This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 – 7-1 - LF, MF and HF Communications 
CHAPTER 1 - LF, MF AND HF COMMUNICATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
This  chapter  describes  the  installation  and  operation  of  a  typical  HF  communications  system and 
briefly mentions the uses of MF and LF systems. 
Typical HF Installation 
2. 
Fig 1 illustrates, in block schematic form, a typical aircraft HF installation. 
7-1 Fig 1 Typical HF Installation 
Audio Input
Aerial
Intercom 
System
Audio Output
Transmitter-
Aerial 
Receiver
Tuning 
RF
Unit
Mic      Tels
Tuner Warning Lamp 
Control Unit
or Tone Sub-assembly
3. 
Control  Unit.    The  control unit enables selection of the frequency and mode of operation of the 
equipment.    Typically  an  HF  set  is  able  to  operate  in  the  2  –  30  MHz  range,  usually  in  the  single 
sideband (SSB) mode but may be able to operate in double sideband (DSB) and CW modes.  Channel 
spacing is in the order of 100 Hz intervals (giving 280,000 channels) with some older equipments more 
widely spaced.  The power output of an HF set is between 100 and 400 W in the SSB and 125 to 250 
W  in  the  DSB  and  CW  modes.    The  control  unit  will  normally  be  installed  in  the  cockpit  although  in 
some multi-crew aircraft it may be at a rear station. 
4. 
Aerial  Tuning  Unit.    The  aerial  tuning  unit,  or  coupler  antenna,  matches  the  transmitter  and 
antenna to ensure efficient radiation of maximum power from the aerial.  Aerial matching is normally 
automatic when the transmitter is keyed. 
5. 
Tuning  Indications.    During  the  tuning  cycle,  coarse  matching  of  transmitter  and  aerial  takes 
place and, in some systems, this causes the tuner to resonate.  Failure to resonate produces a 1 kHz 
audio  warning  tone  which  will  continue  to  operate  until  the  frequency  has  been  reselected.    Other 
systems  include  a  warning  light  which  extinguishes  when  tuning  has  been  accomplished.    Automatic 
fine tuning takes place during the first 0.5 seconds of each transmission. 
Operation of HF Radio 
6. 
Mode  Selection.    Some  devices  operate  only  on  the  upper  sideband  and  have  no  other  modes.  
However, on other equipments the following modes may be selectable: 
a.  Upper Sideband (USB). 
b.  Lower Sideband (LSB). 
Revised Jun 10 
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-1 - LF, MF and HF Communications 
c.  Double Sideband (DSB). 
d.  Continuous Wave (CW). 
e.  Data Transmission  (DATA) (eg RATT). 
7. 
Frequency  Selection.    The  required  frequency  is  set  by  turning  selector  knobs  until  the  desired 
frequency appears in the indicator windows.  Channels may be preselectable. 
8. 
Radio Frequency (RF) Sensitivity The sensitivity control acts on the RF stage of a receiver.  If 
a  received  signal is particularly strong it may saturate the RF stage and thus be distorted.  Reducing 
the  sensitivity  reduces  both  the  signal  and  the  background  noise.    This  allows  strong  signals  to  be 
received without distortion and with low levels of background noise.  Conversely, the sensitivity needs 
to  be  increased  when  receiving  weak  signals,  despite  this increasing background noise.  In the latter 
case, the clarity of weak signals can be improved by using various filters, such as bandwidth controls. 
9. 
BandwidthThe  type  of  signal  being  transmitted  will  determine  the  bandwidth  needed  at  the 
receiver.  CW transmission may be received with bandwidths as low as 500 Hz whilst voice operation 
will  generally  need  bandwidths  of  at  least  3  kHz  (low  fidelity  SSB).    The  bandwidth  of  data 
transmissions  may  vary  considerably  and  may  be  as  high  as  100  kHz.    Generally,  the  receiver 
bandwidth  needs  to  be  twice  the  highest  message  frequency.    Within  reason,  increasing  bandwidth 
increases clarity, decreasing it decreases interference. 
10.  Preparation for Use.  To prepare the HF set for use, the mode is selected and the frequency is 
then  set.    If  the  required  frequency  was  already  set  before  switching  on,  it  may  be  necessary  to 
offset,  then  re-select  the  frequency  to allow aerial tuning.  The equipment cannot be used until the 
1 kHz tone stops or the tuning light has extinguished, indicating that the equipment is ready for use.  
When aerial tuning is complete the RF sensitivity should be adjusted to an appropriate level. 
11.  CW  Operation.    Few  modern  aircraft  require  a  Morse  Code  CW  transmission  facility  but  often 
make use of CW reception for which the CW mode (if available) should be selected. 
12.  Radio  Airborne  Teletypewriter  (RATT)  Operation.    (See  also  Volume  7,  Chapter  25).    The 
RATT may transmit data via any selected channel on HF using the upper sideband. 
13.  Skywave Disturbances.  Regardless of the efficiency of the equipment, reliable communications 
on HF are only likely to be achieved if the frequency is close to the optimum working frequency for the 
time/date/distance determined from radio propagation charts or the Flight Information Handbook. 
14.  Safety.  When making HF transmissions, aircrew are to be aware that a radiation hazard exists to 
personnel and aircraft nearby, and relevant safety procedures must be observed. 
The Uses of Medium and Low Frequencies 
15.  Medium Frequency (MF).  Medium frequencies using ground waves are very reliable when used 
for reception of non-directional beacons and broadcast stations up to about 350 km.  Sky wave results 
are unpredictable although occasional reception can be achieved many thousands of km distant.  MF 
is susceptible to atmospheric and electrical interference. 
16.  Low Frequency (LF).  LF is used for long-range transmission of digital data to aircraft fitted with 
teletype  installations,  and  certain  global  navigation  systems  (eg  LORAN  C).    Very  Low  Frequencies 
Revised Jun 10 
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-1 - LF, MF and HF Communications 
(VLF) are ideal for communicating with submerged submarines.  The LF and VLF bands may also be 
subject  to  atmospheric  interference  caused  by  electrical  discharges  from  clouds  and  by  interference 
from unsuppressed electrical apparatus. 
Revised Jun 10 
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 -7-2 - Satellite Communications 
CHAPTER 2- SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
The continued increase in long distance communications traffic and the expected growth in worldwide 
digital transmissions have led to the development of high capacity satellite communications systems. 
2. 
Satellite  communication  is  by  line  of  sight;  the  satellite  acts  as  a  relay  between  Earth-based 
communications  stations.    For  military  applications,  a  satellite  link  has  the  advantage  of  providing  a 
reliable  and  secure  communication  system  between  remote  theatres  of  defence  interest  without  the 
necessity for multiple, en route ground relay stations. 
Frequencies 
3. 
Satellite  communications  systems  mostly  operate  in  the  frequency  range  1  GHz  to  32  GHz.  
Military  satellite  systems  use  UHF  (Ultra  High  Frequency;  300  MHz  -  3  GHz),  SHF  (Super  High 
Frequency;  3  GHz  -  30  GHz)  and  EHF  (Extra  High  Frequency;  30  GHz  -  300  GHz).    Below  1  GHz, 
cosmic noise is a restrictive factor.  Above 15 GHz, cloud and heavy rain can cause signal attenuation, 
depolarization  and  increased  noise.    Signal  strength  is  also  reduced  by  low  elevation  angles  of  the 
Earth station antennae.  However, 40 GHz transmissions are feasible, provided that antenna angles are 
above 10º to the local horizon, and the weather is clear. 
Satellite Orbits 
4. 
