. 
Table 2 Relationship between Standard Parallel Separation and Scale Reduction Factor 
Scale Reduction 
Scale Deviation at λ0
Standard Parallel Separation 
Factor 
0.99 
1% 
16°
0.98 
2% 
23°
0.97 
3% 
28°
0.96 
4% 
32°
143. Minimizing  Scale  Deviation  on  the  Chart.    Scale  factor  increases  away  from  λ0  in  both 
directions, passing through 1 at the standards, λ1 and λ2.  If the standard parallels are placed so as to 
divide  the  latitude  coverage of a chart in the ratio 1:4:1 or 1/6:4/6:1/6, then the best balance of scale 
deviation  is  achieved.    This  is  known  as  the  1/6  rule.    Furthermore,  if  a  maximum  standard  parallel 
spacing of 14º is observed, then the scale deviation will be limited to <1%.  Thus, a Lambert chart can 
be considered as 'constant scale' if both: 
a. 
The spacing of the standard parallels does not exceed 14º Ch Lat, and 
b. 
The 1/6 rule is observed. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 43 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
144. Great  Circles.    Near  λ0,  great  circles  are  approximately  straight  lines;  away  from  λ0  they  are 
curves concave to λ0.  The angle (∆) between the great circle and the straight line is given by: 
∆ = ½ ch long (sin mean lat − n) 
Near λ0, the great circle is very well represented by a straight line and, on most parts of actual charts, 
the divergence between the two is not noticeable. 
145. Distance  Measurement.    When  measuring  distances  on  Lambert  projections,  the  mid-latitude 
scale in the area should be used, but over long tracks, which pass from areas of negative scale error 
to  positive  scale  error,  a  straight  edge  graduated  at  the  stated  scale  can  be  used.    The amount of 
care which is required can be assessed from para 142.  If the standards are within 16° of each other, 
then a straight edge can be used everywhere within about 12° of λ0.  If the separation is greater than 
16°, then a constant-scale straight edge should only be used when measuring long distances or if the 
flight is within the band of 1% scale deviation about a standard parallel. 
146. Summary of Properties.  The properties of the Lambert Conformal projection are as follows: 
a. 
The projection is conformal with two standard parallels (where scale factor is 1). 
b. 
Scale factor is at a minimum at the latitude whose sine is n.  This latitude is about the mean 
of the standards. 
c. 
Scale factor change is roughly of the form of the secant of the ch lat from λ0. 
d. 
The projection is not conformal at the poles and scale factor is very large near the poles. 
e. 
Great circles are curves concave to λ0.  Near λ0 they are approximately straight lines. 
f. 
Sheets will join only if they are based on the same standard parallels and are at the same scale. 
147. Uses.  Lambert’s Conformal charts are in widespread use except for polar latitudes.  Examples of 
current  charts  are:  1:500,000  Global  Navigation  Charts  (GNC),  1:2,000,000  Jet  Navigation  Charts 
(JNC), 1:500,000 Tactical Pilotage Charts (TPC), 1:100,000 Operational Navigation Charts (ONC) and 
1:500,000  Low  Flying  Charts  (LFC).    The  moving  map  filmstrip  used  in  the  Tornado  is  based  on 
Lambert’s  charts  but  modified  to  a  form  of  equidistant  cylindrical  projection  (Plate  Carree)  during 
photography. 
NAVIGATION PROJECTIONS - COMPARISON AND SUMMARY 
Introduction 
148. In this chapter, the navigation projections are compared, and their properties are summarized. 
Great Circles and Straight Lines 
149. In general, conformal projections do not portray great circles as straight lines, except the equator 
and  meridians  in  some  cases.    It  is  therefore  necessary  to  provide  some  guidelines  as  to  when  it  is 
worthwhile to plot the great circle rather than the straight line. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 44 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
150. Distance.    From  a  distance-saving  point  of  view,  there is usually little to gain in flying true great 
circle  routes  on  the  stereographic  projection  or  on  Lambert’s  projection.    The  difference  between the 
straight line and the great circle distance for flights of less than 2,000 nm contained within ±25° of the 
parallel of origin (λ0) is less than 0.5 % of the distance.  Navigation charts based on these projections 
are usually confined to a much smaller latitude spread, but since this is not the case with the Mercator 
projection, special care is needed with it.  Fig 51 illustrates the penalty, expressed as percentages of 
great circle distances, in flying east-west rhumb line tracks at various latitudes. 
9-3 Fig 51 Mercator Projection Distance Penalty 
80
60
e
d 40
titu
10%
a
L
5%
20
1%
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Rhumb Line Distance(nm × 1,000)
151. Direction The angle between the great circle direction and the straight line is given by: 
∆ = ½ ch long (sin mean lat – n) 
approximately on Mercator’s and on Lambert’s projection, and exactly on the stereographic projection.  
Use  can  be  made  of  ∆  to  sketch  in  a  series  of  straight lines  which  will  correspond  very  well  with  the 
great circle in most cases.  The straight-line distance, AB in Fig 52, is measured in some constant unit 
and perpendiculars are erected at the quarter, half and three-quarter length points.  The line segments 
AC, CD, DE, EB are then drawn using angles 0.75∆ and 0.5∆, and 0.25∆ as shown in the diagram to 
obtain the intercepts C, D and E.  The direction is concave to λ0. 
9-3 Fig 52 Approximate Great Circle 
D
C
E
3
1
/
2
/
A
4
B
Rhumb Line
Scale Reduction Factor 
152. Scale reduction factor (SRF) was used to develop the Lambert conformal projection from the one-
standard  conformal  conic.    It  is  also  the  device  used  in  the  Ordnance  Survey  transverse  Mercator 
Revised Feb 16  Page 45 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
projection  of  the  United  Kingdom  to  reduce  scale  deviation.    SRF  can  be  used  for  any  conformal 
projection to produce the same effect. 
153. If,  for  example,  the  scale  factor  everywhere  on  a  Mercator  projection  is  multiplied  by  0.99,  two 
parallels, one at about 8° N and the other at about 8° S, will gain scale factors of 1.  The projection will 
be of the form illustrated in Fig 53, on to a cylinder cutting a larger reduced Earth in these two parallels, 
and  reduced  Earth  scale  can  now  be  used  everywhere  between  about  11.5° N  and  11.5° S  with  a 
deviation of less than 1%, i.e. with almost constant scale. 
9-3 Fig 53 Mercator with Two Standard Parallels 
RE
SF
1.02
.
1 01
1.00
Lat
10 S
°
5 S
°

5°N
10 N
°
0 99
.
154. The idea can be applied to the polar stereographic.  A scale deviation of 1% occurs at about 11.5º 
from the pole.  To enlarge the area of almost constant scale it is necessary to multiply all scales by 0.99.  
Scale factor becomes 0.99 at the pole and 1 at about latitude 78.5º.  Constant scale measurement can be 
used up to 16º (latitude 74º) from the pole where scale factor is now 1.01.  This projection can now be 
thought of as stereographic on to a plane cutting the Earth at latitude 78.5º (Fig 54). 
Revised Feb 16  Page 46 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 54 Modified Stereographic 
RE
SF
1.02
1.01
1.00
Lat
75
80
85
90
85
0.99
155. Using the Lambert conformal projection, a scale deviation of 1% can be achieved by placing the 
standard parallels some 16º apart; an area bounded by parallels approximately 3º or 4º beyond these 
then has the required maximum scale deviation. 
165. The use of scale reduction factor allows conformal mapping of a hemisphere on to five projections 
with  scale  deviation  everywhere  less  than  1%.    The  projections  are  a  Mercator  at  the  equator,  polar 
stereographic and three Lambert conformal conics covering latitude bands shown in Fig 55. 
9-3 Fig 55 Conformal Mapping of a Hemisphere 
Stereographic
Conformal Conic
180W
180E
180W 180E
180W
180E
74o
55o
34o
Mercator
11 1 o
/2
180W
180E
Errors in Distance Measurement 
157. On  the  majority  of  Lambert  conformal  charts  available  for  navigation  no  sensible  error  is 
introduced  through  using  the  constant  scale  for  distance  measurement,  but  care  is  needed  on  any 
chart on which the standards are about 16º or more apart.  This care is especially necessary when the 
area of operation is at the centre or at the extremes of the projection. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 47 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
158. Similarly, no appreciable error will result from using reduced Earth scale in equatorial regions on a 
Mercator projection, or near the pole on a polar stereographic projection.  When there is any doubt, on 
any  projection,  the  track  should  be  divided  into  latitude  bands  of  100  nm  to  200  nm  and  the  mean 
latitude scale at each band used. 
PROJECTION SUMMARY 
Choice of Chart 
159. Choosing the best chart for a particular task may appear at first sight a difficult task, but it is often 
reduced simply to a choice between only two or three charts and the decision may finally be made by 
availability.  The following summary suggests suitable charts for a number of purposes. 
Planning Charts 
160.  Planning  charts  are  used  for  display  and  for  route  and  operational  planning.    They  must,  in 
general,  cover  large  areas  with  minimal  distortion,  or  have  some  particular  useful  property,  such  as 
showing  great  circles  as  straight  lines,  or  radii  of  action  at  constant  scale.    The  scales  used  for 
planning charts are necessarily small, in the order of 1:10,000,000 to 1:20,000,000. 
161. Without doubt, the best general-purpose display and planning projection is the stereographic.  It is 
conformal, it has the smallest scale expansion, it can display almost the whole world on one sheet, and 
great circles can be drawn with a minimum of difficulty since they are lesser arcs of circles. 
162. For  smaller  areas  the  Lambert  conformal  in  middle  latitudes,  and  the  Mercator  in  low  latitudes, 
provide the best working projections. 
163. SummaryThe applicability of the various projections to planning tasks may be summarized as 
follows: 
Task 
 
Projection Most Suited 
Large Area 
-
Stereographic 
Small Area 
 
Middle 
-
Lambert Conformal 
Latitudes
 
Low Latitudes 
-
Mercator 
 
Polar Regions 
-
Stereographic 
Radii of Action 
-
Azimuthal Equidistant 
Great Circles 
-
Gnomonic 
Plotting Charts (General) 
164. Plotting charts must be conformal.  They should also be easy to use, which implies that the scale 
for  distance  measurement  should  be  uncomplicated  and  that  the  measurement  of  headings  and 
bearings  should  be  made  from  a  straight-line  datum.    The  simplest  form  of  navigation  is  constant 
heading and for this the direction datum should be parallel over the whole chart. 
Revised Feb 16  Page 48 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
165. If  the  direction  datum  is  True  North,  then  the  Mercator  projection  fulfils  this  requirement,  but  it 
cannot be used in high latitudes and is not the best projection in medium latitudes since the rhumb line 
is excessively longer than the great circle.  The plotting of chords of the great circle from a gnomonic 
satisfies the distance difficulty, but it also defeats the object by introducing many changes of direction. 
166. The best all-round solution in middle latitudes is the Lambert conformal projection, on which scale 
is almost constant.  A grid can be overprinted, and the corrections to magnetic or other datum direction 
to indicate grid north are no more difficult to apply than those to obtain True North.  In polar regions, 
the Polar Stereographic is the best chart. 
167. Summary.  The usefulness of the projections for plotting purposes is shown below: 
12º S to 12º N 
-
Mercator 
12º to 74º 
-
Lambert Conformal 
74º to 90º 
-
Polar Stereographic or Transverse Mercator 
Plotting Charts (Special) 
168. Special plotting charts are available when the area of operation is specified by a great circle and a 
narrow band around it. 
169. If  the  area  of  operation  extends  from  polar  to  equatorial regions the best single projection is the 
transverse Mercator. 
170. If the area is along an inter-cardinal great circle then the oblique Mercator projection provides the 
best solution.  Such strip maps are produced for important high-density routes. 
171. SummaryThe best charts for special plotting uses may be summarized as: 
Large ch lat, small ch long 
-  Transverse Mercator 
Inter-cardinal Great Circle 
-  Oblique Mercator 
Topographical Charts 
172. Topographical  charts  for  navigation  must  be  conformal  and  have  the  same  properties  as  other 
plotting charts.  Thus, the Mercator and Lambert projections are usually chosen. 
173. However, an additional problem is introduced when large-scale topographical charts of world-wide 
coverage  are  considered.    Such  charts,  which  are  intended  primarily  for  joint  air/ground  operations, 
must  have  very small-scale errors and adjoining sheets must fit north/south and east/west as exactly 
as  possible.    These  requirements  are  best  met  by  a  sequence  of  transverse  Mercator  projections 
based on close meridians. 
174. Summary.  The appropriate projections for topographical use are summarized as follows: 
General 
-
Lambert Conformal 
-
Mercator (Low Latitudes) 
World-wide (Large Scale) 
-
Transverse Mercator 
Revised Feb 16  Page 49 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
The Navigation Projections 
175. The projections of importance in navigation are summarized in Figs 56 to 62. 
9-3 Fig 56 Lambert Conformal Projection 
CONFORMAL
2400nm
180°
180°


10
Great
°S
20°
Circle
30°
40°
50°
Scale
60°
7
Expands

80°S


80°N
70°
60°
Scale
5
20°W

Factor = 1
40°
30°
20°
10°N

Standard
Parallels


18
180°

9-3 Fig 57 Mercator Projection 
40°
20°W

20°E
40°
60°
80°
100°
120°
140°
75°
75°
GREENLAND
ICELAND
D
N
N
E
Y
D
LA
A
E
W
IN
W
F
R
S
60°
O
N
60°
UNITED
1200nm EIRE KINGDOM
Y
POLAND BELARUS
AN
M
R
E
G
UKRAINE
KAZAKHSTAN
FRANCE
MONGOLIA
45°
45°
ITLAL
UZBEKISTAN
Y
SPAIN
TURK-
JAPAN
TURKEY
MENISTAN
AZORES Is
SYRIA
O
ISTAN
C
IRAQ
IRAN
C
AN
O
30°
R
AFG
O
30°
M
PAKISTAN
CANARY Is
A
R
ALGERIA
LIBYA
A
H
EGYPT
A
IA
S
N
SAUDIA
W
ITA
ARABIA
BURMA
R
INDIA
U
A
MALI
CAPE VERDE Is
M
NIGER
THAI-
15°
15°
LAND
 N
 N
NIGERIA
CHAD
SUDAN
ETHIOPIA
SRI LANKA
MALAYSIA
LIA
N
A
S
O
M
U
KENYA
O
O
M
R
S

A

E
T
M
R
A
A
C
PAPAUA
ZAIRE
INDONESIA
NEW
TANZANIA
GUINEA
BRAZIL
ANGOLA
E
U
IQ
15°
B
ZAMBIA
M
15°
 S 
ZA
O
 S 
M
NAMIBIA
AUSTRALIA
40°
20°W

20°E
40°
60°
80°
100°
120°
140°
Revised Feb 16  Page 50 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 58 Polar Sterographic Projection 
CONFORMAL
10°
10°
20°
20°
30°
30°
Great
40°
40°
Circles
Scale
50°
50°
Expansion
60°
60°
2400nm
9-3 Fig 59 Transverse Mercator Projection 
60N
80N
NP
20W
160E
80N
60N
30N
10W
10E
30E
50E
70E
90E
110E
130E
150E
Equator
30S
60S
80S
SP
20W
160E
80S
60S
30S
30W
50W
70W
90W
110W
130W
150W
170W
170E
Equator
30N
Revised Feb 16  Page 51 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-3 - Map Projections 
9-3 Fig 60 Oblique Mercator Projection 
CONFORMAL
N55
Great Circles
Scale Deviation
less than 1
%
2400nm
9-3 Fig 61 Gnomonic Projection 
180
70
170
30
60
50
160
40
90W
90E
40
30
150
50
20
10
0
140
130
120
110
100
90
80
70
60
0
9-3 Fig 62 Azimuthal Equidistant Projection 
180
90W
90E
0
Revised Feb 16  Page 52 of 52 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
CHAPTER 4 - THE TRIANGLE OF VELOCITIES - APPLICATION TO NAVIGATION 
Speed and Velocity 
1. 
It is important to realize the difference between the meanings of the words 'speed' and 'velocity'.  Speed 
describes only the rate at which an object is moving. The statement that an aircraft has a speed of 400 kt 
gives  no  indication  of  the  direction  in  which  the  aircraft  is  travelling,  and  this  direction  may  be  changed 
without any alteration of speed.  Speed is thus a scalar quantity; it has magnitude but no direction. 
2. 
Velocity  describes  speed  in  a  specified  direction,  it  is  said  to  be  a  vector quantity for it has both 
magnitude  and  direction.    Thus,  an  aircraft  flying  at  400  kt  on  a  heading  of  045°  (T)  has  a  different 
velocity from that of an aircraft flying at 400 kt on 090° (T), although their speeds are identical. 
Vectors 
3. 
Since a velocity is a speed in a given direction, it may be represented graphically by a straight line 
whose length is proportional to speed, and whose direction is measured from an arbitrary datum line.  
Such a straight line is called a vector. 
4. 
The  scale  used  in  drawing  vectors  may  be  any  that  is  convenient.    The  datum  line  for 
measurement of direction is, by convention, True North, and usually points to the top of the sheet.  To 
indicate the direction and scale of the vector, it is usual to insert the True North symbol at some point in 
the diagram, and to indicate scale by a graduated scale line.  Fig 1 illustrates the vector for an aircraft 
flying at 400 kt on a heading of 045° (T); the arrowhead indicates the sense of the vector, showing that 
the direction is 045° and not 225°. 
9-4 Fig 1 A Vector 
TN
B
A
0
100
200
300
400
nm
5. 
The  discussion,  so  far,  has  concerned  an  aircraft’s  velocity  relative  to  the  air  through  which  it 
moves.    However,  there  is  another  factor  which  plays  an  important  part  in  air  navigation  -  the 
movement of the air itself. 
6. 
Wind Velocity.  Wind is air in natural motion, approximately horizontal.  The direction and speed of 
that motion defines wind velocity (w/v), and it too can be represented by a vector.  It is expressed as a five 
or six figure group; the first three figures refer to wind direction (the true direction from which it blows); the 
last  two  or  three  figures  indicate  wind  speed  in  knots.  The  figures  representing  direction  are  separated 
from those of speed by an oblique stroke.  Thus, a wind velocity of speed 45 knots blowing from the east 
would be written as 090/45, and one of 145 knots from the same direction as 090/145. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
Vector Addition 
7. 
Fig 2 illustrates the basic navigation problem; the aircraft is moving at V1 kt through an air mass 
which  itself  is  moving  at  V2  kt  (w/v).    It  is  necessary  to  find  the  resultant  of  these  two  component 
velocities to determine the aircraft’s path over the ground. 
9-4 Fig 2 Factors Affecting the Path of an Aircraft 
Movement
Through Air
V  kt
2
V  kt
1
Movement of
Air
8. 
If  the  component  velocities  act  in  the  same  direction  (i.e.,  the  aircraft  flies  directly  upwind  or 
downwind), the resultant velocity is the algebraic sum of the aircraft speed and wind speed, along the 
aircraft heading.  However, when the component velocities do not act in the same line, the resultant 
velocity is an intermediate speed in an intermediate direction.  In such cases, it is possible to find the 
resultant by constructing a vector diagram, or triangle of velocities. 
Triangle of Velocities 
9. 
If the vectors (see Fig 3) of the aircraft’s velocity (AB or EF) and wind velocity (BC or DE) are drawn 
(using the same scale), such that their sense arrows follow each other, then the resultant velocity vector is 
the  third  side.    The  sense  of  this  vector  is  such  that  its  arrow  opposes  the  arrows  of  the  component 
velocities around the triangle.  Thus, in Fig 3, the vector of the resultant velocity is AC or DF. 
9-4 Fig 3 Triangle of Velocities 
TN
B
F
C
D
A
E
0
100
200
300
400
nm
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
10.  It can be seen that AC and DF are identical in magnitude and direction; it does not matter in which 
order the initial component vectors are drawn as long as their sense arrows follow each other. 
NAVIGATION COMPONENTS OF THE TRIANGLE OF VELOCITIES 
General 
11.  Using  the  triangle  of  velocities  to  solve  the  basic  navigation  problem,  the  component  vectors 
represent the aircraft’s velocity (true heading and true airspeed) and wind velocity; the resultant vector 
represents the aircraft’s true track and groundspeed (see Fig 4a). 
12.  In  addition  to  these  vectors,  the  other  important  quantity  in  navigation  is  the  angle  between  the 
aircraft’s velocity vector and the resultant; this is the drift angle (see Fig 4b). 
9-4 Fig 4 Navigation Vectors 
a  Component Parts of the Triangle of Velocities
b  Arrow Convention
TN
AB = True Heading and 
TN
True Airspeed (080°T 400 kt)
BC = Wind
Velocity
B
(330/30)
B
Drift Angle
C
C
A
A
AC = Resultant Track and 
         Groundspeed = 084°T 410 kt 
0
100
200
300
400
500
0
100
200
300
400
500
nm
nm
13.  Arrow Convention.  The vectors are not normally labelled as in Fig 4a, but are identified merely 
by the number of arrows on the vector.  The convention, illustrated in Fig 4b, is: 
a. 
The true heading and true airspeed vector carries one arrow, pointing in the direction of heading. 
b. 
The track and groundspeed vector carries two arrows, pointing in the direction of track. 
c. 
The  wind  velocity  vector  carries  three  arrows  pointing  in  the  direction  in  which  the  wind  is 
blowing. 
14.  In para 11, several new terms were introduced, eg true airspeed, track, and groundspeed.  These 
will now be examined in more detail. 
Airspeed 
15.  The  speed  of  an  aircraft  measured  relative  to  the  air  mass  through which it is moving is termed 
true  airspeed  (TAS).    It  is  emphasised  that,  because  of  wind  velocity,  this  speed  will  differ  from  that 
measured by an observer on the Earth.  Airspeed is independent of wind and is the same regardless of 
whether the aircraft is flying upwind or downwind. 
16.  An  aircraft’s  airspeed  is  usually  measured  by  an  airspeed  indicator  (ASI).    The  ASI  reading  is 
termed indicated airspeed (IAS), but this does not equal true airspeed.  The difference between these 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
quantities is caused by a number of inaccuracies which, broadly speaking, stem from two sources, the 
ASI itself and the atmosphere. 
17.  If  IAS  is  corrected  for  the  inaccuracies  of  the  ASI  (instrument  and  pressure  errors),  the  result  is 
called calibrated airspeed (CAS).  At higher speeds (normally above about 300 kt), a correction to CAS 
is  necessary  to  take  into  account  the  compressibility  of  air;  this  correction  varies  with  altitude  and 
speed.    The  speed  after  this  correction  is  termed  equivalent  airspeed  (EAS).    ASIs  are  calibrated  in 
relation  to  the  International  Standard  Atmosphere  and  at  mean  sea  level.    At  all  other  altitudes,  EAS 
and  CAS  are  less  than  TAS  because  the  air  is  less  dense  than  at  sea  level.  CAS  or  EAS  may  be 
corrected to TAS by using graphs, tables, digital computers or analogue computers (such as the Dead 
Reckoning Computer Mk 4A). 
Mach Number 
18.  An alternative method of quoting TAS is to express it as a fraction of the local speed of sound; this 
fraction is known as the Mach Number (M) and is given by: 
V
M =  C
Where V = True Airspeed 
 
   C = Speed of Sound (in the same air conditions) 
Mach Numbers are expressed as decimals e.g.: 
V = 440 kt and C = 580 kt, then M = 0.76; or  
V = 725 kt and C = 580 kt, then M = 1.25. 
19.  There are aerodynamic problems which occur at a certain fraction (depending on the aircraft type) 
of the speed of sound.  Although this fraction is fixed, it may be represented by widely varying values of 
CAS  (depending  on  altitude)  and  varying  values  of  TAS  (depending  on  temperature).    It  is  more 
convenient, therefore, in high-speed flight to display the aircraft’s speed as a Mach Number rather than 
as IAS or TAS.  A Machmeter computes and displays this quantity. 
20.  The speed of sound varies as the square root of the absolute temperature. Thus, the calculation 
of TAS from Mach Number is much simpler than, say, from CAS, for the only variable is temperature. 
Groundspeed 
21.  Since air navigation is concerned with the movement of an aircraft over the Earth, it is necessary 
to  know  the  speed  at  which  the  aircraft  is  moving  relative  to  the  Earth;  this  is  termed  groundspeed, 
and, like airspeed, it is measured in knots. 
22.  Groundspeed is usually determined by one of the following methods: 
a. 
Calculating the effect of wind velocity on the aircraft, ie by solving the triangle of velocities. 
b. 
Measuring the time taken to travel a known distance between two positions on the ground. 
c. 
The use of Doppler equipment. 
d. 
The use of inertial navigation systems. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
Track 
23.  The direction of the path of an aircraft over the ground is called its track.  If an aircraft flies directly 
upwind or downwind, or in still air, its path over the ground lies in the same direction as its heading.  In 
all other cases, wind will cause the aircraft to move over the ground in a direction other than that which 
is in line with its fore and aft axis, and to an observer on the ground it will appear to move crab-wise 
rather than straight ahead.  In such cases the aircraft’s heading and track are not the same. 
24.  In Fig 5, an aircraft at A is flying on a heading of 290° (T).  As it maintains this heading, a northerly 
wind  carries  the  aircraft  from  the  path  it  would  have  followed  in  the  absence  of  the  wind  ie  AC.  
Sometime later the aircraft passes over B; AB then represents the track and the aircraft is said to have 
'tracked' from A to B. 
9-4 Fig 5 Heading and Track 
Wind
C
Heading
B
Track
A
25.  The line joining two points between which it is required to fly is known as the required track. 
26.  In flying from one point to another, the path which the aircraft actually follows over the ground is called 
its  'track  made  good'.    When  track  made  good  coincides  with  required  track,  the  aircraft  is  said  to  be  'on 
track'; when track made good and required track are not the same the aircraft is said to be 'off track'. 
27.  Fig 6 illustrates the difference between required track and track made good.  An aircraft attempting 
to  go  from  A  to  B  finds  itself  some  time  later  at  C.  AB  is  therefore  the required track and AC the track 
made good. 
9-4 Fig 6 Required Track and Track Made Good 
B
Required
Track
C
Track
Made Good
A
Heading
28.  Any two points on the Earth’s surface may be joined by a rhumb line and by a great circle.  It follows, 
therefore, that the required track may be either a rhumb line track, which follows the rhumb line between 
two  points,  or  a  great  circle  track,  which  follows  the  great  circle  between  the  points.    By  definition,  the 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
rhumb line track maintains a constant direction relative to true North and is therefore, in many cases, the 
easier to make good. 
29.  Track  is  measured  in  degrees  and  is  expressed  (like  heading)  as  a  three-figure  group  eg  045°.  
Track may be measured relative to true North, magnetic North or grid North and is annotated (T), (M) 
or (G) accordingly. 
Drift 
30.  The angle between the heading and track of an aircraft is called drift.  Drift is due to the effect of 
the wind and is the lateral movement imparted to an aircraft by the wind.  An aircraft flying in conditions 
of  no  wind,  or  directly  upwind  or  downwind,  experiences  no  drift.  In  such  cases,  track  and  heading 
coincide.    Under  all  other  conditions, track and heading differ by a certain amount, referred to as the 
drift. 
31.  Drift may be measured manually by observing the direction of the apparent movement of objects 
on the ground below the aircraft (Track) and comparing this direction with the fore and aft axis of the 
aircraft  (Heading)  to  obtain  the  angular  difference  (Drift).    Many  aircraft  are  fitted  with  automatic 
systems that calculate drift continuously by electronic means eg Doppler or inertial systems. 
32.  Drift  is  expressed  in  degrees  to  port  (P)  or  starboard  (S)  of  the  aircraft’s  heading.    An  aircraft 
experiencing port drift is said to drift to port, and its track lies to port of its heading.  Thus, knowing the 
heading of the aircraft, the track can be determined by proper application of drift to heading.  If drift is to 
port,  track  angle  is  less  than  heading;  if  to  starboard,  track  angle  is  greater  than  heading.    Automatic 
systems can continuously apply drift to heading to give a direct indication of track. 
33.  The  direct  measurement  of  track,  i.e.  from  knowledge  of  actual  ground  position,  enables  drift  to  be 
determined,  provided  the  heading  is  known.    Thus,  an  aircraft  whose  track  is  measured  from  a  map  as 
070° (T) while flying on a heading of 060° (T) is drifting 10° to starboard.  This relationship is shown in Fig 7. 
9-4 Fig 7 Drift 
Wind
Track
070°
B
Heading
060°
Drift 10°S
A
APPLICATION OF THE TRIANGLE OF VELOCITIES IN NAVIGATION 
General 
34.  Having  discussed  the  triangle  of  velocities  and  its  components,  it  is  now  possible  to  review  its 
application in the solution of navigation problems. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
35.  The triangle of velocities may be considered to have six parts; each of its three sides representing a 
speed  and  a  direction.    A  knowledge  of  any  four  of  these  parts  enables  the  remaining  two  parts  to  be 
found. In navigation, the types of problem solved by this method are: 
a. 
Finding the length and direction of one side eg finding track and groundspeed, wind velocity 
or, occasionally, heading and airspeed. 
b. 
Finding the length of one side and the direction of another, eg true heading and groundspeed. 
In  practice,  the  triangle  of  velocities  can  be  continuously  resolved  by  automatic  navigation  systems.  
However,  graphical  methods  may  still  be  used  during  planning  and  in  flight,  using  the  transparent 
plotting disc of the DR Computer Mk 4A or Mk 5A.  The following examples, employing basic pencil-on-
paper  vector  plotting,  are  therefore  intended  to  provide  a  thorough  understanding  of  the  underlying 
principles, rather than to illustrate a practical method of solving navigation problems. 
Rules for Plotting 
36.  In plotting the vector triangle, there are a number of points to note.  The same datum direction, and a 
uniform  unit  of  measurement,  must  be  used  for  all  vectors,  otherwise  the  diagram  will  be  distorted.  
Furthermore,  one  must  ensure  that  true  airspeed  is  measured  only  along  true  heading  and  that  similar 
relationships for track and groundspeed, and wind direction and wind speed are maintained. 
Finding the Length and Direction of One Side 
37.  To Find Track and Groundspeed
Example:  An aircraft flying at TAS 450 kt, on a heading of 090° (T), experiences a w/v of 025°/50 kt.  
What is its track and groundspeed? 
Solution (Fig 8): 
9-4 Fig 8 Calculating Track and Groundspeed 
TN
A
(090°/450kt)
B
(025/50)
C
0
100
200
300
400
500
nm
a. 
Draw AB, the heading and airspeed vector. 
b. 
From B, lay off the wind vector BC. 
c. 
Join  AC  and  measure  its  direction  and  length.    Track  and  groundspeed  are  found  to  be 
096° (T) and 432 kt respectively. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
38.  To Find Wind Velocity.
Example:  The groundspeed of an aircraft is 500 kt on a track of 260° (T); its true airspeed is 420 kt on 
a heading of 245° (T).  What is the wind velocity? 
Solution (Fig 9): 
9-4 Fig 9 Finding Wind Velocity 
TN
A
(260°/500kt)
C
(245°/420kt)
B
0
100
200
300
400
500
nm
a. 
Plot AB, the heading and true airspeed vector. 
b. 
From A, lay off AC, the track and groundspeed vector. 
c. 
Join BC and measure its direction and length. Wind velocity found is 129°/145 kt. 
39.  To Find True Heading and True Airspeed.
Example:  In order to maintain a schedule, it is necessary to fly a track of 270° (T) at a groundspeed of 
550 kt.  The wind velocity is 350°/60 kt.  What true airspeed and what true heading must be flown to 
achieve these conditions? 
Solution (Fig 10): 
9-4 Fig 10 Finding True Heading and Airspeed 
TN
C
(270°/550kt)
A
(350/60kt)
B
0
100
200
300
400
500
nm
a. 
Plot AB, the wind vector. 
b. 
From A, lay off AC, the track and groundspeed vector. 
c. 
Join BC to obtain the heading and airspeed vector.  Heading and airspeed are 276° (T) and 
563 kt respectively. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-4 - The Triangle of Velocities – Application to Navigation 
Finding the Length of One Side and the Direction of Another 
40.  To Find Heading and Groundspeed.  The determination of the heading to make a given track, 
and the resultant groundspeed, is probably the most common navigation problem: 
Example:    It  is  necessary  to  make  good  a  track  of  060° (T)  whilst  flying  at  a  TAS  of  450  kt.    Wind 
velocity is 140°/40 kt.  What heading must be flown and what groundspeed will be achieved? 
Solution (Fig 11): 
9-4 Fig 11 Finding Heading and Groundspeed 
Draw arc BC
TN
(Radius 450 nm)
X
(060°)
C
B
(140/40kt)
A
0
100
200
300
400
500
nm
a. 
Draw line AX of indefinite length in a direction 060° (T) to represent required track. 
b. 
From A, lay off AB, the wind vector. 
c. 
With centre B, and radius true airspeed, describe an arc to cut AX at C.  The direction of BC, 
065° (T), is the heading required to make good a track of 060° (T); AC represents groundspeed, 
which is measured as 441 kt. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
CHAPTER 5 - DETERMINATION AND APPLICATION OF WIND VELOCITY 
DETERMINATION 
Introduction 
1. 
Wind  velocity  plays  a  major  part  in  navigation  calculations.    If  wind  velocity  was  constant,  one 
measurement  would  suffice  for  all  calculations  and  workloads  would  be  considerably  reduced.  
However, wind velocity is seldom constant; it varies in direction and speed with height, time, and place.  
Consequently,  a  knowledge  of  the  expected  wind  velocities  is  required  in  order  to  plan  a  flight,  a 
knowledge of the wind effect actually being experienced in flight is necessary to calculate position and 
a  knowledge  of  present  wind  velocity  is  needed  to  calculate  alterations  of  heading.    Because  of  its 
continual variation, it is normally necessary to measure wind velocity frequently if accurate navigation is 
to be accomplished.  
Mean and Local Wind Velocities 
2. 
Measured wind velocities may be divided into mean and local winds, the division depending upon 
the interval over which the wind is determined.  A mean wind velocity is one which has been found over 
a fairly long-time period and usually over a large area; it represents the mean effect of all the different 
wind  velocities  experienced  by  the  aircraft  during  that  time.    However,  should  the  wind  velocity  have 
changed  during  the  period  of  measurement,  the  mean  wind  velocity  may  be  quite  different  from  the 
actual wind velocity affecting the aircraft at the end of the period.  Consequently, although a mean wind 
velocity  is  ideal  for  calculating  position,  it  is  not  usually  suitable  for  calculating alterations of heading, 
because  it  may  not  represent  the  wind  velocity  that  will  affect  the  aircraft  to  its  next  turning  point  or 
destination. 
3. 
A wind velocity found instantaneously, or over a comparatively short period of time, is known as a 
local  wind  velocity.    It  represents  the  wind  velocity  affecting  the  aircraft  at  that  time  and  as  such  is 
usually the best available wind velocity for use in calculating alterations of heading. 
4. 
In practice, it is usually necessary to compromise between mean wind velocities found over long 
periods of time and the more quickly calculated local wind velocity.  Whereas the former are of limited 
value for future application, the latter tend to be less accurate because the time interval in which they 
are measured is small. The actual period of time that will provide a reasonable value of wind velocity is 
a matter of judgement.  For example, if the wind velocity was required in order to calculate a change of 
heading,  it  would  be  inappropriate  to  use  a  time  period  during  which  there  had  been  a  significant 
change  in  height  or  during  which  a  weather  front  had  been  crossed.  In  normal  circumstances,  wind 
velocities found over time periods between 18 minutes and 40 minutes are used.  
5. 
Modern navigation systems provide an instantaneous readout of local W/V which can be used to 
compare  against  the  forecast  W/V  or  to  calculate  required  heading  changes  if  necessary.    Although 
manual  plotting  techniques  are  rarely  practised  nowadays,  where  they  are  used,  several  methods  of 
determining W/V can be employed, and the following paragraphs may provide a useful background to 
the  basic  understanding  of  navigation.    It  should  be  appreciated  that  the  results  obtained  by  each 
method described in the following paragraphs will be different. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
Track and Groundspeed Method 
6. 
The  track  and  groundspeed  method  is  that  solution  of  the  vector  triangle  which  determines  the 
length and direction of one side of the triangle (the wind vector), given the length and direction of the 
other  two  sides  (the  heading  and  track  vectors).    The  wind  velocity  so  found  may  be  a  mean  wind 
velocity, or a local wind velocity, depending upon the time interval chosen. 
7. 
The  principle  of  the  method  is illustrated in Fig 1. An aircraft leaves point A at 1000 hours, on a 
heading of 125º T and with a TAS of 420 kt.  At 1024 hours, the aircraft’s ground position is found to be 
at point B, which bears 115º T from A, at a distance of 180 nm. The aircraft’s ground speed can thus 
be calculated as 450 kt and the drift as 10º P.  Heading, TAS, drift and groundspeed can be set on to a 
DR computer and wind velocity found as 231º/82 kt. 
9-5 Fig 1 Track and Groundspeed Wind Velocity 
True
North
A 1000
Drift 10° P
B 1024
115° T
Wind
Vector
125°
(for 24 mins)
T
0
60
120
180
240
300
360
nm
8. 
When using this method, no alterations of heading or airspeed can be tolerated between the fixes 
used  in  determining  the  track  and  groundspeed.  An  alteration  of  heading  between  the  two  fixes  will 
result in the measurement of an erroneous track and groundspeed and consequently an incorrect wind 
velocity. Similarly, an alteration of airspeed will cause errors because the resultant changes in drift and 
groundspeed will be attributed to the wind effect. 
9. 
The  track  and  groundspeed  method  of  finding  wind  velocity  eliminates  the  plotting  and 
measurement  of  wind  vectors,  which  is  often  a  major  source  of  error,  and  so  its  accuracy  depends 
primarily  on  the  accuracy  of,  and  measurement  between,  the  fixes  used  to  determine  the  track  and 
groundspeed.  Other pertinent factors are the accuracy to which true heading is known, the accuracy of 
timing and computation, and the pilot’s ability to maintain a constant heading and airspeed. 
10.  Automated  Wind  Velocities.  None of the limitations mentioned in paras 8 and 9 apply to wind 
velocities  found  from  the  continuous  outputs  of  drift  and  groundspeed  provided  by  automated 
navigation equipments. These quantities may be applied to true heading and true airspeed to find the 
local  wind  velocity.    The  advantages  of  this  method  are  that  the  wind  velocity  currently  affecting  the 
aircraft  can  be  quickly,  easily  and  continuously  determined,  consequently  there  is  little  restriction  on 
tactical freedom. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
Track Plot Wind Method 
11.  When  keeping a track plot, winds are normally found by the track and groundspeed method.  If, 
however, a fix is found from which neither groundspeed nor track can be calculated, the wind velocity 
may  be  determined  by  back  plotting  vectors  in  the  following  manner.    In  Fig  2,  a  fix  has  been  found 
shortly after a change of heading.  A DR position, using the old wind velocity is plotted for the time of 
the fix.  The reciprocal of the old wind velocity is laid off from this DR position, making the length of the 
vector  proportional  to  the  time  that  has  elapsed  since  the  start  of  the  track  plot,  to  produce  an  air 
position.  The new wind velocity for the same period of time is given by joining this air position to the 
fix.  Alternatively, by joining the fix to the DR position for the same time, a correction vector for the old 
wind velocity may be obtained. 
9-5 Fig 2 Track Plot Wind Vectoring 
Air Position 
0942
New
W/V
Old
0910
W/V
0942
DR Position
0927
Air Plot Wind Method 
12.  The air plot method does not rely on the measurement of track and groundspeed, instead the wind 
vector, ie the displacement between a fix and its corresponding air position, is measured directly (Fig 3).  
The wind vector measured is of course proportional to the period of time that the air plot has been running 
and must be converted mathematically to nautical miles per hour (ie a wind velocity in knots). 
Revised Sep 12  Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
9-5 Fig 3 Air Plot Wind Velocity 
1000 Depart Base
Measure this 20 min Vector
and expand it to one hour
Fix 1020
Air Position 1020
13.  Whereas the track and groundspeed method of finding wind velocity cannot be used if there is any 
alteration  of  heading  or  airspeed  between  the  fixes,  this  restriction  does  not  apply  to  the  air  plot 
method.  Wind velocities can be measured, regardless of heading and airspeed flown, provided that an 
accurate log of air positions is maintained for each change of heading or airspeed.  The plot must be 
restarted whenever a fix is obtained, and the navigation equipment updated. 
14.  As an example, in Fig 4, an aircraft flying at a true airspeed of 420 kt leaves point A at 1000 hours 
and  flies  for  20  minutes  on  each  of  three  headings,  290º  T,  250º  T,  and  010º  T.    At  1100  hours  the 
aircraft’s position is fixed at point B, and from the log of heading and airspeed, an air position for the 
same  time  can  be  established  at  point  C.    The  vector  CB  is  the  wind  effect  for  an  hour,  and  it 
represents the average of the wind velocities which have affected the aircraft over the hour; it can be 
measured as 269º/105 kt. 
9-5 Fig 4 Air Plot Wind Velocity Incorporating Changes of Heading 
North
(True)
1100
1100
C
B
1020
A
1040
1000
0
100
200 nm
15.  The accuracy of the air position, which depends on the accuracy of the start fix and the knowledge 
of  headings  and  airspeed  flown,  together  with  the  accuracy  of  the  final  fix,  dictates  the  accuracy  to 
which the wind velocity can be determined.  
16.  An air plot wind is the mean wind velocity over the period since the air plot was started and thus its 
validity for future calculations must be considered carefully.  It is usually necessary for this reason to limit 
the period over which air plot winds are found in order to obtain an approximation to the local wind. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
17.  Conversely, if air plots winds are found over very short intervals, the resultant vectors are often so 
short that accurate measurement is difficult.  Errors in measuring vectors, representing short periods of 
wind effect, cause large errors in the wind speed found, e.g. an error of 1 nm in a vector representing a 
6-minute period will result in a 10 knot inaccuracy.  Usually the most satisfactory period for wind finding 
is between 18 minutes and 40 minutes. 
Visual Wind Assessment 
18.  When flying at low level, in sight of the surface, it may be possible to make an assessment of the 
wind  direction,  and  with  experience  also  of  the  wind  speed, by observing its effect on smoke plumes 
from  factories,  power  stations  and  other  miscellaneous  fires.    It  should  be  remembered  that  close  to 
the surface there may be local wind channelling and eddies, and the apparent wind direction may not 
be a true representation of the mean wind over a broader area or at the aircraft’s height.  Despite these 
shortcomings, such clues can be helpful where there is little better information, or where it is required 
to  confirm  a  forecast  wind  velocity.    Over  open  water,  the  wind  causes  a  pattern  of  parallel  lines  or 
streaks formed by foam or spray.  These streaks, called wind lanes, are aligned with the wind direction 
and are usually clearly visible from the air. 
APPLICATION 
Introduction 
19.  Generally  speaking,  wind  velocities  found  by  the  methods  described  in  the  previous  paragraphs 
are used directly in the calculation of future headings, and DR groundspeed.  It is, however, sometimes 
necessary  to  apply  corrections  to  the  wind  found  before  it  is  used  in  further  navigation  calculations.  
The occasions requiring such corrections are dealt with in the following paragraphs. 
Change of Meteorological Zones in Flight 
20.  Where the meteorological forecast for a particular flight is divided into a number of zones, it will be 
necessary to take into account the change in wind to be expected on crossing the boundary between 
zones.  This is done by comparing the wind velocity found with that forecast, for the zone in which the 
aircraft has been flying.  The arithmetical difference in both direction and speed is then applied to the 
wind forecast for the next zone. 
Example.  A met forecast for zones 1º E to 5º E and from 5º E to 10º E gives wind velocities of 
250º/20  kt  and  270º/30  kt  respectively.    Approaching  5º  E  from  the  west,  the  wind  is  found  as 
235º/15  kt.    The  difference  between  the  met  forecast  and  the  wind  found  in  the  first  zone  is 
therefore  –15º  and  –5  kt.    This  correction  factor  is  applied  to  the  forecast  wind  for  the  second 
zone, giving a wind to be used as 255º/25 kt. 
21.  This  procedure  is  applicable  to  navigation  in  areas  where  few  fixes  are  available,  whereas  in 
rapid-fixing  areas  local  wind  velocities  found  regularly  over  relatively  short  periods  would  be  used 
without corrections. 
Change of Height in Flight 
22.  The method of selecting a wind velocity for use after the aircraft has changed height is similar to 
that outlined above.  A correction factor, being the difference between the forecast and found winds at 
the height flown, is applied to the forecast wind velocity for the new height to be flown. 
23.  In  the  event  of  the  aircraft  making  a  long  climb,  it  may  be  necessary  to  alter  heading  while 
ascending, and therefore to select a wind velocity for that part of the climb from the DR position at the 
time of altering heading to the limit of the ascent.  Wind velocities found whilst climbing are mean wind 
Revised Sep 12  Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
velocities  (apart  from  those  found  by  automated  equipments)  and  the  height  at  which  they  are 
considered to be operative is ascertained by the application of simple rules which depend upon the rate 
of climb of the aircraft.  
24.  If the rate of climb is constant throughout the period in which the wind velocity is found, the wind 
velocity is said to apply to the mean height for the period.  If the rate of climb is decreasing during the 
period in which the wind velocity is found, the wind applies at two-thirds of the height band ascended 
during the period. 
Example.    A  wind  velocity  of  240º/30  kt  is  found  whilst  an  aircraft  is  climbing  from  7,000  ft  to 
16,000  ft,  and  during  that  time  the  rate  of  climb  decreases.    Therefore  240º/30  kt  is  the  wind 
velocity applicable to a height at two-thirds of the ascent from 7,000 ft to 16,000 ft, ie 13,000 ft. 
25.  Two-thirds is an arbitrary fraction designed to take some account of the fact that the aircraft, with 
a decreasing rate of climb, spends more time in the higher layers of air and is therefore affected to a 
greater degree by wind velocities at the higher levels. 
26.  Having  established,  in  the  above  example,  that  the  wind  velocity  at  13,000  ft  is  240º/30  kt,  it  is 
necessary to select a wind velocity for the remainder of the climb, say to 22,000 ft.  Since the rate of 
climb  continues  to  decrease  with  height,  the  two-thirds  rule  is  again  applied,  and  a  wind  velocity  is 
therefore required for 20,000 ft, ie two-thirds of the ascent from 16,000 ft to 22,000 ft.  The procedure 
for selecting this wind is as described in paras 24 and 28. 
Wind Velocity for Flight Planning a Climb or Descent 
27.  The wind velocity to be used when flight planning a climb or descent is the mean of the wind effects 
which will be experienced by the aircraft as it ascends or descends through the various layers of air.  The 
selection  of  this  wind  velocity,  in  practice,  depends  upon  the  change  of  wind  speed  and  direction  with 
height, and upon the rate of climb or descent of the aircraft.  Where the wind velocity changes regularly 
with height and the rate of climb or descent is constant, the wind velocity at the mid-level would be used; 
where the rate of climb reduces with altitude the level chosen would need to reflect the longer time spent 
at the higher altitudes and the two-thirds rule will normally suffice, although this may need to be amended 
for  certain  aircraft  types  and  payload.    Where  there  is  an  intermediate  fix  (or  fixes),  in  the  climb  or 
descent, an appropriate wind velocity for each section can be used. 
28.  Example.    Consider  an  aircraft  which  is  to  climb  from  2,000  ft  to  27,000  ft  at  a  constant  rate  of 
climb.  The forecast wind velocities are as follows: 
2,000 ft
220º/15 kt
5,000 ft
230º/25 kt
10,000 ft
240º/30 kt
15,000 ft
260º/40 kt
20,000 ft
290º/50 kt 
30,000 ft
350º/70 kt 
29.  These wind velocities vary regularly with height, and since the rate of climb is constant, the wind 
for the mean height of the climb would be used, ie that effective at 12,500 ft - 250º/35 kt. 
30.  If the aircraft was to climb from 2,000 ft to 27,000 ft at a reducing rate of climb, the two-thirds rule would 
be applied to determine the appropriate height, ie 18,500 ft in this case, giving a wind velocity of 280º/47 kt to 
be used.  In practice, the 20,000 ft wind velocity would probably suffice to avoid interpolation. 
31.  A  further  adjustment  may  be  necessary  in  the  situation  where  the  wind  velocity  does  not  vary 
uniformly with height, but exhibits a marked change at some level, perhaps due to a jet stream.  In any 
Revised Sep 12  Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-5 - Determination and Application of Wind Velocity 
event the wind velocity that is used will inevitably be an approximation, and even the simple case of a 
constant rate of climb or descent may be disrupted by Air Traffic Control restrictions. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
CHAPTER 6 - ESTABLISHMENT AND USE OF POSITION LINES 
Terminology 
1. 
A  position  determined  without  reference  to  any  former  position  is  called  a  fix.    This  is  a  generic 
term and is often qualified to indicate the fixing method, e.g. GPS fix, radar fix, visual fix etc. 
2. 
Instantaneous fixes can be obtained from electronic navigation systems or the visual identification 
of  the aircraft position vertically beneath the aircraft.  Electronic rapid fixing facilities are not infallible, 
and position lines can be used to enhance confidence in them.  While position lines are not generally 
plotted on charts nowadays, some operators may still use such traditional navigation techniques.   
3. 
It is possible to fly over an identifiable feature, e.g. a motorway, without knowing the precise point 
of crossing; all that can be said is that at that particular time the aircraft was somewhere on the line of 
the motorway.  This is known as a position line (P/L) and two or more such lines can provide a fix. 
POSITION LINE TYPES 
General 
4. 
Position  lines  can  be  straight  or  curved,  depending  on  the  information  they  convey.    Bearings  are 
straight position lines representing the angular relationship between the aircraft and a known position, or 
the orientation of a line feature.  Circular position lines represent the aircraft’s range from a position, the 
radius of the curve being equal to the range.  Both forms of position line and their sub-classifications are 
discussed below. 
Bearings 
5. 
Relative  Bearings.    A  bearing  may  be  taken  relative  to  the  fore  and  aft  axis  of  the  aircraft, 
normally  by  using  a  radio  compass  tuned  to  a  radio  beacon  or  by  visual  or  radar  observation  of  a 
feature.  To obtain the true bearing of the beacon or feature, the true heading of the aircraft must be 
added  to  the  relative  bearing  (either  directly  or  by  offsetting  the  azimuth  scale  of  the  measuring 
instrument).    The  reciprocal  of  this  true  bearing  plotted from the beacon or feature gives the position 
line  for  the  time  of  observation.    It  is  essential  that  the  true  heading  applied  to the relative bearing is 
obtained at the precise time of the observation. 
Example.  At 1015 hours, while on a heading of 310° T, a prominent headland is observed on a 
bearing of 080° relative (see Fig 1). 
Revised Sep 12  Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
9-6 Fig 1 A Relative Bearing 
Airc
Relative 
ra
True Bearing 
ft
Bearing 
H
3
030  
° (T)
e
1
a
080  
° (R)