Depending  on  the  Earth  coverage  requirements,  satellite  orbits  may  be  circular  or  elliptical,  with 
equatorial, polar or inclined planes, two examples of which are illustrated in Fig 1. 
7-2 Fig 1 Circular and Elliptical Orbits 
Fig 1a Circular Equitorial Orbit 
Fig 1b Elliptical Inclined Orbit 
Apogee
N
N
Orbit of
Satellite
Satellite
Satellite
S
S
Perigee
5. 
These orbital categories may be further classified by reference to the orbital period, as depicted in 
Fig 2: 
a. 
Sub-synchronous Orbit A satellite in a sub-synchronous orbit has an orbital period of up to 
12 hours depending on its height (2,000 to 20,000 km).  A communication system based on this 
type of satellite would employ a number of satellites, spaced apart.  Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite 
systems  use  constellations  of  up  to  66  satellites  to  give  full  Earth  coverage.    Earth  stations 
communicate with each other via a satellite mutually in view. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 -7-2 - Satellite Communications 
b. 
Geosynchronous Orbit.  A geosynchronous orbit is one in which a satellite stationed in an 
equatorial plane at a height of approximately 36,000 km has an orbital period of 24 hours; viewed 
from an observer on Earth the satellite appears to be stationary. 
7-2 Fig 2 Sub-synchronous and Geosynchronous Orbits 
Geosynchr onous Satellite
O r bital Path
36,000 Km
Sub-synchr onous
       Satellite
O r bital Path
20,000 Km
Earth
Earth
Station
Station
Earth
Rotation
Earth
6. 
The geosynchronous satellite configuration requires fewer satellites and launches than a typical LEO 
constellation,  but  more  complex  signal  technology  is  required  to  provide  a  comparable  service.  
Worldwide  communications  coverage,  with  the  exception  of  the  polar  regions,  can  be  achieved  using 
three geosynchronous satellites 120º apart, as shown by Fig 3. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 -7-2 - Satellite Communications 
7-2 Fig 3 Worldwide Earth Coverage 
Satellite Sub-systems 
7. 
Communications satellites contain the following sub-systems: 
a. 
Transponders. 
b. 
Antennae. 
c. 
Telemetry and Command. 
d. 
Attitude and Orbit Control. 
e. 
Propulsion. 
f. 
Electrical Power. 
8. 
Transponders.    The  communications  sub-system  contains  a  number  of  transponders,  each 
capable of handling multiple signals simultaneously.  A transponder receives the up-link signal in one 
frequency  band,  translates  the  signal  to  a  down-link  band,  then  amplifies  and  retransmits  the signals 
within  a  specified  bandwidth  and  at  a  set  power  level.    In  addition  to  up-link/down-link  frequency 
separation, use is made of circular polarization to further isolate the transmitter from the receiver.  The 
transmit signals have right-hand polarization; the receive signals have left-hand polarization. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 -7-2 - Satellite Communications 
9. 
Antennae.  Satellites carry one or more communications antennae.  Simple satellites may use 
only a single antenna to receive and another to transmit.  More complex satellites use a mixture of 
widebeam  and  narrowbeam  antennae.    The  widebeam,  or  Earth  coverage,  antenna  enables  the 
transponder  to  radiate  its  power  over  an  18º  illuminating  area,  or  'footprint'.    The  narrow,  or  spot 
beam,  antenna  concentrates  its  power  into  a  4º  beam  thus  focusing  the  available  power  into  a 
restricted area (see Fig 4).  Current communications satellites use digital technology to form multiple 
spot beams which are reflected from a single large antenna. 
7-2 Fig 4 Satellite Coverage Beams 
18  
o Earth Coverage
Beam
N orth        
Ar ctic
Cir cle
Pole
4o
Spot Beams
4o
10.  Telemetry and Command.  Separate telemetry and command antennae are usually carried.  The 
down-link transmissions contain engineering and equipment status information, and the up-link is used 
for commands to select equipment modes and to pass any information needed to maintain or change 
the satellite’s orbit. 
11.  Attitude and Orbit Control.  Communications satellites need to be maintained in the chosen orbit 
as follows: 
a. 
Attitude.    The  attitude  of  a  satellite  is  defined  by  its  aspect  relative  to  Earth,  in 
particular  the  direction in which its antennae are pointing.  Satellites are either spin stabilized or 
three-axis stabilized.  Spin stabilization is achieved by allowing the satellite to spin about its pitch 
axis  whilst  the  antenna  platform  is  maintained  pointing  towards  Earth.    Three-axis  stabilization 
means that the satellite body, including the antenna platform, maintains a fixed attitude relative to 
Earth whilst the solar panels point towards the sun. 
b. 
Orbit  Control.    If  a  satellite  is  disturbed,  or  if  it  deviates  from  its  designated  path,  its 
inclination  and  speed  may  need  to  be adjusted.  Corrections are made using propulsion units to 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 -7-2 - Satellite Communications 
manoeuvre  the  satellite  about  its  North-South  or  East-West  axis  (relative  to  an  observer  on  the 
surface of the Earth). 
12.  Propulsion.    The  propulsion  system  provides  the  motive  power  to  drive  the  satellite  to  the 
selected  orbit,  and  to  maintain  it  there  by  commands  sent  from  the  ground  control  station.    Most 
satellites use either hydrazine thrusters, low impulse ion thrusters, or a combination of both. 
13.  Electrical Power.  Primary electrical power is derived from solar cells, either mounted on panels 
around the body of the satellite or in the form of winged arrays.  Typical power levels are between 300 
W  and  16  kW.    Stand-by  batteries  are  provided  for  use  when  solar  power  is  not available, eg during 
periods of solar eclipse. 
Earth Segment 
14.  The  Earth  segment  of  a  military  satellite  communications  system  comprises  the  communications 
ground stations and their control function.  Ground stations may be fixed, semi-static deployable, or mobile 
tactical, and include terminals located on ships and in aircraft.  The Earth segment has to ensure that: 
a. 
The satellite is not jeopardized by the action of any of its associated ground stations. 
b. 
Receiving ground stations can obtain, and maintain, links with the terminals having the lowest 
performance rating. 
Military Applications 
15.  A  military  satellite  communications  system  is  designed  to  provide  adaptable  and  flexible 
telecommunications  to  support  operational  requirements.    It  must  also  be  compatible  with  existing 
communications networks. 
16.  The United Kingdom uses the Skynet 4 series of satellites to provide secure, jam-resistant military 
communications.  The satellites are operated under a Private Finance Initiative by Paradigm Services.  
This  organisation  will  provide  satellite  communication  services  to  UK  military  users  by  utilizing  the 
existing  Skynet  4  satellites  and  by  providing  new  Skynet  5  satellites  as  the  user  need  for  bandwidth 
increases.  From a master ground station, Paradigm Services link ships at sea, a static ground station 
in Cyprus and various deployed transportable terminals. 
17.  Skynet 4 is also used to provide the NATO Satellite Communications System, which forms part 
of  the  NATO  Integrated  Communications  System  (NICS),  linking  member  governments  and 
Commanders-in-Chief in each strategic theatre.  The system comprises 2 NATO satellites positioned 
over  the  Atlantic  Ocean  illuminating  fixed  ground  stations  and  transportable  terminals  located  in 
various countries, ranging from Turkey to Canada.  The master ground station is in Belgium. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 -7-3 - V/UHF Communications 
CHAPTER 3 - V/UHF COMMUNICATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
Short  range  communication  with  aircraft  normally  takes  place  on  frequencies  in  the  very  high 
frequency (VHF) or ultra high frequency (UHF) bands at ranges of up to approximately 100 miles.  The 
UHF frequency band is used exclusively for military aircraft control, while VHF is used for both civil and 
military control purposes. 
2. 
The  theoretical  maximum  range  of  V/UHF  air-ground  communications  is  the  line-of-sight  range 
which  varies  according  to  the  altitude  of  the  aircraft.    In  normal  operations,  the  maximum  range  of 
V/UHF communications is approximately 100 nm, although this may be extended by the use of remote 
relay slave sites.  The maximum range reduces at lower aircraft altitudes until, at ground level, ranges 
of a few miles are normal.  Because transmitter power has little effect on range at V/UHF frequencies 
aircraft transmitter output power is typically 20 watts or less. 
3. 
On  modern  equipment  there  are  over  1300  VHF  and  7000  UHF  channels  available  at  25 kHz 
spacing.  The control switches usually select and identify a channel by its frequency in MHz, although a 
channel  number  or  letter  may  be  used.    In  order  to  increase  the  number  of  channels  available, 
8.33 kHz spacing has been introduced. 
4. 
Because V/UHF equipment may be used to communicate over transmission path lengths varying 
from  a  few  hundred  metres  to  around  100  nm,  use  is  made  of  automatic  gain  control  (AGC)  to 
maintain  a  constant  receiver  output  and  obviate  the  need  for  continuous  adjustment  of  the  manual 
volume control. 

The aerials for VHF and UHF equipments are quite small and can be placed almost anywhere on 
the aircraft.  They may be built into the contours of the aircraft skin to reduce drag on high performance 
aircraft.  An aircraft fuselage may block radiation from aerials in certain directions and to overcome this 
problem  two  sets of aerials may be mounted on the aircraft, one set on top and one set underneath.  
When two sets of aerials are installed the pilot is able to select which set to use by means of an aerial 
changeover switch (see Figs 1 and 2). 
Jun 10 
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 -7-3 - V/UHF Communications 
7-3 Fig 1 V/UHF Installation 
VHF Aerial
Upper
UHF
Aerial
UHF
VHF
Adapter Unit
Changeover 
Switch
Interface Unit
To Junction Box
& Aircraft Systems
Control
Unit
Lower
UHF
Aerial
7-3 Fig 2 Block Schematic Diagram of a Typical V/UHF Installation 
VHF
Aerial
Adapter
VHF
   Unit
T/R
UHF
Control
Junction
Interface
Upper 
Unit
Box
Unit
Aerial
UHF
Aerial 
T/R
Switch
UHF
Mounting Tray
Lower 
Aerial
6. 
Within  the  equipment  there  are  separate  receiver  channels  which  are  tuned  to  the  emergency 
frequencies 121.5 MHz, VHF or 243 MHz UHF.  These channels, known as GUARD channels, may be 
monitored  by  superimposing  the  output  from  the  GUARD  receiver  on  to  the  frequency  or  pre-set 
channel selected (see para 8). 
Jun 10 
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 -7-3 - V/UHF Communications 
MAIN EQUIPMENT 
V/UHF Installation 
7. 
A  V/UHF  system  is  shown  in  Fig  1.    The  UHF  and  VHF  transmitter/receiver  units  and  interface 
and  adaptor  units  are  mounted  together.    A  single  control  unit  is  used  to  control  both 
transmitter/receivers.  The adaptor unit is needed to convert serial data from the control unit to parallel 
data  for  the  VHF.    The  adaptor  unit  also  contains  a  1 kHz  oscillator  to  provide  tone  transmissions 
which,  with  the  aid  of  a  simple  code,  can  be  used  to  communicate  information  when  speech  is  not 
possible, ie microphone failure, or, in tactical situations, where the use of speech is not advisable.  The 
interface unit contains controls and links to allow the use of carbon and electro-magnetic microphones 
and the emergency intercom.  In multi-seat aircraft where boom microphones are used the function of 
the interface unit may be carried out by the intercom system.  A block schematic diagram of a typical 
V/UHF installation is shown in Fig 2. 
Control Unit 
8. 
A  typical  control  unit  incorporates  controls  and  switches  for  the  selection  of  function,  mode  and 
frequency. 
a. 
Function.    The  required  function  may  be  selected  from  transmit-receive  (T-R),  transmit-
receive  +  Guard (T-R+G),  transmit-receive  +  homing  (T-R+H),  or  transmit  receive  +  guard  + 
homing (T-R+G+H).  Homing is only available when a UHF frequency is selected. 
b. 
Mode.  The mode of operation selected determines whether the equipment will operate on a 
manually selected frequency (M), or the frequency of a pre-set channel (P).  Pre-set channels, or 
STUDS,  may  be  identified  by  a  letter  or  number.    The  VHF  and  UHF  guard  frequencies,  121.5 
MHz and 243 MHz can be selected by placing the Mode Selector to Gv or Gu as appropriate. 
c. 
Manual Frequency Selection.  Frequencies can be selected manually in increments of 100 
MHz, 10 MHz, 1 MHz, 100 kHz and 25 kHz.  The first five digits of the frequency are displayed.  If 
8.33 kHz spacing has been installed, frequencies are selected by channel numbers. 
There are also controls for volume and lighting dimmer. 
EMERGENCY UHF 
Introduction 
9. 
There are several types of Emergency UHF transceivers in use.  Their prime purpose is to enable 
communications  on  the  Emergency  UHF  frequency  243  MHz  in  the  event  of  power  or  main  radio 
failure.  In addition, some installations allow operation on between 1 and 4 other preset channels. 
Leading Particulars 
10.  The standby radio frequency range spans 238 MHz to 248 MHz.  Apart from the guard frequency 
of  243  MHz,  facilities  allow  operation  on  an  additional channel or channels, depending on radio type, 
between 241 MHz and 245 MHz. 
11.  Although some installations include a separate ½ wave aerial, when in use most transceivers are 
switched  to  the  main  UHF  antennas.    On  some  installations,  where  the  emergency  system  can  be 
utilized simultaneously with the main transceiver, the Emergency UHF is switched automatically to the 
non-selected aerial. 
Power Supplies 
12.  The Emergency UHF requires 24V - 28V DC which is obtained from the aircraft power supply.  In 
the event of its failure, a 24V battery continues to allow emergency operation. 
Jun 10 
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-4 - Data Link and Encryption 
CHAPTER 4- DATA LINK AND ENCRYPTION 
Introduction 
1. 
Data link is the term used to describe equipment which is used to pass tactical information between 
units in a manner that can be readily understood and absorbed into the Tactical Data Systems (TDS) of 
the linked units.  Data link is the standard method used by NATO forces to co-ordinate actions, whether 
anti-air, anti-surface, or anti-submarine, where more than one unit is involved. 
2. 
A Data Link Net consists of a Net Control Station (NCS) and one or more Participating Units (PU), 
which  may  be  ground  stations;  reconnaissance,  offensive  or  airborne  warning  and  control  system 
(AWACS)  aircraft;  or  capital  warships.    The  sensor  information  from  each  PU  is  co-ordinated  to 
produce the best possible assessment of the tactical situation which is then made available to all PUs 
by the NCS. 
Operation 
3. 
In a simple system, data is passed between PUs by radio.  Fig 1 shows a simplified diagram of a 
data link transmission system; the reception equipment is essentially the same except that the output 
buffer is replaced by an input buffer. 
7-4 Fig 1 Data Link Transmission Chain – Schematic 
Digital
Analogue
Audio
Data
Output
TDS
Base
Buffer
Crypto
DTS
Radio
4. 
All sensor inputs are passed to the unit’s database by the individual sensor operators for display 
on the tactical plot and for storage in the structured message formats ready for transmission to other 
Pus,  as  and  when  required.    Command  and  administration  messages  are  also  formatted  and  held 
ready for transmission.  All messages are stored as digital groups.  Although it is an operator function 
to decide which data will be put on the link, from then on the process is automatic. 