di
(
n
T
g
)
Position Line
1015
∴True bearing of headland from aircraft = 080° + 310° = 030° T 
Plot reciprocal: 030° T + 180° = 210° T. 
At 1015 hours, the aircraft was therefore at some point along that position line. 
6. 
Transit  Bearings.    A  line  drawn  on  a  chart  through  two  features  observed  to  be  in  line,  i.e.  in 
transit,  must  pass  through  the  aircraft’s  position  at  the  time  of  sighting.    This  line,  a  true  bearing,  is 
therefore a position line. 
Example.  A lighthouse and a promontory of land are sighted in transit at 1410 hours (see Fig 2a).  
The  position  line  is  drawn  as  in  Fig  2b,  though  the  dotted  portion  need  not  be  plotted.    Greater 
accuracy  is  obtained  when  the  distance  between  the  objects  in  transit  is  large  in  relation  to  the 
distance between the aircraft and the nearer object. 
9-6 Fig 2 A Transit Bearing 
2a 
2b 
Fl (3) 20 sec
1410
7. 
Line  Features.    Stretches  of  coastline,  road,  railway  or  river,  though  lacking  prominent  features 
suitable for pinpoints, may be used as position lines provided that they are marked on the charts in use. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
Example.    An  aircraft  crosses  a  straight  stretch  of  railway  at  1115  hours.    The  railway  thus 
becomes the position line as shown in Fig 3. 
9-6 Fig 3 Use of Line Features 
e
in
L
n
sitio
o
1115
P
DR Track
8. 
Position  Lines  from  Ground  D/F  Stations.    A  position  line  may  be  obtained  by  a  direction-
finding  ground  station  taking  a  bearing  on  an  aircraft’s  radio  transmission.    The  bearing  is  passed  to 
the aircraft by radio, usually in the form of either the true bearing of the aircraft from the station, or as 
the magnetic track that the aircraft must make good to reach the station.  The form is decided by the 
initial call: "request true bearing" or "request QDM" (magnetic heading to facility (zero wind)).  In order 
to  use  the  latter  information,  the  magnetic  variation,  measured  at  the  station,  must  be  applied,  so 
obtaining the true track to the station; the reciprocal is then plotted.  The other information which can 
be provided by the ground D/F station is the magnetic heading to fly to reach that station; this is termed 
a  'steer'.    Using  a  local  wind  velocity,  the  ground  operator  assesses  the  drift  and  applies  this  to  the 
QDM measured, to calculate the steer for the aircraft.  Ground D/F facilities are provided on VHF and 
UHF within the UK, but the service may be available on other bands elsewhere. 
9. 
TACAN  and  VOR  Bearings.    TACAN  and  VOR  beacons  both  transmit  a  signal  which,  when 
interpreted by the aircraft equipment, gives the magnetic bearing of the aircraft from the beacon.  The 
position line is obtained by taking the reciprocal of the reading of the indicator needle. 
Circular Position Lines 
10.  Radar Range Position Lines.  The range from a ground TACAN or DME beacon can be obtained 
using  transmitter/responder  equipment.    The  range  displayed  is  a  slant  value  (Fig  4),  which  should  be 
converted to plan range before plotting.  Fig 5 shows a typical slant range to plan range conversion graph.  
The circular position line is drawn with the plan range as radius and with the beacon as the centre.  Range 
position  lines  may  also  be  obtained  by  ground  mapping  radars,  in  some  of  which  the  range  is 
automatically converted to plan range.  However more simple equipments, such as cloud warning radars, 
give slant range only which should be corrected in the same way as TACAN and DME ranges. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
9-6 Fig 4 Slant Range 
Slant R
Height
ange
Fix
Point
Plan Range
9-6 Fig 5 Slant to Plan Range Conversion 
20
)
m 15
(n
e
g
Curve 1 - Ground Level
n
a 10
Curve 2 - 10,000 feet
R
Curve 3 - 20,000 feet
n
la
Curve 4 - 30,000 feet
P
Curve 5 - 40,000 feetl
5
3
5
1 2
4
0
5
10
15
20
Slant Range (nm)
USE OF SINGLE POSITION LINES 
Introduction 
11.  A single position line can be used to provide navigation data in one or more of the following ways: 
a. 
As a check on groundspeed. 
b. 
As a check on ETA. 
c. 
As a check on track made good. 
d. 
As a means of homing to an objective. 
Groundspeed Check 
12.  For  a  groundspeed  check,  a  position  line  is  required  which  lies  as  nearly  as  possible 
perpendicular to the aircraft’s track (see Fig 6). 
Revised Sep 12  Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
9-6 Fig 6 Position Line used forGroundspeed Check 
20° 20°
1400
1440
13.  The  distance  between  the  last  fix  and  the  position  line  is  measured  along  the  DR  track,  and  so, 
knowing the time that has elapsed, the groundspeed can be calculated.  If the position line is within ±20°
of the perpendicular to track, then errors in DR track (represented by the broken track lines in Fig 6) will 
produce  little  difference  in  the  distance  measured  and  therefore no significant error in the groundspeed 
calculated. 
ETA Check 
14.  A  position  line  near  the  perpendicular  to  track  may  provide  a  check  of  ETA  at  the  next  turning 
point by enabling the distance to run to be measured accurately. 
Track Check 
15.  To check track made good, a position line is required which is parallel or nearly parallel (±10°) to 
DR track (see Fig 7). 
9-6 Fig 7 Position Line used for Track Check 
C
TMG
A
Planned Track
16.  In  Fig  7,  an  arc  equal  in  radius  to  the  ground  distance  flown  since  the  last  fix  (position  A), 
calculated using the latest groundspeed, is described from that fix to cut the position line at C.  AC then 
represents the track made good.  Errors in the groundspeed used will cause an error in the position of 
C along the position line, but this error will have little effect if the limits of para 15 are observed. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
Homing Check 
17.  Homing to a destination along a position line, whose origin is the destination, is a simple matter, 
since the direction of the position line is the same as that of the required track.  The aircraft is turned 
on to a heading which will make good this track and tracking can be checked against further position 
lines obtained from the destination. 
Accuracy of Position Lines 
18.  When a position line is obtained, it is assumed, for the purposes of navigation, that the aircraft’s 
position is on that line at that particular time.  However, in practice, the aircraft is very seldom exactly 
on that line at the time it was obtained.  All position lines are subject to errors, the magnitude of which 
depends  upon  the  type  of  position  line,  i.e.  whether  it  is  a  visual  bearing  or  an  electronically  derived 
bearing, and the conditions under which it is obtained. 
19.  If  a  large  number  of  position  lines  of  the  same  type could be taken from an aircraft in the same 
known  position,  and  operating  under  identical  conditions,  the  position  lines  when  plotted  would  be 
found to lie in a band about the aircraft’s true position.  They would be found to be concentrated in the 
area  about  the  aircraft’s  position  and  would  become  more  widely  dispersed  with  distance  away  from 
the aircraft. 
20.  This dispersion of results is due to a variety of reasons, eg slight errors in timing and observation, 
approximations  in  calculations.    It  is  possible  to  carry  out  a  statistical  analysis  on  a  set  of  accuracy 
figures  for  position  lines  of  any  type,  and  from  this,  to  define  the  width  of  the  band  about  the  true 
position  which  would  enclose  a  certain  proportion,  say  50%,  70%  or  90%  of  all  the  position  lines 
considered (see Fig 8). 
9-6 Fig 8 Statistical Distribution of Observed Position Lines 
90%
50% 76%
Bands
of Error
True
Position
Line
21.  The bands are known as bands of error in navigation terminology, and the 50% and 76% bands 
are those normally considered.  Extensive trials have been carried out on the accuracy of position lines 
and as a result it has been possible to produce a table which defines, for convenience, half the width of 
bands of errors for various types of position lines (see Table 1). 
Revised Sep 12  Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-6 - Establishment and Use of Position Lines 
Table 1 Position Line Bands of Error 
Band of Error  
Type of Position Line 
(Half - Widths) 
50% 
76% 
Transit Bearing 
0.5°
0.9°
TACAN Bearing 

3.5°
TACAN/DME Range 
0.2 nm 
0.5 nm 
VOR 


ADF 
1.5°
2.5°
Cloud Warning Radars: 
a. 
Range 
2 nm 
3 nm 
b. 
Bearing 


22.  Taking  the  50%  band  as  an  example,  this  band  encloses  50% of all possible position lines, and 
there is, therefore, only an even chance of being somewhere inside the band of error.  The 76% band 
is wider since it must contain a larger number of possible position lines and if this band is plotted there 
is a 76% chance of being somewhere inside it.  To cover every possible case the 100% band of error 
would  need  to  have  infinite  width,  since  gross  errors  would  inevitably  occur  in  a  few  cases  in  the 
calculating  and  plotting  of  a  large  number  of  position  lines.    It  is  clearly impracticable to work at very 
high levels of probability and, indeed, a position line that falls a considerable distance from its expected 
position  should  be  treated  with  circumspection  and  its  accuracy  should  be  verified  by  other  means  if 
possible. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
CHAPTER 7 - PLOTTING POSITION LINES 
Introduction 
1. 
Position  lines  are  not  generally  plotted  onto  charts  nowadays  but  where  they  are  used,  this 
chapter will provide the necessary information to allow the user to employ them correctly.  The line of 
sight  between  two  points  lies  along  the  shortest  path  between  them.    The  corresponding  radio  wave 
also  follows  the  same  path.    Consequently,  visual  and  radio  bearings  are  great  circles,  and  this 
complicates plotting for none of the common plotting charts portray all great circles as straight lines. 
2.  The  divergence  (Δ)  between  the  straight  line  joining  two  points  on  the  chart,  and  the 
corresponding great circle varies according to: 
a. 
The projection. 
b. 
The bearing and distance between the two points. 
c. 
The area of operation. 
3. 
The Projection.  The path represented by a straight line on a chart depends upon the projection 
employed in the chart’s construction.  On some projections, the straight line approximates to a great 
circle,  while  on  others  it  is  very  different.    Consequently,  the  magnitude  of  the  angular  divergence 
between  the  straight  line  and  the  great  circle  is  a  function  of  the  projection  being  used.    Loosely 
speaking,  ignoring  both  the  effect  of  the  relative  orientation  of  the  two  points  and  the  area  of 
operation,  the  divergence  is  greater  on  the  Mercator  projection  than  on  the  other  common 
projections:  the  polar  stereographic,  the  Lambert’s  conformal,  the  oblique  and  transverse  (skew) 
Mercators.  On the Mercator projection, the straight line represents the rhumb line. 
4. 
The Relative Orientation of the Two Points.  A straight line can represent more than one path 
on  a  projection.    For  example,  on  the  Mercators,  Lamberts  and  polar  stereographic  projections,  the 
meridians, which are great circles, appear as straight lines.  On the skew Mercators, with the exception 
of  the  meridian  through  the  vertex  (oblique  Mercator)  and  the  central  meridian,  anti-meridian  and 
meridians  at  90º  (transverse  Mercator),  the  meridians  appear  as  curves  (although  the  curvature  is 
small in the best areas of cover).  With some exceptions, it is fair to say that the greater the departure 
from the point or line of origin of the chart, the more the straight line departs from representing a great 
circle; the longer the straight line the greater this discrepancy. 
5. 
Area  of  Operation.    The  various  chart  projections  have  been  devised  to  provide  the  most 
accurate  representation  of  the  Earth  within  limited  areas.    It  is  possible  to  represent  the  hemisphere 
accurately using five projections.  If this plan were rigidly adhered to, the divergence (Δ) between the 
great  circle  and  the  straight  line  over  distances  of  500  nm  and  less  would  be  very  small.    However, 
conditions may result in projections being used outside of the optimum areas and for this reason it is 
necessary to study the methods of plotting visual and radio position lines. 
The Angular Divergence (Δ) Between the Straight Line and Great Circle 
6.  A general expression for the magnitude of Δ is given by: 
Δ = ½ ch long (sin mean lat − n) 
Revised Sep 12  Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
Ch  long  and  mean  lat  refer  to  the  change  of  longitude  and  latitude  between  the  DR  position  and  the 
bearing  source;  n  is  the  constant  of  the  cone  which  is  treated  in  Volume  9,  Chapter  3.    For  the 
purposes of this chapter it is sufficient to know that: 
a. 
On the Mercator and skew Mercator projections, n = 0. 
b. 
On the Lambert’s conformal projection n may lie between 1 and 0, the precise value being a 
function  of  the  parallel  of  origin.    The  GNC  and  JNC  series  of  charts  which  are  based  on  this 
projection, covering the latitude bands (approximately) of 0º to 40º and 32º to 76º, have values of 
n of 0.3118 and 0.785 respectively. 
c. 
On the polar stereographic projection, n = 1. 
7. 
General  Conclusions.    Assuming  a  small  change  of  longitude  along  the  bearing,  the  following 
deductions for each projection, based on the information above, can be made: 
a. 
Mercator.  At low latitudes, since the sine of a smal  angle is smal  and n = 0, Δ is smal . 
b. 
Lambert’s  Conformal.    n  is  of  the  same  order  as  the  sine  of  the  latitude  for  temperate 
latitudes, thus Δ is general y smal  in these areas.  However, at the limits of a Lambert’s projection 
there  can  be  a  considerable  difference in the sine of the mean latitude and n, depending on the 
standard parallels selected and therefore the parallel of origin, where n = sin lat and divergence is 
nil. 
c. 
Polar Stereographic.  In high latitudes, the sine of the mean latitude approaches 1, thus on a 
polar stereographic projection where n = 1, Δ is smal . 
PLOTTING PRACTICE WHEN BEARINGS ARE MEASURED AT A GROUND STATION 
Mercator Projection 
8. 
On a Mercator chart the straight line represents the rhumb line, while the great circle appears as a 
curve concave to the equator and, particularly outside of the Mercator’s optimum latitude band of 12.5º S 
to 12.5º N, this difference must be considered when plotting bearings.  The angle between the great circle 
and the rhumb line bearing between two points is known as conversion angle (CA, see Fig 1). 
9-7 Fig 1 Great Circle and Rhumb Line on a Mercator Chart 
MERCATOR CHART
Great
Circle
CA
CA
Line
Revised Sep 12  Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
9. 
Although  it  is  the  great  circle  bearing  which  is  measured  by  the  direction-finding  equipment, it is 
the rhumb line bearing which is initially plotted since this is a straight line.  This bearing is obtained by 
applying  CA  to  the  great  circle  bearing  such  that,  in  the  northern  hemisphere,  the  rhumb  line  lies 
nearer 180º T.  In the southern hemisphere the CA is applied in the opposite sense, so that the rhumb 
line  lies  nearer  000º  T  (see  Fig 2).    For  example,  if  in  the  northern  hemisphere  a  true  bearing  of  the 
aircraft is measured as 070º T and the conversion angle is 2º, the rhumb line bearing is 072º T. 
9-7 Fig 2 Conversion of a Great Circle Bearing to the Corresponding Rhumb Line 
Aircraft
a  North Latitude
Aircraft
West of
East of
Station
Station
CA
CA
Rhumb Line
Rhumb Line
Aircraft
b  South Latitude
Aircraft
West of
East of
Station
Station
Rhumb Line
Rhumb Line
CA
CA
10.  From Fig 3 it can be seen that, to plot the portion of the great circle bearing in the vicinity of the 
DR position, in this case, the rhumb line bearing should now be turned towards 180º T (in the northern 
hemisphere) at the DR meridian, through an angle equal to CA.  In practice the value of the conversion 
angle would have to be quite large before there was any appreciable difference between the rhumb line 
and the great circle in the vicinity of the DR meridian, and the rotation of the rhumb line to lie along the 
great circle at the DR meridian can usually be ignored.   
9-7 Fig 3 Plotting the Great Circle Position Line 
Bearing Measured
DR Meridian
Great Circle
Rhumb Line
CA
11.  Calculation  of  Conversion  Angle.    Conversion  angle  can  be  deduced  from  a  graph  (Fig  4),  a 
nomogram (Fig 5), or from the formula which, since n = 0, reduces to CA = ½ ch long × sin mean lat.  
For practical purposes ½ × sin mean lat, which is called the conversion angle factor, can be reduced to 
six  values  to  cover  the  hemisphere  as  shown  in  Table  1.    CA  is  then  the  product  of  ch  long  and  the 
conversion angle factor.  
Revised Sep 12  Page 3 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
9-7 Fig 4 Conversion Angle Graph 
MERCATOR
9
NOTE
o
20  Ch Long Corresponds to the
Following Departure Values at :
o
20  N : 1140 nms
o
8
50  N : 780 nms
o
70  N : 415 nms
7
o
20
6
Long
h
C
5
4
o
3
Ch Long 10
2
o
Ch Long 5
1
Ch Long 2o
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Latitude
9-7 Fig 5 Conversion Angle Nomogram 
Change
A 12
13
14
15
20
25
30
35
of
B
Longitude
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Conversion
C 3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10
15
20
Angles
D 1
2
3
4
5
6
Mean
35
40
45
55 60 65
Latitude
Revised Sep 12  Page 4 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
Table 1 Conversion Angle Factor – Mercator 
Mean Lat 
Conversion Angle Factor 

0.0 

0.1 
18 
0.2 
30 
0.3 
45 
0.4 
65 
0.5 
90 
Lambert’s Conformal Projection 
12.  Depending on the relative magnitude of the sine of the mean latitude and n, Δ may be positive or 
negative.  The area of operation on a particular Lambert’s projection will determine on which side of the 
straight line the great circle lies.  If the mean latitude is greater than that of the parallel of origin, then 
the great circle will be closer to the pole than the straight line, and vice versa (see Fig 6).  It should be 
remembered that the straight line on a Lambert’s projection is not a rhumb line. 
9-7 Fig 6 The Great Circle and the Straight Line on a Lambert’s Conformal Projection 
Great Circle
Parallel of
Origin
Great Circle
Great Circle
13.  Theoretically, the problems of plotting a great circle on a Lambert’s projection are essentially the 
same as those for the Mercator.  The great circle is converted to the straight-line equivalent by applying 
Δ, and this line is then rotated at the DR meridian through an angle Δ to give the tangent to the great 
circle.  The application of Δ, in both cases, is such as to make the bearings nearer 180º if the mean 
latitude is greater than the parallel of origin, and nearer 000º if less than this parallel.  
14.  Graphs  of  mean  latitude  against  Δ  are  shown  at  Figs  7  and  8  for  values  of  n  of  0.31137  and 
0.78535 respectively.  For a radio position line obtained over a range of 250 nm, Δ varies from (approx) 
Revised Sep 12  Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
−0.6º to +1.5º in Fig  7 (at latitudes 0º and 50º), and from 1º to +1º in Fig 8 (at latitudes 20º and 
70º).    These  are  the  maximum  values  in  the  circumstances  as  it  is  assumed  that  the  aircraft  and 
station are at the same latitude.  If they were at any other position the ch long would be smaller over 
the given distance.  Thus, in the majority of circumstances the great circle can be plotted directly as a 
straight line with only minimal error. 
9-7 Fig 7 Graph of Δ Against Mean Latitude (n = 0.31137) 
7 NOTE
o
20  Ch Long Corresponds to the
Following Departure Values at :
o
20  N : 1140 nms
6
o
o
50  N : 780 nms.  (250 nms is a Ch Long of 6.4 )
o
70  N : 415 nms
5
o
SP
SP
20
l 1
l 2
in
4
lle
lle
Long
ra
rig
ra
h
a
O
a
C
P
f
P
o
rd
l
rd
a
a
3
lle
d
d
n
ra
n
a
ta
ta
o
S
P
S
2
Ch Long 10
o
1
Ch Long 5
Ch Long 2o
0
10
30
40
50
60
70
20
Latitude
-1
-2
n = 0.31137
-3
LAMBERT'S CONFORMAL PROJECTION
Revised Sep 12  Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
9-7 Fig 8 Graph of Δ Against Mean Latitude (n = 0.78535) 
NOTE
o
20  Ch Long Corresponds to the
Following Departure Values at :
o
o
20  N : 1140 nms.  (250 nms is a Ch Long of 4.4 ) 
o
50  N : 780 nms 
o
o
70  N : 415 nms.  (250 nms is a Ch Long of 12 )
2
1
Latitude
10
50
20
30
40
60
70
80
o
Ch Long 2
-1
o
Ch Long 5
o
-2
10
Long
h
C
-3
l
l
in
lle
lle
ra
rig
ra
a
O
a
P
f
P
-4
o
rd
l
rd
a
a
lle
d
d
o
n
ra
n
0
2
ta
a
ta
S
P
S
-5
ng
o
L
h
C
n = 0.78535
-6
LAMBERT'S CONFORMAL PROJECTION
Polar Stereographic Projection 
15.  On  the  polar  stereographic  projection,  the  great  circle  lies  nearer  the  equator  than  does  the 
straight line (see Fig 9), i.e. Δ is negative. 
16.  Although  the  procedure  for  plotting  the  great  circle  bearing  is  similar  to  that  outlined  for  the 
Mercator and Lambert’s projections, in practice, the value of Δ is so smal  that for al  practical purposes 
in Polar Regions the great circle and straight line can be regarded as coincident. 
9-7 Fig 9 The Great Circle and Straight Line on a Polar Stereographic Projection 
Great Circle
NP
Great Circle
Revised Sep 12  Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
17.  A graph of Δ against mean latitude is plotted for various values of ch long at Fig 10.  In the lower 
latitudes, at the extremes of the projection’s useful cover, Δ can become significant and in this situation 
the conversion of the great circle to the equivalent straight line becomes necessary. 
9-7 Fig 10 Graph of Δ for the Polar Stereographic Projection
NOTE
o
Ch Long 20  Corresponds to the
Following Departure Values at : 
o
50  N : 780 nms 
o
70  N : 415 nms
POLAR STEREOGRAPHIC PROJECTION
n = 1.0
-3
-2
Ch Long20o
-1
Ch Long 10o
Ch Long 5o
Ch Long 2o
50
60
70
80
Latitude
Skew (Oblique and Transverse) Mercator Projections 
18.  Divergence  on  skew  Mercator  charts  causes  the  great  circle  to  be  concave  to  the  false 
equator/central meridian.  For a 250 nm long line, divergence is unlikely to exceed 0.5º on the oblique 
Mercator  and  1.2º  on  the  transverse  Mercator.    For  both  charts,  if  the  bearing  is  measured  at  the 
ground station, the bearing is plotted from the meridian through the ground station. 
PLOTTING PRACTICE WHEN BEARINGS ARE MEASURED AT THE AIRCRAFT 
Introduction 
19.  The  bearing  measured  at  a  ground  D/F  station  will  be  the  same  for  all  aircraft  transmitting  from 
positions on the same great circle; consequently, that great circle is the position line.  The converse is 
not true; aircraft flying the same heading and lying on the same great circle through the station will not 
measure the same relative bearing from the ground beacon’s transmission (Fig 11).  Thus, where the 
bearing  is  measured  at  the  aircraft,  the  great  circle  is  not  the  position  line.    However,  in  most 
circumstances the difference is not significant.  This outcome is the result of meridian convergence on 
the Earth and is not a function of any particular map projection. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
9-7 Fig 11 Relative Bearings 
Great
Ground
Circ
Station
le
Plotting Relative Bearings on the Mercator Projection 
20.  Having  measured  the  true  bearing  of  the  great  circle  between  the  aircraft  and  the  station 
(i.e. relative  bearing  +  true  heading),  the  corresponding  rhumb  line  can  be  obtained  by  applying 
conversion angle to the great circle such that, in the northern hemisphere, the rhumb line lies closer to 
180º.  The reciprocal is then plotted from the station.  It should be emphasized that CA is applied to the 
true  bearing  of  the  great  circle  and  not  to  the  relative  bearing.    Rotation  of  the  rhumb  line  at  the  DR 
meridian to account for meridian convergence is usually ignored in practice, bearing in mind the range 
of MF beacons and the latitude band in which the Mercator projection is used.  
Plotting Relative Bearings on the Lambert’s Conformal Projection 
21.  The effect of meridian convergence is very apparent on the Lambert’s conformal projection.  From 
Fig 12 it can be seen that the bearing of the great circle at A differs from that at B, the difference being 
Earth convergence. 
9-7 Fig 12 The Effect of Convergence 
120
A
140
B
22.  In attempting to plot the great circle bearing measured at the aircraft (eg relative bearings such as 
ADF  or  radar  azimuth),  it  would  be  wrong  merely  to  plot  the  reciprocal  from  the  source.    If  this  were 
done the bearing plotted would not cut the DR meridian at the measured angle (see Fig 13) but at the 
measured angle ± convergence. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
9-7 Fig 13 Reciprocal Bearing (not allowing for Convergence) 
120  measured
       at aircraft
Reciprocal bearing 
gives incorrect position line
300
This problem is overcome by plotting the reciprocal from the source with reference to a line parallel to 
the DR meridian (Fig 14). 
9-7 Fig 14 Reciprocal Bearing (corrected for Convergence) 
120  measured
       at aircraft
Draw reference line 
parallel to aircraft’s 
DR meridian
Plot 300
As with the Mercator chart, over the distances travelled by UHF, VHF, and MF radio waves, rotation of 
the position line at the DR meridian is normally unnecessary. 
Plotting Relative Bearings on the Oblique Mercator Projection 
23.  The  procedure  for  plotting  on  the  oblique  Mercator  is  the  same  as  that  used  on  the  Lambert’s 
conformal, ie the DR meridian is paralleled through the beacon (see Fig 14).  
Plotting Relative Bearings on Polar Charts 
24.  The  polar  stereographic  and  polar  transverse  Mercator  charts  are  invariably  used  with  a  grid 
overlay  and  used  with  grid  navigation  techniques.    The  plotting  procedure  for  a  relative  bearing 
obtained while using a grid technique is very simple.  Relative bearing + grid heading gives the required 
grid  bearing  and  the  reciprocal  is  then  plotted  from  the  origin.    This  procedure  applies  equally  to 
Lambert’s charts if a grid technique is being used. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-7 - Plotting Position Lines 
SUMMARY 
General 
25.  The  methods  used  to  plot  position  lines  are  a  compromise  between  precision  and  expeditious 
plotting; the speedier and simpler approximation is normally to be preferred.  Although it is not possible 
to state an invariable rule, consideration should usually be given to converting the great circle bearing 
to  the  straight  line  equivalent,  whereas  the  need  to  rotate  the  position  line  at  the  DR  meridian  is 
normally ignored.  The characteristics of the various common projections are summarized below. 
26.  The Mercator.  The divergence between the straight line and the great circle varies directly as the 
sine of the mean latitude along the great circle.  Since this projection is often used over a wide latitude 
band, significant values of Δ may be encountered.  The need to calculate the straight line equivalent 
therefore often arises on the Mercator chart. 
27.  The  Skew  Mercator.    Provided  the  skew  Mercator  is  restricted  to  the  optimum  band  of  cover, 
i.e. ±  8º  of  false  latitude,  the  values  of Δ are smal .  If the chart is not gridded, then relative bearings 
must be plotted with reference to the DR meridian and not the meridian through the ground station. 
28.  The  Lambert’s  Conformal  Projection.    The  standard  parallels  on  these  charts  can  be  widely 
spaced.  Consequently, at the limits of cover, Δ can be significant.  Thus, although the great circle and 
the straight line can be considered coincident over the greater part of the projection, this should not be 
assumed near the limits of cover.  When plotting relative bearings, an allowance for convergence must 
be made, most simply by paralleling the DR meridian through the ground station.  
29.  The Stereographic Projection.  Values of Δ on the stereographic projection are very smal  and, 
over  the  distances  that  bearings  are  taken,  the  straight  line  and  great  circle  may  be  considered 
coincident. 
30.  VOR and TACAN Bearings.  Although VOR and TACAN bearings are intercepted at the aircraft, 
the  bearing  information  is  encoded  at  the  ground  station.    On  all  charts,  TACAN  and  VOR  radials 
should  be  plotted  as  originating  from  the  appropriate  ground  station  and  orientated  with  reference  to 
magnetic North at the beacon.  Where necessary, divergence should be applied. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
CHAPTER 8 - DEAD RECKONING COMPUTER, MARKS 4A AND 5A 
Introduction 
1. 
The  Dead  Reckoning  Computer  (Mks  4A  and  5A)  is  designed  for  solving  the  vector  triangle 
problems  of  air  navigation.    The  Mk  5A  is  a  reduced  size  version  of  the  4A,  produced  for  helicopter 
use.  Both Mks include an airspeed computer and a circular slide rule. 
Description 
2. 
The  face  and  reverse  of  the  Mk  4A  computer  are  illustrated  in  Figs  1  and  2.    The  computer 
consists  of  a  metal  frame  carrying,  on  one  side,  a  transparent  plotting  disc  in  a  graduated  compass 
rose, and on the other, a circular slide rule which is also used for airspeed computation.  A reversible 
sliding card printed with concentric speed arcs, radial drift lines, and a rectangular grid, moves under 
the plotting disc.  One side of the sliding card is graduated from 50 to 800 speed units, while the other 
bears  a  range  from  80  to  320  speed  units  together  with  a  square  grid  graduated  from  0  to  80.    The 
units  can  represent  whatever  is  required  (e.g.  kt,  mph,  kph),  provided  that  the  chosen  unit  is  used 
consistently.  Similarly, one side of the Mk 5A computer is graduated from 30 to 200 speed units and 
carries  a  square  grid  graduated  from  0  to  100,  while  the  other  side  is  blank  (but  older  versions  may 
bear  graduations  from  20  to  120  and  markings  for  helicopter  jump  navigation  once  used  with  the 
Wessex 1).  The examples in this Chapter use the Mk 4A version. 
 