5. 
Data  is  transmitted,  typically,  as  30-bit  frames  arranged  in  predetermined  formats,  each  frame 
consisting  of  24  information  bits  and  6  error  detection  and correction bits; two such frames form one 
link message. 
6. 
Messages  for  transmission  are  passed  to  the  output  buffer  ready  to  be  encrypted  by  the  crypto 
sub-system.    The  encryption  is  completed  on-line  automatically  as  part  of  the  normal  transmission 
process.  The encrypted information passes to the Data Terminal Set (DTS) where it is converted from 
its  digital  form  into  analogue  audio  before  being  used  to  modulate  the  transmitter  output.    Data  is 
passed at high speed, at either 2,250 or 1,364 bits per second, either sequentially, or simultaneously 
as 15 multiplexed tones (multiplexing is explained in Volume 7, Chapter 27). 
7. 
Analogue audio received signals are converted to digital form and, if multiplexed, rearranged into 
their  original  format  ready  for  decryption  and  subsequent  passage  via  the  input  buffer  to  the  tactical 
display; display is generally automatic although inputs may be manually filtered out if required. 
8. 
The  control  of  transmission  is  vested  in  the  NCS  which  may  interrogate  each of the PUs in turn 
which then automatically release the information stored in their output buffers.  Alternatively, in order to 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-4 - Data Link and Encryption 
maintain a greater degree of radio silence, PUs may broadcast short bursts of data as necessary to all 
other  units  on  the  net.    The  NCS  promulgates  details  of  the  information  required  on  the  net  together 
with operational details of, for example, frequencies and crypto to be used. 
9. 
Effective  data  linking  demands  very  precise  navigation  and  any  unit  in  a  net  must  be  able  to 
determine its own position accurately and continuously both geographically and relative to other PUs in 
the net in terms of a common positional grid system.  Errors in position can generate false targets on 
the  net  and  may  also  result  in  real  targets  being  missed.    Typically,  a  PU  will  identify  a  target  by  its 
relative  position  as  range  and  bearing.    Depending  on  the  sensor  used  there  will  be  some  degree  of 
error in this data which may be aggravated when converted into a grid position.  Another PU may hold 
the same target but with different system errors and so may relay a different position to the NCS.  One 
of  the  principle  tasks  of  the  NCS,  therefore,  is  to  resolve  these  inconsistencies  and  relay  the  correct 
target position to the PUs. 
Digital Data Link Systems 
10.  The following paragraphs describe the data link systems in most common military use by NATO 
forces: 
a. 
Link 1.  Link 1 is a non-secure dedicated point-to-point telephone data link for exchange of 
the Recognized Air Picture (RAP).   
b. 
Link  4.    Link  4  is  a  tactical  fighter  direction  link.    It  is  fitted  in  a  variety  of  NATO  aircraft 
including the E3D Sentry.  This unencrypted link operates at high speed in the UHF band. 
c. 
Link 11.  Link 11 is an automatic, high speed, encrypted maritime system using both UHF and 
HF  frequencies.    It  is  installed  in  the  E3D  Sentry  and  certain  warships.    It  provides  real-time  air, 
surface and sub-surface track data, track management and EW information. 
d. 
Link  14.    Link  14  is  a  secure  link  used  to  disseminate  non-real-time  data,  particularly  the 
Recognized  Surface  or  Sub-surface  Picture  (RSP/RSSP).    It  can  utilize  a  broad  spectrum  of 
channels covering HF to SHF frequency bands.  It is capable of operating in broadcast mode. 
e. 
Link  16/Joint  Tactical  Information  Distribution  System  (JTIDS).    JTIDS  and  its 
associated Link 16 is a high speed, ECM resistant, secure system.  It has high capacity voice and 
data  capabilities  and  is  used  in  co-ordination  of  air,  ground  and  maritime  operations.    It  can 
transfer data automatically between AWACS assets and command centres, to suitably equipped 
ships and aircraft and to beyond line of sight by the use of relays.  Time Division Multiple Access 
(TDMA)  techniques  are  employed  to  enable  a  large  number  of  users  to  communicate  amongst 
themselves  using  formatted  or  free  text  messages.    To  that  end,  an  Interim  JTIDS  Message 
Standard,  (IJMS)  was  introduced  to  allow  early  development  of  a  message  library.    The 
sophisticated  JTIDS  system  uses  spread  spectrum  techniques  combined  with  variable  carrier 
frequencies  making  it  difficult  to  detect  or  jam.    Fig  2  represents  a  typical  JTIDS  display  screen 
showing a variety of features which could be presented in a hostile environment. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-4 - Data Link and Encryption 
7-4 Fig 2 Typical JTIDS Display 
 Forward Edge
Unknown
Friendly Aircraft
Range
of Battle Area 
 Aircraft
Hostile Aircraft
Target
    (FEBA)
60
RELN
3
2
5
1
M4
S3
MODE
SELF
EXP
X
Recovery Base
Own Aircraft
Navigation Route
Feature Select
Waypoint
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-5 - Principles of Direction Finding 
CHAPTER 5 - PRINCIPLES OF DIRECTION FINDING 
Introduction 
1. 
Radio  compasses  and  ground  based  radio  direction  finding  equipment  use  specially  designed 
receiver aerials to measure the direction from which the received signal is coming.  Airborne equipment 
operates  in  the  LF/MF  frequency  range  (usually  between  200  kHz  and  1800  kHz)  and  the  system 
normally  provides  for  the  automatic  determination  and  display  of  the  relative  bearing  of  the  transmitter.  
The technique of radio direction finding is based on the reception characteristics of a loop aerial. 
Loop Aerial Theory 
2. 
Fig 1a shows a loop aerial, consisting of two vertical members, A and B, connected in the form of 
a  loop  by  horizontal  members.    If  a  vertically  polarized  radio  wave  is  incident  upon  the  loop,  it  will 
induce voltages in the vertical members of the loop of value Va and Vb. 
3. 
Consider  a  wave  incident  at  an  angle  θ  to  the  plane  of  the  loop  (Fig  1b).    Distance  AB  is 
insignificant  compared  with  the  range  from  the  transmitter  to  the  loop,  so  both  A  and  B  receive  the 
same  signal  strength.    However,  as  the  signal  travels  a  different  distance  to  each,  there  is  a  phase 
difference at A and B given by AB cos θ. 
4. 
Since AB is constant, the value of the resultant voltage in the loop is proportional to θ, giving the 'figure 
of eight' polar diagram for a loop aerial shown in Fig 1c.  The plus and minus signs show the sign of cos θ, 
and hence the resultant voltage, Vr, in both lobes of the loop.  The horizontal polar diagram has two sharply 
defined minima at θ = 90º and θ = 270º, and two poorly defined maxima at θ = 0º and θ = 180º. 
7-5 Fig 1 Simple Vertical Loop
Fig 1a Vertical Loop 
Fig 1b Loop AB in Plan 
A
B
C
Va
Vb
q
B
A
Va    Vb
Fig 1c Horizontal Polar Diagram 
Loop
q
A B
-
+
5. 
If a loop aerial which is receiving a wave from a transmitter is rotated, the resultant voltage in the 
loop will vary as θ varies.  When θ = 90º or 270º the resultant voltage is zero.  When θ = 0º or 180º the 
resultant  voltage  is  a  maximum.    As  the  minima  are  the  more  sharply  defined,  these  are  used  for 
direction finding.  To take a manual loop bearing, the loop is rotated until a minimum signal (or 'null') is 
found.    At  this  point,  the  transmitter  must  be  on  the  line  normal  to  the  plane  of  the  loop  (subject  to 
certain  errors  mentioned  later).    However,  there  is  no  indication  on  which  side  of  the  loop  the 
transmitter is sited.  The process of resolving this ambiguity is known as 'sensing'. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 – 7-5 - Principles of Direction Finding 
Sensing 
6. 