9-8 Fig 1 DR Computer, Mk 4A – Face 
 
 
9-8 Fig 2 DR Computer, Mk 4A - Reverse 
TRUE COURSE
10
10
VA
2
R
0
.W
20
EST
VAR. EAS T
3
D R
0
I
30
F
LEFT
100 110 1
T RI
IFT
E
20
G
R
1
H
D
3
40
4
80
0
T
0
14
70
0 15
60
0
16
0
0
5
17
0
0
4
0
S
3
1
9
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
1
21
N
0
2
0
2
5
0
3
0
2
4
3
3
0
0
2
3
4
3
0
0
2
2
5
3
0
0
1
26
3
0
0
0
3
W
0
9
2
0
8
2
THE LONDON NAMEPLATEMFG.CO.LTDOFLONDON&BRIGHTON
MADE BY
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
VECTOR TRIANGLE SOLUTION 
Principle 
3. 
The  DR  Computer  reproduces,  within  the  rotatable  compass  rose,  that  part  of  the  triangle  of 
velocities  which  is  of  prime  concern,  i.e.  it  shows  the  wind  vector  applied  between  the  heading/true 
airspeed and the track/groundspeed vectors. 
4. 
The principle is illustrated in Fig 3, in which ABC is the vector triangle.  The compass rose (or 
bearing plate) is orientated to register the direction of the heading vector AB, i.e. 270° T, against a 
lubber line (marked TRUE COURSE on the computer).  In doing this, the compass rose is orientated 
with respect to the other vectors.  Thus, the wind vector BC is laid off down wind from B.  The wind 
is therefore from D, i.e. 159° T.  The direction of the track is shown as degrees to port or starboard 
of heading, e.g. in Fig 3 the drift is shown as 10° starboard which, when applied to heading, gives a 
track  of  280°  T.    In  Fig  3,  if  AB  (airspeed)  is  180  kt  and  BC  (windspeed)  36  kt,  then  AC 
(groundspeed) is 196 kt. 
9-8 Fig 3 Principle of DR Computer Mk 4A 
C
Track &
Wind
Groundspeed
Velocity
B
10° S
A
LUBBER
270°
LINE
Heading & TAS
220
200
180
160
140
D
159°
5. 
It is unnecessary to have the whole of the vector triangle shown on the DR Computer.  Therefore, 
only the essential part of the triangle, that containing the wind vector, is shown.  The computer may be 
used over a range of speeds by adjusting the sliding card so that the curve corresponding to the true 
airspeed lies under the centre of the compass rose. 
6. 
Thus,  the  transparent  disc  acts  as  a  plotting  dial  on  which  only  the  wind  vector  is  drawn,  the 
heading  vector  being  represented  by  the  centre  line  on  the  sliding  card  and  the  track  vector  by  the 
appropriate radial (drift) line.  The centre of the disc is shown by a small circle which normally marks 
the end of the heading vector. 
Operation 
7. 
Wind Speed and Direction.  To draw the wind vector when the speed and direction of the wind are 
given, the wind direction is set against the lubber line and the wind vector is drawn from the centre along 
the centre line in a direction away from the lubber line.  The length of the line relative to the card scale 
represents the wind speed.  The end of the vector so plotted is called the wind point.  Conversely, if the 
wind point has been found by other means, the wind speed and direction may be measured by rotating 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
the plotting dial until the wind point lies on the centre line, on the opposite side of the centre circle to the 
lubber line.  The wind direction is now read against the lubber line, while the distance of the wind point 
from the centre measured against the speed scale of the card gives the wind speed. 
Note.  The  wind  vector  is  always  drawn  away  from  the  heading  pointer  because  wind  direction  is 
conventionally quoted as the direction from which the wind is blowing.  Headings and tracks are specified 
as  the  direction  towards  which  the  aircraft  is  going.    It  should  be  noted  also  that  the  scales  on  the  two 
sides of the card are different so that a wind drawn using one scale must not be used with the other. 
8. 
Airspeed  and  Groundspeed.    Airspeed  is  always  set,  or  read,  on  the  centre  line  of  the  card 
under  the  centre  of  the  plotting  dial.    Groundspeed  is  indicated  by  the  speed  circle  under  the  wind 
point. 
9. 
Variation and Drift.  Although the plotting dial is normally orientated with respect to true north, a 
variation  scale  marked  on  either  side  of  the  lubber  line  can  be  used  to  convert  true  directions  to 
magnetic and vice versa.  This scale may also be used to obtain track by applying drift to heading, and 
vice versa. 
Examples of Use 
10.  The  examples  which  follow  illustrate  the  versatility  of  the  DR  Computer  in  solving  problems 
graphically,  although  only  the  first  two  are  common  in  everyday  practice.    It  should  be  remembered 
that, as noted in para 7, the wind always blows outwards from the centre of the computer.  Animated 
diagrams are also provided to help explain the various calculations. 
11.  To Find Track and Groundspeed (Fig 4).  The problem is to find track and groundspeed, given: 
Heading 
-
185º T 
TAS 
-
420 kt 
W/V 
-
105°/39 kt 
It is first necessary to ensure that the appropriate side of the sliding card is uppermost.  The following 
steps are then carried out: 
a. 
Set the W/V.  The plotting dial is rotated until 105° on the compass rose is against the lubber 
line and a line is drawn from the centre of the plotting dial, away from the direction set, equal in 
length to 39 units on the scale (Fig 4a).  Once familiarity with the use of the instrument has been 
gained, it will be found necessary only to plot the wind point, ie the end of the wind vector, rather 
than the complete line. 
b. 
Set Heading and TAS.  The plotting dial is rotated until 185° is against the lubber line, and 
the card is adjusted until the 420 speed arc lies under the centre of the plotting dial (Fig 4b). 
c. 
Read Off the Solution Under the Wind Point.  From Fig 4b, it will be seen that the wind 
point is on the 5° S drift line.  Track can therefore be calculated as 185° T + 5° = 190° T, or it 
can  be  read  off  on  the  compass  rose  against  the  5°  mark  on  the  drift  scale.    The 
groundspeed is given by the speed arc under the wind point, i.e. 415 kt. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 4 Finding Track and Groundspeed 
a  Setting the W/V
b  Reading the Solution
TRUE COURSE
TRUE COURSE
10
10
V
1
A
2
0
R
0
10
.W
20
V
E
A
2
R
S
0
.
T
W
20
VAR. EAST
D
3
ES
R
0
T
I
30
F
VAR. EAST
D
3
R
0
LEFT
100 110 1
E
20
T R
I
30
F
LEFT
S
19
I
0
T
G
20
170
0
R
RIFT
1
H
IG
D
3
40
4
80
0
T
0
RIFT
2
H
D
1
1
0
T
0
4
40
4
160
2
70
0
20
1
150
5
2
0
60
30
1
140
6
0
2
0
5
0
40
1
13
7
0
2
0
4
0
5
2
0
1
2
0
S
0
6
3
1
0
1
1
9
0
W
0
0
2
0
1
2
0
2
0
0
8
1
E
0
21
2
N
0
9
0
0
8
2
0
2
3
5
0
0
0
3
0
7
2
0
3
3
4
1
3
0
0
0
6
0
2
3
3
4
2
3
0
0
0
5
0
2
2
5
3
3
0
0
3
4
0
0
2
1
6
3
0
3
0
4
0
3
0
0
3
W
0
9
2
0
8
2
0
2
0
5
3
0
1
N
THE
T
LO
HE
ND
L
O
O
N
N
N
D
AM
O
E
N
PL
N
ATE
A
MF
M
G.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
M A DE B Y
E PLATE MFG.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
M ADE BY
12.  To  Find  Heading  and  Groundspeed  (Fig  5).    The  problem  is  to  find  the  heading  and 
groundspeed, given: 
Track Required  -  300º T 
TAS 
-  320 kt 
W/V 
-  195º/45 kt 
It is first necessary to ensure that the appropriate side of the sliding card is uppermost.  The following 
steps are then carried out: 
a. 
Set the W/V.  This is carried out in the manner described in para 11a. 
b. 
Set TAS.  TAS is set by  adjusting the card  until  the  320 speed arc lies  under the centre of 
the plotting dial. 
c. 
The  plotting  dial  is  rotated  until  the  required  track  is  registered  against  the  lubber  line 
(Fig 5a).  The drift indicated by the wind point (7½° S) is noted; this represents the drift that would 
be experienced if a heading of 300° T were steered. 
d. 
The  required  track  is  now  set  against  the  drift  scale  mark  equivalent  to  the  drift  found  in 
para 12c, i.e. 7½° S. 
e. 
It is possible that the wind point will now indicate a slightly different drift value (Fig 5b).  If this 
is the case, the plotting dial is adjusted until the required track is against this new value of drift on 
the drift scale; (8° S in this example). 
f. 
The  required  heading  (292°  T)  is  read  on  the  plotting  dial  against  the  lubber  line,  and  the 
groundspeed (329 kt) is indicated by the speed arc lying under the wind point (Fig 5b). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 5 Finding Heading and Groundspeed 
a  Setting Track and Reading Drift
b  Setting Track against Drift Scale
and Reading Solution
TRUE COURSE
TRUE COURSE
10
10
10
V
10
A
2
R
0
VA
.W
20
2
R
0
E
.W
20
S
E
T
S
VAR. EAST
3
D
VAR. EAST
T D
30
3
300
R
0
IF
R
0
I
30
F
LEFT
31
290
0
290 3
3
T R
LEFT
00
T
I
280
3
R
IFT
2
G
1
I
IFT
0
G
R
280
0
H
H
D
R
D
W
40
4
3
T
3
0
3
T
0
W
0
40
4
20
3
260
3
4
3
0
0
260
3
250
3
5
4
0
0
250
240
3
0
N
5
4
0
2
0
3
2
N
0
1
3
0
0
2
22
1
0
2
0
2
0
0
2
12
2
0
3
0
1
0
0
2
0
2
3
0
4
0
0
0
0
2
9 1
4
0
5
0
9
0
1
S
6
5
0
0
S
0 7 1
6
0
7
0
7
0
1
0 6 1
0
8
7
6
0
0
1
0 5
0
1
8
5
E
0
1
0
4
0
4
0
1
1
E
1
0
0
0
3
1
3
0
2
1
0
1
1
1
0
2
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
TH
T
E
H
L
E
ON
L
D
O
O
N
N
D
N
O
A
N
M
N
E P
A
L
M
ATE
E
MFG.CO.LTD
P
OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
MADE BY
LATE MFG.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
MADE BY
13.  Finding W/V by the Track and Groundspeed Method (Fig 6).  The problem is to find the W/V 
given the following data: 
Heading 
-
120º T 
TAS 
-
230 kt 
Track Made Good 
-
112º T 
Groundspeed 
-
242 kt 
It is first necessary to ensure that the appropriate side of the sliding card is uppermost.  The following 
steps are then carried out: 
a. 
The heading and TAS are set as described in para 11b. 
b. 
Set  the  Track  Made  Good  and  the  Groundspeed.    Firstly,  the  drift  is  calculated  as  the 
difference between heading and track, in this example 120° − 112° = 8° Port (P).  A pencil mark is 
now  made  on  the  plotting  dial  (Fig  6a)  where  the  drift  line  (8°  P)  intersects  the  speed  arc 
representing the groundspeed (242 kt). 
c. 
A line drawn from the centre of the dial to this point represents the wind vector.  In order to 
measure  it,  the  dial  is  rotated  until  the  vector  is  aligned  exactly  with  the  centre  line  and  running 
from the dial centre away from the lubber  line (Fig 6b).  The wind direction can  now be read  off 
against the lubber line (227º T), and the wind speed can be determined by measuring the length 
of the vector against the speed arcs (34 kt). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 6 Finding W/V by Track and Groundspeed Method 
a  Plotting Drift and G/S and
b  Reading the W/V
Drawing the Wind Vector
310
310
TRUE COURSE
TRUE COURSE
10
10
V
10
10
V
A
2
R
A
20
300
5
5 0
.WE
20
300
2
R
5
5 0
.WE
S
S
10
T
VAR. EAST
D
1
3
0
R
10
T
VAR. EAST
D
1
3
0
30
120
0
IF
LEFT
1
T
30
110
3
23
R
0
IF
0
R
LEFT
0
220
2
I
4
T R
IFT
290
14
G
290
0
I
H
IFT
R
100
0
210
2
G
T
R
5
H
D
0
D
0
T
40
4
15
40
40
E
0
200
260
280
1
280
6
80
0
190
W
17
S
270
270
2
0
70
80
0
S
17
260
260
2
60
90
0
19
6
0
250
1
0
250
3
5
00
0
20
5
0
240
1
240
3
0
4
1
0
0
2
4
230
1
230
0
1
3
0
3
2
0
0
2
220
3
220
2
0
1
3
0
2
30
0
210
2
210
3
2
0
0
1
3
1
40
2
0
200
200
5
5
4
1
5
5
10
10
1
10
10
3
N
0
1
5
15
5
15
15 0
2
0
190
0
5
0
190
5
0
1
N
3
0
2
180
6
E
180
4
0
1
3
0
W
0
0
8
3
2
3
170
0
0
8
2
0
0
170
2
7
3
0
1
0
9
2
0
0
3
3
6
0
0
3
0
5
0
4
T
160
T
160
H
H
E
E
L
L
ON
ON
D
D
ON
ON
NA
N
M
A
E
M
P
E
L
P
AT
L
E
A
MFG
T
1.5
C0
E
O.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
M AD E B Y
MF 1
G. 5
C 0
O.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
MA DE B Y
140
140
14.  Correcting a W/V by Finding the Error in a DR Position (Fig 7).  It is possible to find a new wind 
velocity by applying a correction vector to the wind velocity in use, given a simultaneous DR position and 
fix.    As  an  example,  suppose  that  the  wind  velocity  that  has  been  used  is  345º/30 kt,  and  that,  after  20 
minutes of flight, the aircraft’s position is fixed at a position which bears 220º T/5 nm from a DR position.  
The procedure is as follows: 
a. 
The card is adjusted until the square-ruled section is under the dial.  The wind direction is set 
against the lubber line and the wind vector in use is drawn on the dial using a convenient scale, 
e.g. one large square = 10 nm (Fig 7a). 
b. 
The error per hour is calculated (an error of 5 nm in 20 minutes is equivalent to 15 nm per hour).  
The  dial  is  rotated  until  the  bearing  of  the  fix  from  the  DR  position  is  against  the  lubber  line.    A 
correction vector is then drawn from the end of the wind vector, parallel to the grid lines and towards the 
lubber line.  The correction vector is of a length equal to the hourly error at the chosen scale (Fig 7b). 
c. 
The  line  from  the  centre  dot  to  the  end  of  the  correction  vector  represents  the  new  wind 
vector.  It can be measured by rotating the dial until the vector is aligned with the centre line and 
then reading the direction from the lubber line and measuring the speed against the chosen scale 
of the square ruled section of the card (Fig 7c).  In the example, the new wind is 003º/40 kt. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 7 Correcting a W/V 
a  Drawing the Wind Vector
b  Drawing the Correction Vector
TRUE COURSE
TRUE COURSE
10
10
V
1
A
2
10
0
R
0
.W
20
VA
2
E
R
0
S
.W
20
T
E
VAR. EAST
D
3
S
R
0
T
I
30
VAR. EAST
D
3
F
R
0
I
L EFT
340 350
N
T
30
220
F
330
R
LEFT
2
T
I
210
3
G
0 2
RI
RIFT
1
H
IFT
4
G
R
200
0
D
40
4
320
0
T
0
H
D
40
4
2
T
0
2
5
0
0
190
310
2
3
6
S
0
0
300
W
4
90
0
170
2
2
0
8
0
5
6
0
8
0
1
2
2
0
9
6
5
0
0
1
W
3
0
0
0
7
4
0
1
6
0
2
3
0
1
3
0
8
0
1
5
0
2
3
0
2
0
E
2
0
4
1
2
3
1
0
3
0
0
1
0
3
1
2
0
3
0
4
0
1
0
0
2
10
1
2
35
0
1
E
0
1
2
2
0
N
0
1
0
0
3
8
2
0
1
0
9
1
0
0
1
40
7
S
0
5
1
0
20
0
7
1
0
6
1
6
0
5
0
4
0
3
THE
T
LO
H
N
E
D
L
O
O
N
N
N
D
AM
O
E
N
PL
N
ATE
A
MF
M
G.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
MA DE B Y
E PLATE MFG.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
M ADE BY
c  Constructing a New Wind Vector and Reading the Solution
TRUE COURSE
10
10
VA
2
R
0
.W
20
ES
VAR. EAST
T D
3
R
0
I
30
F
LEFT
N
1
350
0
2
T RI
IFT
0
G
R
H
D
340
3
40
4
0
T
0
330
40
320
50
0
31
60
0
0
3
70
092
80
082
E
1
W
00
0 6
1
2
10
0 5
1
2
20
0 4
1
2
30
0 3 2
140
0 2 2
150
0
1
2
16
0
0
0
2
0
0
7
1
9
1
S
THE LONDON NAMEPLATEMFG.CO.LTDOFLONDON&BRIGHTON
MADE BY
15.  Interception  (Fig  8).    Interception  problems  concerning  a  slow-moving  target,  such  as  a  ship, 
can be solved satisfactorily on the DR computer.  It is easier to  deal  with the problems in two steps.  
The first step is to find the relative wind velocity, while the second is to determine the heading to make 
good  the  relative  track  and  the  groundspeed  along  it,  i.e.  the  speed  of  closing  along  the  line  of 
constant bearing.  As an example, consider the following data: 
W/V 
-  060º /15 kt 
TAS 
-  140 kt 
Ship’s track 
-  000º T 
Ship’s speed 
-  25 kt 
Ship’s position from aircraft  - 80 nm on a bearing of 330º T. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
a. 
To Find Relative W/V.
(1)  Adjust the card until the square-ruled part is under the dial. 
(2)  Set the W/V on the dial using any suitable scale (Fig 8a). 
(3)  Turn the dial until the ship’s track (000º T) is registered against the lubber line. 
(4)  From the end of the wind vector, draw a line equal to the ship’s speed to scale (25 kt) 
parallel with, but away from, the lubber line (Fig 8b).  This is the vector of the ship’s track and 
speed reversed. 
(5)  Join the centre of the plotting dial to the end of this second vector to obtain the vector of the 
relative W/V (Fig 8c).  It measures 022º/35 kt. 
b. 
To Find Heading to Intercept and Speed of Closing
(1)  Proceed  as  in  para  11,  to  find  the  heading  to  steer  and  G/S  to  make  good  a  track  of 
330º in a W/V of 022º/35 kt with a TAS of 140 kt. 
(2)  The heading is found to be 341º T. 
(3)  Although  a  G/S  of  117  kt  is  found,  the  figure  actually  represents  the  speed  of  closing 
along the relative track, or line of constant bearing.  Thus, the ship  will be intercepted after 
41 minutes of flight. 
Note.  If the relative W/V is found using the same basic scale as represented by the concentric arcs, 
there  is  no  need  to  measure  the  relative W/V.    The  second  step  can  then  be  taken  immediately  the 
first two vectors of the first step are drawn. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 8 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 8 Interception 
a  Setting the W/V
b  Setting Ship’s Speed
TRUE COURSE
TRUE COURSE
10
10
10
10
VA
2
V
R
0
A
.
2
W
20
R
0
.
E
W
20
S
ES
VAR. EAST
T D
3
VAR. EAST
T D
3
30
60
R
0
I
R
0
F
30
N
IF
LEFT
50
70
T
LEFT
1
T
R
350
0
R
I
I
IFT
2
IFT
80
G
0
G
R
40
H
R
340
H
D
40
4
E
T
0
D
40
4
3
T
0
30
330
0
10
4
20
0
0
320
11
5
0
10
0
310
1
0
6
N
20
0
0
3
1
0
0
7
5
3
9
0
3
0
2
1
0
4
0
8
4
0
8
0
3
2
1
0
5
E
3
0
3
W
1
1
0
0
2
6
0
0
6
0
3
2
1
1
0
0
1
1
7
5
0
3
0
2
0
S
0
1
0
4
2
3
2
0
0
1
1
9
9
0
3
2
0
3 2
0
0
2
1
8
0
0
4
2
0
2 2
0
21
1
W
0
0
1
5
2
0
0
6
2
1
2
2
0
6
0
0
0
0
5
2
2
0
4
2
0
3
2
0
9
1
0
7
1
S
TH
T
E
H
L
E
ON
LO
D
N
ON
DO
NA
N
M
N
E P
A
L
M
AT
E
E MF
P
G.CO.LTD
L
OF LONDON & BR IGHTON
MADE BY
ATE MFG.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
MADE BY
c  Drawing and Reading the Relative W/V
TRUE COURSE
10
10
VA
2
R
0
.W
20
EST
VAR. EAST
3
D
30
20
3
R
0
IF
LEF T
0
10
4
T RI
IFT
G
R
N
0
H
D
5
40
4
0
T
0
350
60
340
70
0
33
80
0
2
3
E
013
10
0
0
03
11
0
0
9
2
12
0
0

2
130
W
14
0
0
6 2
15
0
0
5 2
16
0
0
4 2
17
0
3
0
2
0
S
2
2
0
1
0
9
1
2
0
0
2
THE LONDONNAMEPLATEMFG.CO.LTDOFLONDON&BRIGHTON
MADE BY
16.  To  Calculate  Convergence  (Fig  9).    Convergence  may  be  determined  using  the  following 
procedure: 
a. 
Set the compass rose with North against the lubber line. 
b. 
Set the zero point of the squared portion of the slide under the centre of the plotting disc. 
c. 
Mark ch long upwards from the zero point, on the squared section, using any convenient scale 
(Fig 9a). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 9 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
d. 
Rotate the compass rose to set Mean Lat against the lubber line (Fig 9b). 
e. 
Measure convergence horizontally on the squared grid (Fig 9b). 
Example: Ch long 4º, Mean Lat 30º 
Convergence = 2º 
9-8 Fig 9 Calculating Convergence 
a  Marking Ch Long
b  Setting Mean Latitude and
Reading Convergence
TRUE COURSE
TRUE COURSE
10
10
10
10
VA
2
V
R
0
A
2
.W
20
R
0
.
E
W
20
S
EST
VAR. EAST
T D
3
3
R
0
VAR. EAST
D
I
30
R
0
F
30
30
IF
LEFT
N
350
10
T
LEFT
4
T
R
20
0
R
I
I
IFT
5
IFT
2
G
G
R
10
0
R
340
0
H
H
D
40
4
3
T
0
D
40
4
6
T
0
330
0
N
0
40
Ch long
70
320
350
50
80
310
4 °
340
0
6
0
E
0
0
3
3
3
Ch long
1
0
7
0
0
9
0
2
0
4 °
2
3
1
0
8
0
1
8
0
1
0
2
3
Convergence
E
1
0
2
W
0
0
3
1
1
0
0
0
3
6
0
9
0
2
2
1
1
0
1
0
4
5
0
8
0
2
2
1
1
0
2
5
4
0
0
2
W
0
1
1
3
3
0
6
2
0
6 2
0
0
1
1
2
4
0
7
2
0
5 2
0
0
1
1
5
0
S
2
0
4 2
0
0
1
1
2
60
0
3
90
0
9
2
1
S
0
7
1
0
2
2
0
1
2
0
0
2
TH
T
E
H
L
E
O
L
N
O
D
N
O
D
N
O
N
N
AM
N
E
A
P
M
LA
E
TE
P
MF
L
G.CO.LTD
A
OF LONDON & BRIGH TON
MA DE B Y
TE MFG.CO.LTD OF LONDON & BRIGHTON
MADE BY
AIRSPEED COMPUTER 
Description 
17.  The  airspeed  computer  works  on  the  slide  rule  principle  and  has  scales  for  the  following 
applications: 
a. 
Computation  of  TAS  from  CAS,  corrected  outside  air  temperature  (OAT)  and  pressure 
altitude,  with  an  ancillary  scale  to  allow  compressibility  corrections  to  be  made  to  TAS  above 
300 kt.  (Note: CAS is annotated as RAS on inner scale.) 
b. 
Inter-conversion of TAS and Mach Number. 
c. 
Proportion problems. 
Use for Airspeed Computations 
18.  The procedure for calculating TAS from inputs of CAS, corrected OAT, and pressure altitude is as 
follows: 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 10 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
a. 
The  inner  disc  is  rotated  so  that  the  value  of  corrected  OAT  is  set  against  the  value  of 
altitude, in thousands of feet, in the window (Fig 10a). 
b. 
The value of computed TAS can now be read on the outer scale against the value of CAS on 
the inner scale (Fig 10a). 
c. 
If  the  computed  TAS  is  above  300  kt,  an  additional  correction  must  be  made  for 
compressibility error.  The correction scale appears in the window, below the altitude window, and 
the  correction  is  made  by  rotating  the  inner  disc  anti-clockwise  so  that  the  reading  of  the 
correction scale, against its index, is increased by the value of: 
Computed TAS − 3 divisions
100
d. 
The corrected TAS is now read off on the outer scale against the original CAS on the inner scale. 
Note.    To  obtain  the  most  accurate  results  from  the  computer,  pressure  altitude  and  corrected  OAT 
should be used for all airspeed computations.  Even so, when computing TAS for altitudes, particularly 
above 30,000 ft, noticeable, but navigationally insignificant, errors are produced when compared with 
results using the mathematical formula. 
19.  Example.  As an example, consider the calculation of TAS from the following data: 
Pressure Altitude 
-
48,000 feet 
Corrected OAT 
-
– 56º C 
CAS 
-
210 kt  
The procedure is as follows: 
a. 
Set −56° against 48 in the altitude window   (Fig 10a). 
b. 
Against 210 on the inner scale, read the computed TAS on the outer scale - 500 kt (Fig 10a). 
c. 
As  the  computed  TAS  exceeds  300  kt,  a  compressibility  correction  must  be  made.    The 
current value of the correction scale is 25½.  This must be adjusted by: 
Comp TAS −
500
3 =
− 3 =  2 divisions
100
100
d. 
The correction scale is therefore made to read 27½  against its index (Fig 10b). 
e. 
The corrected value of TAS is now read on the outer scale against the value of CAS (210) on 
the inner scale (Fig 10b).  The result is 476 kt. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 11 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 10 Calculating TAS 
a  Setting Altitude against OAT
b  Applying Compressibility Correction
and Reading the Solution
Read TAS (Outer Scale)
Read TAS (Outer Scale)
 against CAS (Inner Scale)
 against CAS (Inner Scale)
Set Corrected OAT
against Altitude
Adjust by
2 divisions
Adjust by
2 divisions
Mach Number/True Airspeed Conversion 
20.  The  Mach  number  scale  appears  in  the  altitude  window  at  the  upper  end  of  the  altitude  scale.  
The scale can be used for converting Mach number to TAS and vice versa (Fig 11). 
9-8 Fig 11 Mach No/TAS Conversion 
Set Corrected OAT
against M Index Arrow
Read TAS (Outer Scale)
against Mach Number (Inner Scale)
Revised Jul 10 
Page 12 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
21.  Inter-conversion of Mach Number and TAS.  Mach number and TAS may be inter-converted in 
one of two ways: 
a. 
Set corrected outside air temperature against the Mach index arrow (marked M). 
b. 
Set indicated outside air temperature against the intersection of Mach number and 'K' factor.  
('K' factor is empirically determined for each aircraft type). 
In either case, TAS is read on the outer scale against Mach number on the inner scale. 
22.  Example.  It is required to determine the TAS corresponding to M 0.85 in a corrected OAT of − 50° T. 
Using the method in para 21a (see Fig 11): 
a. 
Set −50° C against the 'M' index arrow. 
b. 
Read TAS (495) kt on the outer scale against 0.85 on the inner scale. 
CIRCULAR SLIDE RULE 
Introduction 
23.  The reverse sides  of the Mks 4A and  5A  DR Computer carry  a circular slide rule.  Although the 
pocket electronic calculator has superseded the slide rule for carrying out arithmetic, the circular slide 
rule  is  nevertheless  useful  for  the  solution  of  the  normal  speed,  distance  and  time,  and  fuel 
consumption problems which regularly occur in navigation.  It should be remembered that, as with all 
slide rules, decimal points are ignored during calculation and only inserted at the end.  It is therefore 
important to have an appreciation of the order of the result expected. 
24.  Reflecting the normal usage of the circular slide rule, the outer scale is marked 'MILES', and the 
scale on the rotating disc (the  inner scale) is marked  'MINUTES'.   The inner scale  has a large black 
arrow indicating one hour. 
Calculating Distance and Time  
25.  The problem most often encountered, which is solved readily by the circular slide rule, is that of 
determining  the  time  taken  to  cover  a  given  distance,  or  conversely  the  distance  covered  in  a  given 
time.  To solve these problems, the given groundspeed is set, in knots on the outer scale, against the 
black (hour) arrow of the inner scale.  Distance is then read on the outer scale, against time in minutes 
on the inner scale. 
26.  Example (Fig 12).  Given a groundspeed of 470 kt, how long will it take to fly 100 nm, and how 
far will the aircraft fly in 8 minutes?  By setting 47 on the outer scale against the hour arrow it will be 
seen that a time of 12.8 minutes on the inner scale will be read against the 10 mark on the outer scale, 
ie  100  nm  takes  12.8  minutes;  against  8  on  the  inner  (minutes)  scale,  a  distance  of  62.5  nm  will  be 
read on the outer scale. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 13 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 12 Distance/Time Calculation 
Read Time required (Inner Scale)
against Distance (Outer Scale)
Read Distance travelled (Outer Scale)
against Time (Inner Scale)
Set Groundspeed
against Hour Arrow
Calculating Groundspeed 
27.  If  the  distance  flown  in  a  given  time  is  known,  the  circular  slide  rule  can  be  used  to  find  the 
groundspeed.  The procedure is to set the distance flown on the outer scale against the time taken on 
the inner scale.  The groundspeed is then read on the outer scale against the black (hour) arrow of the 
inner  scale,  e.g.  if  40  nm  are  flown  in  7  minutes,  a  groundspeed  of  343  kt  is  read  against  the  black 
arrow (Fig 13). 
9-8 Fig 13 Calculating G/S 
Fuel Consumption 
28.  Given the fuel consumption rate (e.g. in kg/min) and the leg time over which that consumption 
rate applies, the circular slide rule can conveniently be used to determine the total fuel used.  The 
fuel  consumption  rate  is  set  on  the  outer  scale  against  the  appropriate  time  on  the  inner  scale.  
The  total  fuel  used  can  then  be  read  on  the  outer  scale  against  the  leg  time  on  the  inner  scale.  
Thus,  in  the  example,  Fig  14,  a  fuel  consumption  rate  of  22  kg/min  is  set  against  the  1  minute 
mark (remembering that there are no decimal points and 1 is identical to 10).  Over a leg time of 
18 minutes, it will be seen that 396 kg of fuel is used. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 14 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-8 - Dead Reckoning Computer, Marks 4A and 5A 
9-8 Fig 14 Fuel Consumption 
Read Fuel Used (Outer Scale)
against Time (Inner Scale)
Set Consumption Rate (Outer Scale)
against appropriate Time (Inner Scale)
Unit Conversions 
29.  Unit  conversions  only  require  the  multiplication  and  division  of  numbers,  so  any  such  calculation 
could be carried out on a slide rule.  However, this is not normally the quickest or most accurate method; 
electronic calculators or graphical methods are generally preferred.   The circular slide rule can readily 
be  used to convert between nautical miles, statute miles, and kilometres.  The  outer scale has indices 
marked for each unit and, by setting the known value on the inner scale against its respective index, the 
corresponding  values  in  the  other  units  can  be  read  against  the  relevant  index.    Thus,  for  example, 
setting 18 against the 'Naut' index gives values of 20.7 statute miles and 33.3 kilometres (Fig 15). 
9-8 Fig 15 Unit Conversion 
Set known value (Inner Scale)
against respective Index (Outer Scale)
Read corresponding Values (Inner Scale)
against other Indexes (Outer Scale)
Revised Jul 10 
Page 15 of 15 

link to page 138 link to page 138 link to page 138 link to page 138 AP3456 – 9-9 - Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight 
CHAPTER 9 - SUNRISE, SUNSET AND TWILIGHT 
Introduction 
1. 
The  intensity  of  sunlight  received  at  any  point  on  Earth  depends  on  the  Sun’s  altitude1,  the 
maximum  daily  intensity  being  received  at  local  noon  when  the  Sun  is  at  its  zenith.    Direct  sunlight 
begins  at  sunrise  and  ceases  at  sunset  when  the  Sun’s  upper  rim  is  on  the  horizon.    Due  to  the 
reflective properties of the atmosphere, a period of diffused light, known as twilight, precedes sunrise 
and  follows  sunset.    This  chapter  should  be  read  in  conjunction  with  the  UK  Air  Almanac  which 
contains  data  regarding  Sunrise  and  Sunset  times,  Moonrise  and  Moonset  times  and  the  duration  of 
Twilight.    The  UK  Air  Almanac  is  available  on  the  Aeronautical  Information  Documents  Unit  (AIDU) 
website (www.aidu.mod.uk/Milflip) and also as a free PDF download from HM Nautical Almanac Office 
at  http://astro.ukho.gov.uk/  (www).    The  Almanac  contains  tables  and  graphs,  along  with  instructions 
for use, to allow the user to determine the required data. 
Theoretical Risings and Settings of the Sun 
2. 
Theoretical rising and setting occurs when the Sun’s centre is on the observer’s celestial horizon.2
Due to atmospheric refraction, an observer sees objects below his celestial horizon (Fig 1). 
9-9 Fig 1 Sensible and Visible Horizons 
Z
Sensible Horizon
Refraction
Depression
Visible Horizon
Semi-
diameter
SUNRISE AND SUNSET 
Depression 
3. 
Sunrise  and  sunset  are  respectively  defined  as  the  point  when  the  upper  rim  of  the  Sun  just 
appears above (sunrise) or disappears below (sunset) the observer’s visible horizon.  At these times, 
the Sun’s centre is 50' of arc below the celestial horizon.  Atmospheric refraction accounts for 34' and 
the Sun’s semi-diameter for the other 16'.  The predicted times of sunrise and sunset tabulated in the 
Air  Almanac3  are  calculated  using  this  depression  of  50'  which  approximates  to  0.8°.    The  tabulated 
times of sunrise and sunset given in the Air Almanac are in local mean time (LMT). 
Variation in Times of Sunrise and Sunset with Latitude 
4. 
When the Sun’s declination(north or south of the celestial equator) is of the SAME name as the 
observer’s latitude (north or south of the earth’s equator), sunrise occurs earlier and sunset later as the 
observer’s latitude increases.  In high latitudes, when declination is greater than co-latitude (Fig 2), the 
Sun  is  continuously  above  the  horizon.    Conversely,  when  the  Sun’s  declination  and  the  observer’s 
Revised Sep 12  Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-9 - Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight 
latitude  are  CONTRARY  named,  sunrise  occurs  later  and  sunset  earlier  as  the  observer’s  latitude 
increases. 
9-9 Fig 2 Co-latitude 
N Co-latitude (90-latitude)
Observers latitude
23.5° 
Equator
Sun’s declination
S
Variation in Times of Sunrise and Sunset with Height 
5. 
The  plane  of  the  observer’s  visible  horizon  changes  with  change  in  height;  sunrise  becomes 
earlier and sunset later with an increase in height (Fig 3).  θ is given by the formula: 
θ = 1.06 observer's height in feet
9-9 Fig 3 Effect of Height on Sunrise and Sunset 
Observer at 20,000 ft
θ
Horizon at Surface 
Observer
Sunrise
at Surface
at
Surface
at 20,000'
Horizon
Sunrise
at
20,000'
θ = 1.06 √ observer’s height in feet
Tabulation of Sunrise and Sunset 
6. 
Three ways of presenting the time of sunrise and sunset are given in the Air Almanac: 
a. 
Sunrise and Sunset Tables. 
b. 
Semi-duration of Sunlight Graphs. 
c. 
Rising, Setting and Depression Graphs. 
Full  descriptions  of  the  Table  and  the  Graphs  are  given  in  the  Air  Almanac;  brief  descriptions  are 
included in paragraphs 7 to 9. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-9 - Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight 
7. 
Sunrise and Sunset Tables.  These tables give the times of sunrise and sunset for an observer at 
the surface on the Greenwich Meridian between latitudes 60° S and 72° N.  The Coordinated Universal 
Time (UTC) of sunrise and sunset are tabulated at three-day intervals.  UTC is referred to as UT in the Air 
Almanac.    The  tabulated  UT  of  the  occurrence  may  be  taken  as  the  local  time  of  the  occurrence  at 
meridians  other  than  Greenwich.    The  normal  entering  arguments  are  tabular  date  and  observer’s 
latitude.  The following symbols indicate that the Sun is continuously above or below the horizon: 
       Sun continuously above horizon 
       Sun continuously below horizon. 
8. 
Semi-duration  of  Sunlight Graphs.  The times of sunrise and sunset at sea level for latitudes 
between 65° N and 90° N may be determined using the Semi-duration Graphs.  The LMT of the Sun’s 
transit  and  the  semi-duration  of  sunlight  are  obtained  from  the  graphs.    The  times  of  sunrise  and 
sunset are found from the relationships: 
LMT of sunrise = LMT of Transit – semi-duration 
LMT of sunset = LMT of Transit + semi-duration. 
9. 
Rising, Setting and Depression Graphs.  Rising, Setting and Depression Graphs are provided 
for  each  2°  of  latitude  from  72°  to  50°  and  every  5°  from  50°  to  0°.    An  associated  table  gives  the 
following information: 
a. 
Daily LMT of Sun’s meridian passage. 
b. 
Daily declination of Sun at 1200 UT. 
c. 
Sun’s depression at rising or setting for heights between 0 feet and 60,000 feet. 
The  semi-duration  of  sunlight,  expressed  as  an  hour  angle,  is  obtained  by  entering  the  graph  for  the 
appropriate latitude with Sun’s declination and the depression value corresponding to aircraft height.  The 
LMT of sunrise and sunset are calculated by applying the semi-duration to the LMT of meridian passage.  
In  high  latitudes,  a  small  latitude  change  may  correspond  to  a  large  change  in  hour  angle,  and  a 
subsidiary graph is provided for interpolation.  Without interpolation, the maximum error is 12 min up to 
42°, increasing to 15 min by 52°. 
TWILIGHT 
Types of Twilight 
10.  The period of diffused light before sunrise and after sunset is known as twilight.  The amount of 
illumination  varies  with  the  Sun’s  depression  and  also  with  atmospheric  conditions.    Three  twilights, 
each occurring at a particular depression value, are recognized: 
a.
Civil Twilight.  Civil twilight occurs when the Sun’s centre is 6° below the sensible horizon.  
Light conditions are such that everyday tasks are just possible without artificial light. 
b.
Nautical  Twilight.    At  nautical  twilight,  the  Sun’s  centre  is  12°  below  the  sensible  horizon.  
General outlines are still discernible, and all the brighter stars are visible. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-9 - Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight 
c.
Astronomical Twilight.  At astronomical twilight, the Sun’s centre is 18° below the sensible 
horizon.  All the stars are visible.  Astronomical twilight is regarded as synonymous with complete 
darkness. 
Dimensions of the Twilight Zone 
11.  The difference between the depression angle of the Sun at sunrise and sunset (0.8°) and that for the 
beginning or end of civil twilight is 5.2°, which is the dimension of the twilight zone around the earth.  This, 
in turn, can be converted into a distance of 312 nm because 1' of arc on the surface of the Earth is equal 
to 1 nm. 
Factors Affecting Duration and Time of Twilight 
12.  The duration and time of twilight for a stationary observer depend upon the following: 
a. 
Observer’s Latitude. 
b. 
Sun’s Declination. 
c. 
Height of Observer above Sea Level. 
Variation of Twilight with Latitude 
13.  Fig  4  shows  two  observers,  Z  and  Z1,  their  respective  horizons,  VH  and  V1H1,  and  associated 
twilight belts.  The Sun, declination d°, crosses observer Z1’s twilight zone from A to B, the duration of 
twilight being A1B1, while for observer Z, the Sun crosses from C to D, giving duration C1D1.  Duration 
A1B1  is  greater  than  C1D1,  and  therefore  the  duration  of  twilight  increases  with  increased  latitude.    In 
high  latitudes,  ie  when  same-name  declination  is  greater  than  co-latitude,  the  Sun  is  continuously 
above  the  horizon.    Similarly,  the  Sun  may  remain  less  than  6°  below  the  horizon  giving  twilight 
conditions throughout the night.  This condition is indicated by the symbol //// in the Air Almanac. 
9-9 Fig 4 Variation in Duration of Twilight with Latitude 
P
H
H1
Z
D
C
B
A
Sun’s Declination (d°)
Eq
D
B
1
1
V1
Width
312 nm
V
Revised Sep 12  Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-9 - Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight 
Variation of Twilight with Height 
14.  The  Sun  rises  earlier  and  sets  later  with  an  increase  in  height.    Morning  twilight  therefore  occurs 
earlier  and  evening  twilight  later  as  height  increases.    The  amount  of  pollution  in  the  atmosphere 
decreases with height resulting in a decrease in the amount of light reflected and scattered by particles in 
the air.  The degree of illumination associated with a depression of 6° at sea level occurs at a depression 
of less than 6° at height.  Fig 5 shows the decrease in the duration of twilight with height. 
9-9 Fig 5 Decrease in Duration of Twilight with  Height 
40
t)
e
fe
30
0
d
0
n
0
E
(1
ro
t
e
20
h
d
gin
ilig
n
ltitu
w
in
T
A
g
10
e
il
B
ivC
0









Degrees Below Horizon
(Defined at Sea Level)
Tabulation of Duration of Twilight 
15.  The  duration  of  twilight  is  presented  in  the  Air  Almanac,  together  with  the  times  of  sunrise  and  
sunset.  One  table  and  two  graphical  solutions  are  provided.    Full  explanations  are  given  in  the  Air 
Almanac, but brief descriptions are included below. 
16.  Civil Twilight Tables The times of morning civil twilight and evening civil twilight are tabulated in 
the Air Almanac at three-day intervals for latitudes between 60° S and 72° N.  The times given are the 
UT of the occurrences at sea level on the Greenwich Meridian, but the UT of the occurrences may be 
regarded as the LMT of the occurrences at other meridians. 
17.  Duration  of  Twilight  Graph.    The  duration  of  Twilight  graph  gives  the  time  interval  between 
morning  civil  twilight  and  sunrise  (or  sunset  to  evening  civil  twilight).    In  the  region  "No  Twilight  nor 
Sunlight"  the  Sun  is  continuously  more  than  6°  below  the  horizon.    Adjacent  to  this  "No  Twilight  nor 
Sunlight" region, is a region where the Sun’s depression is less than 6° for part of the day, although the 
semi-duration of sunlight graphs show the Sun to be continuously below the horizon.  In this region, the 
duration of twilight is the sum of the intervals between morning civil twilight and meridian passage, and 
meridian  passage  and  evening  civil  twilight.    The  total  duration  of  twilight  is,  therefore,  double  that 
given by the graph. 
18.  Rising,  Setting  and  Depression  Graphs.    The  numerical  values  of  the  depressions 
corresponding  to  specific  brightness  at  various  height  are  difficult  to  quantify.    However,  a  particular 
brightness at a particular height is always associated with a specific depression value. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-9 - Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight 
SUNLIGHT AND TWILIGHT IN HIGH LATITUDES 
General 
19.  In high latitudes, the Sun may be above or below the horizon all day.  Twilight conditions, where 
they  exist,  last  longer  than  at  low  latitudes.    In  extreme  cases,  morning  and  evening  twilights  are 
continuous, the Sun remaining below the visible horizon all day. 
20.   The  Sun’s  apparent  path  over  the  Earth  is  from  East  to  West.    An  aircraft  travelling  westwards 
travels "with the Sun".  If the westerly component of ground speed equals 15° of longitude per hour, the 
light  conditions  experienced  remain  constant.    An  aircraft  travelling  at  less  than  15°  of westerly 
longitude  per  hour  experiences  a  slower  change  of  light  conditions  than  a  stationary  observer  on  the 
Earth.    On  easterly  tracks  the  Sun’s  westward  velocity  and  the  aircraft’s  easterly  velocity  combine, 
accelerating the normal daily change of light conditions.  In the space of a few hours an aircraft might 
pass from daylight through evening twilight, night and morning twilight back into daylight. 
21.  In high latitudes, the times of sunrise, sunset, and twilight for various points along the route may 
be established from tables and graphs in the Air Almanac. 
End note: 
Altitude - The angular distance between the direction to an object and the horizon. Altitude ranges 
from 0 degrees for an object on the horizon to 90 degrees for an object directly overhead. 
Celestial Horizon - The celestial horizon is a great circle on the celestial sphere whose plane lies at 
90°  to  the  zenith/nadir  axis  of  an  observer  and  passes  through  the  centre  of  both  the  Earth  and  the 
celestial sphere. 
Air Almanac - The UK Air Almanac is available as a free PDF download from HM Nautical Almanac 
Office at http://astro.ukho.gov.uk/ (www). 
Declination  -  The  angular  distance  of  a  celestial  body  north  or  south  of  the  celestial  equator. 
Declination is analogous to latitude in the terrestrial coordinate system. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 6 of 6 

link to page 145 link to page 145 link to page 145 AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
CHAPTER 10 - THE MOON 
GENERAL 
Introduction 
1. 
The Moon is the Earth’s only natural satellite.  Because of its short period of revolution about the Earth, 
the Moon’s position on the celestial sphereis constantly changing.  Like the planets, the Moon is not self-
luminous, but shines by reflecting sunlight.  The intensity of moonlight varies with the Moon’s phase. 
THE MOON’S ORBIT 
General 
2. 
The Moon revolves around the Earth in an elliptical orbit in accordance with Kepler’s first law2, modified 
by  perturbations  caused  by  the  sun.    The  orbit  is  inclined  at  5°  to  the  ecliptic,  the  points  of  intersection 
between  the  orbit  and  the  ecliptic  being  known  as  the  Ascending  and  Descending  Nodes  (Fig 1).    The 
Moon’s Nodes precess westwards along the ecliptic, completing one revolution in 18.6 years. 
9-10 Fig 1 Motion of the Moon Relative to Ecliptic 
a
b
Descending
Node
rbit
Earth
rbit
O
Earth
O
Moon’s
E
Moon’s
cliptic
Ecliptic
Ascending
Moon s
’  Orbit
Node
Inclined at 5°
Nodes
to Ecliptic
Precess
Westerly
The Moon’s Phases 
3. 
Seen from Earth, the phaseor shape of the Moon depends on the Moon’s position relative to the 
Sun and on the angle at which the Moon’s illuminated hemisphere is presented to the Earth.  The eight 
phases of the Moon, in Fig 2, are drawn as they appear to an observer on Earth, ie looking outwards 
from the centre of the diagram. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 1 of 7 

link to page 145 AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
9-10 Fig 2 Phases of the Moon 
Easterly Quadrature
First Quarter
Gibbous Phase
Crescent Phase
Opposition
Conjunction
X
Sun’s
Rays
Full Moon
New Moon
Gibbous Phase
Crescent Phase
Westerly Quadrature
Last Quarter
4. 
The  interval  between  successive  New  Moons  is  approximately  29.5  days.    The  Moon’s  age  is 
measured in days from the New Moon.  At New Moon the Moon’s age is 0 days and at First Quarter 
about 7 days.  Full Moon occurs about 15 days and Last Quarter about  22 days.  The Moon’s age is 
given in the Air Almanac4. 
5. 
At New Moon, the Moon and the Sun are over the observer’s meridian at the same time, ie local 
noon.  When the Moon is above the horizon in the periods immediately preceding and following New 
Moon, the illuminated portion of the Moon presented to the observer is too small to be seen against 
the sunlight.  The Moon crosses the observer’s meridian at 1800 Local Mean Time (LMT) at the First 
Quarter, 2400 LMT at Full Moon, and 0600 LMT at Last Quarter. 
MOONRISE AND MOONSET 
Visible Rising and Setting 
6. 
The  Moon’s  visible  risings  and  settings  occur  when  the  Moon’s  upper  rim  is  just  on  the  visible 
horizon.  The Moon’s average altitude at visible rising and setting is +7' of arc: 
HO  upper rim 

00º 00' 
Atmospheric Refraction 

   – 34' 
Semi Diameter 

   – 16' 
Horizontal Parallax 

   + 57' (average) 
HO Moon’s Centre 

   +   7' 
Because  of  the  varying  distances  between  the  Moon  and  the  Earth  the  value  of  horizontal  parallax 
varies between 54' and 61'.  In practice, the times of visible rising and setting given in the Air Almanac 
are  calculated  using  an  altitude  of  (–50' + HP), where HP is the actual value of horizontal parallax at 
the time of the occurrence. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 2 of 7 

link to page 145 AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
Retrograde Motion of the Moon 
7. 
Calculation  of  the  times  of  moonrise  and  moonset  at  longitudes  other  than  Greenwich  is 
complicated by the Moon’s movement around its orbit.  The Moon moves around its orbit in the same 
direction  as  the  Earth’s  rotation,  completing  one  orbit  in  approximately  29.5 days.  The average daily 
movement  along  the  orbit  is  approximately  12°,  or  48  minutes  of  time.    In  Fig  3,  Z1  and  Z2  are  the 
positions of successive moonsets, the Moon’s declination being assumed constant.  During the time it 
takes  the  Earth  to  rotate  through  360°,  the  Moon  moves  12°  along  its  orbit.    Moonset  on the second 
day  occurs  at  Z2  and  not  Z1.    The  observer  moves  372°  between  moonsets,  i.e.  the  elapsed  time 
between moonsets is 24 hours 48 minutes. 
9-10 Fig 3 Retrograde Motion of the Moon 
Z
Z
2
1
Horizon 2
Moonset
2nd Day
12°
12° (Approx)
H
372°
o
0
rizon 1
Moonset
1st Day
Effect of Declination Changes on Times of Moonrise and Moonset 
8. 
The  daily  change  in  declination5  can  be  sufficiently  great  to  have  a  considerable  effect  on  the 
times  of  moonrise  and  moonset.   When the Moon’s declination is increasing, the daily time lag of 48 
minutes in the time of moonrise reduces for SAME name declinations and increases for CONTRARY 
name  declinations.    Conversely,  when  the  Moon’s  declination  is  decreasing,  the  daily  time  lag  is 
increased for SAME name declinations and decreases for CONTRARY name declinations (Fig 4). 
Revised Sep 12  Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
9-10 Fig 4 Effect of Declination Changes on Time of Moonrise 
48 Minutes Time Lag
P
Increased
Decreased
Z
H
2nd Day
1st Day
Moon’s Path
MR2
Dec Inc Nth
MR1
Eq
1st Day
Moon’s Path
2nd Day
MR1
Dec Inc Sth
MR2
V
9. 
The  effect  of  the  declination  changes  on  the  time  of  moonset  is  reversed.    When  declination  is 
increasing, the time lag, increases for SAME name declinations, and decreases for CONTRARY name 
declinations (Fig 5). 
9-10 Fig 5 Effect of Declination Changes on Time of Moonset 
48 Minutes Time Lag
P
Increased
Reduced
Z
V
MS
2nd Day
2
Moon’s Path
1st Day
MS1
Dec Inc Nth
Eq
1st Day
Moon’s Path
2nd Day
MS1
Dec Inc Sth
MS2
H
Effect of Latitude on Times of Moonrise and Moonset 
10.  For  any  given  daily  change  of  declination,  the  effect  on  the  times  of  moonrise  and  moonset 
increases with latitude.  In Fig 6, the Moon’s declination has the SAME name and is increasing.  The 
time of moonset on both days is shown.  The increase in time lag experienced by observer Z1 is larger 
than the increase experienced by observer Z2. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
9-10 Fig 6 Effect of Latitude 
Large Increase
Small Increase
in Time Lag at
in Time Lag at
High Latitudes
Low Latitudes
P
V
Z1
2
Z2
V1
2nd Day
Moon’s
MS2
MS2
1st Day
 Path
MS
MS
1
1
Eq
H1
H2
Effect of Longitude on Times of Moonrise and Moonset 
11.  Due to the above effects, the LMT of moonrise and moonset at the Greenwich Meridian cannot be 
considered  the  LMT  of  the  occurrences  at  other  meridians.   The difference between the times of the 
occurrences at Greenwich and the times of the occurrences at the 180° E/W meridian are calculated 
and  tabulated  in  the  Air  Almanac.    Since  the  rate  of  change  of  declination  is  almost  constant,  the 
difference between the time of an occurrence at Greenwich and the time at any other meridian may be 
found  by  simple  proportion.    A  simple  proportion  table  is  provided  to  facilitate  interpolation  for 
intermediate  longitudes.    The  corrected  difference  is  applied  to  the  LMT  of  the  occurrence  at 
Greenwich to give the LMT of the occurrence at the desired longitude. 
Effect of Height on Times of Moonrise and Moonset 
12.  The  effect  of  height  on  the  times  of  moonrise  and  moonset  is  complicated  by  the  Moon’s  rapid 
movement and is therefore ignored. 
Variations in the Daily Time Lag and their Effect on Moonrise and Moonset 
13.  The  48  minute  difference  between  the  time  of  successive moonrise and moonset is modified by 
the  effects  of  latitude  and  declination,  but  the  overall  interval  between  successive  phenomena  is 
usually greater than 24 hours.  When the observer’s latitude exceeds the complement of the obliquity 
of  the  Moon’s  orbit,  the  daily  declination  change  may  not  only  cancel  out  the  48-minute  time  lag,  but 
reduce the time between successive risings or settings to less than 24 hours. 
14.  When the interval between successive phenomena is less than 24 hours, the Moon may rise and 
set twice in one day.  Both times are given in the Air Almanac.  Each month, around the last quarter, 
there  is  one  day  without  a  moonrise,  and  another,  around  the  first  quarter,  without  a  moonset.    On 
these occasions, the time of the following moonrise or moonset at Greenwich will be later than 2400, 
Revised Sep 12  Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
e.g. 2420.  This time, e.g. 2420, is given to facilitate the calculation of the times of the phenomena at 
other longitudes. 
Tabulation of Times of Moonrise and Moonset 
15.  Daily  Tables.    The  LMT  of  moonrise  and  moonset  at  latitudes  between  60°  S  and  72°  N  on  the 
Greenwich Meridian are tabulated in the Air Almanac.  The LMT of the occurrences at longitudes other 
than  Greenwich  are  established  using  the  tabulated  differences and the interpolation table discussed in 
para  11.    When  calculating  the  LMT  of  moonrise  and  moonset  for  a  particular  day,  the  time  calculated 
may be in the previous or the following day; the time of the occurrence at Greenwich is for the required 
day, but the addition or subtraction of the difference correction may move the LMT of the occurrence into 
the previous or the following day.  The LMT of the occurrence is then found by adding or subtracting 24 
hours  plus  twice  the  tabulated  difference.    Twice  the  difference  is  applied  because  the  difference 
correction to 360° of longitude is required, and the difference tabulated is for 180° of longitude. 
16.  Semi-Duration of Moonlight Graphs.  The Semi-Duration of Moonlight Graphs give the LMT of 
the Moon’s meridian passage and the semi-duration of moonlight for latitudes above 65° N.  The times 
of  meridian  passage  and  the  semi-durations  change  rapidly,  and  care  must  be  taken  to  read  the 
graphs accurately. 
17.  Use of Moonlight Graphs.  A rough idea of the times of moonrise and moonset may be obtained 
from a superficial examination of the graphs.  The vertical from the appropriate date cuts the top scale 
at the LMT of meridian passage.  The intersection of the vertical with the appropriate latitude line gives 
the  semi-duration  of  moonlight.    The  semi-duration  is  added  to  and  subtracted  from  the  LMT  of 
meridian passage to give the times of moonset and moonrise respectively.  The times obtained are the 
LMT  of  the  occurrences  on  the  Greenwich  Meridian.    The  times  at  meridians  other  than  Greenwich 
may be obtained by either of the following methods: 
a. 
The LMT of moonrise and moonset on the Greenwich Meridian is calculated for the required 
date  and either the following date or the preceding date.  The difference in the times represents 
the  effect  of  a  360°  change  of  longitude.    The  time  of  moonrise  or  moonset  at  the  desired 
meridian is then established by proportioning the 360° difference. 
b. 
The dates on the graph correspond to 00 hrs LMT at the Greenwich Meridian.  The times of 
meridian  passage,  moonrise  and  moonset  are  estimated  directly  from  the  graphs.    The  times 
extracted are converted to the UT at the desired longitude.  The graph is re-entered at the point 
on  the  daily  scale  corresponding  to  the  UT  of  meridian  passage  at  the  desired  longitude,  and  a 
new  value  of  LMT  meridian  passage  obtained.    Similarly,  the  UT  of  moonrise  and  moonset  are 
used to establish further semi-duration values.  The LMT of moonrise and moonset are obtained 
by applying the new semi-duration values to the new time of meridian passage. 
Celestial Sphere - The celestial sphere is an imaginary sphere of infinite radius, concentric with the 
Earth, on which all celestial bodies are imagined to be projected. 
Kepler’s Laws - Kepler defined the following laws of planetary motion: 
a. 
The orbit of each planet is an ellipse, with the Sun at one of the foci. 
b. 
The line joining the planet to the Sun sweeps across equal areas in equal times. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-10 - The Moon 
c. 
The square of the sidereal period of a planet is proportional to the cube of its mean distance 
from the Sun. 
P′
(Aphelion)
Major axis
S
A
P
A′
Foci
(Perihelion)
Elliptical orbit of planets
Moon – Phases 
Crescent Phase - The phase of the moon at which only a small, crescent-shaped portion of the 
near side of the Moon is illuminated by sunlight. Crescent phase occurs just before and after new 
moon. 
Full  Phase  -  The  phase  of  the  moon  at  which  the  bright  side  of  the  Moon  is  the  face  turned 
toward the Earth. 
New Phase - The phase of the moon in which none or almost none of the near side of the Moon 
is illuminated by sunlight, so the near side appears dark. 
Quarter phase - The phase of the moon in which half of the near side of the Moon is illuminated 
by the Sun. 
Waning Crescent - The Moon's crescent phase that occurs just before new moon. 
Waxing Crescent - The Moon's crescent phase that occurs just after new moon. 
Air Almanac - The UK Air Almanac is available as a free PDF download from HM Nautical Almanac 
Office at http://astro.ukho.gov.uk/ (www). 
Declination  -  The  angular  distance  of  a  celestial  body  north  or  south  of  the  celestial  equator. 
Declination is analogous to latitude in the terrestrial coordinate system. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 7 of 7 

link to page 153 AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
CHAPTER 11 - TIME 
Introduction 
1. 
From  the  earliest  days,  time  has  been  measured  by  observing  the  recurrence  of  astronomical 
phenomena.    The  Earth’s  rotation  on  its  axis  produces  the  apparent  rotation  of  the  celestial  sphere1, 
allowing time to be measured from the relative positions of an astronomical reference point and a specific 
celestial meridian. 
2. 
Nowadays, the fundamental properties of the atom are utilized to provide an independent basis 
for  time  measurement.    The  atomic  time-scale  provides  a  precise  measurement  of  time  intervals, 
the  summation  of  these  time  intervals  providing  an  accurate  measure  of  the  passage  of  time.  
Atomic time is not related to "time of day", but the starting point of any period of atomic time may be 
specified in terms of an astronomical instant. 
THE DAY AND THE YEAR 
General 
3. 
The  Earth’s  rotation  on  its  axis,  and  its  revolution  around  the  Sun,  result  in  the  natural  time 
intervals of the day and the year. 
The Day 
4. 
The  day  is  the  duration  of  one  rotation  of  the  Earth  on  its  axis  and  is  the  interval  between  two 
successive transits of a celestial reference point over a particular meridian. 
Apparent Solar Day 
5. 
The visible Sun is known as the apparent or true Sun, and the apparent solar day is the interval 
between two successive transits of the apparent Sun over a particular meridian.  The Earth’s variable 
speed along the ecliptic (Kepler’s 2nd Law) causes variations in the length of the apparent solar day. 
Mean Solar Day 
6. 
A day of constantly changing length is inconvenient, and therefore the mean solar day of constant 
length is used, the length being based on the average of all apparent solar days over a period of years.  
Mean  solar  time  is  measured  relative  to  the  mean  or  astronomical  mean  Sun,  a  fictitious  body 
assumed  to  travel  around  the  equinoctial  at  a  constant  rate.    The  mean  solar  day  is  divided  into  24 
hours, each hour of 60 minutes, and each minute of 60 seconds of mean solar time or mean time. 
7. 
The astronomical mean Sun must have a constant angular velocity in the plane of the equinoctial; 
a constant angular velocity in the plane of the ecliptic is unsatisfactory because the rate of change of 
hour angle fluctuates due to meridian convergence. 
Equation of Time 
8. 
Mean time increases at a constant rate while apparent time increases at a variable rate.  The 
difference  between  mean  and  apparent  time  is  known  as  the  Equation  of  Time  (E).    E  is  not  an 
Revised Sep 12  Page 1 of 8 

link to page 153 link to page 153 AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
equation  in  the  normal  sense,  but  merely  a  time  difference.    E  is  positive  when apparent noon 
precedes  mean  noon  and  negative  when  apparent  noon  follows  mean  noon.    By  convention,  E 
is the amount which is added algebraically to mean time to obtain apparent time. 
THE YEAR 
Introduction 
9. 
One  year  is  the  period  of  one  revolution  of  the  Earth  about  the  Sun  relative  to  an  astronomical 
reference.  The type of year takes its name from the reference used. 
Sidereal Year 
10.  The  sidereal  year  is  the  period  between  two  successive  conjunctions  of  the  Earth,  Sun,  and  a 
fixed point in space (Fig 1). 
9-11 Fig 1 Sidereal Year 
Earth
Sidereal Year
Sun
Fixed Star
Tropical Year 
11.  The tropical year (Fig 2) is the period between two successive vernal equinoxes2, i.e. the time 
taken  for  one  orbit  around  the  Sun  relative  to  the  First  Point  of  Aries  ()3.    The  tropical  year 
contains one complete cycle of seasons.  Its length is 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes 45.98 seconds, 
which is shorter than the sidereal year because of the westward precession of the equinoxes. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
9-11 Fig 2 Tropical Year 
Earth
Tropical Year
Sun

Precession of 
 
 = 50.26" per Annum
(Exaggerated in illustration)

Civil Year 
12.  The civil year is based on the tropical year, but the calendar is adjusted to give each year an exact 
number of days. 
Gregorian Calendar 
13.  The  Gregorian  calendar  assumes  the  length  of  a  normal  year  to  be  365  days,  with  every  fourth 
year being a leap year containing 366 days.  After four years, the civil year and the tropical year differ 
by 45 minutes, ie the calendar and the seasons are out of step by 45 minutes. 
4 Civil Years 

4  ×  365 days + 1 day 

1,461 days 
4 Tropical Years 

1,460 days 23 hours 15 minutes. 
After 400 years, the difference has increased to 3 days 3 hours.  To correct for this, nearly every year whose 
number is a multiple of 100 (i.e. at the turn of each century) is treated as an ordinary year of 365 days, even 
though it can be divided by 4.  Only when the century number (i.e. the first two figures of the year) is divisible 
by four, is it a leap year.  This adjustment loses three days every 400 years and is known as the Gregorian 
Correction.  At the end of 4,000 years the total error will be 1 day 4 hours 55 minutes. 
Time and Hour Angle 
14.  The Earth rotates once in 24 hours relative to the mean Sun.  360° of hour angle is equivalent to 
24 hours of mean solar time or mean time.  Hour angle is therefore interchangeable with mean time: 
360º
≡ 
24 hours 
15º
≡ 
1 hour 
15'
≡ 
1 minute 
15''
≡ 
1 second. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
Local Mean Time 
15.  Local  Mean  Time  (LMT)  is  defined  as  the  arc  of  the  equinoctial  intercepted  between  the 
observer’s anti-meridian and the meridian of the mean Sun measured westwards, i.e. the elapsed time 
since the mean Sun’s transit of the observer’s celestial anti-meridian: 
LMT = local hour angle mean Sun (LHAMS)  ±  12 hours. 
The anti-meridian is used so that the local date changes during the hours of darkness.  The mean Sun 
crosses an observer’s meridian at 1200 LMT, ie local noon. 
16.  Since LMT depends upon LHAMS, LMT varies with longitude; LMT at one longitude is converted 
to  LMT  at  another  longitude  by  applying  the  ch  long  converted  to  time.    Ch  long  East,  in  hours  and 
minutes, is added to LMT at the original longitude to obtain LMT at the desired longitude: 
+ E ch long
LMT = LMT
2
1 − W ch long
a. 
Example  1.    LMT  and  local  date  (LD)  are  03.10.00  on  2  August  at  Longitude  12°  W.  Find 
LMT and LD at longitude 33° E. 
LMT at 12° W 

03.10.00 on 2 Aug 
Ch long 45° E 
≡ +03 (see para 20) 
LMT at 33° E 

06.10.00 on 2 Aug. 
Note.  The date must be included in all time problems.  Where the sum of the original time and ch 
long exceeds 24 hours, the date is increased by one day.  Conversely, where the sum is less, i.e. 
a negative value, the date is decreased by one day. 
b. 
Example 2.  LMT and LD are 09.40.00 at longitude 46° E on 2 August.  Find LMT and LD in 
longitude 110° W. 
LMT at 46° E 

09.40.00 on 2 Aug 
Ch long 156° W   
≡ − 10.24.00 
∴ LMT at 110° W   =  − 00.44.00 on 2 Aug 

23.16.00 on 1 Aug. 
Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) 
17.  UTC  is  used  as  the  world  standard  of  reference  time.    For  all  practical  purposes  it  can  be 
regarded  as  LMT  at  the  Greenwich  Meridian.    UTC  can  therefore  be  converted  to  LMT  at  any  other 
meridian by applying longitude, converted to time: 
+ long E
LMT = UTC − long W
The relationship between UTC and LMT is illustrated in Figs 3a and 3b.  G represents the Greenwich 
Meridian; Z the observer’s meridian and S is the Sun’s meridian. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
9-11 Fig 3 Relationship Between UTC and LMT 
a  Longitude East
b  Longitude West
C
T
C
T
P
T
M
P
T
M
U
L
U
L
S
S
W
E Long
L
Z
ong
Z
G
G
a. 
Example 3.  Find LMT at longitude 26° E when UTC is 10.30.00 on 2 August. 
UTC 

10.30.00 on 2 Aug 
26° E 
≡ + 01.44.00 
LMT 

12.14.00 on 2 Aug 
b. 
Example  4.    Find  the  LMT  at  longitude 120° E,  when  UTC  is  19.32.00  and  Greenwich  Date 
(GD) is 2 August. 
UTC 

19.32.00 on 2 Aug 
120° E 
≡ + 08.00.00 
LMT 

27.32.00 on 2 Aug 

03.32.00 on 3 Aug 
18.  UTC and LMT are both unsuitable for regulating time in particular areas; UTC is in step with the 
phenomena  of  day  and  night  only  at  the  Greenwich  Meridian,  and  all  longitude  changes,  however 
small,  result  in  changes  in  LMT.    Zone  time  and  standard  time  overcome  the  problems,  being 
approximately  in  step  with  night  and  day,  and  having  the  additional  advantage  that  time  remains 
uniform in particular areas. 
Zone Time 
19.  The  Earth  is  divided,  purely  by  longitude,  into  25  zones,  all  of  which  are  15°  of  longitude 
(or 1 hour) wide, except for the two semi-zones adjacent to the International Date Line (approximately 
180° E/W  -  see  para  25).    The  central  meridians  of  the  zones  are  removed  from  the  Greenwich 
meridian by multiples of 15° and the extremities of the zones are bounded by meridians 7.5° removed 
from the central meridian.  The zones are each allocated an identifying letter as shown in Fig 4. 
20.  The  zone  time  is  the  LMT  of  its  central  meridian,  and  therefore  zone  time  differs  from  UTC  by 
multiples of one hour.  Furthermore, zone time is related to sun time ± 30 minutes. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
21.  The  number  of  hours  difference  between  zone  time  and  UTC  can  be  calculated  by  dividing  the 
longitude by 15 and approximating the result to the nearest whole number, e.g.: 
A  ship  at  48°  W  shows  a  zone  time  of  1800  hours  on  2  August  ie  1800  hours  P.    What  is  the 
UTC? 
Dividing 48 by 15 gives 3.2, which is 3 to the nearest whole number.  Therefore, UTC is 3 hours 
different from zone time.  As the longitude is West the 3 hours must be added to zone time to find 
UTC.  UTC is thus 2100 hours on August 2. 
Standard Time 
22.  Each  national  authority  throughout  the  world  has  decreed  that  a  particular  LMT  shall  be  kept 
throughout its country; this time is known as standard time.  In those countries with a significant east-west 
extent, such as the USA and Australia, further subdivision is necessary.  Although the standard times, in 
general,  approximate  to  zone  time,  the  boundaries  tend  to  follow  natural  features  such  as  rivers  or 
mountain ranges, or national or state borders, and are not tied to specific longitudinal changes. 
23.  Standard times mostly differ from UTC by whole numbers of hours and the Air Almanac contains 
three  lists  showing  the  differences  between  UTC  and  the  standard  times  kept  throughout  the  world.  
List  I  shows  those  places  fast  on  UTC  (mainly  East  of  Greenwich),  list  II  those  places  keeping UTC, 
and list III those places slow on UTC (West of Greenwich). 
24.  Many countries keep summer, or daylight-saving time, which is one hour fast on standard time, for 
all or part of the year.  Such variations are noted in the Air Almanac. 
International Date Line 
25.  The  LMT  of places east of Greenwich are ahead of UTC, and places west of Greenwich behind 
UTC, LMT on the Greenwich anti-meridian is therefore either 12 hours ahead or 12 hours behind UTC.  
There  is  a  24-hour  time  difference  between  neighbouring  places  separated  by  the  Greenwich  anti-
meridian, ie local date changes on crossing the Greenwich anti-meridian. 
26.  The Greenwich anti-meridian is called the International Date Line.  This date line deviates from the anti-
meridian in places, to avoid date changes occurring in the middle of populated regions.  The International 
Date  Line  is  illustrated  in  Fig  4.    On  crossing  the  date  line,  one  day  is  added  on  westerly  tracks  and 
subtracted on easterly tracks.  Since zone time and standard time are based on Greenwich, there is also a 
change of one day in zone date and standard date when crossing the International Date Line. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
9-11 Fig 4 Time Zones 
Any Zone may be described by its Zone letter.  The Zone 
number indicates the number of hours by which Zone Time
must be increased or decreased to obtain Greenwich Mean Time.
8
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
7
o
7
5
4
2
1
9
8
6
5
3
2
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
o
2
7
2
7
2
o
o
5
6
9
1
2
4
5
7
7
2
7
2
7
2
7
o
o
o
o
o
2
7
7
2
7
2
7
2
3
3
3
3
3
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
0
0
0
0
0
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
3 o
3 o
3
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
3 o
'
0
'
'
'
'
0
'
'
'
'
'
'
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
W
'
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
'
'
W
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
TIME REFERENCES 
Atomic Time 
27.  The  atomic  time  standard  is  based  on  the  fundamental  properties of the caesium atom and forms 
the basis of the world standard of time, (UTC).  Previously, the LMT at the Greenwich meridian was used 
as  the  standard  and  this  is  known  as  Greenwich  Mean  Time  (GMT).    Whereas  UTC  increases  at  a 
constant rate, GMT, which is a measure of the Earth’s rotation on its axis, increases at a variable rate due 
to  tidal  friction  and  other  periodic  changes.    The  variations  in  GMT  are  small,  varying  between  −  0.5 
seconds and + 2.5 seconds a year, but UTC must be corrected for the variations before it equals GMT. 
28.  All  primary  time  signals  give  UTC,  and  a  coded  correction  is  included  to  enable  UTC  to  be 
converted to GMT to an accuracy of 0.1 second.  By international agreement, UTC is allowed to depart 
from  GMT  by  0.7 seconds.    When  the  correction  reaches  0.7  seconds,  a  positive  or  negative  leap 
second is applied to UTC.  For all normal air navigation purposes UTC and GMT can be regarded as 
identical since the maximum error involved is 0.7 seconds. 
Radio Time Signals 
28.  Numerous  national  and  commercial  broadcast  stations  throughout  the  world  transmit  frequent 
time  signals  whose  accuracy  is  sufficient  for  all  navigation  purposes.    Primary  and  secondary 
transmission  sources  are  recognized  and,  whereas  all  stations  transmit  UTC,  the  primary 
transmissions include the coded correction that can be applied to UTC to obtain GMT accurate to 0.1 
second.    Some  of  the  more  important  time  signals  are  included  in  the  Flight  Information  Handbook 
together with their transmission frequency and time. 
Revised Sep 12  Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-11 - Time 
Celestial Sphere - The celestial sphere is an imaginary sphere of infinite radius, concentric with the 
Earth, on which all celestial bodies are imagined to be projected. 
Vernal Equinox - The point in the sky where the Sun appears to cross the celestial equator moving 
from south to north. This happens approximately on March 21. 
Aries - First Point of Aries () (vernal (springequinox
 