If a vertical omni-directional aerial is placed midway between the two vertical members of the loop, 
the voltage induced in it by an incident wave will be midway in phase between the voltages induced in the 
vertical members of the loop (Fig 2a).  It can be shown that the phase of the voltage in the sense aerial, 
Vs, is always 90º removed from the phase of the resultant voltage, Vr, in the loop. 
7. 
If the incident wave comes from the left of the normal to the plane of the loop (direction X in Fig 2b), 
Vs  leads  Vr  by  90º,  while  if  it  comes  from  the  right  (direction  Y),  Vr  leads  Vs  by  90º.    By  permanently 
incorporating suitable components in the sense aerial circuit, the phase of Vs can be retarded by 90º.  If 
this is done, Vs will be in phase with Vr if the wave comes from the left of the normal and in antiphase if 
the wave comes from the right.  The aerials are designed so that the value of Vs is equal to the maximum 
value of Vr. 
7-5 Fig 2 Sensing 
Fig 2a Loop + Sensing Aerial 
Fig 2b Direction of Incident Wave 
A
B
Sense 
Aerial
Direction X
Direction Y
Va
Vs
Vb
A
S
B
8. 
If Vs and Vr are combined, the polar diagram shown in Fig 3 will result.  The figure of eight is the polar 
diagram for the loop alone, the circular polar diagram is for the sense aerial alone, and the heart-shaped or 
cardioid polar diagram is for the loop and sense aerials combined.  (To the right of the normal to the loop, Vs 
and Vr are in antiphase, and cancel each other; to the left they are additive).  In many installations the sense 
aerial is located away from the mid-point of the loop, but the principle is unchanged. 
7-5 Fig 3 Generation of Cardioid Polar Diagram 
C
N
M
ve
Loop
θ
A B
ve
+  ve
R
SD
Manual Sensing 
9. 
With the sense aerial switched out, the loop is rotated until a direction of minimum signal is found.  
The transmitter must now lie on the line CD in Fig 3 but can be either in direction C or in direction D.  
To resolve the ambiguity the sense aerial is switched in to combine with the loop to provide the cardioid 
polar diagram.  A signal of medium strength will be received proportional to the distance from the loop 
to point R or point N on the polar diagram.  Rotating the loop anti-clockwise by 10º - 15º changes the 
signal strength due to the eccentricity of the polar diagram.  If the beacon is in direction D, point S on 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 – 7-5 - Principles of Direction Finding 
the diagram will now be on the line CD so that a greater signal strength will be received.  If the beacon 
had been in direction C, a weaker signal would have resulted as point M would now be on the line CD.  
Thus, if an anti-clockwise rotation produces a stronger signal, the assumed bearing of the transmitter 
is correct, and if a weaker signal is produced, the bearing is a reciprocal. 
Automatic Direction Finding (ADF) 
10.  The loop aerial principle is used in practical radio compasses which automatically determine and 
display the transmitter direction.  Instead of the single loop aerial, a 'Bellini-Tosi' aerial system is used.  
This consists of two loops at right angles to one another and each loop has a primary coil connected 
within the loop such that the coils cross at the centre (Fig 4). 
7-5 Fig 4 Bellini-Tosi System 
11.  The alternating current flowing in each loop is proportional to the angle the incident wave makes with the 
loops.  The field set up by the coil in each loop is proportional to the current flowing in its loop, thus the strength 
of each field depends on the angle of the incident wave on the respective loop.  The resultant field produced by 
the combined effect of both coils wil  lie in the same direction as the incident wave.  A coil can be rotated within 
this resultant field and the current induced in it wil  be dependent on the angle it makes with the field.  If it is 
paral el to the field, maximum current (and therefore maximum signal) wil  be produced.  If it is perpendicular, no 
signal  is  produced.    The  combination  of  two  static  perpendicular  coils  and  a  rotatable  coil  is  known  as  a 
goniometer. 
Direction Finding Errors 
12. Night  Effect.    A  loop  aerial  is  designed  to  use  vertically  polarized  waves  for  direction  finding.    If  the 
incoming wave has a horizontal component of polarization it will induce a current in the horizontal members 
of the loop which will tend to cancel.  However, if the loop is not at right angles to the travelling wave, the 
currents in the top and bottom will not cancel completely.  A resultant current will flow in the loop which will 
degrade  the  nulls  of  the  polar  diagram  thus  making  it  impossible  to  take  accurate  bearings.    By  day  MF 
transmissions  propagate  by  surface  waves  and  their  plane  of  polarization  does  not  change  during 
propagation.  However, at night, sky wave propagation becomes significant and, on being refracted at the 
ionosphere  a  vertically  polarized  wave  becomes  elliptically  polarized,  ie  it  has  a  changing  horizontal 
component of polarization.  On arriving back at the surface it is travelling downwards and has a horizontal 
component of polarization – the two features necessary to interfere with the directional properties of the loop.  
At night therefore, the nulls of the loop polar diagram tend to be wandering and indistinct.  In order to reduce 
this  effect,  the  horizontal  members  should  be  kept  as  close  as  possible,  so  that  any  phase  difference  in 
induced currents is minimized; in addition, the top of the loop should be screened. 
13. Synchronous  Transmission.   If two or more beacons are transmitting on frequencies that are the 
same (or within the pass band of the receiver) and within effective range, the measured bearing will be in the 
direction of the resultant of the signal strength vectors (Fig 5).  The act of deliberately creating a false bearing 
as part of electronic warfare is termed 'meaconing'. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 – 7-5 - Principles of Direction Finding 
7-5 Fig 5 Synchronous Transmission 
14.  Bank Error.  When an aircraft is banked, the aerial is tilted and some of the signal is detected by 
the horizontal elements of the aerial.  This will produce an error in the ADF bearing until the wings are 
levelled again. 
15. Coastal  Refraction.    The  velocity  of  propagation  of  a  surface  wave  is  affected  by  the  nature  of 
the  surface  over  which  the  wave  is  travelling.    A  radio  wave  travels  slower  over  a  surface  of  poor 
conductivity  than  over  a  surface  of  good  conductivity.    Thus,  for  example,  radio  waves  travel  faster 
over  sea  than  over  land.    Fig  6  shows  the  case  where  an  aircraft  flying  over  the  sea  is  receiving 
transmissions from an inland beacon.  When the wave-front reaches the coast it will speed up but, due 
to the angle of the coast, elements of the wave-front to the north will reach the coast before elements 
to the south and hence they will speed up earlier.  This causes a tilting of the wave-front at the coast 
away from the normal.  The wave is thus refracted at the coast so that the angle of refraction is greater 
than  the  angle  of  incidence.    The  greater  the  angle  of  incidence  the  more  the  wave  is  refracted  to  a 
maximum of 3º or 4º.  The error can be minimized by using coastal beacons or by taking bearings from 
an inland beacon when a line joining the DR position to the beacon crosses the coast at 90º. 
7-5 Fig 6 Coastal Refraction 
000
Bearing
Bearing
Angle of
Measured
Plotted
Angle of
Inc id enc e
Refrac tion
Position Line Plotted
180
16. Quadrantal  Error.    The  electrical  axis  of  an  aircraft  usually  coincides  with  its  fore-and-aft  axis.  
Incoming  radio  waves  cause  re-radiation  from  metallic  parts  of  the  aircraft  and  the  wave  is  refracted 
towards  this  axis  (Fig  7).    Since  the  error  tends  to  be  greatest  on  relative  quadrantal  points  it  is  called 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 – 7-5 - Principles of Direction Finding 
quadrantal error.  Quadrantal error can be virtually eliminated by incorporating a quadrantal error corrector 
in the radio compass. 