Over the course of a year the 
Sun, moving along its annual path, crosses the equator from south to north and again from north to 
south.  These crossings occur on or near 21 March and 23 September and are known as the vernal 
(spring) and autumn equinoxes respectively.  The vernal equinox is also known as the First Point of 
Aries (). 
Revised Sep 12  Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-12 - Glossary of Astronomical Terms 
CHAPTER 12 – GLOSSARY OF ASTRONOMICAL TERMS 
Air  Almanac  -  The  UK  Air  Almanac  is  available  as  a  free  PDF  download  from  HM  Nautical  Almanac 
Office at http://astro.ukho.gov.uk/ (www). 
Altitude - The angular distance between the direction to an object and the horizon. Altitude ranges from 0 
degrees for an object on the horizon to 90 degrees for an object directly overhead. 
Angular Momentum - The momentum of a body associated with its rotation or revolution. For a body in a 
circular  orbit,  angular  momentum  is  the  product  of  orbital  distance,  orbital  speed,  and  mass.  When  two 
bodies collide or interact, angular momentum is conserved. 
Aphelion - The point in the orbit of a solar system body where it is farthest from the Sun. 
Apogee - The apogee is the point in the orbit of the Moon, planet or other artifical satellite farthest from 
the Earth. 
Apparent Brightness - The observed brightness of a celestial body. 
Apparent Magnitude - The observed magnitude of a celestial body. 
Apparent Solar Day - The amount of time that passes between successive appearances of the Sun on 
the meridian. The apparent solar day varies in length throughout the year. 
Apparent Solar Time - Time kept according to the actual position of the Sun in the sky. Apparent solar 
noon occurs when the Sun crosses an observer’s meridian. 
Aries - First Point of Aries () (vernal (springequinox)   
Over  the  course  of  a  year  the  Sun, 
moving  along  its  annual  path,  crosses  the  equator  from  south  to  north  and  again from north to south.  
These  crossings  occur  on  or  near  21  March  and  23  September  and  are  known  as  the  vernal  (spring) 
and autumn equinoxes respectively.  The vernal equinox is also known as the First Point of Aries (). 
Ascending Node - The point in the Moon’s orbit where it crosses the ecliptic from south to north. 
Autumnal  Equinox  -  The  point  in  the sky where the Sun appears to cross the celestial equator moving 
from north to south. This happens on approximately September 22. 
Azimuth  -  The  angular  distance  between  the  north  point  on  the  horizon  eastward  around  the  horizon to 
the point on the horizon nearest to the direction to a celestial body. 
Celestial Equator - The circle where the Earth’s equator, if extended outward into space, would intersect 
the celestial sphere. 
Celestial Horizon - The celestial horizon is a great circle on the celestial sphere whose plane lies at 90°
to the zenith/nadir axis of an observer and passes through the centre of both the Earth and the celestial 
sphere. 
Celestial Sphere - The celestial sphere is an imaginary sphere of infinite radius, concentric with the Earth, 
on which all celestial bodies are imagined to be projected. 
Original Sep 12  Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-12 - Glossary of Astronomical Terms 
Co-latitude – Co-latitude is 90º - latitude. 
N Co-latitude (90-latitude)
Observers latitude
23.5° 
Equator
S
Coriolis  Effect  -  The  acceleration  which  a  body  experiences  when  it  moves  across  the  surface  of  a 
rotating body. The acceleration results in a westward deflection of projectiles and currents of air or water 
when  they  move  toward  the  Earth’s  equator  and  an  eastward  deflection  when they move away from the 
equator. 
Declination - The angular distance of a celestial body north or south of the celestial equator. Declination 
is analogous to latitude in the terrestrial coordinate system. 
Descending Node - The point in the Moon’s orbit where it crosses the ecliptic from north to south. 
Diurnal – Daily. 
Diurnal  Circle  -  The  circular  path  that  a  celestial  body  traces  out  as  it  appears  to  move  across  the  sky 
during an entire day. Diurnal circles are centered on the north and south celestial poles. 
Earth  Orbit  -  The  Earth  completes  one  orbit  round  the  Sun  in  approximately  365.25  days.    The  orbital 
plane  is  called  the  ecliptic.    The  Earth’s  N-S  axis  is  inclined  at  66.5º  to  the  ecliptic.    The  plane  of  the 
ecliptic makes an angle of 23.5º with the plane of the Earth’s equator; this angle is known as the obliquity 
of the ecliptic
N
The Obliquity of the Ecliptic
N
66.5° 
Plane of Ecliptic
23.5° 
Eq
E
u
q
a
u
to
Sun
a
r
tor
S
S
Earth Rotation - The Earth rotates from west to east on its axis as it orbits the Sun.  The Sun’s apparent 
daily path over the Earth is along a parallel of latitude, the particular latitude depending on the position of 
the  Sun  along  its  apparent  annual  path.    Since  the  Earth  rotates  from  west  to  east,  the  apparent  daily 
movement of the Sun and all other astronomical bodies is east to west. 
Earth Seasons - The tilting of the Earth’s axis causes the annual cycle of seasons.  The projection of the 
Sun’s  apparent  annual  path  on  the  Earth  is  a  great  circle  inclined  at  23.5º  to  the  equator.    About  23 
Original Sep 12  Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-12 - Glossary of Astronomical Terms 
December,  the  North  Pole  is  inclined  directly  away  from  the  Sun,  which  is  overhead  the  23.5º  South 
parallel.    Known  as  the  winter  solstice,  this  is  winter  in  the  northern  hemisphere  and  summer  in  the 
southern hemisphere. 
Eccentricity - A measure of the extent to which an orbit departs from circularity. Eccentricity ranges from 
0.0 for a circle to 1.0 for a parabola. 
Eclipse - The obscuration of the light from the Sun when the observer enters the Moon’s shadow or the 
Moon when it enters the Earth's shadow. Also, the obscuration of a star when it passes behind its binary 
companion. 
Eclipse  Year  -  The  interval  of  time  (346.6  days)  from  one  passage  of  the  Sun  through  a  node  of  the 
Moon’s orbit to the next passage through the same node. 
Ecliptic - The plane of the Earth’s orbit about the Sun. As a result of the Earth’s motion, the Sun appears 
to move among the stars, following a path that is also called the ecliptic. 
Ellipse - A closed, elongated curve describing the shape of the orbit that one body follows about another. 
Equator - The line around the surface of a rotating body that is midway between the rotational poles. The 
equator divides the body into northern and southern hemispheres. 
Equatorial System - A coordinate system, using right ascension and declination as coordinates, used to 
describe the angular location of bodies in the sky. 
Equinoctial  -  The  equinoctial  is  the  primary  great  circle  of  the  celestial  sphere,  and  is  formed  by  the 
projection of the Earth’s equator onto the celestial sphere. 
Gravity - The force of attraction between two bodies generated by their masses. 
Great  Circle  -  A  circle  that  bisects  a  sphere.  The  celestial  equator  and  ecliptic  are  examples  of  great 
circles. 
Horizon –  
Celestial Horizon - The celestial horizon is a great circle on the celestial sphere whose plane lies at 90°
to the zenith/nadir axis of an observer and passes through the centre of both the Earth and the celestial 
sphere. 
Visible or Apparent Horizon - The line at which the Earth and sky appear to meet is called the visible or 
apparent  horizon.    Although,  on  land,  this  is  usually  an  irregular  line,  at  sea,  the  visible  horizon  appears 
very regular.  Its position relative to the celestial sphere depends primarily upon the refractive index of the 
air and the height of the observer’s eye above the surface. 
Geoidal/Sensible Horizon - If the plane of the horizon forms a tangent to the Earth it is called the geoidal 
horizon and if it passes through the eye of the observer (A) it is the sensible horizon. 
Original Sep 12  Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-12 - Glossary of Astronomical Terms 
Zenith
A
Sensible
Horizon
Geoidal
Horizon
B
B
Celestial
Horizon
O
Geometrical
B'
B'
Horizon
Visible
C'
C'
Horizon
Nadir
Inclination - The tilt of the rotation axis or orbital plane of a body. 
Kepler’s Laws - Kepler defined the following laws of planetary motion: 
a. 
The orbit of each planet is an ellipse, with the Sun at one of the foci. 
b. 
The line joining the planet to the Sun sweeps across equal areas in equal times. 
c. 
The  square  of  the  sidereal  period  of  a  planet  is  proportional  to  the  cube  of  its  mean  distance 
from the Sun. 
P′
(Aphelion)
Major axis
S
A
P
A′
Foci
(Perihelion)
Elliptical orbit of planets
Latitude  -  The  angular  distance  of  a  point  north  or  south  of  the  equator  of  a  body  as  measured  by  a 
hypothetical observer at the center of a body. 
Local Hour Angle - The angle, measured westward around the celestial equator, between the meridian 
and the point on the equator nearest a particular celestial object. 
Longitude  -  The  angular  distance  around  the  equator  of  a  body  from  a  zero  point  to  the  place  on  the 
equator nearest a particular point as measured by a hypothetical observer at the center of a body. 
Major  Axis  -  The  axis of an ellipse that passes through both foci. The major axis is the longest straight 
line that can be drawn inside an ellipse. 
Mean Solar Time - Time kept according to the average length of the solar day. 
Meridian - The great circle passing through an observer’s zenith and the north and south celestial poles. 
Original Sep 12  Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-12 - Glossary of Astronomical Terms 
Moon – Phases 
Crescent Phase - The phase of the moon at which only a small, crescent-shaped portion of the near side 
of the Moon is illuminated by sunlight. Crescent phase occurs just before and after new moon. 
Full  Phase  -  The  phase  of  the  moon at which the bright side of the Moon is the face turned toward the 
Earth. 
New  Phase  -  The  phase  of  the  moon  in  which  none  or  almost  none  of  the  near  side  of  the  Moon  is 
illuminated by sunlight, so the near side appears dark. 
Quarter phase - The phase of the moon in which half of the near side of the Moon is illuminated by the 
Sun. 
Waning Crescent - The Moon's crescent phase that occurs just before new moon. 
Waxing Crescent - The Moon's crescent phase that occurs just after new moon. 
Minute of Arc - A unit of angular measurement equal to 1/60 of a degree. 
Nadir - The nadir is the point on the celestial sphere diametrically opposite the zenith. 
Nodes - The points in the orbit of the Moon where the Moon crosses the ecliptic plane. 
North  Celestial  Pole  -  The  point  above  the  Earth’s  north  pole  where  the  Earth’s  polar  axis,  if  extended 
outward  into  space,  would  intersect  the  celestial  sphere.  The  diurnal  circles  of  stars  in  the  northern 
hemisphere are centered on the north celestial pole. 
Orbit  -  The  elliptical  or  circular  path  followed  by  a  body  that  is  bound  to  another  body  by  their  mutual 
gravitational attraction. 
Perigee - The point in the orbit of the Moon, planet or other artifical satellite nearest to the Earth. 
Perihelion - The point in the orbit of a body when it is closest to the Sun. 
Period - The time it takes for a regularly repeated process to repeat itself. 
Perturbation - A deviation of the orbit of a solar system body from a perfect ellipse due to the gravitational 
attraction of one of the planets. 
Precession - The slow, periodic conical motion of the rotation axis of the Earth or another rotating body. 
Prime  Meridian  -  The  circle  on  the  Earth’s  surface  that  runs  from  pole  to  pole  through  Greenwich, 
England. The zero point of longitude occurs where the prime meridian intersects the Earth’s equator  
Right  Ascension  -  Angular  distance  of  a  body  along  the  celestial  equator  from  the  vernal  equinox 
eastward  to  the  point  on  the  equator  nearest  the  body.  Right  ascension  is  analogous  to  longitude  in  the 
terrestrial coordinate system. 
Original Sep 12  Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-12 - Glossary of Astronomical Terms 
Sidereal  Day  -  The  length  of  time  (23  hours,  56  minutes,  4.091  seconds)  between  successive 
appearances of a star on the meridian. 
Sidereal Month - The length of time required for the Moon to return to the same apparent position among 
the stars. 
Sidereal Period - The time it takes for a planet or satellite to complete one full orbit about the Sun or its 
parent planet. 
South Celestial Pole - The point above the Earth’s South Pole where the Earth's polar axis, if extended 
outward  into  space,  would  intersect  the  celestial  sphere.  The  diurnal  circles  of  stars  in  the  southern 
hemisphere are centered on the south celestial pole. 
Summer Solstice - The point on the ecliptic where the Sun’s declination is most northerly. The time when 
the Sun is at the summer solstice, around June 21, marks the beginning of summer. 
Synodic Month - The length of time (29.53 days) between successive occurrences of the same phase of 
the Moon. 
Synodic  Period  -  The  length  of  time  it  takes  a  solar  system  body  to  return  to  the  same  configuration 
(opposition to opposition, for example) with respect to the Earth and the Sun. 
Tropical Year - The interval of time, equal to 365.242 solar days, between successive appearances of the 
Sun at the vernal equinox. 
Vernal Equinox - The point in the sky where the Sun appears to cross the celestial equator moving from 
south to north. This happens approximately on March 21. 
Winter  Solstice  -  The  point  on  the  ecliptic  where  the  Sun  has  the  most  southerly  declination.  The  time 
when the Sun is at the winter solstice, around December 22, marks the beginning of winter. 
Year - The length of time required for the Earth to orbit the Sun. 
Zenith - The point on the celestial sphere directly above an observer. 
Original Sep 12  Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
CHAPTER 13 - AERONAUTICAL DOCUMENTS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  aim  of  this  chapter  is  to  summarize  those  aeronautical  documents  which  have  a  direct 
application to the safe conduct of air navigation and which are available and relevant to the Services as 
a  whole.    The  chapter  does  not  include  any  discussion  of  documents  that  are  promulgated  by 
Commands or lower authorities. 
2. 
Aeronautical  information  is  published  in  a  series  of  documents  and  charts  known  under  the 
generic title of Flight Information Publications (FLIPs).  Revised editions of most FLIPs take effect on 
certain  pre-determined  dates  which  accord  with  those  agreed  internationally  under  the  Aeronautical 
Information  Regulation  and  Control  (AIRAC)  system.    The  information  published  in  FLIPs  may  be 
augmented or updated by Supplements to the UK Military Aeronautical Information Publication (UK Mil 
AIP)  and  Notices  to  Airmen  (NOTAMs).    Classified  information  is  not  published  in  either  FLIPs  or 
NOTAMs.    FLIPs  are  available  via  the  No  1  Aeronautical  Information  Documents  Unit  (No  1  AIDU) 
website;  https://www.aidu.mod.uk/MilfLIP/.    The  Military  Flight  Information  Publications  (MilFLIP) 
provides  authorised  customers  with  secure  internet  access  to  the  complete  AIDU  catalogue.    For 
MilFLIP access see para 19. 
MOD AERONAUTICAL CHARTS 
The Ministry of Defence Catalogue of Geographic Products (GSGS 5893) 
3. 
The MOD Catalogue of Geographic Products (GSGS 5893) provides details of the principal series 
of  topographical  maps,  air  charts  and  digital  geographic  products  that  are  required  by  the  Army,  the 
Royal  Air  Force  and  the  Royal  Navy.    The  catalogue  is  available  in  electronic  format  only,  and  is 
updated regularly. 
4. 
For each series of maps or air charts, a coverage diagram depicts the geographical limits of both 
the series and of the individual sheets.  A portion of a sheet is usually included as an example.  Each 
map or chart series is further described under the following headings: 
a. 
Type.    This  section  gives  the  purpose  of  the  series,  e.g.  "Topographical  (Air),  coloured, 
overprints". 
b. 
Format.    In  addition  to  naming  the  map  projection  used,  this  section  includes  other  details 
such as the standard parallels and the scale factor of the chart. 
c. 
Size.  This section states the physical size of individual charts. 
d. 
Characteristics.    This  section  gives  details  of  the  aeronautical  information  represented  on 
the chart, and the base map used. 
5. 
Moving  Map  Displays  for  aircraft  are  listed  and  detailed  (including  areas  of  coverage) within this 
catalogue. 
Chart Amendment Document (CHAD) 
6. 
Chart Amendment Document.  The Chart Amendment Document (CHAD) is available on line via 
the AIDU website to inform all MOD flying units and other holders of the GSGS 5893 of: 
Revised Nov 17  Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
a. 
Significant  additions  and  corrections  to  be  considered  when  using  the  current  edition  of 
published charts within the geographical areas defined in the CHAD. 
b. 
Notices of special interest to MOD aeronautical chart users. 
Chart Updating Manual (CHUM) 
7. 
Chart Updating Manual.  The Chart Updating Manual (CHUM) is available on line via the AIDU 
website and amends certain US and RAF charts (Low Flying Charts and the FLIP En Route Charts are 
excluded from the CHAD/CHUM coverage. 
Chart Amendments - Low Flying (CALF) 
8. 
The  Chart  Amendment–Low  Flying  (CALF)  provides  an  amendment  service  for  the  Low  Flying 
Charts  (LFC)  and  M5219-Air  paper  charts.    Incorporated  in  the  CALF  is  the  Low  Flying  Supplement, 
containing  the  operating  hours  of  scheduled  airspace  within  the  coverage  of  the  Low  Flying  Charts.  
The CALF is available as a paper booklet or download from the AIDU website. 
THE UNITED KINGDOM AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION SERVICE 
9. 
The  United  Kingdom  Aeronautical  Information  Service  (UK  AIS)  is  part  of  National  Air  Traffic 
Services (NATS) Ltd and is located close to London Heathrow Airport.  UK AIS is responsible for the 
collection  and  dissemination  of  information  necessary  for  the  safety,  regularity  and  efficiency  of  air 
navigation throughout UK airspace.  Details of UK AIS services and products can be obtained from the 
AIS website at http://www.nats-uk.ead-it.com/public/index.php.html . 
The AIRAC System 
10.  The  Aeronautical  Information  Regulation  and  Control  (AIRAC)  system  gives  a  framework  for 
planned  changes  to  aeronautical  facilities,  procedures  and  regulations.    A  series  of  pre-determined 
dates  (known  as  AIRAC  dates)  is  published  in  advance.    Changes  will  normally  be  planned  to  take 
effect  on  these  AIRAC  dates.    Thus,  with  reasonable  notice  (normally  28  days),  all  operators  can  be 
made aware of any forthcoming change and its effective date. 
The UK Integrated Aeronautical Information Package 
11.  The  UK  AIS  produces  aeronautical  information  in  several  publication  formats,  under  the  generic 
title of 'The UK Integrated Aeronautical Information Package (UKIAIP)'.  Details of the UKIAIP can be 
obtained from the AIS website. The UKIAIP consists of: 
a. 
The  UK  Aeronautical  Information  Publication  (UK  AIP).    The  UK  AIP contains information 
essential to air navigation and operations within UK airspace.  The UK AIP can be accessed via the AIS 
website. 
b. 
UK  AIP  Supplements.    UK  AIP  Supplements  detail  temporary  changes  to  the  UK  AIP, 
usually of long duration, and contain comprehensive text and/or graphics. 
c. 
Aeronautical Information Circulars (AICs).  AICs are notices relating to safety, navigation, 
technical, administrative or legal matters. 
d. 
NOTAMs.  NOTAMs are notices relating to the condition or change to any facility, service or 
procedure notified within the UK AIP. 
Revised Nov 17  Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
e. 
Pre-flight Information Bulletins (PIBs).  PIBs  are  summaries  of  the  current  status  of 
aeronautical facilities and services and are available on the AIS website.  They are produced for 
pre-selected  areas,  with  almost  world-wide  coverage,  and  contain  edited  versions  of  selected 
NOTAMs.    PIBs  are  issued  as  general  bulletins  containing  route,  aerodrome  and  general 
information, and also as navigation warning bulletins. 
Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) 
12.  A NOTAM is a notice containing information concerning the establishment, condition or change in 
any  aeronautical  facility,  service,  procedure  or  hazard,  the  timely  knowledge  of  which  is  essential  to 
personnel concerned with flight operations.  Trigger MOTAMs are used to inform users of operationally 
significant  information  due  to  be incorporated in an AIP amendment or SUP.  NOTAMs are available 
from the AIS website. 
13.  The existence of a NOTAM advising of an activity within an area does not grant the sponsor sole 
use of the airspace concerned, but simply advises other airspace users of the activity. 
14.  A NOTAM will deal with one subject only and is originated by the unit where the change occurs.  
NOTAMs should be restricted to information of a temporary nature and of short duration but may also 
be used when operationally significant permanent changes, or temporary changes of long duration, are 
made at short notice.   
15.  The NOTAM Code.  Details of the NOTAM Code, its format and use are contained in the UK Mil 
AIP and in the Flight Information Handbook (FIH). 
16.  The  UK  NOTAM  Service.    The  UK  International  NOTAM  Office  is  a  combined  military  and  civil 
organisation  within  NATS  and  is  part  of  the  UK  AIS.    AIS  Heathrow  distributes  NOTAMs  to  military 
units  in  accordance  with  distributions  lists  laid  down  by  MOD.    Low  Flying  Operations  Squadron 
(Ops LF) based at RAF Wittering issue NOTAMs concerning the UK low flying system. 
17.  NOTAM  Display  Boards.    NOTAMs  are  displayed  in  all  RAF  briefing  rooms  to  facilitate  easy 
reference to NOTAM information. 
SNOWTAMs 
18.  A SNOWTAM is a specific type of NOTAM, used for notifying the presence or removal of hazardous 
conditions  due  to  snow,  slush,  ice  or  standing  water  on  the  movement  areas  of  aerodromes.  The 
SNOWTAM proforma is explained in the UK Mil AIP and in the FIH. 
MILITARY AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION SERVICES 
No 1 Aeronautical Information Documents Unit (No 1 AIDU) 
19.  No  1  Aeronautical  Information  Documents  Unit  (No  1  AIDU)  is  responsible  for  the  publication  and 
distribution of all permanent unclassified information concerning any aeronautical facility, service, procedure 
or hazard, that might be required by UK military personnel directly involved with the operation and safety of 
aircraft.    Most  of  this  information  is  now  provided  in  both  hard  copy  and  digital  format.  No 1 AIDU has a 
policy  to  migrate  from  the  provision  of paper-based products to an electronic format where customers will 
download and print products locally.  The AIDU website can be accessed via the web address in para 2.  To 
access MilFLIP, a username and password is required which can be obtained by logging on to the AIDU 
Revised Nov 17  Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
website and selecting MilFLIP, where a request for a new account can be processed.  This will allow 
the user to apply for access and for AIDU to verify the request.  Deployed or diverted crews can obtain 
emergency access via AIDU Customer Services on telephone +44 (0) 8833 8587 or Mil 95233 8587. 
20.  AIDU FLIP publications may be considered in three groups: 
a. 
Planning Documents and Services. 
b. 
En Route Publications. 
c. 
Terminal Area Documents. 
Although  produced  primarily  for  the  Armed  Forces,  most  of  these  publications  are  available  for 
purchase by civilian operators. 
Planning Documents and Services
21.  The  Integrated  Aeronautical  Information  Package.    Planning  information  is  published  in  the 
Integrated Aeronautical Information Package, which comprises: 
a. 
The UK Military Aeronautical Information Publication (UK Mil AIP). 
b. 
The UK Military Low Flying Handbook. 
c. 
International Planning Information. 
UK Military Aeronautical Information Publication (UK Mil AIP) 
22.  The UK Military Aeronautical Information Publication (UK Mil AIP).  The UK Mil AIP Consists of 
two volumes which are updated every 28 days by No 1 AIDU to meet the AIRAC schedule.  The General 
and En-route volume (Volume 1) provides guidance to military aircrew on: 
a.  General Rules and Procedure. 
b.  ATS Airspace. 
c.  Radio Navigation Aids. 
d.  Warnings. 
e.  Military Training and Exercise Areas. 
The  UK  Aerodromes  volume  (Volume  2)  provides  comprehensive  information  on  UK  military  airfields 
including  operating  times,  facilities,  airfield  surface  and  obstruction  information,  communications  and 
runway lighting details, noise abatement and special procedures.  It also contains graphics for SIDs and 
STARs, instrument approaches, airfield diagrams and ramp charts.  The UK Mil AIP is produced every 28 
days on CD ROM and is also available to download from the No 1 AIDU website. 
23.  Amendments to the UK Mil AIP.  Amendments to the UK Mil AIP are issued once every 28 days, 
in  the  form  of  replacement  sheets,  to  coincide  with  the  AIRAC  dates.    The  amendment  is  used  to 
introduce  permanent,  operationally  significant  changes  into  the  AIP  on  the  indicated  AIRAC  date.  
These are issued in advance but do not become effective until the relevant AIRAC date. 
Revised Nov 17  Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
24.  UK  Mil  AIP  Supplements. UK  Mil  AIP  Supplements  contain  operational  items  of  a  temporary 
nature  only.    They  are  printed  on  yellow  paper  and  normally  issued  every  28  days.    The  period  of 
validity of the information will usually be given in the Supplement itself. 
United Kingdom Low Flying Handbook (LFH) 
25.  United  Kingdom  Low  Flying  Handbook. This  document  is  available  for  download  from  the 
AIDU website.  It lists specific information regarding the Low Flying System and regulations, along with 
avoids, warnings and High Intensity Radio Transmission Areas (HIRTA). 
a. 
Section  1  The  UK  Low  Flying  System.    Section 1  contains  a  description  of  the  low  flying 
system along with general restrictions and procedures. 
b. 
Section 2 The UK Day Low Flying System.  Section 2 describes the day low flying system 
restrictions, Tactical Training Areas (TTA), TTA booking procedures and TTA timing restrictions. 
c. 
Section  3  The  UK  Night  Low  Flying  System.    Section  3  contains  the  night  low  flying 
restrictions together with specific details for rotary wing operations. 
d. 
Section 4 The Highlands Restricted Area. 
Section  4  gives  details  of  the  Highlands 
Restricted Area which is established to ensure the necessary traffic separation to enable Terrain 
Following Radar (TFR) training to be conducted in IMC. 
e. 
Section 5 Not Used.
f. 
Section 6 Centralised Aviation Data Service (CADS).   
Section  6  contains  details  of 
the CADS system, the aim of which is to reduce the risk of mid-air collision. 
26.  UK Low Flying Charts (LFC)
The  1:500,000  LFCs  and  the  M5219-A  1:250,000  series charts 
contain extensive Ordnance Survey topographical, obstruction and power line information in addition to 
portraying  the  Low  Flying  Areas  and  avoidances.    The  North  and  South  Flag  Officer  Sea  Training 
(FOST) 1:500,000 charts are designed for VFR low flying in the Plymouth Danger Areas. 
27.  International  Planning  Information.    The  International  Planning  Document  that  contained 
information  on  foreign  airspace  structure  and  national  air  traffic  procedures  is  no  longer  available  in 
print.    This  document  has  been  replaced  by  a  Library/Enquiry  Service  operated  by  the  Aeronautical 
Information  Bureau  of  No  1  AIDU.    Enquiries  can  be  made  via  telephone  on  DFTS  95233  8713  or 
civil 020 8833 8713.  Some foreign AIPs are available via the AIDU website. 
En-Route Publications 
28.  No  1  AIDU  produces  aeronautical  information  for  use  by  aircrew  in  flight,  in  a  series  of 
conveniently sized publications.  The coverage of RAF en route FLIPs is from the Eastern seaboard of 
the USA, through Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Southern Asia.  British military users operating 
outside  this  area  of  coverage  should  use  the  appropriate  FLIPs  produced  by  the  US  Department  of 
Defense, Canadian Forces or Royal Australian Air Force. 
29.  The  En-Route  Supplement  (ERS).    The  ERS  is  produced  in  four  volumes,  based  on  specified 
geographical  areas  (British  Isles  and  North  Atlantic  (BINA),  Northern  Europe  (NOREU),  European  and 
Mediterranean  (EUMED),  South  Atlantic,  Africa,  Asia  and  Far  East  (SAAAFE)).    Each  ERS  contains 
comprehensive details of aeronautical information and facilities within its specific area, including: 
a. 
All active British military aerodromes, regardless of size. 
Revised Nov 17  Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
b. 
Selected  civil  and  other  military  aerodromes  with  a  hard  surface  runway  length  of  at  least 
5,000 ft, and some communications facilities. 
c. 
Other aerodromes at the discretion of No 1 AIDU. 
d. 
Relevant communications and navigational facilities. 
30.  The Flight Information Handbook (FIH).  The FIH is designed to provide a digest of information 
useful  to  aircrew  during  flight  planning,  and  when  airborne.    It  includes  en  route  procedures,  general 
planning information, emergency and safety procedures, codes and conversion tables. 
31.  En Route Charts (ERCs).  ERCs are available in both paper format and as downloads from the 
AIDU website.  A sub-set of the charts is also available in digital format.  ERCs provide details of ATS 
routes,  designated  airspace,  airspace  reservations,  radio  navigation  facilities  and  en  route 
communications.    Due  to  chart  congestion,  sufficient  information  is  given  for  transit  flight  only.  ERCs 
should,  therefore,  always  be  used  in  conjunction  with  ERS,  Planning  Documents  and  Terminal 
Publications.  ERCs are drawn to plotting chart standards, based on the Oblique Mercator projection or 
the  Lamberts  Conformal  projection.    The  latitude  and  longitude  graticule  on  ERCs  is  based  on 
WGS 84.  Topographical data, other than major water features, is not shown.  A Maximum Elevation 
Figure (MEF) is printed for each one-degree quadrangle, where scale permits, for en route safety.  The 
UK  Mil  AIP  contains  chart  coverage  diagrams  together  with  an  En-route  Chart  Legend,  which  is also 
available as a separate document.  The following types of ERC are published: 
a. 
Low Altitude.  These charts portray aeronautical information within the vertical limits of each 
Flight Information Region (FIR), as stated on the chart panel. 
b. 
High  Altitude.    Aeronautical  information  is  shown  only  for  the  Upper  Airspace.    Where  no 
Upper  Flight  Information  Region  (UIR)  is  defined, the lower limit of aeronautical information shown 
on the chart is FL 245.  The true vertical limit of each FIR and UIR is shown on the chart panel. 
c. 
High/Low  Altitude  (H/L).    These  charts  show  aeronautical  information  for  combined  upper 
and lower airspace. 
d. 
Area Navigation (Rnav).  Area navigation information is shown on charts which cover routes 
in the European area. 
Terminal Area Documents 
32.  Terminal  Charts.    Terminal  charts  include  Standard  Instrument  Departures  (SIDs),  Standard 
Arrival  Routes  (STARs),  Terminal  Approaches,  Airfield  Diagrams  and  Ramp  Charts.    A  Terminal 
Charts  Information  and  Legend  leaflet  is  available  in  the  UK  Mil  AIP  Volume  1  or  as  a  separate 
document.  Terminal charts are available in various formats: 
a. 
Loose-leaf Format.  All TCs are available in loose-leaf format.  The full list of current TCs is 
published in the Terminal Charts Specification and Legend.  They are available for download from 
the AIDU website. 
b. 
Fast-Jet Terminal Chart Book.  A set of procedures (mostly TACAN and ILS) for airfields likely to 
be used by fast-jet aircraft is contained in the Fast-Jet Terminal Chart book which is produced every 56 
days.  Amendments are published in the Terminal Charts Amendment Bulletin (TCAB). 
c. 
Aerodrome  Booklets.    These  booklets  contain  TCs  for  airfields  within a geographical area 
or route and are based on operational requirements. 
Revised Nov 17  Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
d. 
Terminal Charts UK North & South.  Volumes of terminal chart procedures to cover the UK 
are  published  in  two  volumes,  North  and  South,  separated  by  52°  30’  N  latitude.    They  have 
comprehensive  coverage  of  all  UK  military  airfields  and  include  SIDs,  STARs  and  airfield  and 
ramp  charts  and  are  produced  every  56  days.    Significant  amendments  are  published  in  the 
TCAB. 
33.  Terminal  Chart  (TC)  Specifications.    The  majority  of  TCs  made  available  through  No  1  AIDU 
are produced by them, but some are purchased from the European Aeronautical Group (EAG) to cover 
gaps in the AIDU catalogue. 
a. 
No 1 AIDU produce TCs known as No1 AIDU (RAF) New Specification charts.  These charts 
use  International  Civil  Aviation  Organisation  (ICAO)  and  UK  AIP  symbols  and  abbreviations.  
Exceptionally, abbreviations unique to AIDU are used.  The symbols and abbreviations used on No1 
AIDU  (RAF)  New  Specification  TCs  can  be  found  in  the  No1  AIDU  Terminal  Charts,  Specification 
and Legend book.  Some of the TCs listed in the Terminal Charts Catalogue (TCC) are the editorial 
responsibility of the EAG.  AIDU is responsible for all military airfields and EAG, in general, for major 
international airfields. 
b. 
The EAG produce TCs known as NAVTECH EAG charts.  Symbols and abbreviations used 
on  NAVTECH  EAG  TCs  can  be  found  in  the  NAVTECH  Aerodromes  Charts  Specification  and 
Legend book. 
34.  Minor  Aerodromes  UK.    The  Minor  Aerodromes  UK  booklet  contains  information  for  selected 
aerodromes  (Military,  government  and  civil)  in  the  UK  that  either  do  not  have  a  published  instrument 
let-down procedure, or do not meet the minimum criteria for inclusion in other FLIPs. 
35.  Helicopter  Landing  Sites  (HLS).    Three  HLS  booklets  are  published,  each  containing  detailed 
graphics  and  associated  information  for  selected  sites.    They  are  supported  by  the  TCAB.    These 
booklets are titled: 
a. 
Helicopter  Landing  Sites  UK  contains  details  of  military  and  some  civilian  sites  in  the  UK, 
together with helicopter routes in selected control zones and training areas. 
b. 
Helicopter Landing Sites Hospitals UK contains details of hospital helicopter landing sites in 
the UK and certain control zones. 
c. 
Helicopter  Landing  Sites  and  Visual  Approach/Departure  Charts  –  Europe  contains  military 
and  some  civilian  sites  in  Belgium,  Cyprus,  Denmark,  France,  Germany,  Italy,  Norway,  The 
Netherlands and Ireland along with associated visual approach and departure charts. 
No 1 AIDU Amendment Services 
36.  FLIPs are amended by routine issue, and by an assortment of amendment bulletins, which form 
an  integral part of all FLIPs.  These amendments are produced and distributed in hard copy, and are also 
available via the AIDU website.  The aeronautical information in FLIPs is also augmented and updated by 
NOTAM.  The following amendment documents are issued: 
a. 
En-route Bulletin.  The En-route Bulletin is issued every 28 days contains amendments for 
ERC, ERS and the FIH.  The ERB also contains ERC area of coverage. 
b. 
Terminal Charts Catalogue (TCC).  All available Terminal Charts are listed in the TCC which is 
issued every 28 days. 
Revised Nov 17  Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-13 - Aeronautical Documents 
c. 
Terminal Charts Amendment Bulletin (TCAB).  Non-permanent, textual amendments to the 
charts are published in the TCAB which is issued every 28 days. 
d. 
Terminal Documents Amendment Supplement (TDAS).  The TDAS is published monthly 
on AIRAC dates.  It supplements the Emergency and Unplanned Diversion Books (Vols 1-2), TC 
UK N & S and Fast-jet N & S.  Only significant changes are published. 
37.  Accuracy  of  FLIP  Information.    All  users  of  documents  produced by No 1 AIDU, on finding an 
error  or  omission,  have  a  responsibility  for  notifying  No 1  AIDU  without  delay  via  AIDU  Customer 
Services on telephone +44 (0) 8833 8587 or Mil 95233 8587. 
38.  Accuracy  of  Aeronautical  Charts.    Where  errors  are  identified  in  aeronautical  information  on 
topographical  charts  (eg  boundaries  of  controlled  airspace)  then,  again,  No  1  AIDU  is  to  be  informed.  
However,  in  the  event  that  the  error concerns the geographical base map (e.g. mapping details, including 
obstructions), then the point of contact is the Geo Support department at the Defence Geographic Centre, 
Feltham via +44 208 818 2726 or Mil (9)4641 4726. 
No 1 AIDU Digital Products 
39.  The Digital Aeronautical Flight Information File (DAFIF).   
DAFIF  is  the  military  standard  for 
digital  aeronautical  data  produced  in  support  of  Mission  Planning,  Flight  Management  Systems  and  Flight 
Simulation.  It is administered by the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and distributed to the MoD via 
No 1 AIDU. 
40.  En-Route Charts (ERCs)
ERCs  provide  graphical  detail  of  airways  routes,  designated  airspace, 
airspace  reservations,  radio  navigation  facilities  and  en-route  communications.    They  are  available  in 
1:500,000, 1:1,000,000, 1:2,000,000 and 1:5,000,000 scales. 
41.  Low Flying Charts (LFCs).  LFCs provide extensive topographical, obstruction, MEFs and powerline 
information in addition to providing all low flying information up to 2,000 ft, all other airspace up to 10,000 ft 
and generalised airspace up to FL 195.  Available charts are the LFC UK (Day and Night), 1:5,000,000, and 
the North and South FOST 1:5,000,000. 
42.  M5219 (Air) (aka Helicopter Charts).  M5219 
(Air) 
charts 
provide 
extensive 
topographical, 
obstruction, MEFs and powerline information in addition to providing all low flying information up to 2,000 ft, 
also depicting aeronautical information up to FL 100.  They are available in 1:250,000 scale. 
43.  Map Availability Catalogue (MAC)
The MAC is available for download from the AIDU website only 
for  each  supported  digital  map  system  and  type  defining  all  mapping  currently  available  to  the  AIDU 
customer. 
Revised Nov 17  Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
CHAPTER 14 - NAVIGATION PLANNING 
Introduction 
1. 
The  navigation  planning  requirements  for  any  flight  will  depend  largely  on  the  nature  of  the  task,  the 
area of operation and any procedures or orders relevant to a particular aircraft type or role.  Many tasks will 
be of a 'standard' nature, e.g. regular air transport routes, and, in such cases, maximum use can be made of 
Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), computerized planning facilities and statistical meteorological data.  
Alternatively,  the  mission  may  be  of  an  operational  or  emergency  nature  and  the  normal  flight  planning 
procedures may have to be amended or circumvented in the interests of expediency; much reliance will be 
placed on the use of SOPs and on the experience of the crew.  It would be inappropriate to attempt to cover 
all  of  the  specialist  procedures  in  use;  rather  this  chapter  will  review  the  basic  navigation  planning 
requirements for a straightforward flight at medium or high level.  Fuel planning, which is an integral part of 
flight planning, will be covered in Volume 9, Chapter 15. 
2. 
In  order  to  highlight  the  principle  ingredients  of  navigation  planning,  by  way  of  example,  this 
chapter  will  investigate  the  planning  requirements  and  procedures  for  a  straightforward  flight  from  St 
Mawgan to Valley.  
Pre-planning Considerations 
3. 
Before any actual planning can take place a number of factors must be considered which will help 
to determine the route and techniques to be used.  Among these factors are: 
a. 
The task. 
b. 
The fuel requirements or limitations. 
c. 
Aircraft performance. 
d. 
The geography of the area to be overflown. 
e. 
The meteorological forecast for the route or area. 
f. 
The availability and serviceability of navigation aids. 
g. 
Air traffic control restrictions, danger areas and prohibited airspace. 
h. 
Any special procedures that must be obeyed. 
i. 
Availability of diversion airfields. 
4. 
The Task.  In this example, the task is straightforward; to navigate the aircraft safely between St 
Mawgan and Valley, in accordance with normal operating and air traffic procedures.  It should be borne 
in  mind,  however,  that  frequently  the  task  is  more  complex,  eg  there  may  be  intermediate  stops, 
specific  times  to  make  good  at  reporting  points,  air-to-air  refuelling  to  be  accomplished.    The  only 
restriction in this example is that the flight is to take place at cruising levels around FL 200. 
5. 
Fuel.    In  this  case,  the  flight  is  well  within  the  capability  of  the  aircraft  with  regards  to  fuel 
consumption.  The detail of fuel planning is covered in Volume 9, Chapter 15.  
6. 
Aircraft  Performance.    In  this  case,  the  aircraft  has  no  performance  limitations  with  respect  to  the 
cruising level, or with the runway lengths at either airfield.  It should be noted that this is not always the case, 
for example, at some All-up Weights (AUWs) it may not be possible to climb to the desired level, and there 
may  be  prohibitive  restrictions  on  runway  length.    On  a  short  route,  such  as  in  this  example,  a  major 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
consideration is that, if the aircraft is fully fuelled at take-off, it may arrive at the destination, at an AUW which 
is too heavy for landing.  
7. 
Geography.    There  are  no  particular  geographical  factors  pertaining  to  this  flight,  except  that  it 
should be noted that the northern end of the route is over mountainous terrain and particular care must be 
taken when calculating safety altitude and when monitoring the descent.  
8. 
Meteorology.  The following meteorological data will be assumed: 
a. 
Cloud.  A general cloud base of 2,500 ft over the whole area, multi-layered up to tops at 15,000 ft. 
b. 
Wind.    The  following wind structure applies to the whole route including departure and arrival 
airfields: 
Surface  310°/15 kt 
2,000 ft  315°/22 kt 
5,000 ft  325°/30 kt 
10,000 ft  330°/35 kt 
20,000 ft  340°/45 kt 
25,000 ft  350°/55 kt 
c. 
Temperature.  The temperature is ISA +4. 
d. 
Weather.  There is no significant weather either en route or at either airfield. 
9. 
Navigation Aids.  It will be assumed that the aircraft is fitted with serviceable TACAN, VOR, ADF.  
All of the appropriate ground beacons are also serviceable. 
10.  Restricted  Airspace.    A  study  of  the  en  route  chart  (Fig  1)  reveals  that  there  are  a  number  of 
Danger  Areas  to  be  avoided,  and  some  Airways  to  cross  (for  which  clearance  or  control  will  be 
necessary). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 8 



AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
9-14 Fig 1 En Route Chart for Route - St Mawgan to Valley (example only) 
11.  Special Procedures.  Fig 2 shows the SID for St Mawgan, and it will be apparent that it involves 
no  more  than  a  climb  on  runway  heading  to  2,000  ft  (QFE)  before  setting  heading  as  required.    The 
intention at Valley is to descend to the overhead at 1,000 ft, to join the visual circuit.  These are simple 
procedures;  however,  particularly  at  major  civilian  airfields,  the  procedures  are  likely  to  be  far  more 
complex  and  will  often  influence  the  selection  of  the  route  to  include  specific  reporting  points.    SIDs, 
STARs, the ERS, and the Planning Document will need to be consulted at the planning stage.  
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
9-14 Fig 2 St Mawgan Standard Instrument Departure (example only) 
SID
ST MAWGAN
Elev 390
Var 5°W
TA 3000
TRL ATC
04 OCT 01 G1
D
N
A
L
G
N
E
/-
G
D
G

MSA SM
E
2000
°0
1800
1
2
3000
075°
300°
2400
3
25nm
05°
r
o
in
St Mawgan
M
:
SM 356.5
s
St Mawgan
e
g
SMG Ch 73
n
a
(112.6)
h
C
12
1

G
G
NOT TO SCALE
D
G
E
d
ra
e
2000
A
s
ic
n
io
v
A
s
le
a
h
MNM RQRD CLIMB RATE (fpm)
)/T
RWY GS
80
120
150
180
210
250
To
A
13
4.4% 360
540
670
810
940 1120 2000
(R
31
2.6% 210
320
400
480
560
660 2000
U
1. CAUTION. Risk of birdstrike
ID
A
RWY
ROUTEING (Including Mnm Noise Routes)
1
o
13/31
Climb on rwy Tr to 200  
0 QFE, then as cleared
N
ST MAWGAN
SID
12.  Diversion Airfields.  There are no significant problems with availability of diversion airfields in this 
example.    Cardiff  and  Shawbury  are  not  far  from  the  route  should  it  be  necessary  to  divert  en  route; 
Mona, Ronaldsway, Liverpool, Woodvale and Warton would make suitable diversion airfields should it 
be  impossible  to  land  at  Valley.    When  selecting  diversion  airfields,  it  is  important  to  consider  their 
suitability with regards to runway length, navigation and landing aids, weather (including any cross-wind 
limitations)  and  necessary  services,  e.g.  availability  of  appropriate  fuels  and  oils.    The  fuel  planning 
implications of diversion will be reviewed in Volume 9, Chapter 15. 
Route Determination and Chart Preparation 
13.  For  the  example  exercise,  the  En  Route  Low  Altitude  and  Area  Navigation  (R-NAV)  charts  are 
appropriate.  It would be prudent to carry High Altitude charts in case it is necessary for weather or air 
traffic  reasons  to  fly  in  the  upper  airspace  or  cross  R-NAV(H)  routes.    Also  a  topographical  chart 
should be carried, and in any case will need to be consulted in order to ascertain safety altitudes. 
14.  Route.  For convenience, the runway heading at St Mawgan will be maintained until the edge of the 
MATZ  before  turning  onto  the  desired  track.    The  principle  constraint  on  the  choice  of  the  route  is  the 
need to avoid the numerous Danger Areas in the Bristol Channel and Cardigan Bay.  With this in mind, 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
turning points have been selected at 5130N 00400W and at 5250N 00400W, before making for the Valley 
overhead (Fig 1). If required, the turning points may be lettered or numbered to aid identification. 
15.  Chart Preparation.  Having drawn the route on the chart, other points of interest can be added or 
highlighted,  e.g.  isogonals,  ASR  boundaries,  suitable  navigation  beacons  and  Danger  Area boundaries.  
NOTAMs  should  be  checked  to  ensure  that  no  activity  is  likely to affect the flight and, if necessary, the 
route  may  have  to  be  amended.    It  may  be  convenient to draw range arcs, centred on Valley, to make 
navigation  in  the  terminal  phase  easier.    Once  the  top  of  descent  point  has  been  determined,  further 
range arcs back along track from this point, and from intermediate turning points, may be constructed if 
desired.  Care must be taken to ensure that working areas of the chart do not become over-cluttered. 
Completing the Navigation Flight Plan 
16.  Fig 3 shows a typical flight plan form.  Different operators will use variations of this form to cater 
for  their  particular  requirements.    The  top  part  of  the  form  is  self-explanatory  and  needs  no  further 
comment here.  The bottom part acts as a reminder of various fuel requirements.  This chapter will be 
concerned with the main body of the form and its completion.  
9-14 Fig 3 Flight Plan Form
A/C
C/S
DATE
PILOT
NAV
SCREEN
DIVERSION
1
TR             (         )
DIST 
NM
FL
TR
W/V
HDG
VAR
HDG
DR
WP
ROUTE TO
SALT
RAS
FL
OAT
TAS
G/S
LEG
LEG
ET
ETA
START
FUEL
(T)
(T)
(M)
MACH
ALT
DIST
TIME
FLOW
USED
8000
MIN
035
330/35
028
6W
034
7S
TOC
3000
210
267
250
46
11
11
80
035
340/45
028
6W
034
7S
5130N 0400W
4000
210
210
-23
290
262
34
8
19
359
340/45
356
6W
002
3S
5250N 0400W/TOD
5600
210
210
-23
290
249
80
19
38
319
330/35
320
6W
326
1P
VALLEY
5600
1000
282
250
32
8
46
MIN THRESHOLD
800
FUEL FOR APPROACHES
RW.....................................ROLL.......................................
INST APP AT DIVERSION
400
VISUAL APPROACH
100
MIN FUEL..........................COMBAT..................................
OVERSHOOT AND CLIMB AT DESTN
100
INSTRUMENT APPROACH
200
RW.....................................ROLL.......................................
TRANSIT FUEL (W/C + ICING)
FULL INSTRUMENT PATTERN AND APPROACH
400
MIN FUEL..........................COMBAT..................................
Notes: 1. Max x-wind component - 25 kt.  2. Max surface W/V limit - 40 kt
FUEL ON THE GROUND
17.  The first stage is to enter the names or positions of the waypoints in the column marked "Route To".  
The first point will be 'Top of Climb' (TOC), and the penultimate point 'Top of Descent' (TOD), although these 
points have not yet been determined.  Tracks and distances are measured and entered in the appropriate 
columns.    The  first  and  last  leg  distance  will  be  divided  once  the  climb  and  descent  planning  has  been 
completed.  In this example, the initial part of the climb from take-off to five miles has been ignored for the 
purpose of calculating headings, although it will of course be included in the total distance and in the time 
and fuel calculations. 
18.  Climb Planning.  Fig 4 shows the appropriate page from the Operating Data Manual (ODM) for 
the climb portion of the flight.  Care must be taken to ensure that the page is correct with respect to the 
climb  profile  (if  the  aircraft  can  undertake  a  variety  of  climb  profiles),  and  to  the  temperature  profile 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
(ISA +4 in this case).  The layout of the ODM will vary between aircraft, but the example is fairly typical.  
The first task is to decide the level to which it is intended to climb.  The route brief has specified Flight 
Levels  around  FL200  and  in  this  situation  FL210  is  selected.    By  finding  this  level  in  the  left-hand 
column and reading across to the appropriate take-off weight (21,000 lb in this example) it will be seen 
that the mean TAS for the climb is 267 kt and the time for the climb is 11 minutes.  This data can be 
inserted in the appropriate columns on the first line of the flight plan.  In practice, the fuel used in the 
climb can also be extracted at this stage and recorded in the flight plan, but fuel planning is covered in 
Volume 9, Chapter 15.  
9-14 Fig 4 ODM Climb Table 
NORMAL CLIMB
(ISA + 3°C to ISA + 7°C)
TAKE-OFF WEIGHT (lb X 1000)
PRESS
ISA
MEAN
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
ISA
PRESS
HEIGHT
TEMP
T A S
TEMP
HEIGHT
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
FUEL
TIME
ft X 1000
°C
kt
°C
ft X 1000
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
LB
MIN
42
-57
318
1745
36
1525
30
1375
26
1245
23
1130
20
-57
42
41
-57
314
1585
30
1420
26
1295
23
1180
21
1080
19
-57
41
25
-35
281
1060
13
1005
13
945
12
890
11
835
10
785
10
740
9
690
9
-35
25
24
-33
278
1020
13
955
12
905
11
850
10
805
10
755
9
710
9
665
8
-33
24
23
-31
274
980
12
920
11
870
10
820
10
775
9
725
9
685
8
640
8
-31
23
22
-29
271
940
11
880
11
835
10
785
9
745
9
695
8
660
8
615
7
-29
22
21
-27
267
900
11
845
10
800
9
755
9
715
8
670
8
635
7
595
7
-27
21
20
-25
264
860
10
805
9
770
9
720
8
685
8
645
7
610
7
570
7
-25
20
19
-23
260
820
9
775
9
740
8
695
8
660
7
620
7
590
7
550
6
-23
19
18
-21
257
785
9
740
8
705
8
670
8
630
7
595
7
565
6
530
6
-21
18
17
-19
254
745
8
705
8
675
7
640
7
605
7
575
6
540
6
510
6
-19
17
16
-17
251
710
8
670
7
640
7
610
7
580
6
545
6
520
6
485
5
-17
16
15
-15
247
670
7
635
7
610
7
575
6
550
6
520
6
495
5
465
5
-15
15
14
-13
244
635
7
605
7
580
6
550
6
525
6
495
5
470
5
445
5
-13
14
13
-11
240
600
6
570
6
550
6
520
6
500
5
470
5
450
5
425
5
-11
13
12
-9
237
565
6
540
6
520
5
490
5
470
5
450
5
425
4
405
4
-9
12
11
-7
233
530
6
510
5
490
5
465
5
445
5
425
4
405
4
385
4
-7
11
10
-5
229
495
5
480
5
460
5
440
5
420
4
400
4
380
4
365
4
-5
10
9
-3
224
465
5
445
5
430
4
410
4
395
4
380
4
360
4
345
4
-3
9
8
-1
219
430
4
415
4
400
4
380
4
370
4
355
4
335
3
325
3
-1
8
7
+1
213
400
4
385
4
370
4
355
4
345
3
330
3
315
3
300
3
+1
7
6
+3
207
365
4
350
4
340
3
330
3
320
3
305
3
295
3
285
3
+3
6
5
+5
200
335
3
352
3
310
3
305
3
295
3
285
3
275
3
265
3
+5
5
4
+7
187
290
3
280
3
270
3
265
3
255
3
250
2
245
2
235
2
+7
4
3
+9
175
245
2
240
2
235
2
230
2
220
2
215
2
210
2
205
2
+9
3
2
+11
163
200
2
195
2
195
2
190
2
190
2
185
2
185
2
180
2
+11
2
1
+13
151
150
2
150
2
150
2
150
2
150
2
150
2
150
2
150
2
+13
1
Time to height at
Increase in time to height
Increase in fuel to height
intermediate rating
at max. cont. power
at max. cont. power
(min.)
(min.)
(lb.)
4
1
35
6
2
60
8
3
95
10
4
135
12
5
180
14
6
230
16
7
295
19.  The next stage is to determine the wind velocity for the climb, and then to use the DR Computer to 
calculate the heading, groundspeed and distance to the TOC and enter the results on the form.  It will 
be  assumed  that  the  aircraft  climbs  at  a  steady  rate  to  FL  210,  and  as  the  meteorological  forecast 
shows  that  the  wind  varies  uniformly  with  height,  the  mid-height  wind  can  be  used;  in  this  case  the 
10,000 ft wind, 330°/35 kt, will be satisfactory.  The TOC position can now be plotted on the chart. 
20.  Descent Planning.  The descent is planned in a similar manner to the climb using the appropriate 
page from the ODM (Fig 5) and the correct descent profile (Normal Descent in this example).  Mean 
TAS, fuel used, and time taken are extracted from the table, allowing the heading, groundspeed, and 
distance to be calculated, again using mid-height wind (330°/35 kt at 10,000 ft).  The TOD can now be 
plotted  on  the  chart.    In  this  example,  the  calculated  TOD  point  is  within  a  mile  of  the  last  planned 
turning point and therefore it is reasonable to make them coincident. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
9-14 Fig 5 ODM Descent Tables 
Normal Descent
Fast Descent
(0.66MIND / 234kt I A S)
(0.715MIND / 279kt I A S)
(85%NMA  
X to 30000 FT.
(Air Brakes Open, Flight
Then Flight Idling)
Idling Throughout)
Pressure
Mean
Pressure
Mean
Height
Fuel
Time
T A S
Height
Fuel
Time
T A S
ft X 1000
lb
Min
kt
ft X 1000
lb
Min
kt
42
390
20
341
42
80
5
377
41
375
19
338
41
80
5
375
40
360
18
335
40
75
5
375
39
340
18
331
39
75
5
371
38
325
17
328
38
75
5
369
37
310
16
325
37
70
4
367
36
290
15
322
36
70
4
365
35
270
15
319
35
70
4
363
34
250
14
315
34
65
4
360
33
235
13
312
33
65
4
358
32
215
13
309
32
65
4
356
31
200
12
306
31
60
4
354
30
185
11
303
30
60
4
351
29
180
11
300
29
60
4
349
28
175
10
297
28
60
4
347
27
170
10
295
27
55
3
345
26
165
10
293
26
55
3
342
25
160
9
290
25
55
3
340
24
155
9
288
24
50
3
338
23
150
9
286
23
50
3
335
22
145
8
284
22
50
3
333
21
140
8
282
21
45
3
331
20
135
8
280
20
45
3
329
19
130
7
278
19
45
3
326
18
125
7
276
18
40
3
324
17
120
6
274
17
40
2
322
16
110
6
272
16
40
2
320
15
105
6
270
15
35
2
317
14
100
5
268
14
35
2
315
13
95
5
266
13
35
2
313
12
90
5
264
12
30
2
311
11
80
4
262
11
30
2
309
10
75
4
260
10
25
2
306
9
70
3
258
9
25
1
304
8
65
3
256
8
20
1
302
7
55
3
254
7
20
1
300
6
50
2
252
6
15
1
298
5
40
2
250
5
15
1
296
4
30
1
248
4
10
1
294
3
20
1
246
3
5
0
291
2
10
0
244
2
5
0
289
1
0
0
242
1
0
0
287
FOR DESCENT BETWEEN TWO INTERMEDIATE
HEIGHTS THE MEAN TAS IS OBTAINED BY ADDING
THE MEAN TAS AT EACH HEIGHT AND SUBTRACTING
THE FOLLOWING:
NORMAL DESCENT 240 KNOTS
FAST DESCENT 290 KNOTS
21.  Cruise  Planning.    Having  determined  the  TOC  and  TOD  positions,  the  leg  distances  for  the 
cruise portion can be measured and inserted in the flight plan.  The cruise section of the ODM can now 
be consulted, once again ensuring that the correct cruise type or speed, and the correct temperature 
profile  are  selected  (Fig  6).    In  this  case,  the  data obtained from the ODM is TAS and fuel flow rate.  
The  TAS  may,  alternatively,  be  calculated  on  the  DR  Computer  using  the  forecast  meteorological 
information.  The DR Computer can now be used to determine headings, groundspeeds and times for 
each of the cruise legs, and this data entered on the flight plan form.  Elapsed times and ETAs can be 
entered in the appropriate columns of the flight plan. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-14 - Navigation Planning 
9-14 Fig 6 ODM Long Range Cruise Table 
Long Range Cruise
(ISA + 3°C to ISA + 7°C)
Speed (knots T A S) above line
Pressure
ISA
Speed
Fuel
Fuel
Speed
ISA
Pressure
Height
Temp
(below
Flow
Fuel Flow (lb/hr). below line
Flow
(below
Temp
Height
line)
(above
Weight (lb/1000)
(above
line)
knots
line)
line)
knots
ft X 1000
°C
T A S
lb/hr
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
lb/hr
T A S
°C
ft X 1000
42
-57
1675
360
1655
1590
1540
375
-57
42
41
-57
1760
357
1735
1670
1615
1565
375
-57
41
40
-57
1845
356
375
1750
1695
1645
1595
375
-57
40
39
-57
1935
356
375
1830
1775
1720
1670
1625
375
-57
39
38
-57
375
1975
1910
1850
1800
1750
1700
1660
375
-57
38
37
-57
367
1940
1885
1830
1780
1730
1795
1645
367
-57
37
36
-57
359
1915
1860
1810
1760
1710
1670
1635
359
-57
36
35
-55
352
1910
1855
1805
1760
1715
1675
1640
352
-55
35
34
-53
346
1900
1850
1805
1760
1720
1680
1640
346
-53
34
33
-51
340
1900
1850
1805
1760
1720
1680
1645
340
-51
33
32
-49
334
1900
1855
1810
1765
1720
1680
1645
334
-49
32
31
-47
328
1905
1855
1810
1765
1725
1690
1655
328
-47
31
30
-45
323
1910
1860
1815
1770
1730
1695
1660
323
-45
30
29
-43
317
1910
1865
1820
1780
1740
1700
1665
317
-43
29
28
-41
312
1915
1870
1825
1785
1745
1705
1670
312
-41
28
27
-39
307
1920
1875
1830
1785
1745
1710
1675
307
-39
27
26
-37
301
1925
1880
1835
1790
1750
1715
1680
301
-37
26
25
-35
296
1930
1880
1835
1795
1755
1720
1685
296
-35
25
24
-33
306
2040
1995
1955
1915
1880
1845
1815
306
-33
24
23
-31
301
2040
2000
1960
1920
1885
1850
1820
301
-31
23
22
-29
296
2045
2005
1965
1925
1890
1860
1830
296
-29
22
21
-27
291
2055
2015
1975
1935
1900
1865
1835
291
-27
21
20
-25
287
2070
2030
1990
1950
1915
1885
1855
287
-25
20
19
-23
282
2075
2035
1995
1960
1925
1895
1865
282
-23
19
18
-21
277
2085
2045
2010
1975
1940
1910
1885
277
-21
18
17
-19
273
2095
2060
2025
1990
1960
1930
1905
273
-19
17
16
-17
268
2115
2075
2040
2010
1980
1950
1925
268
-17
16
15
-15
265
2140
2105
2070
2040
2010
1985
1960
265
-15
15
14
-13
261
2165
2130
2100
2070
2040
2010
1985
264
-13
14
13
-11
256
2195
2160
2125
2095
2065
2040
2015
256
-11
13
12
-9
252
2225
2190
2155
2125
2095
2070
2045
252
-9
12
11
-7
248
2255
2220
2190
2160
2130
2105
2085
248
-7
11
10
-5
245
2295
2260
2230
2205
2180
2155
2135
245
-5
10
9
-3
241
2330
2300
2275
2250
2225
2200
2180
241
-3
9
8
-1
238
2375
2345
2320
2295
2270
2250
2230
238
-1
8
7
+1
234
2425
2395
2370
2345
2325
2300
2280
234
+1
7
6
+3
230
2475
2445
2420
2395
2375
2350
2330
230
+3
6
5
+5
227
2535
2505
2480
2455
2430
2405
2380
227
+5
5
4
+7
224
2590
2560
2535
2505
2475
2450
2425
224
+7
4
3
+9
221
2645
2610
2580
2550
2525
2495
2470
221
+9
3
2
+11
217
2695
2660
2630
2600
2570
2545
2520
217
+11
2
1
+13
214
2750
2715
2680
2650
2620
2590
2565
214
+13
1
NOTE: For operation above line throttles are set to give Maximum Continuous Power.
For operation below line engines are throttled back to give Recommended Speed.
For fuel flows above line reduce fuel flow by 10 lb / hr / 1000 lb for weights greater than 15000 lb, and
increase fuel by 10 lb / hr / 1000 lb for weights less than 15000 lb.
22.  Safety  Altitude.    The  safety  altitude  (SALT)  for  each  leg  or  section  must  be  determined  from  a 
topographical chart using whatever criteria are laid down by the Command, Group, or other operating 
authority.    In  this  example,  the  basic  criterion  has  been  to  find  the  highest  obstacle  within  30  nm  of 
each planned section of track, and then add 1,000 ft (2,000 ft in the case where the obstacle is 3,000 ft 
or higher).  That sum has then been rounded up to the nearest 100 ft.  The SALT figure for each track 
is then annotated on the flight plan form (Fig 3).   
Note: SALT calculation is explained in detail in Volume 9, Chapter 23. 
23.  F2919/CA48.    If  necessary,  an  F2919/CA48  -  Flight  Plan  can  now  be completed and submitted.  
The occasions when this form should be completed, and instructions for its completion, are contained 
in the UK Military Aeronautical Planning Document and in FLIPs. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
CHAPTER 15 - FUEL PLANNING 
Introduction 
1. 
Fuel planning is an integral part of flight planning, and accurate calculation of the fuel requirement for a 
particular flight is important for safety, economical operation, and the maximum utilization of payload. 
2. 
The methods of calculating the fuel plan, and of monitoring the fuel consumption in flight, will vary 
between  aircraft  type  and  role,  and  on  the  requirements  of  the  flight.    The  requirements,  and  terms 
used,  for  fast-jet  operations  are  described  in  Volume  9,  Chapter  18.    The  principles  outlined  in  this 
chapter are applicable mostly to larger aircraft.  
Fuel Planning Data 
3. 
Fuel consumption is a function of altitude, air temperature, speed, all-up weight (AUW) and engine 
RPM.  Data on fuel consumption, expressed in either pounds (lb) or kilograms (kg) per minute or hour, is 
presented in the Operating Data Manual (ODM) for the aircraft type, usually in tabular form with entering 
arguments of altitude and AUW.  The other parameters are assumed constant, with their values stated on 
the table, and with a selection of tables for variations in these parameters.  Fig 1 shows a typical ODM 
table.  The title 'Long Range Cruise' specifies the flight profile and a secondary table shows the assumed 
speeds.  The heading 'ISA –2 to ISA +2' specifies the air temperature range for which the table is valid.  
There will be additional tables for different flight profiles (e.g. climb, descent, endurance cruise), and for 
different air temperature regimes (see examples in Volume 9, Chapter 14). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
9-15 Fig 1 ODM Long Range Cruise Table 
Long Range Cruise
(ISA -2°C to ISA +2°C)
Speed (knots T A S) Above Line
Pressure
ISA
Speed
Fuel
Fuel
Speed
ISA
Pressure
Height
Temp
(Below
Flow
Fuel Flow (lb/hr). Below line
Flow
(Below
Temp
Height
Line)
(Above
Weight (lb/1000)
(Above
Line)
knots
Line)
Line)
knots
ft X 1000
°C
T A S
lb/hr
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
lb/hr
T A S
°C
ft X 1000
42
-57
1730
352
1685
1625
1565
1510
371
-57
42
41
-57
1815
349
1760
1705
1645
1590
1540
371
-57
41
40
-57
1905
348
1840
1785
1720
1665
1615
1565
371
-57
40
39
-57
371
1915
1860
1800
1745
1690
1640
1595
371
-57
39
38
-57
371
1940
1875
1820
1770
1720
1675
1630
371
-57
38
37
-57
362
1905
1850
1795
1750
1700
1655
1615
362
-57
37
36
-57
355
1885
1830
1775
1730
1685
1645
1605
355
-57
36
35
-55
348
1875
1825
1775
1730
1685
1645
1610
348
-55
35
34
-53
342
1870
1820
1775
1730
1690
1650
1615
342
-53
34
33
-51
336
1865
1820
1775
1730
1690
1650
1615
336
-51
33
32
-49
330
1870
1825
1780
1735
1695
1655
1620
330
-49
32
31
-47
325
1875
1830
1785
1740
1700
1660
1625
325
-47
31
30
-45
319
1880
1830
1785
1745
1705
1670
1635
319
-45
30
29
-43
314
1885
1840
1795
1750
1710
1675
1640
314
-43
29
28
-41
309
1885
1840
1800
1755
1715
1680
1645
309
-41
28
27
-39
303
1890
1845
1805
1760
1720
1685
1650
303
-39
27
26
-37
298
1895
1850
1805
1765
1725
1690
1655
298
-37
26
25
-35
293
1900
1855
1810
1770
1730
1695
1660
293
-35
25
24
-33
303
2015
1970
1930
1890
1855
1820
1790
303
-33
24
23
-31
298
2015
1975
1935
1895
1860
1825
1795
298
-31
23
22
-29
293
2020
1980
1940
1900
1865
1835
1805
293
-29
22
21
-27
288
2025
1985
1945
1910
1875
1840
1810
288
-27
21
20
-25
284
2045
2005
1965
1925
1890
1860
1830
284
-25
20
19
-23
279
2050
2010
1970
1935
1900
1870
1845
279
-23
19
18
-21
275
2060
2020
1980
1945
1915
1885
1860
275
-21
18
17
-19
270
2070
2035
2000
1965
1930
1905
1880
270
-19
17
16
-17
266
2085
2050
2015
1985
1955
1925
1900
266
-17
16
15
-15
262
2115
2080
2045
2015
1985
1960
1935
262
-15
15
14
-13
258
2140
2105
2070
2040
2010
1985
1960
258
-13
14
13
-11
254
2165
2130
2100
2070
2040
2010
1985
254
-11
13
12
-9
250
2195
2160
2130
2100
2070
2045
2020
250
-9
12
11
-7
246
2230
2195
2160
2130
2105
2080
2060
246
-7
11
10
-5
243
2265
2235
2205
2180
2155
2130
2110
243
-5
10
9
-3
239
2300
2270
2245
2220
2195
2175
2155
239
-3
9
8
-1
235
2345
2315
2290
2265
2245
2225
2205
235
-1
8
7
+1
232
2395
2365
2340
2315
2295
2275
2255
232
+1
7
6
+3
228
2445
2415
2390
2365
2395
2320
2300
228
+3
6
5
+5
225
2500
2475
2450
2425
2400
2375
2350
225
+5
5
4
+7
222
2560
2530
2500
2470
2445
2420
2400
222
+7
4
3
+9
219
2615
2575
2550
2520
2495
2470
2445
219
+9
3
2
+11
216
2665
2630
2600
2570
2545
2515
2490
216
+11
2
1
+13
212
2715
2680
2650
2620
2590
2560
2535
212
+13
1
NOTE: For operation above line throttles are set to give Maximum Continuous Power.
For operation below line engines are throttled back to give Recommended Speed.
For fuel flows above line reduce fuel flow by 10 lb / hr / 1000 lb for weights greater than 15000 lb, and
increases fuel by 10 lb / hr / 1000 lb for weights less than 15000 lb.
4. 
The ODM will normally present a rapid planning section where the fuel requirement for a given sector 
distance is tabulated against a variety of head or tail wind components (Fig 2).  These tables are valuable in 
the initial planning stages, to see whether a proposed flight is possible and to give an idea of the payload that 
might be carried.  Additional tables give diversion fuel requirements (Fig 3) and holding fuel (Fig 4).  In all of 
these cases it is important to note the assumptions on which the tables are calculated. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
9-15 Fig 2 ODM Sector Fuel and Time Table 
100
2500
0:41
2500
0:40
2450
0:39
2450
0:39
2400
0:38
2400
0:38
2350
0:37
2350
0:37
2300
0:36
2300
0:36
2250
0:35
100
150
2950
0:52
2900
0:51
2850
0:50
2800
0:49
2750
0:48
2750
0:47
2700
0:46
2650
0:45
2600
0:45
2600
0:44
2600
0:43
150
200
3350
1:03
3300
1:02
3200
1:00
3150
0:59
3100
0:57
3050
0:56
3050
0:55
3000
0:54
3000
0:53
2950
0:53
2900
0:51
200
250
3750
1:14
3700
1:12
3600
1:10
3550
1:09
3500
1:07
3450
1:06
3400
1:05
3350
1:03
3300
1:02
3250
1:01
3200
0:59
250
300
4100
1:25
4000
1:23
3950
1:21
3850
1:19
3800
1:17
3750
1:15
3700
1:14
3650
1:12
3600
1:11
3550
1:09
3500
1:07
300
350
4500
1:36
4400
1:33
4300
1:31
4200
1:28
4150
1:26
4050
1:24
4000
1:23
3950
1:21
3900
1:19
3850
1:17
3800
1:16
350
400
4850
1:47
4750
1:44
4650
1:41
4550
1:38
4450
1:36
4400
1:34
4300
1:32
4250
1:30
4150
1:28
4100
1:26
4050
1:24
400
450
5250
1:57
5100
1:54
5000
1:51
4900
1:48
4800
1:45
4700
1:43
4650
1:41
4550
1:38
4500
1:36
4400
1:34
4350
1:32
450
500
5600
2:08
5450
2:04
5300
2:01
5200
1:58
5100
1:54
5050
1:52
4950
1:49
4850
1:47
4800
1:44
4700
1:42
4650
1:40
500
550
5900
2:19
5750
2:15
5650
2:11
5550
2:07
5450
2:04
5350
2:01
5250
1:58
5150
1:55
5050
1:52
4950
1:50
4900
1:47
550
600
6250
2:30
6100
2:25
5950
2:21
5850
2:17
5700
2:14
5600
2:10
5500
2:07
5400
2:04
5300
2:01
5250
1:58
5150
1:56
600
650
6550
2:41
6450
2:36
6250
2:31
6150
2:27
6000
2:23
5900
2:19
5750
2:16
5650
2:12
5600
2:09
5500
2:07
5400
2:04
650
700
6900
2:51
6750
2:46
6550
2:42
6400
2:37
6300
2:33
6150
2:28
6050
2:24
5950
2:21
5850
2:18
5750
2:15
5650
2:11
700
750
7250
3:03
7050
2:57
6850
2:52
6700
2:46
6550
2:42
6450
2:37
6350
2:33
6200
2:30
6100
2:26
6000
2:23
5850
2:19
750
800
7550
3:14
7350
3:08
7200
3:02
7000
2:56
6850
2:51
6700
2:46
6600
2:42
6450
2:38
6350
2:34
6250
2:30
6150
2:27
800
850
7500
3:13
7300
3:07
7150
3:01
7000
2:56
6850
2:52
6700
2:47
6600
2:43
6500
2:38
6400
2:35
850
900
7450
3:11
7300
3:06
7150
3:01
7000
2:56
6850
2:51
6750
2:47
6600
2:43
900
950
7550
3:15
7400
3:10
7250
3:05
7100
3:00
7000
2:55
6850
2:51
950
1000
7500
3:14
7350
3:09
7250
3:04
7100
2:59
1000
1050
7450
3:13
7350
3:07
1050
1100
7550
3:16
1100
1150
1150
1200
1200
1250
1250
1300
1300
1350
1350
1400
1400
Notes
1.  Take-off and climb to 1,000 ft (2 min) and landing (10 min) time allowances added.
2.  Take-off and climb to 1,000 ft (150 lb) and landing and baulked landing (1,150 lb) fuel allowances added.
3.  Procedure-normal climb to 38,000 ft, long range cruise at 38,000 normal descent to 1,000 ft.  
9-15 Fig 3 ODM Diversion Table 
20
400
350
350
300
300
300
300
 300 
250
250
250
200
200
200
200
200
150
150
150
150 
150
40
650
650
600
600
550
550
500
500
450
450
450
400
400
400
350
350
350
350
300
300
300
60
850
850
800
800
750
750
700
700
650
650
600
600
550
550
550
500
500
500
500
450
450
80
1050
1000
950
950
900
900
850
850
800
800
750
750
700
700
700
650
650
650
600
600
600
100
1200
1150
1100
1100
1050
1050
1000
1000
950
950
900
900
850
850
800
800
800
750
750
750
700
120
1300
1300
1250
1200
1200
1150
1150
1100
1100
1050
1050
1000
1000
950
950
900
900
900
850
850
800
140
1450
1400
1350
1350
1300
1250
1250
1200
1200
1150
1150
1100
1100
1050
1050
1050
1000
1000
950
950
900
160
1550
1550
1500
1450
1400
1400
1350
1300
1300
1250
1250
1200
1200
1150
1150
1100
1100
1100
1050
1050
1000
180
1700
1650
1600
1550
1550
1500
1450
1400
1400
1350
1350
1300
1300
1250
1250
1200
1200
1150
1150
1150
1100
200
1800
1750
1700
1650
1650
1600
1550
1500
1500
1450
1450
1400
1400
1350
1350
1300
1300
1250
1250
1200
1200
220
1950
1900
1850
1800
1750
1700
1650
1600
1600
1550
1500
1500
1450
1450
1400
1400
1350
1350
1300
1300
1250
240
2050
2000
1950
1900
1850
1800
1750
1700
1700
1650
1600
1600
1550
1500
1500
1450
1450
1400
1400
1350
1350
260
2150
2100
2050
2000
1950
1900
1850
1800
1750
1750
1700
1650
1650
1600
1550
1550
1500
1500
1450
1450
1400
280
2300
2200
2150
2100
2050
2000
1950
1900
1850
1800
1800
1750
1700
1700
1650
1600
1600
1550
1550
1500
1500
300
2400
2300
2250
2200
2150
2100
2050
2000
1950
1900
1850
1850
1800
1750
1750
1700
1650
1650
1600
1600
1550
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
9-15 Fig 4 ODM Holding Fuel Table 
42
1850
1700
1450
1340
42
41
1810
1660
1440
1330
41
40
1770
1620
1420
1320
40
39
1750
1590
1410
1310
39
38
1710
1580
1400
1300
38
37
1690
1570
1390
1300
37
36
1680
1570
1380
1290
36
35
1680
1570
1380
1290
35
34
1670
1560
1390
1290
34
33
1670
1560
1390
1300
33
32
1670
1560
1390
1300
32
31
1670
1560
1390
1310
31
30
1670
1570
1400
1310
30
29
1670
1570
1360
1270
29
28
1670
1570
1370
1280
28
27
1670
1580
1380
1290
27
26
1680
1580
1380
1300
26
25
1680
1590
1390
1320
25
24
1690
1600
1410
1330
24
23
1700
1610
1420
1350
23
22
1710
1620
1440
1370
22
21
1720
1640
1460
1390
21
20
1730
1650
1480
1410
20
19
1750
1670
1510
1440
19
18
1770
1690
1530
1470
18
17
1790
1720
1560
1500
17
16
1810
1740
1590
1530
16
15
1840
1770
1620
1560
15
14
1870
1810
1660
1590
14
13
1910
1840
1690
1620
13
12
1950
1880
1720
1650
12
11
1990
1920
1760
1680
11
10
2030
1960
1790
1720
10
9
2080
2000
1820
1750
9
8
2120
2040
1860
1780
8
7
2160
2080
1890
1810
7
6
2200
2120
1930
1850
6
5
2250
2160
1960
1880
5
4
2290
2200
2000
1910
4
3
2330
2240
2030
1940
3
2
2370
2280
2070
1980
2
1
2410
2320
2100
2010
1
The Fuel Plan 
5. 
Preparing the basic fuel plan is straightforward, using the data from the appropriate tables of the 
ODM.  The following example will illustrate the procedure.  A simple route is shown in profile in Fig 5; it 
consists of a climb, a cruise portion at two flight levels, and a descent.  The cruise portion is divided by 
a  number  of  waypoints.    Even  if  this  were  not  necessary  for  navigation  purposes,  the  cruise  would 
need  to  be  divided  for  fuel  planning  as  the  fuel  consumption  rate  depends  on  AUW,  which  will,  of 
course, reduce during flight.  The length of each section for fuel planning considerations will depend on 
the aircraft type.  The flight plan entries for this route are shown in Fig 6. 
9-15 Fig 5 Simple Route (Elevation) 
TOD
TOC
FL 370
FL 330
Cruise
Climb
Descent
WP0
WP1
WP2
WP3
WP4
WP5
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
9-15 Fig 6 Simplified Flight Plan 
FUEL 8000
Route to
SA
RAS
FL
OAT
TAS
G/S
LEG LEG
ET
ETA
START 
DTG
MSFL MACH ALT
DEV
DIST TIME
WEIGHT FLOW USED REM
230
115
240
− 4
293
328
21
21
21000
1410
6590
840
TOC
.56
315
WP 1
200
330
− 1
336
428
28
49
19590
1865
870
5720
640
200
WP 2
330
437
175
24
73
18720
750
4970
465



WP 3
370
362
287
110
23
96
18070
1850
710
4260
355


WP 4
370
284
180
38
134
17360
1795
1140
3120
175

 
95
370
TOD
286
20
154
16220
1750
590
2530
80

 
175
240
180
325
16
170
15600
310
2220
0
WP 5 (Dest)
.67
300
80

955
170
5780
Totals
Total Fuel used
Tick () indicates 'same as above'
6. 
Climb.  The fuel for the climb section is extracted from the climb table of the ODM, ensuring that the 
correct  climb  and  temperature  profile  is  selected.    In  practice,  this  will  be  done  at  the  same  time  that  the 
mean  TAS  and  time  to  climb  are  found  for  navigation  planning  (see  example  in  Volume  9,  Chapter  14).  
The top of climb (TOC) position is plotted allowing the first cruise leg to be defined.  The fuel used is entered 
in  the  appropriate  column  of  the  flight  plan and, by subtraction, the fuel remaining and AUW at the top of 
climb are calculated and entered. 
7. 
Descent.  The descent fuel is similarly found using the ODM descent tables, as per the example 
in Volume 9, Chapter 14.  The top of descent (TOD) point can be plotted, thus allowing the last cruising 
leg to be defined.  It should be noted that the descent table will normally assume a descent to 1,000 ft.  
If  it  is  planned  to  stop  the  descent  at  an  intermediate  level,  then  an  adjustment  must  be  made.    For 
example,  if  it  is  intended  to  descend  from  FL  310  to  FL  40  then  the  figures  for  fuel  and  time  for  a 
descent from FL 40 are subtracted from those for a descent from FL 310.  The fuel calculated for use 
in the descent is then entered in the flight plan. 
8. 
Cruise.    The  start  weight  at  the  beginning  of  the  first  leg  is  used  as  an  entering  argument  with 
altitude to determine the fuel flow rate.  The table for the correct cruise conditions (speed, temperature) 
in  this  example  yields  a  rate  of  1,865  lb/hr  (Fig  7).    The  time  for  the  200 nm  leg  is  28  minutes  and 
therefore  the  fuel  used  is  870  lb.    This  can  be  entered  in  the  flight plan and subtracted from the fuel 
remaining to give the new fuel remaining, and from the previous AUW to give the AUW for the next leg.  
The process is repeated for the remaining cruise legs. 
9-15 Fig 7 Extraction of Cruise Fuel Rate 
Long Range Cruise
(Extract from Fig 1)
Speed (knots T A S) Above Line
Pressure
ISA
Speed
Fuel
Height
Temp
(Below
Flow
Fuel Flow (lb/hr). Below line
Line)
(Above
Weight (lb/1000)
knots
Line)
ft X 1000
°C
T A S
lb/hr
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
42
-57
1730
352
1685
1625
1565
1510
41
-57
1815
349
1760
1705
1645
1590
1540
40
-57
1905
348
1840
1785
1720
1665
1615
1565
39
-57
371
1915
1860
1800
1745
1690
1640
1595
38
-57
371
1940
1875
1820
1770
1720
1675
1630
37
-57
362
1905
1850
1795
1750
1700
1655
1615
36
-57
355
1885
1830
1775
1730
1685
1645
1605
35
-55
348
1875
1825
1775
1730
1685
1645
1610
34
-53
342
1870
1820
1775
1730
1690
1650
1615
33
-51
336
1865
1820
1775
1730
1690
1650
1615
32
-49
330
1870
1825
1780
1735
1695
1655
1620
31
-47
325
1875
1830
1785
1740
1700
1660
1625
(Extract from Fig 6)
TAS
G/S
LEG LEG
ET
ETA
START 
FUEL 8000
DTG
DIST TIME
WEIGHT FLOW USED
REM
115
293
328
21
21
21000
1410
6590
840
315
336
428
28
49
19590
1865
870
5720
640
200
437
175
24
73
18720
750
4970
465

362
287
110
23
96
18070
1850
710
4260
355
284
180
38
134
17360
1795
1140
3120
175

95
286
20
154
16220
1750
590
2530
80

175
325
16
170
15600
310
2220
0
300
80
955
170
5780
Totals
Total Fuel used
Tick () indicates 'same as above'
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
Minimum Fuel Requirements 
9. 
Minimum  Fuel  Overhead  the  Destination.    The  planning  procedure  discussed  above  has 
determined the amount of fuel needed to carry out the flight but has taken no account of the quantity of 
fuel  with  which  it  is  necessary  to  arrive  at  the  destination.    The  ODM-based  calculations  give  the 
amount  of  fuel  remaining  when  the  aircraft  arrives  overhead  the  destination  at  1,000  ft  (2,220 lb  in 
Fig 6).  The minimum fuel required overhead the destination should be calculated, and is normally the 
sum of the following factors:  
a. 
Minimum  Landing  Fuel.    There  will  be  a  minimum  landing  fuel  permitted  for  the  aircraft 
type.  This usually allows sufficient for taxiing to dispersal, plus an allowance for gauging errors. 
b. 
Missed Approach and Transit to Alternate Airfield.  It is normal to carry a fuel allowance 
for  a  'Missed  Approach'  at  the  destination  airfield,  and  subsequent  transit  to  the  alternate 
(diversion) airfield.  Extra fuel may be required within this allowance, for factors such as forecast 
icing and its associated fuel penalty, or air traffic restrictions. 
c. 
Approach Fuel.  A fuel allowance will be required to provide for the approach (either visual or 
instrument) from 1,000 ft overhead the destination, to touchdown.  Similarly, an allowance must be 
made for the approach at the alternate airfield. 
10.  'Standard' Diversion Figures.  For most aircraft there will be 'standard' amounts for these various 
fuel  requirements  (perhaps  printed  on  the  flight  plan  form  for  convenience  -  see  Fig  3  to  Volume  9, 
Chapter  14).    In  addition,  there  is  usually  a  locally  produced  table  giving  the  transit  fuel  required  to  the 
commonly-used diversion airfields.  For other airfields, the transit fuel will have to be calculated, normally 
by the use of a table such as that shown in Fig 3. 
11.  En Route Minimum Fuel.  The 'en route minimum fuel' is the amount of fuel required at a specific point 
to enable the aircraft to complete the route as planned, arriving at the destination with the specified overhead 
fuel.  Once the fuel overhead the destination has been calculated, it is possible to work back through the fuel 
plan and calculate the en route minimum fuel for any point on the flight plan. 
In-flight Fuel Monitoring 
12.  The  fuel  plan,  as  calculated,  gives  an  indication  of  the  expected  fuel  consumption,  leg  by  leg.  
However,  if  the  fuel  consumption  varies from that expected, it can be difficult to make an accurate 
assessment  of  any  trend  from  the  flight  plan  form.    To  overcome  this  shortcoming,  the  fuel  graph 
has been developed.  The fuel graph presents a visual solution: the fuel expected is plotted on the 
vertical  axis  against  either  time  or  distance  on  the  horizontal  axis.    The  former  is  known  as  the 
fuel/time Howgozit and the latter as the fuel/distance Howgozit.  Each type is suited to certain roles; 
in general, the maritime and AAR roles use fuel/time graphs while transport operations tend to use 
the fuel/distance graph.  The fuel/distance Howgozit has the advantage of being ideally suited to the 
solution of critical point and other tactical problems (Volume 9, Chapter 16). 
13.  COMBAT, BINGO and JOKER Fuels.  The terms 'COMBAT', 'BINGO' and 'JOKER' can be used 
to assist with in-flight fuel management.  These terms are described fully in Volume 9, Chapter 18. 
Fuel/Distance Howgozit 
14.  Construction.  Fig 8 shows an example fuel/distance Howgozit, based on the flight plan at Fig 6.  
The  vertical  axis  represents  fuel  remaining  while  the  horizontal  axis  represents  the  distance  to  go  to 
the destination.  The departure airfield is represented by the intersection of the total route distance and 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
the take-off fuel, in this example 955 nm and 8,000 lb.  The destination is similarly represented by the 
intersection  of  the  flight  plan  fuel  remaining  overhead  the  destination  (2,220  lb)  and  zero  distance  to 
go.  The predicted fuel consumption between these points is plotted using the flight plan values of fuel 
remaining at each waypoint and the corresponding distance to go.  As fuel consumption is a function of 
time  rather  than  distance,  the  gradient  of  the  line  will  vary  with  changes  in  groundspeed  (higher 
groundspeeds giving shallower gradients).  This fact can be used as a cross-check of the plotting as 
the gradient changes can be correlated with the flight plan groundspeed changes. 
9-15 Fig 8 Fuel/Distance Howgozit 
FROM:
E/L
WP 0
TIME
WP 0
TO:
FUEL
WP 5
REM
+  LINE
8000
+   ETA
TOC
TOTAL
7000
FP
DEST
WP 1
REV
DEST
6000
MIN
WP 2
DEST
OXY
VOLTS
5000
WP 3
4000
WP 4
TOD
3000
WP 5
2000
WEIGHT OF
FUEL IN LBS
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
DISTANCE FROM DESTINATION (IN NAUTICAL MILES)
15.  Minimum Fuel Line.  The graph plotted in Fig 8 represents the expected fuel consumption for 
the flight and, in particular, terminates at the expected fuel remaining overhead the destination.  For 
the  reasons  outlined  in  paras  9  to  11,  there  will  be  a  minimum  fuel  requirement  overhead  the 
destination;  this  value  is  plotted  at  the  zero  distance-to-go  point.    In  the  example  (Fig  9),  the 
minimum  fuel  overhead  is  assumed  to  be  1,710  lb.    A  minimum  fuel  line  may  now  be  constructed 
through  this  minimum  fuel  point  and  parallel  to  the  planned  fuel  line.    As  a  flight  safety  item,  the 
minimum fuel line is normally plotted in red.  Any in-flight fuel check that falls below this line means 
that the destination cannot be reached with the stipulated reserves and some action must be taken 
to remedy the situation. 
9-15 Fig 9 Fuel/Distance Howgozit with Minimum Fuel Line and Plotted Fuel Checks 
DTG
FROM:
WP 0
E/L
830
630
460
315
175
TIME
1025
1055
1125
1155
1225
TO:
WP 5
FUEL
REM 6800
5800
5200 4200
3300
+250
+100
+250 +200
+150
8000
1025
POSITIVE TREND
NEGATIVE TREND
TOTAL
7000
FP
DEST
2220
2220
2220 2220
2220
1055
1125
REV
DEST
2440
2290
2440 2390
2240
6000
MIN
DEST
1710
1710
1710 1710
1710
OXY
1155
VOLTS
6/28
6/28
6/28
6/28
6/28
5000
4000
1225
3000
MINIMUM FUEL LINE
2000
WEIGHT
OF FUEL
MINIMUM FUEL OVERHEAD
IN LBS
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
DISTANCE FROM DESTINATION (IN NAUTICAL MILES)
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
16.  In-flight Fuel Checks.  One advantage of graphical monitoring of fuel consumption is that fuel 
checks  can  be  carried  out  at  any  convenient  time  and  are  not  restricted  to  pre-planned  times  or 
positions.  The fuel remaining at any time is simply plotted against the distance to go at that time.  If 
the fuel check plots above the line, then there is more fuel than planned and vice versa.  A series of 
such checks is shown in Fig 9.  From the first fuel check it will be seen that the fuel consumption is 
'above  the  line'.    There  may  be  several  reasons  for  this;  a  greater  than  expected  start  fuel,  colder 
temperatures, better than average engine efficiency.  At this stage, the only assumption that can be 
made  is  that  the  fuel  for  the  remainder  of  the  flight  will  be  as  planned  and  therefore  the  fuel 
remaining overhead the destination will be above the line by a similar amount.  The frequency of fuel 
checks will normally be stipulated by the operating authority, but, in general, a check will be made at 
TOC, just prior to TOD and at approximately 30-minute intervals during the cruise. 
17.  Fuel  Consumption  Trend.    After  a  number  of  fuel  checks,  it  will  be  possible  to  join  them  to 
establish  an  impression  of  the  actual,  rather  than  the  predicted,  consumption.    This trend line may 
be  extrapolated  to  estimate  the  effect  on  the  expected  destination  fuel.    Clearly,  such  estimates 
must be treated with caution and, the longer the period over which the trend can be established, the 
more reliable it is likely to be.  It is important to give some consideration as to the reason for a trend 
varying  from  the  prediction.    For  example,  it  may  be  due  to  winds  differing  from  forecast,  in  which 
case  this  difference  may  not  necessarily  persist  for  the  rest  of  the  flight.    In  the  case  of  a  circular 
route  back  to  base,  it  is  quite  likely  that  such  a  trend  established  on  the  outbound  section  will  be 
reversed  on  the  inbound  section.    This  effect  is  shown  in  Fig  9  where  the  positive  trend  between 
1055 hrs and 1125 hrs is reversed between 1125 hrs and 1155 hrs. 
Fuel/Time Howgozit 
18.  Construction.  The fuel/time Howgozit is constructed in a similar manner to the fuel/distance variety 
except that the horizontal axis represents flight plan elapsed time from take-off.  Fig 10 shows an example 
graph on which a horizontal minimum fuel line has been plotted.  The gradient of the fuel/time line is more 
constant than the fuel/distance line as the fuel flow with respect to time is relatively constant.  The minor 
difference as AUW reduces is not readily apparent at the scale of the graph. 
9-15 Fig 10 Fuel/Time Howgozit with Minimum Fuel Line and Plotted Fuel Checks 
FROM:
WP 0
E/L
3L
6L
10L
10L
11L
TIME
1025
1055
1125
1155
1225
TO:
WP 5
FUEL
REM 6800
5800
4900 3900
3000
+350
+300
+300 +200
+200
8000
-90
-180
-300
-300
-330
TOTAL +260 +120
0
-100
-130
7000
FP
DEST
2220
TREND
REV
DEST
2480
2340
2220 2120
1990
6000
MIN
DEST
1710
1710
1710 1710
1710
OXY
VOLTS
6/28
6/28
6/28
6/28
6/28
5000
4000
PREDICTED FLOW
3000
2000
WEIGHT
MINIMUM FUEL LINE
OF FUEL
IN LBS
1020
1040
1100
1120
1140
1200
1220
1240
1300
1320
TIME
Revised Jul 10 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-15 - Fuel Planning 
19.  In-flight Fuel Checks.  Once airborne, the elapsed times on the horizontal axis can be replaced 
with real times, if required.  Fuel checks are plotted on the graph as values of fuel remaining against 
time, or elapsed time from take-off.  Revision of fuel expected at destination requires an extra stage 
when using this graph.  Suppose that a fuel check plots above the line by 200 lb.  It is not sufficient 
to assume that the destination fuel will be better by 200 lb; it is first necessary to check how airborne 
ETAs  correspond  with  the  flight  plan  ETAs.    At  the  time  of  the  fuel  check,  the  ETA  for  the  next 
waypoint is calculated and compared with the flight plan ETA.  If the flight is running, say, 3 minutes 
behind flight plan then 3 minutes extra fuel will be used (assuming that the 3-minute discrepancy is 
maintained).  Using an average fuel flow rate of 30 lb/min in this example, an extra 90 lb of fuel will 
be  used.    Thus,  the  revision  to  the  overhead  fuel  is  200  –  90  =  +110  lb.    An  extra  facility  can  be 
offered,  on  the  fuel/time  Howgozit,  by  joining  2  representative  fuel  checks,  and  extending  that  line 
downwards.    Where  this  line  intercepts  the  minimum  fuel  line,  the  time  can  be  estimated  for 
achieving that fuel state.  In the example in Fig 10, by joining the 1155 hrs and 1225 hrs fuel checks 
and  projecting  that  line,  it  can  be  forecast  that  the  minimum  fuel  of  1,710  lb  will  be  reached  at 
approximately 1306 hrs. 
Fuel Saving 
20.  If, during the flight, a fuel check falls below the minimum fuel line, or if a reliable trend shows that 
the fuel will be below minimum at the destination, then some fuel saving action must be initiated. 
21.  The  action  to  be  taken  will  depend  on  a  number  of  factors  such  as  the  aircraft  type  and 
performance,  the nature of the task, and airspace restrictions.  Although no precise guidance can be 
given, the following options might be considered: 
a. 
Reduce  Time  on  Task.    Reducing  time  on  task  is  a  simple  method  of saving fuel but may 
not be operationally acceptable. 
b. 
Shorten the Route.  This is normally the most effective method but is dependent upon the 
route geometry.  It should be relatively simple in a route with large turns but will be impossible in a 
straight  route.    In  addition,  there  may  be  air  traffic  control  or  airspace  restrictions  preventing  re-
routeing. 
c. 
Alter the Cruise Profile.  There are various techniques which may be considered within the 
cruise  profile.    When  on  task,  it  may  be  possible  to  change  to  a  more  economical  speed 
(endurance  cruise),  or  perhaps  fly  higher.    On  route  to  the  destination,  best  speed  for  range 
should be utilized.  A higher cruising flight level may also save fuel over a long distance (but the 
effect  of  a  different  fuel  flow  rate  and  of  a  different  wind  structure  must  be  considered).  
Approaching the destination, it may be beneficial to remain at height for longer and then execute a 
rapid,  rather  than  normal,  rate  of  descent.    Finally,  the  planned  approach  may  be  changed,  eg 
straight-in visual rather than full instrument recovery, weather permitting. 
d. 
Re-negotiate  the  Minimum  Overhead  Fuel.    It  may  be  possible  to  change  the  planned 
diversion airfield to one that is closer or has better weather (allowing a visual approach instead of 
an instrument approach) thereby permitting a reduced minimum fuel overhead the destination. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
CHAPTER 16 - CRITICAL POINT AND POINT OF NO RETURN 
Introduction 
1. 
An  important  aspect  of  flight  planning  is  the  calculation  of  the  action  to  be  taken  in  the  event  of  a 
diversion or an emergency.  The decision to be made is whether, with the available fuel and knowledge of 
the wind velocity, it will be preferable to return to base, divert, or continue to the destination, and indeed 
which  of  these  options  is  feasible.    This  chapter  will  describe  the  various  decision  points  which  can  be 
determined at the flight planning stage and the methods by which they can be calculated.  
CRITICAL POINT 
Definition 
2. 
Route Critical Point (CP).  The CP is the point between two airfields from which it would take the 
same time to fly to either airfield.  The calculation of critical point is based on the ratio of groundspeed to 
destination and groundspeed back to base.  These speeds are computed from a mean wind velocity for 
the  flight  for  simplicity.    The  TAS  selected  for  the  calculation  depends  on  the  type  of  emergency 
envisaged.  For example in the case of an engine failure a reduced TAS will be used, whereas in the case 
of a sudden deterioration in the condition of a patient on a medical evacuation flight a higher than normal 
TAS might be appropriate. 
3. 
There  are  three  methods  of  determining  the  critical  point  between  two  airfields;  formula  (DR 
Computer), Howgozit and critical line graphics. 
Formula (DR Computer) Method 
4. 
Fig  1  illustrates  the  problem  to  be  solved.    A  and  B  are  the  two  airfields  and  C  is  the  critical point 
whose position along AB is to be found.  The distance from A to B is D, and the distance from A to C is X.  
The groundspeed on to the destination is O and the ground-speed back to base is H.  In most cases, these 
ground-speeds will be calculated on the basis of a reduced TAS. 
9-16 Fig 1 Critical Point Problem 
H
O
C
A
B
X
D
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
By the definition of Critical Point, the time from C to A is the same as the time from C to B.   
Therefore: 
D − X
X