7-5 Fig 7 Quadrantal Error 
000
Electrical Axis
of Aircraft
Plotted
Position Line
Correc t
Bearing
Measured
Bearing
Plotted
Apparent Direction
Bearing
of Beacon
180
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
CHAPTER 6 - PRINCIPLES OF VOR 
Introduction 
1. 
Very High Frequency Omni-Directional Radio Range (VOR) comprising a ground beacon and an 
airborne  installation,  automatically  and  continuously  provides  the  airborne  operator  with  the  magnetic 
bearing of the aircraft from the beacon.  The system is used extensively as an en-route navigation and 
terminal approach aid. 
2. 
VOR,  operating  in  the  frequency  band  108.00 MHz  to  117.95  MHz,  has  a  great  advantage  over 
any  MF  system  offering  similar  facilities,  for  its  performance  is  not  affected  by  static  or  night  effect.  
However  the  line  of  sight  properties  of  VHF  transmissions  limit  the  VOR  coverage  provided  for  low 
flying aircraft. 
3. 
In 1960 ICAO adopted VOR as the international standard short-range navigation aid, and a large 
number  of  Service  aircraft  now  carry  the  necessary  receiver  equipment  enabling  them  to  use  the 
numerous beacons throughout the world. 
Ground Beacon Operation 
4. 
The principle of the VOR system is bearing by phase comparison: the aircraft’s equipment derives 
the  bearing  from  the  phase  difference  between  two  30  Hz  modulations  associated  with  the  radio 
frequency transmission of the ground beacon. 
5. 
Although the aerial systems of VOR beacons vary in construction, all transmit omni-directional and 
rotating  directional  signals.    The  polar  diagrams  of  these transmissions, a circle and a figure of eight 
respectively, are shown in Fig 1 together with their resultant, a limacon pattern.  (A limacon differs from 
a cardioid in that there is some signal strength present at the minimum). 
7-6 Fig 1 VOR Polar Diagram 
Resultant Limacon
Rotating 
30 Revs/Sec
Directional Signals
30 Revs/Sec
Omni-directional Signal
6. 
The  figure  of  eight  diagram,  and  consequently  the  limacon,  is  made  to  rotate  at  30  revs/sec  by 
rotating the horizontal dipole within a resonant cavity. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
7. 
If  the  limacon  polar  diagram  starts  rotating  from  the  initial  position  shown  in  Fig  2,  then  the 
characteristics  of  the  signal  received  at  the  four  cardinal  points  during  one  revolution  are  as  shown  in 
Fig 2.    It  can  be  seen that the signal is amplitude modulated at 30 Hz, one full cycle for each complete 
rotation of the polar diagram, and that the phase of the modulation varies with the position of the receiver 
relative to the beacon.  The modulation depth is maintained at 30 per cent. 
7-6 Fig 2 Amplitude Modulation of Variable Signal 
30 Hz
30 Hz
30 Hz
30 Revs+
per Sec
30 Hz
8. 
To  compute  the  aircraft’s  bearing  from  this  information  it  is  necessary  to  have  a  reference  from 
which the phase of the directional signal can be measured.  This is provided by the omni-directional or 
reference signal which is frequency modulated at 30 Hz by the transmitter. 
9. 
The two 30 Hz modulations are arranged to appear in phase to a receiver due North (Magnetic) of 
the beacon, hence any difference in phase is a direct measure of the bearing of the receiver from the 
beacon, see Fig 3. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
7-6 Fig 3 Bearing by Phase Comparison 
Phase Dif  000°
N
W
E
Phase Dif  270°
S
Phase Dif  090°
Phase Dif  180°
Reference Phase 30 Hz Modulation (derived from Omni-directional signal)
Vari-phase 30 Hz Modulation (derived from Limacon)
Airborne Installation 
10.  The heart of the VOR airborne installation is the Navigation Unit:  this contains the circuits that detect 
and phase compare the variable and reference signals and provide outputs to the VOR displays. 
11.  The input arrives at the phase detector via two paths which are designed to extract the two 30 Hz 
components and present them in a suitable form for phase comparison within the detector.  One path 
allows  only  the  30  Hz  component  of  the  AM  signal  to  pass;  the  second  path  extracts  the  30  Hz  FM 
reference signal and converts it to a 30 Hz AM signal.  The output from the phase detector is a signal 
proportional to the measured phase difference. 
Frequency Allocation 
12.  The  allocation  of  frequencies  in  the  108.00  MHz  to  117.95  MHz  band  is  as  shown  in  the  Flight 
Information Handbook, but can be summarized as follows: 
a. 
From  108.00  MHz  to  111.85  MHz,  those  frequencies  with  an  EVEN  first  decimal  place  (eg 
109.20 MHz, 111.65 MHz) are VOR channels. 
b. 
All frequencies in the range 112.00 MHz to 117.95 MHz are VOR channels. 
c. 
From  108.10  MHz  to  111.95  MHz,  those  frequencies  with  an  ODD  first  decimal  place  (eg 
109.10 MHz, 111.35 MHz) are ILS localizer channels. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
13.  The majority of VOR receivers also act as ILS localizer receivers, and the selection of a frequency 
automatically puts the equipment into the appropriate mode, VOR or ILS. 
VOR Performance 
14.  As VOR is a VHF aid, the ranges that can be expected depend largely upon aircraft height.  VHF 
range is approximately line of sight, plus 15% to 20% to allow for atmospheric refraction.  The following 
table lists the approximate ranges to be expected. 
Height (ft) 
Range (nm) 
1,000 
40 
5,000 
90 
20,000 
185 
30,000 
230 
Note:  There is a cone of confusion overhead the beacon, the radius of which is about 4 nm at 30,000 ft. 
15.  It is difficult to lay down specific accuracy figures for a complete VOR system, the final accuracy 
being  the  result  of  errors  induced  by  the  ground  beacon,  the  airborne  equipment  and  the  crew’s 
interpretation  of  the  display.    Beacon  errors  can  be  caused  by  misalignment  with  magnetic  North 
(which is itself subject to diurnal and longer term change), siting effects (reflections of the signals from 
nearby  objects  or  terrain)  and  minor  inaccuracies  within  the  manufacturing  tolerances  of  the 
equipment.    Airborne  equipment  error  is  considered  to  be  the  total  error  due  to  the  receiver  and 
display,  ie  the  difference  between  the  received  and  displayed  bearing.    Errors  due  to  crew 
interpretation depend on the way in which the information is used, ie whether the display is used by the 
pilot to fly a radial or whether the bearing is plotted as a position line. 
16.  At the 95% probability level these error components are considered to be: 
a. 
Ground Beacon Error - ± 3º (easily achieved in practice). 
b. 
Airborne Equipment Error - ± 3º. 
c. 
Pilot Error - ± 2.5º (for radial tracking). 
Since  the  errors  are  independent  of  each  other  the  aggregate  error  can  be  taken  as  the  root-mean-
square  of  the  individual  components.    This  results  in  an  error  of  ± 5º  in  the  case  of  an  aircraft 
attempting to maintain a selected radial and ± 4º in the case of a plotted position line. 
Protected Range 
17.  To  overcome  the  problem  of  mutual  interference  from  adjacent  beacons  a  'protected  range'  is 
quoted  in  the  form  of  two  figures,  eg  30/50.    This  describes  a  cylinder  of  radius  30  nm  and  height 
50,000 ft within which the transmission is protected from interference from other beacons on the same 
frequency. 