O
H
XO

H(D – X) 
XO

HD – HX 
XO + XH

HD 
HD
ie X

O + H
X
H
or

D
O + H
5. 
In this latter form, the equation can be solved for X on the DR Computer by setting H on the outer 
scale against (O + H) on the inner scale and then reading X on the outer scale against D on the inner 
scale. 
6. 
Example.  
D

1,000 nm 
Reduced TAS 

260 kt 
W/V

060°/60 
Track

090°T 
=
O

208 kt 
H

312 kt 
O+H

520 kt 
From the DR Computer (Fig 2)  
X

600 nm  
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 10 


AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
9-16 Fig 2 DR Computer Solution to Critical Point 
X
D

H
O + H
Howgozit Method 
7. 
The  CP  can  be  determined  using  the  fuel/distance  Howgozit  graph.    The  principle  is  to  back  plot, 
from  the point at the departure and destination airfield representing the minimum fuel, two fuel gradient 
lines equivalent to the expected fuel consumption rate from the CP.  The intersection of these gradients 
will then be at the CP. 
8. 
Fig 3 shows a fuel/distance Howgozit for a flight of 741 nm.  The minimum fuel required at either 
the  destination  or  on  return  to  base  is  1,500  lbs.    Points  A  and  B  represent  this  fuel  value  at  the 
departure and destination airfields. 
9-16 Fig 3 Howgozit Solution of Critical Point 
FROM: LOSSIEMOUTH
E/L
TIME
TO:
KEFLAVIK
FUEL
REM
8000
TOTAL
7000
FP
DEST 2900
2900
2900
2900
REV
DEST
6000
MIN
E
DEST
Weight
OXY
of Fuel
VOLTS
5000
in lbs
C
D
4000
3000
F
2000
1500
B
A
1000
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
CP
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
9. 
The  requirement  now  is  to  determine  the  fuel  gradients  in  terms  of  fuel  against  distance,  taking 
into  account  the  optimum  single-engine  cruising  level  and  speed,  a  representative  AUW,  and  the 
expected  wind velocity.  The ODM table (Fig 4) shows an example of the distance flown whilst using 
2,500 lbs of fuel (from 4,000 lbs to 1,500 lbs) for a selection of head and tail wind components.  Other 
aircraft  will  have  different  figures,  but  the  principle  remains  the  same.    The  gradients  can  now  be 
constructed by stepping these distances from the departure and destination airfields on the graph and 
plotting the 4,000 lbs of fuel point.  
9-16 Fig 4 ODM Table - Distance Flown for 2500 lbs of Fuel 
Headwind
Distance
Tailwind
Distance
Knots
Naut. Miles
Knots
Naut. Miles
0
415
0
415
5
405
5
425
10
400
10
430
15
390
15
440
20
380
20
450
25
375
25
455
30
365
30
465
35
355
35
475
40
350
40
480
45
340
45
490
50
330
50
500
55
325
55
505
60
315
60
515
65
305
65
525
70
300
70
530
75
290
75
540
80
280
80
550
85
275
85
555
90
265
90
565
95
255
95
575
100
250
100
580
10.  On  the  example  graph,  the  'home'  wind  component  is  9  kt head and the 'out' component is 8 kt 
tail.  These values are computed using forecast wind velocity and a reduced TAS in the single engine 
case.  Fig 4 gives distances of 401 nm and 428 nm respectively for these wind components.  Point C is 
plotted  at  4,000  lbs  and  428  nm  from  destination;  point  D  is  plotted  at  4,000  lbs  and  401  nm  from 
departure  (741  − 401  =  340  DTG).    CB  and  AD  are  then  the  required  fuel  gradients  and  their 
intersection gives the CP position, 383 nm DTG.  
11.  It should be remembered that the CP represents the equal time point between two bases and the 
fact that the solution has been determined on a fuel Howgozit graph does not in itself guarantee that 
the aircraft will arrive at base or destination with the minimum required fuel.  The expected fuel can be 
determined  by  drawing  a  line  through  the  flight  plan  fuel  point  at  the  CP  parallel  to  the  appropriate 
gradient determined above.  Thus, on the example graph, if it was decided to return to base from the 
CP  under  the  single-engine  conditions,  the  fuel  line  would  be  plotted  as EF, parallel to AD, giving an 
expected  fuel  at  base  of  2,900  lbs.    However  an  adverse  combination  of  distance  and  wind  velocity 
could bring the overhead fuel level to less than minimum. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
Critical Line 
12.  The  critical  point  represents  that  point  on  track  from  which  it  will  take  equal  time  to  proceed  to 
destination or return to base.  If the aircraft is off track however, the critical point loses its significance 
and must be replaced by a critical line.  For a straight line track, as in Fig 5, in still air the perpendicular 
bisector of track represents the equal time line back to A or on to B.  Thus, for an aircraft well off track 
(at C), it would be quicker to return to A than proceed to B in still air.  
9-16 Fig 5 Critical Line in Still Air 
X
C
Equi-line
A
B
500 nm
500 nm
Y
13.  To be valid, this line must be modified for the effect of wind.  The time for the aircraft to fly from 
the still air critical line to either A or B in still air at the reduced TAS is calculated.  The critical line is 
then moved upwind by a distance equal to the still air time multiplied by the wind speed.  
14.  In the example, the still air critical line is at 500 nm, the reduced TAS is 260 kt and the wind velocity is 
060°/60.  The still air time to fly from the critical line to either A or B is 115 minutes (1.923 hrs).  Thus the 
critical line must be moved upwind (i.e. in the direction 060° T) by 1.923 ×  60 nm = 115 nm (Fig 6). 
9-16 Fig 6 Wind - Modified Critical Line 
Equi-line moved
upwind for 115 nm
A
B
Equi-line
Critical Line
15.  The assumption in this solution is that the distance, from any point on the still air critical line to A or B, 
is  the  same  (i.e.  500  nm  in  this  example).    This  assumption  becomes  less  valid  as  distance  off  track 
increases but the errors induced are unlikely to be significant unless the track error is large and the route 
relatively short.  
Critical Point/Line Between Three Airfields 
16.  The  discussion  in  the  foregoing  paragraphs  has  considered  only  the  case  where  the  options 
available  are  proceeding  to  the  destination  or  returning  to  base.    More  commonly,  there  will  be  a  third 
option of diverting to an off-track airfield.  Fig 7 shows the still air situation, where, between A and L, it will 
be quicker to return to base, from L to N it will be quicker to divert to C, and beyond N it will be quicker 
to proceed to B.  Thus, L and N represent two critical points.  The best method of finding the positions 
of L and N is graphical and is based on the critical line solution. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
9-16 Fig 7 Critical Point Between Three Airfields 
C
A
L
N
B
17.  The  method  is  illustrated  in  Fig  8.    AC  and  BC,  joining  the  departure  and  destination  airfields to 
the diversion, are drawn, and the perpendicular bisectors of these lines (LM and NO) are constructed 
to cut the track, AB, at L and N.  As L is equidistant from A and C, and N is equidistant from B and C, L 
and N are the still air critical points.  
9-16 Fig 8 Graphical Solution for Critical Points/Lines Between Three Airfields 
C
O
M
Critical
Line
Critical
L
CP
N
CP
Line
A
B
Wind Vector
Wind Vector
for Time
for Time
L to C
N to C
18.  To  account  for  the  wind  effect  the  points  L  and  N  are  moved  upwind,  in  the  same  manner  as 
constructing a critical line, by an amount equal to the wind speed multiplied by the time to fly from L and N 
respectively  to  C  at  the  reduced  TAS.    Critical  lines  are  drawn  through  the  ends  of  the  wind  vectors, 
parallel to LM and NO, and where these cut the track represent the critical points. 
POINT OF NO RETURN 
Definition 
19.  The point of no return (PNR) is that point furthest removed from base to which an aircraft can fly 
and still return to base within its safe endurance.  PNR is normally calculated on long flights where the 
aircraft  is  unable  to  land  between  the  departure  and  destination  airfields.    As  with  the  CP,  there  are 
three methods of solution, but only the formula (DR Computer) and Howgozit methods are practical.  
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
Formula (DR Computer) Method 
20.  By definition, the distance to the PNR equals the distance from the PNR back to base.  If T is the 
time  to  the  PNR,  O  the  outbound  groundspeed  (using  full  TAS),  H  the  homebound  groundspeed 
(full TAS), and P the aircraft endurance, then: 
T × O

(P – T)H 
TO

PH – TH 
T(O + H)

PH 
PH
ie         T

O + H
Distance to the PNR is then found from T × O. 
21.  The problem can be solved on the DR Computer by transposing the formula into the form: 
T
H

P
O + H
H is set on the outer scale against O + H on the inner scale and then T can be read on the outer scale 
against P on the inner scale.  
22.  Example. 
O

380 kt 
H

340 kt 
P

3 hrs 
∴ T

340
340
=
180
380 + 340
720
From  Fig  9,  T  can  be  seen  to  equal  85  minutes.  Distance  to  PNR  is  then  equal  to  85  minutes  at 
380 kt = 538 nm. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 10 


AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
9-16 Fig 9 DR Computer Solution to PNR 
Howgozit Method 
23.  Fig 10 shows a fuel/distance Howgozit for a flight of 741 nm.  Point A represents the minimum fuel 
requirement on arrival back at base (1,200 lbs) and it is necessary to construct a fuel gradient back to 
this point. 
9-16 Fig 10 Howgozit Solution for Point of No Return 
FROM: LOSSIEMOUTH
E/L
TIME
TO:
KEFLAVIK
BEM
8000
FP
TOTAL
7000
FP
DEST 2900
2900
2900
2900
REV
DEST
6000
Weight
MIN
DEST
of Fuel
OXY
VOLTS
in lbs
5000
C
4000
B
3000
2000
A
1000
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
PNR
24.  From  the  ODM  cruise  table,  the  TAS  and  fuel  flow  rate  for  the  appropriate  return  flight  level  is 
extracted.  An assumption will have to be made for the AUW pertinent to the return leg, a mid-AUW will 
probably suffice.  
25.  The groundspeed is now calculated for the homebound leg, using the ODM TAS and the forecast 
wind velocity.  There is now sufficient information to plot the gradient as the fuel used per hour and the 
distance flown per hour are known and therefore the fuel used per distance is known.  In the example, 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
the fuel rate is 1760 lbs/hr and the groundspeed is 312 kt and a point on the graph at 1760 + 1200 = 
2960 lbs and 312 nm from base can be plotted (B in Fig 10). 
26.  The fuel gradient is drawn in by joining AB and is extended to intersect the planned consumption 
line (C in Fig 10).  The distance corresponding to this point represents the PNR. 
Last Point of Diversion 
27.  The  last  point  of  diversion  (LPD)  is  a  special  case  of  the  point  of  no  return.    Under  normal 
circumstances, an aircraft will arrive at its destination with sufficient fuel reserves to divert to and reach 
its  diversion  with  a  specified  minimum  fuel.    However,  occasionally,  routes  may  be  flown  where  the 
nearest diversion is at such a distance from the destination that the aircraft cannot carry enough fuel to 
reach the destination and then divert safely.  Under these circumstances it is possible to determine that 
point  along  track  beyond  which  it  is  impossible  to  reach  the  diversion  airfield  safely.    This  point  is 
known as the 'Last Point of Diversion'.  
28.  The  LPD  is  found  graphically  and  the  procedure  is  illustrated  in  Fig  11,  where  B  is  the  intended 
destination.    AB  is  the  final track, and C is the diversion airfield.  The track AB is extended to D (the 
false  destination)  such  that  AD  represents  the  limit  of  safe  endurance  at  the  groundspeed along that 
track.  CD is joined and a perpendicular bisector is constructed, QP, cutting AD at P.  The still air time 
from P to C is calculated and a wind vector is drawn upwind from P for this time.  A critical line can now 
be drawn parallel to PQ cutting the track AB at the last point of diversion for C. 
9-16 Fig 11 Last Point of Diversion (LPD) Solution 
A
P
B
D
LPD
Q
C
29.  In  flight  it  may  be  necessary  to  amend  the  position  of  the  false destination in accordance with a 
Howgozit  fuel  trend.   Fig 12 shows a Howgozit graph with a fuel trend drawn in.  This is extended to 
intersect the minimum fuel line and the distance equating to this point defines the false destination, in 
this example 100 nm beyond the destination.  The LPD is then constructed graphically as above. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-16 - Critical Point and Point of No Return 
9-16 Fig 12 Howgozit Solution of False Destination (FD) 
8000
1000
Trend Line
1030
6000
)
s
1100
'False Destination' is 
(lb
l
Planned Fuel Line
1300
100 nm beyond 
e
u 4000
real destination
F
2000
Min Fuel Line (1200 lbs)
1000
800
600
400
200
0
False
Dest
nm
Revised Jul 10 
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
CHAPTER 17 - TIMING TECHNIQUES 
Introduction 
1. 
Many  air  operations  require  that  aircraft  reach  a  given  point  at  a  precise  time.  As  it  is  usually 
easier  to  lose  time  than  to  gain  it,  such  operations  are  often  planned  with  a  margin  of  time  in  hand. 
Whether  or  not  this is done, some adjustment to the speed or to the distance flown will invariably be 
necessary to achieve the planned arrival time. 
TIMING BY SPEED ADJUSTMENT 
General 
2. 
The  obvious  way  to  alter  an  aircraft’s  time  of  arrival  at  its  target  is  to  increase  or  decrease  the 
airspeed, thus changing the groundspeed.  If the aircraft is equipped with a navigation system giving a 
direct readout of groundspeed, it is more convenient to base adjustments directly on groundspeed. 
3. 
Only a small increase above the standard operating speed of an aircraft at a given height is normally 
possible  without  an  appreciable  penalty  in  fuel  consumption.    Small  speed  changes  result  in  only  small 
increases  or  decreases  in  flight  time.    For  example,  at  a  groundspeed  of  200  kt  an  adjustment  in 
groundspeed of 10 kt will gain or lose only three minutes in an hour; the same adjustment at 400 kts gives 
a difference of only one and a half minutes per hour.  If, therefore, accurate timing at the target is to be 
achieved by speed adjustments, action must be initiated as early as possible.  The ideal is to be on time 
at the beginning of a flight, and stay on time by adjusting the speed at each fix. 
4. 
Two  factors  usually  tell  against  attainment  of  the  ideal.    If  operating  in  an  area  not  served  by  a 
reliable  wind  forecasting  service  (a  situation  more  common  operationally  than  in  training),  to  stay  on 
time during the early part of the flight might lead to impracticable speed changes being required when 
near  the  target,  to  compensate  for  major  changes  from  the  forecast  head  or  tail  wind  component.  
Furthermore, frequent speed changes when operating high performance aircraft are expensive in fuel.  
It  is  therefore  good  practice  to  make  only  one  or  two  adjustments  to  speed  in  the  early  stages  of 
theflight, and changes at turning points are usually adequate.  The aim is to stay nearly on time but with 
a  progressively  decreasing  amount  of  time  in  hand,  arriving  on  time  at  a  suitable  way  point  near 
enough to the target to allow any reasonable wind changes to be taken care of by speed adjustment.  
From that waypoint, to the target, timing is checked and speed adjusted at each fix. 
Calculation of Speed Adjustments 
5. 
The required groundspeed changes can be calculated as follows: 
a. 
On  the  Dead  Reckoning  computer,  by  calculating  the  groundspeed  required  between  a  fix 
and the next turning point, by using time and distance to go. 
b. 
By  the  use  of  tables,  prepared  for  the  usual  operating  speeds,  giving  the  amount  of  time 
gained or lost if various speed changes are applied for a given period. 
c. 
By using annotations, made on the flight plan, of the airspeed adjustments required to gain or 
lose one minute, computed for each leg. 
d. 
By estimation in flight using mental DR (MDR). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
6. 
An  MDR  change  of  G/S  can  be  converted  to  an  MDR  change  in  CAS  by  multiplying  it  by  the 
approximate ratio of CAS to TAS.  Thus, if the required G/S is an increase of 44 kt with a current CAS 
of 209 kt and a TAS of 282 kt, then the CAS should be increased by 44 × 0.75, i.e. 33 kt. 
Change of Mach Number 
7. 
When an aircraft is being flown by reference to a Mach meter, rather than an airspeed indicator, 
an adjustment to indicated Mach number to gain or lose time can be calculated as follows: 
a. 
Computer Method
(1)  Determine the present groundspeed. 
(2)  Determine the groundspeed required to make good the required ETA. 
(3)  Calculate, on the computer, a new Mach number to fly, using the following formula: 
Current Mach No
 Mach No
= New
Current G / S
Required G / S
This method is adequate under most circumstances, but becomes increasingly inaccurate with head or 
tail wind components in excess of 50 kt. 
b. 
Use  of  Timing  Graph.    The  change  in  Mach  number  required  can  be  determined  directly 
from a graph (such as that illustrated at Fig 1); the method is as follows: 
(1)  Calculate the ETA, using the current groundspeed and the distance to go. 
(2)  From this ETA and the required ETA, determine the amount early or late. 
(3)  Enter the graph with distance to go and current groundspeed, extract the Mach number 
change  required  to  gain  or  lose  one  minute,  and  by  proportion  determine  the Mach change 
needed. 
9-17 Fig 1 Change of Mach Number to Gain or Lose Time 
.10
0
0
0
0
0
0
in
3
4
5
M
e
n
O .08
e
s
o
L
r
o .06
in
a
G
to
o
N .04
h
c
a
Groundspeed
M
(Knots)
in
e .02
g
n
500
a
h
400
C
300
0
0
100
200
300
400
500
Distance to Go (nm)
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
TIMING BY ADJUSTMENT OF DISTANCE TO BE FLOWN 
General 
8. 
It  may  sometimes  be  desirable  to  adjust  timing  by  altering  the  distance  to  go  rather  than  by 
changing airspeed.  The various methods of doing this, some of them requiring pre-planning and some 
not, are described in the following paragraphs. 
Losing Time by 60° Dog-leg 
9. 
Heading is altered 60° in either direction for the length of time that is to be lost, then altered 120°
in the opposite direction for the same length of time to regain track.  Heading to the next turning point, 
or target, is then resumed.  The aircraft will, thus, have flown two sides of an equilateral triangle, and 
the time lost will be equal to the time taken to fly one side. 
10.  Small  inaccuracies  in  tracking  and  time  lost  will  be  introduced  by  the  wind  effect  during  the 
procedure,  but  they  will  usually  be  negligible  if  the  amount  of  time  to  be  lost  is  small.    If  the  same 
constant  rate  of  turn  is  maintained  throughout  the  three  turns,  and  if  legs  are  timed  accurately  from 
levelling out after a turn to the start of the next turn (see Fig 2), the effect on time lost of the time taken 
to turn can be ignored. 
9-17 Fig 2 60° Dog-leg Procedure 
Wind Direction
120°
C
D
B
60°
E
A
60°
Notes.
1. Legs are Timed Between B-C and D-E.
2. Time Lost      Time Flown B-C.
11.  The  60°  dog-leg  procedure,  as  described  above,  can  normally  be  used for small time losses.  If 
more than two minutes is to be lost, or if the wind is strong, it will be necessary to adjust the time on 
the second leg to ensure that the final turn will bring the aircraft back on track.  If this is not done, the 
resulting  track  error  will  leave  a  further  timing  problem,  particularly  if  near  the  next  turning  point.  
Where  such  an  adjustment  will be necessary, it is usual to make the first turn towards the 'into wind' 
direction.  This will ensure that track can be rejoined with time in hand, and that it will not be necessary 
to extend the second leg to regain track, thus putting the aircraft in the more difficult position of having 
to make up time. 
Losing Time by 30° Dog-leg 
12.  A similar procedure, altering heading first 30° in one direction, then 60° in the other, before resuming 
heading, may be used for small adjustments in ETA (see Fig 3). 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
9-17 Fig 3 30° Dog-leg Procedure 
C
60°
D
B
30°
E
F
A
30°
Notes.
1. Legs are Timed B-C and D-E.
2. Time A-F           of time A-C-F and time loss
1 min in 8 mins.
13.  For each minute to be lost, each leg is flown for four minutes.  This procedure is useful for small 
time losses (up two minutes) when it is desired to stay near track and avoid big alterations of heading. 
14.  Even  when  timing  is  not  a  consideration,  adoption  of  a  formal  dog-leg  procedure  to  avoid 
obstacles or weather will enable the track to be regained and ETA amended with minimum calculation. 
Losing Time by Rate 1 Turns (90° Method) 
15.  The procedure illustrated at Fig 4 could occasionally be useful in high performance aircraft.  The 
time lost by using the procedure is arrived at as follows: 
Distance  A-B-C-D

π d (where 'd' is the diameter of turn) 
Time A-B-C-D

2 mins (360ºat Rate 1) 
Direct Distance A-D

2d 
2
Time A-D

2d ×
mins
πd

1¼ mins approx 
∴ Time lost

¾ min 
9-17 Fig 4 Losing Time by 90° Method 
Commence Reverse
Commence Reverse
Turn Through 180°
Turn Through 90°
B
C
Commence Rate 1
Back on Original
Turn Through 90°
Heading
d
d
A
d
D
2
2
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
16.  To  lose  more  than  ¾    min,  subtract  ¾    min  from  the  time to be lost, and straighten up between 
each reverse for half the resultant time. 
Summary of Dog-leg and 90° Methods 
17.  The above methods suffer from the disadvantages that: 
a. 
They are imprecise in regaining track. 
b. 
They can be inaccurate in losing time. 
18.  It is usually necessary for them to be followed by heading corrections, and if precision is required, 
by speed adjustments.  They do, however, serve to lose a lot of time in a short distance along track, 
but at the expense of considerable deviation from the planned track - not always tactically acceptable. 
Cutting the Corner 
19.  If there is a suitably large track alteration along the route, timing may be adjusted by extending or 
cutting the corner at that turning point.  Two simple examples of this procedure are shown in Fig 5. 
9-17 Fig 5 Timing by Adjustment of Track at a Turning Point 
a
b
L3
L3
L2
L2
L1
L1
Allowance for
G3 G2 G1
L1 L2 L3
Turning Circle
A
X
B
B
G1
G1
G2
G2
G3
G3
C
C
20.  Given  a  route  A-B-C  (Fig  5a),  timing  is  adjusted  by  adopting  a  new  turning  point  in  place  of 
position B. As shown in Fig 5a, distances representing 1, 2 and 3 minutes of groundspeed are marked 
along  the  track  B  C  and  its  reciprocal,  and  marked  G1,  G2  and  G3  (gaining  time)  and  L1,  L2  and  L3
(losing time).  If at position X the aircraft were two minutes ahead of time, heading would be altered to 
fly the track X-L2-C.  Alternatively, the track AB may be extended beyond B and the 1, 2, and 3 minute 
marks placed on this extension for losing time ( L1 , L2  and L3 ) and on the reciprocal for gaining time 
( G1 , G2 ,  and  G3 ).    If  running  late, time may be gained by turning early to C from either  G1 ,  G2  or 
G3 .    If  early,  overflying  B  and  turning  towards  C  from  L1 ,  L2   or  L3   will  provide  the  appropriate 
number of minutes delay.  However, since the track has changed so too will the groundspeed.  Thus a 
revision of timing on the new leg will be necessary.  Where turning circles have to be allowed for, and 
using the first method as an example, it is convenient to mark the timing points along a line parallel to 
the track from B to C, passing through the originally planned start turn point at B, as shown in Fig 5b.  
ETA start turn is then easily calculated. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
21.  The technique of cutting short/extending at corners, described in Para 20, requires the turn angle at 
B to be close to 90°, so that, for example, the leg X - L2 would be approximately equal to X - B. 
Pre-computed Timing Leg 
22.  A  more  precise  method  of  adjusting  timing,  by  revising  the  distance  to  be  flown,  is  to  use  pre-
computed timing legs at any convenient turning point.  Use is again made of the principle of isosceles 
triangles. 
23.  Fig 6 shows pre-computed timing legs constructed for the route A-B-C.  At position B, a line BDE 
is drawn at an angle of 75° to track BC.  The length of BD is the distance flown in, say, four minutes 
where  three  minutes  is  the  longest period it is thought it will be necessary to make up at that turning 
point.    Similarly,  DE  is the distance flown in the maximum time it will be necessary to lose.  From D, 
line BDE is divided into units of distance flown in one minute, and marked G1, G2, L1, L2 etc as shown. 
9-17 Fig 6 Pre-computed Timing Legs 
A
B
F
75°
G3
C
G2
G1
75°
D
L1
L2
L3
L4
E
24.  A  line  DF  is  drawn  at  an  angle  of  75°  to  BD  to  intercept  BC  at  F.    A-B-D-F  is  now  the  'on  time' 
track,  used  in  calculating  the  required  set  heading  time  when  completing  the  flight  plan.    The  dotted 
line in Fig 6 illustrates the track to gain two minutes.  A method of construction when allowance must 
be made for turning circles is shown in Fig 7. 
9-17 Fig 7 Pre-computed Timing Legs with Turning Circles 
B
G3
F
G2
G1
D L1
Revised Jul 10 
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-17 - Timing Techniques 
GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS 
Accuracy 
25.  Accurate flying and navigation are essential to successful timing.  Turns should be executed at the 
planned  rate,  and  the  aircraft  flown  at  the  correct  airspeed  and  altitude.    Track  keeping  is  important; 
attempts to make up or lose time by speed adjustment will be negated if the aircraft is allowed to stray 
far from the planned track. 
Early Remedial Action 
26.  The task of arriving at a target, or destination, on time will be simplified if any tendency to gain or 
lose  time  is  quickly  recognized,  and  if  remedial  action  is  taken  before  too  big  an  error  has 
accumulated.  When the aircraft is early, care must be taken to ensure, before shedding all the time in 
hand, that the planned route for the remainder of the flight to the target, coupled with practicable speed 
adjustments, gives sufficient flexibility to make up any foreseeable subsequent loss of time. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 9-18 - Flight Planning 
CHAPTER 18 - FLIGHT PLANNING 
Introduction 
1. 
Fast  jet  operations  are  primarily  concerned  with  the  delivery  of  weapons  onto  a  surface  or  air 
target,  and  the  gathering  of  reconnaissance  information.    In  the  air  defence  role,  air  navigation  will 
normally  be  carried  out  with  direct  reference  to  the  air  target  rather  than  to  geography,  and  with 
assistance or control from ground agencies, AWACS, or on-board sensors.  Even so, an awareness of 
geographical position is vital so that adequate terrain clearance can be maintained and the aircraft fuel 
state in relation to base or diversion airfield can be monitored. 
2. 
In  addition  to  these  specialized  roles,  there  are  occasions where some form of medium or high-
level  navigation  techniques  are  appropriate,  e.g.  transit  to  a  low  level  entry  point  (LLEP)  or  exercise 
area,  or  a  ferry  flight.    However,  due  to  the  limited  cockpit  space  the  techniques  of  Volume  9, 
Chapter 14  can  rarely  be  used  without  amendment,  particularly  in  single-seat  aircraft;  maximum  use 
will be made of mental dead reckoning (MDR) techniques (Volume 9, Chapter 19) and radio aids (see 
Volume 9, Chapter 21).  The particular case of airways flying is covered in Volume 8, Chapter 30. 
Planning and Map Preparation 
3. 
Chart.  The en route series of charts (ERCs) are normally used for medium/high level navigation.  
Although  the  high-level  chart  will  be used in the UK for any cruise portion of the flight above FL 245, 
reference will need to be made to the low level chart for the climb and descent portions, to ensure that 
due  account  is  taken  of  restricted  and  controlled  airspace  at  the  lower  levels.    It  may  be  considered 
desirable  to  highlight  any  restricted  airspace  adjacent  to  track  and  emphasize  its  vertical  extent.    In 
addition,  navigation  beacons  and  any  control  frequencies  may  be  emphasized.    Other  information 
which  should  be  annotated  includes  safety  altitude  and  pressure  setting  for  the  descent,  and  the 
contact  frequency  for  any  suitable  air  traffic  control  agency  that  might  be  able  to  provide  assistance, 
particularly if in IMC. 
4. 
Route.    The  route  waypoints  should  be  carefully  selected  and plotted.  The tracks can be drawn 
between waypoints, ensuring that the appropriate turning circles for the TAS and rate of turn are correctly 
constructed.    An  information  box  may  be  drawn  near  the  beginning  of  each  leg  as  shown  in  Fig  1.  
Distance-to-go (DTG) marks are annotated along track, if required. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 1 of 4 


AP3456 – 9-18 - Flight Planning 
9-18 Fig 1 Medium Level Transit to LLEP (not to scale) 
LEU
LARS 255.4

LLEP
309
129R/10nm
180
10
2900
TOD
380
405
20
129R/37nm
270
295
10 DME
30
129R/
40
43nm
309
50
CH 72
FL205
Prepared DME Arcs
15 DME
180
1
3700
29R
SCOT MIL
CH 89Y
249.475
14 DME
Control Agencies 
& Frequency

349
Expected Fuel
460
FL205
LONDON MIL
En Route
350
173
Minimum Fuel
299.975
3700
070R
TOC
070R/20nm
Track (M)
349 Flight Level
FL205
090R
IAS
140
SALT
090R/15nm 3300
3
0
1
3
F
4
L
9
0
0
2
0
0
0
5
5. 
Planning.    The  top-of-climb  (TOC)  and  top-of-descent  (TOD)  points  are  calculated  and  plotted 
using Operating Data Manual (ODM) or Flight Reference Card (FRC) information.  The determination 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 9-18 - Flight Planning 
of headings and groundspeeds for the climb, cruise and descent portions may be achieved using the 
DR Computer or MDR methods. 
6. 
Fixing.  To simplify matters in the air, especially for the single-seat operator, it will be beneficial to 
construct  a  selection  of  range  circles  and  bearing  lines  from  appropriate  TACAN,  VOR  or  DME 
beacons (Fig 1).  Careful selection of beacons can assist navigation and reduce workload.  TACAN or 
DME ranges from beacons on the beam will provide position lines to assist tracking.  Beacons ahead 
or  behind,  aligned  with  track,  offer  many  advantages  -  a  VOR  or  TACAN  bearing  will  assist  with 
tracking; a DME or TACAN range will provide distance gone or distance to go information.  The use of 
radio aids for navigation is covered in Volume 9, Chapter 21. 
7. 
Selection  of  Beacons  for  Descent.    It  is  especially  beneficial  to  have  one  beacon  aligned  with 
track  during  the  section  from TOD to LLEP.  This will help to ensure that the TOD and LLEP can be 
located accurately and with the minimum of effort, during a portion of the flight where the workload is 
liable to be high.  Indeed, it may be worthwhile revising the descent track if a small change (perhaps 
10º  to  15º)  will  enable  alignment  with  a  beacon  (see  Fig  2).    During  the  final  stages  of  the  descent, 
terrain  screening  and  earth  curvature  (i.e.  long  range)  are  considerations,  as  they  may  cause  the 
beacon to unlock.  
9-18 Fig 2 Adjusting Track to make best use of TACAN Beacon 
a  Original Plan
b  TOD on Radial
c  LLEP on Radial
TACAN
TACAN
TACAN
LLEP
LLEP
LLEP
Alternatively, fly 
Track through TOD 
to intercept the 
and LLEPdoes not lie
By flying a TACAN
radial through 
on any common radial 
radial from WP1, 
the LLEP.
from TACAN beacon.
the revised TOD 
is easily located. 
TOD
Original
Original
Track
New TOD
New TOD
Track
Revised Track
Revised Track
<10°
<10°
WP1
WP1
WP1
Fuel Planning 
8. 
Fuel  planning  is  accomplished  using  data  from  the  ODM  or  FRCs  as  appropriate  (see  also 
Volume  9,  Chapter  15).    Many  units  will  have  locally-produced,  rapid  planning  guides  to  cover  the 
normal  load  configurations  and  the  common  flight  profiles.    Minimum  and  expected  fuel  figures  are 
calculated for TOC, TOD and, if appropriate, the LLEP.  Conventionally, the figures are marked on the 
map  in  a  circle  (Fig  1),  the  top  figure  being  the  expected  fuel  and  the  lower  figure  is  the  'en  route 
minimum fuel' (see para 9).  In addition, for extended cruise sectors, fuel circles should be added, at 
medium level every 30 minutes and, at low level at convenient intervals such as 6 or 10 minutes. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 9-18 - Flight Planning 
9. 
En Route Minimum Fuel.  The 'en route minimum fuel' is the amount of fuel required at a specific 
point,  to  enable  the  aircraft  to  complete  the  route  as  planned,  arriving  at  the  destination  with  the 
specified fuel reserves.   
10.  Fuel Checks.  During the sortie, fuel checks should be taken at the planned points by comparing the 
aircraft’s actual fuel remaining against the expected fuel.  Regular and punctual fuel checks will assist the 
crew in identifying any deviation from the expected fuel flow rate. 
11.  COMBAT  and  BINGO  Fuels.    The  following  terms  are  commonly  used  to  assist  in-flight  fuel 
management: 
a. 
COMBAT  Fuel.    At  any  point  en  route,  the  difference  between  the  aircraft’s  fuel  remaining 
and  the  en  route  minimum  fuel  is  termed  COMBAT  fuel.    A  positive  COMBAT  figure  can  be 
utilized  for  unplanned  eventualities  such  as  extra  tasking,  weather  avoidance,  timing  adjustment 
by speed (if late), or actual combat.  A negative COMBAT figure indicates that some fuel saving 
action is necessary. 
b. 
BINGO Fuel.  The term BINGO fuel is used to describe the minimum amount of fuel required 
at  a  point,  to  enable  the  aircraft  to  recover  to  base,  or  nominated  airfield,  utilizing  the  most 
economical route and profile from that point, to arrive with the specified fuel reserves.  The ideal 
criterion  for  a  BINGO  profile  is  a  direct  route,  with  an  unrestricted  climb  to  the  most  efficient 
cruising  level,  followed  by  an  unrestricted  descent  to  land  from  the  first  approach.    The  BINGO 
calculation  must  include  an  allowance  for  any  headwind.    Furthermore,  where  there  are 
foreseeable ATC restrictions in routeing or cruising heights, the BINGO fuel must include suitable 
allowance.  
12.  Formation Sorties.  To assist with sortie management, the leader of a formation must be aware 
of the fuel situation of the other aircraft whilst airborne.  The leader will normally brief the other pilots to 
declare when they first reach a specified fuel state; often termed 'JOKER' fuel.  The pre-flight briefing 
should include fuel information calls tailored to the particular sortie, e.g. 
JOKER 1

30 minutes of fuel remaining 
JOKER 2

2,000 kg of fuel remaining 
Prompt and diligent reporting of fuel states by formation members is essential. 
Revised Jul 10 
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
CHAPTER 19 - MENTAL DEDUCED RECKONING 
Introduction 
1. 
The  operating  environment  in  a  single  or  two-seat  cockpit  normally  precludes  the  use  of 
traditional  plotting  and  calculating  equipment.    Further  limitations  may  be  imposed  by  system 
degradation  or  equipment  unserviceability  and,  in  some  aircraft,  the  lack  of  navigation  aids.  
There  is,  therefore,  a  requirement  to  be  able  to  solve  mentally,  calculations  involving  speed, 
distance,  direction,  time  and  fuel.  The  ability  to  multiply  and  divide  numbers  mentally  is  an 
essential skill that users of Mental Deduced Reckoning (MDR) techniques must possess.  As with 
any  other  skill,  MDR  needs  to  be  practiced  to  the  extent  that  it  becomes  second  nature.    This is 
particularly important in the airborne environment.  An appreciation of the techniques of MDR can 
also be useful in checking the results from ground planning aids and aircraft navigation systems, 
thus avoiding gross errors. 
The 1 in 60 Rule 
2. 
The  1  in  60  rule  is  used  as  a  method  of  assessing  track  error  and  closing  angle,  and  has  long 
been  favoured  as  a  MDR  navigation  technique  because  of  its  flexibility,  ease  of  use  and  relative 
accuracy (up to about 40º).  The 1 in 60 rule postulates that an arc of one unit at a radius of 60 units 
subtends an angle of one degree (see Fig l). 
9-19 Fig 1 The 1 in 60 Rule 
1o
60 Units
1 Unit
60 Units
3. 
In practical use, this 1 in 60 rule may be applied equally well to a right-angled triangle.  It may be 
accepted that, in a right-angled triangle, if the length of the hypotenuse is 60 units, the number of units 
of length of the small side opposite the small angle will be approximately the same as the number of 
degrees in the small angle (see Fig 2). 
9-19 Fig 2 Application to a Right-angled Triangle 
1o
60 Units
1 Unit
This approximation can be compared with the exact computation below: 
Short Side  Sine of Angle 
Angle 
1 unit 
  1/60 = .0167 
  0º 57' 
10 units 
10/60 = .1667 
  9º 36' 
20 units 
20/60 = .3333 
19º 28' 
30 units 
30/60 = .5000 
30º 
35 units 
35/60 = .5833 
35º 41' 
40 units 
40/60 = .6667 
41º 49' 
Revised Mar 11  Page 1 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
4. 
Furthermore,  since  the  navigator  is  likely  to  have  distances  on  the required track marked on his 
map,  the  approximation  is  just  as  good  if  the  distance  gone  is  measured  along  the  required  track 
(see Fig 3).  In either case, the distance gone is compared with the distance off track and the ratio of 
one to the other is reduced to an angle. 
Distance off Track x 60 
Track error (degrees) = 
Distance along Track 
9-19 Fig 3 Calculation of Track Error 
Pin Point Fix
Track Made Good
2 nm
4o
Required Track
30 nm
Thus, an aircraft passing over a feature 2 miles port of the required track, after flying 30 miles has a 
track error of: 

×  60 = 4º 
30 
Estimation of Map Distances 
5. 
With  practice  in  using  particular  maps  and  their  scale  on  the  parallels  of  latitude,  it  should  be 
possible  to  make  reasonable  estimates  of  distance  by  eye.    This  skill  may  be  aided  by  one  of  the 
following techniques: 
a. 
Hand Measurements.  Map distances can be measured against a hand span, fist, or against 
the  length  from  knuckle  to  tip  of  a  finger  or  thumb.    Wearing  flying  gloves  will  yield  marginally 
different measurements over those made with the bare hand. 
b. 
Map  Comparisons.    Pre-flight  map  preparation  includes  distance-to-go  markers  or  time 
marks.  These give distance values that can be used for comparison.  Symbols on the map, such 
as a standard UK MATZ, or the latitude graticule can also be used for comparison. 
c. 
Map Scale.  Any convenient straight edge can be marked and the length measured against the 
latitude or map scale. 
Estimation of Map Directions 
6. 
Changes  of  track  may  be  required  at  short  notice  and  the  use  of  plotting  instruments  may  be 
impractical.    The  ability  to  measure  a  direction  'by  eye'  is  a  skill  that  can  be  acquired  with  practice.  
Several techniques to estimate map directions are described in the following sub-paragraphs. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 2 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
a. 
Visual  Inspection.    Most  people  can  bisect  or  even  trisect  an  angle  by  visual  inspection  quite 
accurately.    Thus  a  90°  angle  can  be  progressively  broken  down  by  bisection  to  45°,  22°  and  11°
(see Fig 4), or by trisection to 30° and 10° (Fig 5).  It is possible to combine these two techniques. 
9-19 Fig 4 Visual Inspection to Bisect Angles 
360°
Approx
022°
(045 )
°
9-19 Fig 5 Visual Inspection to Trisect Angles 
360°
(030°)
(060°)
070°
(080°)
b. 
1 in 60 Rule.  Use of the 1 in 60 rule to calculate angles (Para 2) can give results which are 
accurate to within 2°, up to about 40°.  The rule can also be used to estimate tracks on a map as 
explained below (see Fig 6). 
(1)  Starting at a point where the track crosses a parallel of latitude (see Fig 6a), estimate a 
distance  along  the  track  which  is  a  convenient  fraction  of  60.    In  this  example,  30  nm  has 
been used. 
(2)  From  this  estimated  point,  drop  a  vertical  line  to  the  parallel  of  latitude  to  form  a  right-
angled triangle, as shown in Fig 6a. 
(3)  The length of this line is now measured (10 nm in this case) and the 1 in 60 rule applied 
to determine the angle (20°) (see Fig 6b). 
(4)  The track can now be estimated as 070° (90 – 20). 
Revised Mar 11  Page 3 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
9-19 Fig 6 Using the 1 in 60 Rule to Estimate Track 
a
b
60 nm
20 nm
30 nm
10 nm
30 nm
10 nm
c. 
Map  Comparison.    A  required  direction  can  often  be  estimated  by  comparison  with  other 
known  directions  on  the  map,  such  as  drawn  and  measured  tracks,  airway  centrelines,  or 
overprinted VOR radials. 
d. 
Map  Graticule.    The  latitude  and  longitude  graticule  on  the  map  can  be  used  to  estimate 
bearings and tracks.  In Fig 7, the top left-hand corner of the box has been joined by lines to the 
10 minute divisions of latitude and longitude.  Measuring the angles these lines make with respect 
to  true  north,  gives  guidance  which  can  be  used  to  estimate  tracks  and  bearings.    This  method 
can  be  used  worldwide,  but  the  example  shown  here  applies  to  latitudes  between  50°  and  60°.  
Other latitudes will produce different angles to those shown.  Users can construct an equivalent of 
Fig 7 for their normal operating latitudes. 
9-19 Fig 7 Using the Map Graticule Between Latitudes 50°and 60° to Estimate Track 
30
300o
120o
60o
20
e
d
340o
titu
a
L
s
te
40o
u
in
m
0
3
30o
10
20o
10o
160o
0
0
10
20
30
30 minutes Longitude
Revised Mar 11  Page 4 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
Estimation of True Airspeed (TAS) 
7. 
Because  of  the  rather  complex  effects  of  deviations  from  the  standard  atmosphere  and  of 
compressibility,  there  is  no  simple  formula  for  the  determination  of  TAS  from  either  Calibrated  Airspeed 
(CAS)  or  Mach  number  (see  Volume  1,  Chapter  1).    Nevertheless,  there  are  a  few  methods  which  can 
produce acceptable results within their limitations. 
a. 
Formula  Method.    Up  to  about  25,000  feet,  the  TAS  can  be  estimated  by  multiplying  the 
CAS (in nm/min) by the altitude (in thousands of feet) and adding this figure to the CAS.  This can 
be shown as: 
TAS = CAS + (C x A) 
Where 
C = CAS in nm/min 
 
 
A = Altitude in thousands of feet 
For example: 
CAS = 210 kt (3 ½ nm/min), Altitude = 20,000 feet 
TAS = 210 + (3.5 × 20) 
TAS = 210 + (70) = 280 kt 
b. 
Mach  Number  Method.    At  about  25,000  feet,  the  Mach  number  multiplied  by  ten  is 
approximately  equal  to  the  TAS  in  nm/min,  e.g.  M  0.6  equates  to  6  nm/min,  which  is  360  kt.    For 
other heights a correction is applied to the TAS value as follows: 
(1)  If the indicated Mach number is M 0.6 or less, 1 kt is added to the TAS for each 1,000 ft 
below 25,000 ft, or, 1 kt is subtracted from the TAS for each 1,000 ft above 25,000 ft. 
At 25,000 ft M 0.6 ≡ 6 nm/min ≡ 360 kt TAS 
At 20,000 ft M 0.6 ≡ 360 + (1 × 5) = 365 kt TAS 
At 35,000 ft M 0.6 ≡ 360 – (1 × 10) = 350 kt TAS 
(2)  If  the  indicated  Mach  number  is  greater  than  M  0.6,  2  kt  are  added  to  the  TAS  for  each 
1,000 ft below 25,000 ft, or, 2 kt are subtracted from the TAS for each 1,000 ft above 25,000 ft. 
At 25,000 ft M 0.8 ≡ 8 nm/min ≡ 480 kt TAS 
At 20,000 ft M 0.8 ≡ 480 + (2 × 5) = 490 kt TAS 
At 35,000 ft M 0.8 ≡ 480 – (2 × 10) = 460 kt TAS 
(3)  Where the Mach number does not equate to a whole number of nm/min, the number of 
nm/min is multiplied by 60 to give the TAS; for example: 
At 25,000 ft M 0.43 ≡ 4.3 nm/min ≡ 4.3 × 60 = 258 kt TAS 
At 20,000 ft M 0.43 ≡ 258 + (1 × 5) = 263 kt TAS 
At 35,000 ft M 0.43 ≡ 258 – (1 × 10) = 248 kt TAS 
Revised Mar 11  Page 5 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
c. 
Tabular  Solution.    Table  1  shows  the  factor  by  which  the  CAS  should  be  increased  to 
approximate TAS at various heights. 
Table 1 CAS to TAS Correction Factors 
Height 
% (Starting Value 
Starting Value 
Fraction of CAS to be added 
(ft) 
Squared) 
40,000
10 
100 
1 × CAS 
35,000

81 
4/5 × CAS 
30,000

64 
2/3 × CAS 
25,000

49 
1/2 × CAS 
20,000

36 
1/3 × CAS 
15,000

25 
1/4 × CAS 
10,000

16 
1/6 × CAS 
5,000


1/10 × CAS 
The square of each 'starting value' gives a 'percentage' which is then used to give an approximate 
fraction  by  which  the  CAS  should  be  increased.    If  the  starting  value  of  10  for  40,000 ft  is 
memorized, it is necessary only to reduce it by 1 for every 5,000 ft below.
For example: 
CAS = 210 kt at 20,000 ft 
From memory, starting value at 40,000 ft = 10. 
Deduct 1 for every 5,000 ft below 40,000 ft. 
Therefore, starting value at 20,000 ft = 6 
6 squared = 36 % = approximately ⅓. 
⅓ × CAS = 70 kt. 
∴TAS = 210 + 70 = 280 kt. 
Four-step MDR Plan 
8. 
The  four-step MDR plan (Table 2) is a useful tool to enable the user to mentally determine, in a 
logical manner, navigational information within acceptable limits of accuracy.  Subsequent paragraphs 
will explain the actions given in Table 2 and the reader should refer to the table as required. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 6 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
Table 2 The Four-step MDR Plan 
Step 
Action 
Remarks 
PICTURE 
Visualising the vectors will assist in the 

Picture the situation, i.e. the triangle of velocities. 
correct application of drift and the head/tail-
wind component. 
HEADING 
Once the max drift is determined (Para 10), 
Calculate Max Drift 
the clock analogy (Para 12) is used to find 

Actual Drift = Max Drift × Clock Analogy Fraction 
the actual drift.  The picture of the situation 
Apply Actual Drift to Track = Heading 
ensures the drift is applied in the correct 
sense to the track to find the heading. 
GROUNDSPEED 
The picture of the situation ensures the 
Wind Speed × Clock Analogy Fraction (90-Wind Angle) 
head/tail component is applied in the 

= Head/Tail component. 
correct sense to the TAS to find the 
Apply (±) Head/Tail component to TAS = Groundspeed 
groundspeed. 
TIME 
Use one of the four methods given in 

Time = Distance/Speed 
Volume 9 Chapter 20. 
Distance/Groundspeed = Time 
Wind and Track Vectors 
9. 
Vector Components of Track and Wind.  Fig 8 illustrates how the wind vector can be split into two 
component  vectors  at  right  angles  to  each  other.    One  vector  is  across  track  and  will  affect  drift.    The 
other  vector  is  along track and will affect groundspeed.  For drift purposes, the size of the across track 
vector must be determined.  Mathematically, this value varies in proportion to the sine of the wind angle. 
9-19 Fig 8 Wind Vector Components 
Track
Across Track
Component
WindVe
Along Track
cto
Component
r
Wind Angle
Revised Mar 11  Page 7 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
Estimation of Drift 
10.  Maximum  Drift.    To  estimate  the  drift  on  a  given  track,  it  is  first  necessary  to  determine  the 
maximum drift that could be experienced, i.e. if the wind was at 90° to the track.  The maximum drift 
can be derived from the formula for the 1 in 60 rule.  The 1 in 60 rule formula states that: 
Distance Off Track × 60 
Track Error (degrees) 

Distance Along Track 
Relating this to drift: 
Wind Speed (kt) × 60 
Max Drift

TAS (kt) 
60 

Wind Speed (kt) ×
TAS (kt) 
TAS (kt) 

Wind Speed (kt) ÷
60 

Wind Speed (kt) 
 
Max Drift 

TAS (nm/min) 
 
Thus, maximum drift is easily calculated by dividing the wind speed by the TAS expressed in nm/min.  For 
example, given a wind velocity of 200°/50 kt and a TAS of 300 kt (5 nm/min), the maximum drift is: 
50 
Max Drift 


10°

11.  Wind Angle.  The actual drift encountered can be considered to be a proportion of the maximum 
drift,  depending  on  the  angle  at  which  the  wind  lies  relative  to  the  aircraft  track.    In  this  part  of  the 
calculation,  the  'wind  angle',  which  is  the  angle  between  the  wind  direction  and  the  track,  or  its 
reciprocal, is determined (see Fig 9).  If the wind angle is 0°, then the drift will be 0°.  Conversely, if the 
wind angle is 90°, then the drift will be at a maximum value.  The wind angle, therefore, determines the 
amount  of  drift,  between  zero  and  maximum  drift.    The  proportionate  calculation  to  determine  drift 
value  may  be  carried  out  mentally,  using  the  'clock  analogy'  (described  in  Para  12).    With  a  track  of 
230° and a wind direction of 270°, as shown in Fig 9a, it can be seen that the wind effect will be from 
the  right  and  the  nose  of  the  aircraft.    This  information  is  important  in  determining  how  to  apply  the 
calculated drift and groundspeed.  The along track component will be into the wind and is referred to as 
a  headwind  component.    Drift  will  be  applied  to  the  right  of  track  and  the  headwind  will  result  in  a 
groundspeed that is less than the TAS. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 8 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
9-19 Fig 9 Wind Angle 
a
b
Track = 040
Wind Direction 270
Wind Direction 270
Wind Angle = 40
Wind Angle = 50
Track = 230
Reciprocal of Track 040
0
With a track of 040° (Fig 9b), the wind effect will be from the left and tail of the aircraft.  Thus, the drift 
will be applied to the left of track and the groundspeed will be greater than the TAS. 
12.  The Clock Analogy.  The clock analogy is an MDR simplification of the sine function.  It uses the 
fact  that  one  full  revolution  of  60  minutes  on  a  clock  is  equal  to  1  hour,  half  a  revolution  of 30 minutes 
equals ½ hour, etc (see Fig 10).  To use the clock analogy, take the wind angle (in degrees) and assume 
that  figure  to  be  minutes  of  time  and  thus  a  fraction  of  one  complete  revolution.    For  example,  a  wind 
angle of 15° would be regarded as 15 minutes of time, which equates to ¼ of an hour.  Therefore, with a 
wind angle of 15°, ¼ of the maximum drift will be experienced.  Likewise, a wind angle of 30° equates to 
one half of maximum drift, and 40° equates to two-thirds of maximum drift, etc.  Where wind angles are 
between 60° and 90°, it is assumed that the aircraft will experience the full value of the maximum drift.  It 
will be seen from Fig 10 that some approximations are used on the clock face.  For example, 24 minutes 
is  used  instead  of  25  minutes.    If  25  minutes  was  used,  it would produce a fraction of 5/12, whereas 24 
minutes  produces  the  fraction  2/5  which  makes  the  mental manipulation of other numbers much easier.  
Where a wind angle lies between divisions, for example 32°, it should be rounded to the nearest 5 minute 
mark, in this case 30 minutes, and the fraction 1/2 used.  Depending on the accuracy required, the user 
may choose to use divisions of 10, 15 or 20 minutes only. 
9-19 Fig 10 The Clock Analogy 
60
54
1/1
6
9/10
12
1/10
11
1
50
10
5/6
1/6
10
2
45
15
9
3
¾
¼
8
4
40
20
2/3
1/3
7
5
36
6
24
3/5
30
2/5
½
Revised Mar 11  Page 9 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
13.  Calculation of Drift.  To calculate the drift for a given track, using the following parameters: 
Track 230°, TAS 300 kt (or 5 nm/min), W/V 270°/30 kt 
a. 
The first step is to visualise the vectors, either mentally, by referring to the aircraft Horizontal 
Situation Indicator, drawing a sketch or by referring to a map.  Fig 11 represents a sketch of the 
given example.  Once the vectors are visualised, the effect of the wind can be determined.  In this 
case, the wind is from the right giving a headwind component. 
9-19 Fig 11 A Simple Sketch of the Vectors 
roundspeed
Heading/TAS
Track/G
Wind Velocity
Wind Angle
b. 
The  Wind  Angle  (the  angle  between  the  wind  direction,  270°,  and  the  track,  230°)  is 
determined and its clock analogy fraction found. 

By the clock analogy 
Wind Angle
=
40°
≡ 3 
(See Fig 7) 
c. 
The maximum drift (see Para 10) is calculated as: 
Wind Speed (kt) 
Max Drift
=
TAS (nm/min) 
Thus: 
30
Max Drift
=
=


d. 
From the visualisation of the vectors (Fig 11) it can be seen that the wind angle is from the 
right and nose of the aircraft.  Thus, the drift is applied to the right of the track. 
e. 
In the given example, the drift is calculated as follows: 
Actual Drift = Max Drift × Clock analogy fraction 


Actual Drift
=
6° x 
=


Revised Mar 11  Page 10 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
14.  Calculation  of  Heading.    Having  calculated  the  actual  drift  for  a  specific  track,  that  figure  can  be 
applied  mathematically,  to  determine  the  heading  to  fly  to  maintain  that  track.    In  this  example,  the  wind 
vector is from the right and so the drift will be applied to the right of track giving a heading of 234°. 
Heading = Track ± Actual Drift 
Heading = 230° + 4° (from the right) = 234°
(Drift from the left is subtracted) 
Estimation of Groundspeed 
15.  Wind  Angle.    Referring  back  to  the  vector  components  (Fig  8),  the  maximum  wind  effect  on 
groundspeed  occurs  when  the  wind  angle  is  0°,  giving  either  a  maximum  headwind  or  maximum 
tailwind component.  The wind effect on groundspeed will fall to zero when it is at 90° to track. 
16.  Use of the Clock Analogy.  Just as the amount of drift varies with the sine of the wind angle, so 
the groundspeed headwind/tailwind component will vary with the cosine of that angle.  The relationship 
between cosine and sine is 90° out of phase, therefore Cos α = Sin (90 - α).  The same clock analogy 
can be used to solve this problem, but the entering argument must be 90° minus the wind angle.  This 
then  generates  the  proportion  of  the  wind  speed  to  be  added  or  subtracted  from  TAS  to  give 
groundspeed. 
17.  Calculation of Groundspeed. To calculate groundspeed for a given track, using the example in 
Para 10, the procedure is as follows: 
a. 
Determine the value of wind angle. 
With a wind vector of 270/30 and a track of 230° the wind angle will be 40° from the right (with a 
headwind component) (Fig 11). 
b. 
Subtract wind angle from 90°. 
Wind Angle = 40° degrees 
90° – 40° = 50°
c. 
Use the clock analogy to calculate the head/tail wind component. 

50o applied to the clock analogy gives 
(Fig 10)

d. 
Calculate  the  headwind  or  tailwind  component  by  multiplying  the  wind  speed  by  the  clock 
analogy fraction, remembering that this example gives a headwind component. 

30 kt  x 
=
25 kt (Headwind) 

e. 
Apply the head or tailwind component to the TAS, to give the groundspeed for that track.  A 
headwind  component  will  be  subtracted  from  the  TAS  value  while  a  tailwind  component  will  be 
added.  This step illustrates the importance of visualising the vectors and determining the effect of 
the wind at the start of the process (Para 13a) so that the calculated wind component is applied in 
the correct sense. 
TAS = 300 kt – 25 kt (headwind) = 275 kt groundspeed. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 11 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
Estimation of Time 
18.  The time taken to travel a certain distance is calculated using the following formula: 
Distance 
Time

Groundspeed 
19.  For  the  purposes  of  this  chapter,  the  following  parameters  are  used:  distance  (D)  in  nautical 
miles (nm), groundspeed (GS) in knots (kt) and time (T) in minutes.  As knots are a measure of speed 
in nm/hr, to calculate T (in minutes), the above formula is multiplied by 60: 
D × 60 
T

GS 
This formula can be manipulated mathematically to give: 

T

GS 
 
 
60 
Thus, time equals distance over groundspeed (in nm per minute): 

T
=  GS (nm/min) 
20.  Practical MDR methods should be easy to remember and produce valid answers.  Four different MDR 
methods  of  determining  time  are  described  in  Volume  9,  Chapter  20.    As  all  give  valid  results  (to  varying 
degrees of accuracy), users can select the one most suited to their needs. 
Regaining Track  
21.  Standard  Closing  Angle  (SCA)  Technique.    The  SCA  technique  for  regaining  track  is  used 
when a position is fixed off track, but no on-track feature is available to assist regaining track, or when it is 
impractical to over-fly an on-track feature.  The SCA is based on the 1 in 60 rule and is a closing angle 
determined by the speed of the aircraft.  The SCA for any groundspeed can be found by dividing 60 by the 
groundspeed in nm/min. 
60 
SCA  = 
GS (nm/min) 
Fig 12 shows an aircraft with a groundspeed (GS) of 360 kt (6 nm/min), 1 nm to the left of track. 
Thus: 
60 
SCA  = 
=  10o

9-19 Fig 12 Standard Closing Angle at 360 kt 
SCA
1 nm
off Track
SCA
Revised Mar 11  Page 12 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
The SCA is used to regain track by altering heading through the SCA and maintaining this heading for a 
number  of  minutes  equal  to  the  number  of  miles  off  track.    When  it  is  estimated  that  track  has  been 
regained, the heading is altered to maintain the original track.  In this example, being one mile off track, 
the aircraft, flying at 360 kt, turns 10° right, and after one minute will be back on track.  Variations can be 
considered  when  necessary,  e.g.  by  doubling  the  angle  and  halving  the  time  or  vice  versa.    However, 
using large angular corrections can lead to tracking errors due to the turning circle of the aircraft.  Timing 
errors can also be introduced with large SCAs due to the extra distance flown and fact that the changing 
effect of the wind on the new heading is ignored.  20° is generally considered to be the maximum heading 
alteration that should be employed without adversely affecting the route timing (allowing for any change in 
wind, if necessary).  The aircraft should be flown parallel to the required track before applying the SCA.  
This allows for the correct SCA to be applied and will provide the correct heading to turn on to once the 
required track has been regained. 
Adjusting Time 
22.  Adjusting Speed.  As well as maintaining track, it is often necessary to maintain the planned timing.  
Providing that the speed range of the aircraft permits, and the fuel penalty is acceptable, relatively small 
timing errors can be corrected by speed changes.  One method of calculating the necessary adjustment 
is to adjust speed by the number of knots equal to the number of seconds late or early and maintain this 
speed for the number of minutes equal to the groundspeed in nm/min.  For example, assuming a GS of 
420 kt  and  the  aircraft  being  18  seconds  late,  the  aircraft  should  be  flown  at  438  kt  for  7  minutes 
before resuming 420 kt 
Explanation: 
Assume a distance to go of 79 nm at time 10:00 hrs, 420 kt groundspeed and 18 sec late. 
The actual ETA is 10:11:18 (hrs:min:sec) 
The planned ETA is 10:11:00 
Thus, the aircraft is 18 seconds late 
Fly at 438 kt for 7 minutes (420 kt ≡ 7 nm/min). 
438 kt for 7 minutes ≡ 51 nm 
The distance remaining = 79 – 51 = 28 nm 
28 nm at 420 kt = 4 minutes 
51 nm at 438 kt + 28 nm at 420 kt = 11 minutes 
10:00 hrs + 11 minutes = 10:11:00 = planned ETA 
The speed adjustment can be halved and maintained for twice the time (or vice versa) if necessary.  
Should  a  turning  point  occur  during  the  correction,  the  turn  should  be  made  and  the  timing 
correction reassessed if necessary. 
23.  Dog-legs.  Time can be lost by using standard dog-legs.  A 60° dog-leg (Fig 13a) will lose the 
time equivalent to the time of each leg, whilst for a 30° dog-leg (Fig 13b), each leg needs to be flown 
for a time period equal to four times the time that needs to be lost.  The use of the dog-leg for timing 
is described further in Volume 9, Chapter 17. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 13 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
9-19 Fig 13 Losing Time by Use of Dog-legs 
a  6
  0  
° Dog-leg
b  30  
° Dog-leg
120°
60°
30°
4 minutes
1 minute
s
et
te
u
u
60°
ni
in
inute)
m
m
4
1
minute)
(Loses 1 m
60°
30°
(Loses 1
Each side of the dog-
Time lost is equal to 
leg should equal 4 x 
time to fly one side
time to be lost
24.  90° Turns.  90° turns, or large turns of about 90°, are extremely useful for solving timing problems 
accurately,  and  expediently.    By  simply  extending  at  a  turning  point,  time  will  be  lost  (see  Fig  14).  
Likewise, by turning early, time will be gained.  After the turn, the aircraft should be flown back to track 
at  a  convenient  closing  angle  that  does  not  adversely  affect  the  route  timing.    Large  turns  can  be 
planned into a route and used, as necessary, to correct gross timing errors caused by external factors.  
As well as being useful to adjust timing, large turns, especially close to a target area, make the aircraft 
track less predictable to defending forces. 
9-19 Fig 14 Saving/Losing time at 90° Turns 
Regain track at a convenient closing 
angle that does not affect timing
Planned
Planned Track
Turning Point
Turn early to gain time.
Turn late to lose time
Estimation of the Crosswind Component for Take-Off or Landing 
25.  Runways are designated with a two-digit suffix to the nearest 10° magnetic, and so, for example, 
Runway  04  can  be  orientated  between  035°  M  and  044°  M.    For  the  purposes  of  the  crosswind 
estimation, 040° M is used.  A wind vector from ATC is given in degrees magnetic whereas that from a 
TAF or METAR is given in degrees true.  Variation must be applied when using a true wind vector.  For 
the purposes of the following example, a magnetic wind direction is assumed.  The resultant crosswind 
component is expressed as 'from the left/right at XX kt'.  It is essential to determine the correct sense 
of the crosswind and the habit of picturing the situation is vital to ensure this. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 14 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-19 - Mental Deduced Reckoning 
26.  Normally,  take-offs  and  landings  are  flown  into  wind  and  so  the  crosswind  vector  will  generally 
have  a  headwind  component.    Exceptionally,  take-offs  and  landing  may  be  made  with  a  tailwind 
component  and  it  is  vital  that  this  is  determined  because  of  the  adverse  implications  on  the  aircraft 
performance. 
Example:  Runway 04, W/V 010°/12 kt. 
a. 
The first step is to picture the situation, either mentally, by referring to the aircraft HSI, with a 
diagram (Fig 12), or by imagining that you are on the runway, heading 040°M. 
7-27 Fig 1 Estimating the Crosswind Component 
W/V 010/12kt
b. 
Once  a  picture  of  the  situation  is  visualised,  the  direction  (left/right)  of  the  crosswind 
component  can  be  established;  in  this  example  it  is  from  the  left.    It  can  also  be  determined 
whether  there  is  a  headwind  or  tailwind  component.    In  this  example,  there  is  a  headwind
component. 
c. 
The wind angle is calculated (Para 11) and the clock analogy fraction (Para 12) is applied to 
determine the magnitude of the crosswind component. 
Wind Angle = 040° (runway direction) - 010° (wind direction) = 30°
Clock analogy fraction:   
30° ≡ 1/2
Crosswind speed:  1/2 × 12 kt (wind speed) = 6 kt 
Crosswind component:   
From the left at 6 kt 
27.  The  method  of  establishing  the  crosswind  component  described  in  Para  26  is  based  on  the 
assumptions that the runway direction is exactly that of its designation, and that the clock code analogy 
gives a precise result.  There may be occasions when the estimated crosswind is out of limits for the 
aircraft  to  take  off  or  land  safely.    In this case, the precise orientation of the runway can be obtained 
(from  the  appropriate  En-Route  Supplement)  together  with  an  exact  wind  velocity  from  ATC.    This 
information  can  be  used  to  determine  the  exact  crosswind  value  using  the  Crosswind  Component 
Table in the Flight Information Handbook. 
Revised Mar 11  Page 15 of 15 

AP3456 – 9-20 - MDR Timing Methods 
CHAPTER 20 - MDR Time Calculation Methods
Introduction 
This  chapter  offers  4  methods  of  calculating  time  using  Mental  Deduced  Reckoning  (MDR)  methods.    At 
first  glance  they  may  appear  to  be  quite  complicated  and  unsuited  to  MDR  in  a  fast-moving  airborne 
environment.    Careful  reading  of  the  methods  will  allow  the  user  to  understand  each  and  choose  the  one 
that is best suited to their environment.  It must also be stressed that each method will only be effective with 
practice such that they become second nature. 
Estimation of Time Using the Percentage Adjustment Method 
1. 
Practical  MDR  methods  should  be  easy  to  remember  and  produce  valid  answers.    For  example,  to 
multiply  any  number  by  95  without  using  a  calculator,  multiply  the  number  by  100  then  subtract  5%.  
Consider an example of multiplying 8.1 by 95. 
a. 
By calculator: 
8.1 x 95 = 769.5 
b. 
By MDR and approximation: 
8.1
×
100
=
810
Subtract 5% of 800
=
- 40
810

40
=
770
Note:    Numbers  are  chosen  to  ease  the  mental  arithmetic  process,  thus  in  line  two,  810  is  adjusted 
down to 800 to make the percentage calculation easier. 
2. 
Although the MDR answer is not absolutely correct, it is within acceptable levels of accuracy for most 
users.  This method of MDR can be used across a wide range of applications and it will now be considered 
with respect to time calculations. 
3. 
In  the  same  way  that  an  approximate  answer  of  810  was  calculated  by  adjusting  95  up  to  100  in 
Para 1,  timing  problems  can  be  solved  by  approximating  an  answer  (using  a  simple  number)  and  then 
making an adjustment to improve the accuracy of the answer. 
4. 
Time, in hours, is calculated from distance (D) in nautical miles (nm) and groundspeed (GS) in knots (kt). 
Distance 
Time
=
Groundspeed 
To calculate time in minutes (T), multiply by 60: 
D × 60 
60 
T  =
=   D ×
GS 
GS
5. 
The 60/GS element of the above equation will produce a fraction that is the time, in minutes, taken to 
travel 1 nm.  For example, using a groundspeed of 240 kt (4 nm/min): 
60 


240 

Revised Jan 16  1 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-20 - MDR Timing Methods 
Therefore, the aircraft will travel 1 nm in ¼ of a minute ( ≡ 4 nm/min).  Referring to the equation in Para 4, if 
it takes ¼ of a minute  to travel  1 nm, the  total time in minutes can  be found  by  multiplying  ¼ by the  total 
distance. 
6. 
For the purposes of this method of time estimation, the fractions derived from the 60/GS element of the 
above  equation  are  termed  'Basic  Numbers'.    In  this  context,  useful  Basic  Numbers  are  considered  to  be 
easily manipulated fractions such as ⅓, ½, ⅔.  These are derived from groundspeeds that give whole or half 
nm/min values, such as 300 kt (5 nm/min) or 210 kt (31/2 nm/min).  Single-digit decimal numbers, such as 0.4, 
are also considered to be Basic Numbers but these occur less frequently.  In the speed range 100 kt to 600 kt, 
single-digit decimal numbers only occur at the following groundspeeds:  
100 kt (0.6) 
120 kt (0.5) 
150 kt (0.4) 
200 kt (0.3) 
300 kt (0.2) 
600 kt (0.1) 
7. 
The equation, T(approximate) = D × Basic Number, is used to calculate an approximate time and then 
a percentage adjustment is applied to improve accuracy. 
8. 
Calculating  Time.    To  calculate  an  approximate  time  in  minutes,  the  Basic  Number  derived  from  the 
standard groundspeed nearest to the actual groundspeed is used.  A series of tables at the end of this chapter 
give a series of standard speeds and their associated Basic Numbers.  For example: 
D = 24 nm, actual GS = 132 kt, nearest standard groundspeed = 120 kt (2 nm/min). 
From Table 1, the Basic Number (BN) for 120 kt is ½. 

T (approximate) 
=
D × BN
=
24
×
=
12.0 min 

It  is  essential,  for  accuracy,  that  the  approximate  time  is  calculated  to  one  decimal  place  (±  0.1  min).  
Having found an approximate time, an adjustment is made to produce a more accurate answer. 
9. 
Percentage Adjustment
The adjustment is derived from the percentage difference between the actual 
groundspeed  and  the  speed  used  to  work  out  the  approximate  time.    For  example,  consider  an  actual 
groundspeed of 132 kt.  The nearest standard groundspeed to 132 kt to give a Basic Number is 120 kt.  The 
difference between the two speeds is 12 kt which equates to 10% of 120 kt.  The approximate time is calculated 
using 120 kt and a 10% adjustment is then applied to give a valid time for an actual groundspeed of 132 kt.  The 
basic steps are: 
T (approximate) = D x BN 
T (actual) = T (approximate) ± adjustment 
It  is  vital  that  the  percentage  adjustment  is  applied  in  the  correct  sense.    It  must  be  noted  before  any 
calculations are done,  whether the  actual groundspeed is faster or slower than the speed chosen to  work 
out the approximate time. 
a. 
If the actual groundspeed is faster than the chosen standard groundspeed, it will take less time to 
cover the distance, so the percentage adjustment is subtracted from the approximate time (GS faster
less time, therefore subtract the adjustment from the approximate time)
b. 
If the actual groundspeed is slower than the chosen standard groundspeed, it will take more time 
to cover the distance, so the percentage adjustment is added to the approximate time  
(GS slower = more time, therefore add the adjustment to the approximate time)
Revised Jan 16  2 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-20 - MDR Timing Methods 
10.  The following sub-paragraphs show some examples of applying 5% and 10% adjustments: 
a. 
Example 1
Assume D to be 20 nm and the actual groundspeed to be 132 kt.  From Table 2, the 
nearest standard groundspeed to 132 kt that gives a Basic Number is 120 kt which gives a BN of ½.  It is 
noted that the actual groundspeed (132 kt) is faster than the chosen groundspeed (120 kt). 
1
T (approximate) 
=
20
×
=
10.0 min 
2
132  kt  is  exactly  10%  faster  than  120  kt  which  means  the  adjustment  is  subtracted  from  the 
approximate time. 
10% of 10.0 min = 1.0 min 
T(actual) = 10.0 – 1.0 = 9.0 min 
The answer derived using a calculator is 9.09 min.
b. 
Example 2.  Assume  D  to  be  36  nm  and  actual  groundspeed  to  be  256  kt.    From Table  3,  the 
nearest standard groundspeed to 256 kt that gives a Basic Number is 270 kt, which gives a BN of 2/9.  
It is noted that the actual groundspeed (256 kt) is slower than the chosen groundspeed (270 kt). 
2
T (approximate) 
=
36
×
=
8.0 min 
9
256 kt is just over  5%  slower than 270 kt  which means the  adjustment is added to the approximate 
time. 
5% of 8.0 min = 0.4 min 
T(actual) = 8.0 + 0.4 = 8.4 min 
The answer derived using a calculator is 8.44 min.
11.  This  MDR  time  calculation  technique  is  accurate  to  within  a  few  percent  using  0%,  5%  and  10% 
adjustments  except  in  the  extremes  of  slow  speeds  (below  80  kt)  and/or  long  distances  when  accurately 
worked  percentage  adjustments  are  required.    The  tables  at  the  end  of  this  chapter  give  guidance,  in  the 
form  of  tables  and  notes,  on  which  standard  speeds  to  use  and  their  0%,  5%  and  10%  values.    Study  of 
Tables 2, 3 and 4 will show that: 
a. 
Above  180 kt,  only  0%  and  5%  adjustments  need  be  used.    It  can  be  seen  from  the  tables  that 
above 180 kt, the 10% values of the standard groundspeeds impinge on the speed ranges of adjacent 
standard groundspeeds and so are not needed. 
b. 
Above  330 kt,  only  the  nearest  whole  nm/min  groundspeed  need  be  used.    It  can  be  seen  from 
the tables that above 330 kt, the 5% values of the standard whole number nm/min groundspeeds can 
be used instead of the ½ nm/min groundspeeds. 
c. 
The  converse  argument,  to  that  in  sub-paragraph  b  above,  is  that  below  300  kt  the  closest 
½ nm/min groundspeed, or whole number groundspeed, should be used. 
d. 
The application of percentage adjustments greater than 10% degrades the accuracy of the estimated 
time.  It can also be seen, from the tables, that adjustments greater than 10% impinge on the speed ranges 
of adjacent standard groundspeeds and so are not needed. 
Revised Jan 16  3 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-20 - MDR Timing Methods 
12.  Choosing 0%, 5% or 10% Percentage Adjustment.  Although at first glance the above process may 
seem to be complicated, there is no need to work out the percentage adjustment for every occasion.  It is 
sufficient  to  work  out  the  approximate  time,  as  described  above,  and  then  to  pick  the  closest  0%,  5%  or 
10% value to the actual groundspeed and complete the calculation. 
13.  Operators need only remember a small range of numbers applicable to speeds flown by their particular 
aircraft.  It is generally quicker and easier to recall a few fixed numbers rather than to calculate percentage 
adjustments  each  time  they  are  needed.    Table  1  is  an  extract  from  Table  4  and  illustrates  a  range  of 
numbers that may be needed for an aircraft that usually cruises at 420 kt.  The standard groundspeeds and 
their  Basic  Numbers  are  memorized  along  with  the  groundspeeds  relating  to  the  respective  5%  values.  
The  actual  groundspeed  is  compared  to  the  memorized  table  and  the  appropriate  Basic  Number  and 
percentage adjustment selected. 
Table 1 - Percentage Adjustments Examples 
Speed to use closest to actual GS
360 
378 
399 
420 
441 
456 
480 
Basic Number 



(Time in minutes to travel 1 nm)



% adjustment of time

-5 
+5 

-5 
+5 

14.  The  following  sub-paragraphs  show  two  examples  of  choosing  the  closest  percentage  adjustment  to 
the actual groundspeed. 
a. 
Example 1.  Assume an actual groundspeed of 402 kt.  From the above table, the nearest speed 
giving a Basic Number is 420 kt.  The closest 0% or 5% value to 402 kt is 399 kt which is 5% slower.  
Now,  assume  D  to  be  28  nm.    The  approximate  time  is  worked  out  using  1/7.    Since  the  actual 
groundspeed (402 kt) is slower than the chosen groundspeed (420 kt), the percentage adjustment will 
be added
1
T (approximate) 
=
28
×
=
4.0 min 
7
5% of 4.0 min = 0.2 min 
T(actual) = 4.0 + 0.2  =  4.2 min 
The answer using a calculator is 4.18 min. 
b. 
Example  2.    Assume  an  actual  groundspeed  of  435  kt.    The  nearest  speed  giving  a  Basic 
Number is 420 kt.  The closest 0% or 5% value to 435 kt is 441 kt which is 5% faster.  Now, assume D 
to be 44 nm.  The approximate time is worked out using 1/7.  Since the actual groundspeed (435 kt) is 
faster than the chosen groundspeed (420 kt), the percentage adjustment will be subtracted
1
T (approximate) 
=
44
×
=
6.3 min 
7
5% of 6.3 min = 0.3 min 
T(actual) = 6.3 - 0.3  =  6.0 min 
The answer using a calculator is 6.07 min. 
Revised Jan 16  4 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-20 - MDR Timing Methods 
Estimation of Time to the Nearest Whole Minute 
15.  If  a  tolerance  in  the  order  of  plus  or  minus  one  whole  minute  is  acceptable  to  the  user,  a  modified 
version of the percentage adjustment method is used.  The approximate time is still calculated accurately to 
± 0.1 min in accordance  with the  instructions  in the previous  paragraphs.  The actual groundspeed is still 
noted as faster or slower than the speed used to work out the approximate time, but instead of applying a 
calculated percentage adjustment, the approximate time is adjusted down or up in the correct sense to the 
next nearest whole minute. 
a. 
Assume D to be 40 nm and the actual groundspeed to be 164 kt.  The nearest speed to 164 kt to 
give a basic fraction is 150 kt or 2½ nm/min (see Table 2).  Thus, the approximate time is calculated 
using 2/5.  It is noted that 164 kt is faster than the basic fraction speed of 150 kt. 
2
T (approximate) 
=
40
×
=
16.0 min 
5
164 kt is faster than the basic fraction speed. 
GS faster = less time, therefore subtract from the approximate time, and so the answer is adjusted 
down to next nearest whole minute.  Note: where the approximate time results in a whole number of 
minutes, it is adjusted to the next whole minute, up or down as appropriate. 
T =  16.0  ≈  15 min (adjusted down) 
The  answer  using  a  calculator  is  14.63  min.    Care  is  required  with  the  application  of  rounding  when 
speeds  used  to  work  out  the  approximate  time  are  derived  exactly  from  half  or  whole  nm/min 
groundspeeds.  If the actual speed in this example had been exactly 150 kt, rounding would have been 
inappropriate.  
b. 
Assume D to be 134 nm and the actual groundspeed to be 405 kt.  The nearest speed to 405 kt to 
give  a  basic  fraction  is  420  kt  or  7  nm/min  (see  Table  4).    Thus,  the  approximate  time  is  calculated 
using 1/7.  It is noted that 405 kt is slower than the basic fraction speed of 420 kt. 

T (approximate) 
=
134 
×
=
19.1 min 

405 kt is slower than the basic fraction speed. 
GS slower = more time, therefore add to the approximate time, and so the answer is adjusted up to 
next nearest minute. 
T =  19.1  ≈  20 min (adjusted up) 
The answer using a calculator is 19.85 min.  Large errors can be introduced by adjusting.  Consequently, 
use of this method may be inappropriate, and the method of calculating a percentage adjustment should 
be used. 
16.  Great care must be taken when calculating fuel used based on times derived from this method.  The 
accumulative  effect  of  adjusting,  where  the  actual  time  is  greater  than  the  adjusted  time,  will  result  in  the 
actual fuel used being greater than the planned fuel. 
Revised Jan 16  5 of 10 

AP3456 – 9-20 - MDR Timing Methods 
Estimation of Time Using the Interpolation Method 
17.  Another method of estimating time is to calculate the time taken to cover a distance at two groundspeeds, 
giving  whole  number  nm/min  values,  that  bracket  the  actual  groundspeed.    The  required  answer  is  then 
determined by interpolating between the two-time values.  This process is described below. 
18.  Assuming a groundspeed of 275 kt, and a distance of 86 nm, the time is determined, by calculator, as 
18.76 minutes or 18.8 minutes (to 1 decimal place). 
19.  275 kt is bracketed by 240 kt (4 nm/min) and 300 kt (5 nm/min) and so: 
86 nm 
86 nm 
At 240 kt 
=
21.5 minutes   
At 300 kt 
=
17.2 minutes 
4 nm/min 
5 nm/min 
The difference between the 240 kt and 300 kt times is 21.5 – 17.2 = 4.3 minutes.  The groundspeed of 275 
kt equates to a proportion of that difference as shown: 
240 kt   
275 kt 
300 kt 
Total difference between 240 and 300 = 60 
Difference = 35 
Difference = 25 
35/60 = 7/12 of the total difference 
25/60 = 5/12 of the total difference 
7/12 of 4.3 minutes = 2.5 
5/12 of 4.3 minutes = 1.8 
Thus, by adjusting the 240 kt time we get:  21.5 – 2.5 = 19.0 minutes.  Alternatively, the 300 kt time can be 
adjusted  to  give  17.2  +  1.8  =  19.0  minutes.    This  explanation  shows  both  whole  number  nm/min 
groundspeeds being adjusted.  In practice only one needs to be adjusted to arrive at the answer, but, care 
must be taken to ensure that the adjustment is applied in the correct sense.  When this result is compared 
to the calculated time of 18.76 minutes, it can be seen that this method of interpolation introduces an error 
of less than 2% which is acceptable for the purposes of MDR. 
20.  Although  the  interpolation  method  can  give  acceptable  results,  it  involves  more  calculations  than  the 
percentage  adjustment method.    Meticulous  application  of  this  method  is  required  to  ensure  that  the  time 
adjustment is applied correctly, or large errors will occur. 
Estimation of Time Using the Fractional Proportion Method 
21.  Where  the  groundspeed  is  not  a  multiple  of  60,  the  nm/min  value  is  often  difficult  to  manipulate 
mentally.  For example, a groundspeed of 300 kt is divisible by 60 to give an equivalent speed of 5 nm/min, 
whereas  a  groundspeed  of  287  kt,  when  divided  by  60,  gives  an  equivalent  speed  of  4.78 nm/min.    One 
method  of  solving  this  problem  is  to  increase,  or  decrease,  the  groundspeed  to  a  multiple  of  60  kt  and 
adjust the distance in proportion.  It is important at this stage to note whether