Types of VOR Beacons 
18.  Various  prefix  and  suffix  letters  may  be  seen  against  VOR  beacon  information  in  En-Route 
Supplements.  The most common are: 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
a.
BVOR  -  Weather  Broadcast  VOR.    Weather  Broadcast  VORs,  as  their  name  suggests, 
broadcast weather information for selected airfields and areas. 
b.
DVOR  -  Doppler  VOR  Beacon.    With  Doppler  VOR  beacons,  the  modulation  type  of  the 
reference  and  variphase  signals  is  reversed,  ie  FM  instead  of  AM  and  vice  versa.    The  aerial 
system  is  fixed  and  the  horizontal  dipole  rotation  is  synthesized  by  feeding  phase  differences  to 
many small dipoles in the form of a ring.  Provided that the aircraft receives both signals there is 
no difference in the operation of the airborne equipment.  The advantage of the system is that it 
does  not  have  any  moving  parts  and  is  less  susceptible  to  siting  effects.    The  majority  of VORs 
worldwide are now Doppler VORs. 
c.
TVOR - Terminal VOR.  Terminal VORs are located at major terminal airfields and are low 
powered, hence limited range. 
d.
AFIS  and  ATIS.    AFIS  (Aerodrome  Flight  Information  Service)  may  be  seen  as  a  suffix  to  a 
TVOR; in this case the beacon will be broadcasting information about that particular airfield.  ATIS 
(Automatic Terminal Information Service) can appear as a suffix to any VOR beacon, and the entry 
in the En-Route Supplement will indicate for which terminal airfield(s) the information is valid. 
e.
VORTAC.    A  VORTAC  installation  consists  of  collocated  VOR  and  TACAN  beacons 
operating on the same frequency. 
f.
VOT  -  Test  VOR  Transmitter.    Test  VORs  are  NOT  for  navigational  use.    They  broadcast  a 
fixed omni-directional 180º radial signal for testing VOR receivers. 
g.
OthersAny  combinations  of  the  types  mentioned  in  sub-paras  a  to  e  may  be  found,  eg 
DBVORTAC, a weather broadcasting Doppler VOR beacon collocated with a TACAN operating on 
the same frequency. 
VOR Displays 
19.  Many forms of VOR displays may be encountered.  The type of display will be determined to an 
extent by whether the information is to be presented for pilot or navigator interpretation.  In addition the 
display  may  be  integrated  into  other  equipments,  eg  HSI.    Some  of  the  more  common  displays  are 
briefly outlined below but users should refer to the appropriate Aircrew Manual for detailed information 
and operating procedures. 
20. Radio  Magnetic  Indicator  (RMI).    An  RMI  (Fig  4)  simultaneously  displays  aircraft  heading  and 
the magnetic bearing to a radio navigation aid.  The radio bearing is given by a pointer moving over a 
rotatable  compass  card  which  is  driven  by  the  aircraft’s  gyro-magnetic  compass.    An  RMI  is  usually 
capable of accepting  two  radio inputs at a time.  An RMI therefore usually has two separate pointers 
of different shape or colour or both, with changeover switches to control their functions.  Before display, 
the  VOR  magnetic  bearing  has  to  be  converted  to  a  relative  bearing  by  subtraction  of  the  aircraft’s 
magnetic  heading.    The  relative  bearing  is  then  fed  to  the  display,  and  as  the  compass  card  rotates 
with aircraft heading changes, the result is a display of magnetic bearing. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
7-6 Fig 4 RMI Display 
V
V
O
O
R
R
ADF
ADF
21. Relative Bearing Indicator (RBI).  The RBI is similar to the RMI in mechanization except that the 
compass card is not driven by the gyro-magnetic compass.  The card is fixed with 000º aligned with the 
aircraft fore-and-aft axis, ie at the top of the display.  The pointer thus indicates a relative VOR bearing. 
22. Omni-Bearing Selector (OBS).  The OBS is the basis of many types of VOR display, which will 
normally offer the following features: 
a.
Track  Selector.  The track selector can be used to either set up a desired track on which to 
approach or leave a beacon, or to determine the current bearing to, or radial from, a beacon.  To fly 
a  desired  track  the  figure  is  set  on  the  selector  and  the  aircraft  is  then  flown  to  zero  the  deviation 
indicator.  The current radial or magnetic bearing to the beacon can be determined by adjusting the 
track selector such that the deviation indicator is zeroed. 
b.
TO/FROM Indicator.  The TO/FROM indicator shows the operator which sector the aircraft 
is  in  relative  to  the  perpendicular  to  the  selected  track  through  the  beacon  (Fig  5).    It  does  not 
indicate that the aircraft is heading towards or away from the beacon. 
7-6 Fig 5 Operation of TO/FROM Indicator 
'From' 
Sector
'To'
Sector
Selected
Track
c.
Deviation Indicator.  The deviation indicator can be separate from or integral with the OBS.  
It  may  have  either  a  VOR/ILS  localizer  needle  alone  or  may  be  combined  with  an  ILS  deviation 
indicator  (Fig  6).    The  deviation  indicator  will  only  be  central  when  the  aircraft  is  actually  on  the 
selected track.  Full-scale deflection is approximately 10º off the selected track.  The indicator is not 
a demand indicator in that it does notshow the direction or amount by which the aircraft should be 
turned,  as  it  takes  no  account  of  aircraft  heading.    It  does  indicate  the  direction  relative  to  the 
selected track that the aircraft must be flown in order to achieve that track. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
7-6 Fig 6 Deviation Indicator 
23. Radial Magnetic Selector (RMS).  The RMS (Fig 7) is a combination of the RMI and OBS.  The 
RMI  features  are  the  twin  pointers  and  the  gyro-magnetic  compass  driven  compass  card.    The  OBS 
features are the selection and numeric display of selected track, and the output to a remote deviation 
indicator.  There is no TO/FROM indicator but a radial index always brackets the track selected. 
7-6 Fig 7 Radial Magnetic Selector 
VOR ADF
VOR ADF
SMITHS
0
7
0
24. Horizontal  Situation  Indicator  (HSI).    The  HSI  (Fig  8)  is  another  OBS  derivative  and  is  a 
multi-purpose  navigation  display  which,  in  addition  to  heading,  can  display  VOR,  ILS,  DME  and 
TACAN  information  with  track  selection  and  deviation  indication,  depending  on  the  aircraft  fit.  
The instrument is covered more fully in Volume 5, Chapter 13. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-6 - Principles of VOR 
7-6 Fig 8 HSI 
0 9 0
1 4 2
N.MILES
COURSE
30
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
CHAPTER 7 - PRINCIPLES OF TACAN AND DME 
Introduction 
1. 
TACAN  (TACtical  Air  Navigation  System)  and  DME  (Distance  Measuring  Equipment)  are 
navigation aids which consist of ground beacons and airborne installations.  They both operate in the 
UHF band from 962 to 1213 MHz.  With a channel separation of 1 MHz, this provides for a maximum 
of  252  channels.    Both  TACAN  and  DME  provide  range information using the 'transponder' principle, 
which  involves  the  ground  beacon  receiving  interrogation  pulses  on  one  frequency  and,  after  a  set 
delay  time,  replying  to  the  interrogating  aircraft  on  a  different  frequency  (see  Fig  1).    In  addition, 
TACAN makes use of amplitude modulation to provide magnetic bearing. 
7-7 Fig 1 TACAN/DME System 
Interrogation Pulse
Reply Pulse
Reply
Trigger
Tx
Delay
Rx
Circuit
Ground Beacon
2. 
The  main  advantages  of  TACAN  and  DME  are  worldwide  beacon  coverage,  high  accuracy  and 
ease  of  use  without  the  need  for  special  charts.    TACAN  can  also  be  used  in  air-to-air  mode 
(see para 41), which has tactical applications, eg in-flight refuelling. 
3. 
The  ground  beacons  are  identified  by  two  or  three-letter  Morse  Code  aural  callsigns  and  have 
unique receiving and transmitting frequencies. 
4. 
The  airborne  equipments  differ  in  terms  of  information  provided  and  operation  as  shown  in 
Table 1. 
Table 1 Airborne TACAN and DME Equipment Capabilities 
TACAN 
DME 
Bearing 
Yes 
No 
Slant Range 
Yes 
Yes 
Channel Selection 
Numerical 
By a VHF frequency 
Channel Capacity 
126 ‡
100 (all equipments) ‡
126 (some equipments) ‡
Offset Capability 
Yes †
No 
Range Rate 
No 
Yes * 
* Not always mechanized in the airborne display. 
† Capability provided by a computer external to actual TACAN equipment. 
‡ Can be doubled if equipment has a Y channel capability. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION 
5. 
As  mentioned  in  the  Introduction,  range  measurement  is  achieved  by  use  of  the  transponder 
principle,  whereby  the  ground  beacon  replies  to  interrogations  by  airborne  equipment.    The  airborne 
interrogator  transmits  a  continuous  series  of  pulses  on  a  given  carrier  frequency.    The  pulses  are 
transmitted in pairs with a fixed time interval between the two pulses in the pair.  The repetition interval 
between  these  'pulse  pairs'  is  varied  –  a  technique  known  as  random  or  'jittered'  Pulse  Repetition 
Frequency  (PRF).    At  the  same  time  as  the  interrogations  are  transmitted,  the  airborne  equipment 
commences timing and begins searching for replies from the ground beacon. 
6. 
The ground beacon receives the interrogation and replies to it by sending out pulse pairs on a carrier 
frequency  63  MHz  removed  from  the  interrogation  frequency.    The  airborne  receiver, tuned to the ground 
station’s transmitter frequency, receives all of the responses sent out but recognises its own replies by the 
unique jittered PRF.  It calculates the slant range between the aircraft and the ground beacon by using the 
time interval between transmission of the interrogation and receipt of the reply. 
7. 
There  are  two  types  of  TACAN  and  DME  beacons,  X  and  Y.    Both  operate  on  exactly  the  same 
principle,  but  there  are  differences  in  detail.    In  the  following  paragraphs,  which  explain  the  principles  of 
operation,  figures  used  relate  to  X  beacons.    The  differences  between  X  and  Y  beacons  are  discussed 
further in paras 29 - 35. 
Ground Beacon Operating Cycle 
8. 
The ground beacon consists of a separate transmitter and receiver which operate on frequencies 
separated by 63 MHz.  For technical reasons, the transmitter operates continuously, sending out 2,700 
pulse pairs per second (pp/sec).  These pulse pairs are generated in response to a trigger circuit which 
is fed by the output from the ground beacon’s receiver. 
9. 
If  the  ground  beacon  does  not  receive  any  interrogations  from  airborne  equipments,  the  output 
from the receiver will be random noise.  This noise is fed to the trigger circuit which will fire on receipt 
of  a  pair of pulses above a set amplitude which are 12 µsec apart (known as a '12-µsec pulse pair').  
The random noise from the receiver will contain a number of pulses which satisfy the firing conditions 
of  the  trigger  circuit  (see  Fig 2a).  When the trigger circuit fires, it prompts the beacon to transmit its 
own 12-µsec pulse pair of a fixed amplitude. 
10.  If the receiver gain is increased, more pulse pairs will exceed the pre-set amplitude level and the 
trigger  circuit  will  fire  more  frequently;  the  converse  applies  when  the  receiver  gain  is  decreased.  
Therefore,  the  number  of  pulse  pairs  transmitted  by  the  beacon  varies  directly  with  the  receiver  gain 
which  is  continuously  and  automatically  adjusted  to  produce  2,700  pp/sec.    These  pulse  pairs  are  of 
constant amplitude and shape, but have a random recurrence frequency (see Fig 2b). 
11.  If  the  ground  beacon  is  interrogated  by  an  airborne  equipment,  a  12-µsec  pulse  pair  with  an 
amplitude well above the pre-set level will appear at the receiver output, as at X in Fig 2a.  The trigger 
circuit will fire and a reply will be transmitted to the aircraft amidst the pulse pairs produced irregularly 
by the noise from the receiver, as at Y in Fig 2b. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
7-7 Fig 2 Generation of Ground Beacon Pulses 
a  Receiver Output
Trigger Level
x
b  Transmitted Pulse Pairs
Y
12.  Since  the  ground  beacon  transmits  a  constant  number  of  pulses  per  second  (2,700),  as  the 
number of interrogation pulses received increases, so the number of random noise-generated pulses 
decreases.  This is because the receiver gain will be reduced until the noise pulses with their smaller 
amplitudes  fail  to  satisfy  the  requirements  of  the  trigger  circuit.    As  the  standard  rate  of  the 
interrogation  by  aircraft  is  24  to  30  pp/sec  (average  27),  the  trigger  circuit  will  be  saturated  by  the 
interrogations  from  about 100 aircraft and the receiver gain will be gradually reduced until replies are 
generated only by the strongest 100 interrogations. 
Distance Measurement by TACAN and DME 
13.  Identification of Correct Transponder Signals The airborne equipment will receive replies to its 
interrogations  amidst  all  the  other  pulse  pairs  transmitted  by  the  beacon.    However,  the  airborne  receiver 
must recognize its own replies  in  order  to  calculate  the distance from the beacon.  It can do this because it 
transmits interrogations at irregular intervals, ie the PRF is jittered, therefore the associated replies wil  always 
occur  at  a  regular  time  (t)  after  each  interrogation  (see  Fig  3).    Al   other  signals,  whether  they  are  random 
transmissions  or  replies  to  other  aircraft,  wil   be  received  at  varying  times  with  respect  to  each  interrogation.  
Once the correct replies have been identified, the strobe fol ows smal  variations in position of the reply pulses as 
the aircraft’s range changes – known as 'lock and fol ow'. 
7-7 Fig 3 Airborne Matching of Replies with Interrogations 
Interrogation Pulse Pairs
with Jittered PRF
Al  Received Pulses
t
t
t
t
Moving Strobe Locked to a Recurring Pulse Pair
14.  Interrogation Pulses.  The initial rate of the interrogation used by the airborne transmitter is 150 pp/sec.  
This wil  generate a high reply rate from the ground beacon which is used to 'lock-on' the airborne equipment.  In 
the airborne receiver, an automatic search strobe progressively examines smal  portions of the time base and 
counts the number of pulses occurring within a certain time.  If the number of pulses is low, the strobe advances 
to examine the next portion of the time base.  The search is stopped when the number of pulses received is 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
large (corresponding to the 150 pp/sec transmitted).  The distance calculation is made using the standard pulse 
radar technique and the PRF of the interrogation drops from 150 pp/sec to between 24 and 30; the system is 
now 'locked-on'. 
15.  Memory  Function.    The  memory  function  of  the  airborne  equipment  applies  a  'search  inhibit'  time  of 
approximately 10 seconds.  If replies are interrupted for less than the search inhibit time, the distance display wil  
be frozen by the memory circuit, and the search process wil  be inhibited.  If no replies are received after the 
search inhibit time has elapsed, the search cycle wil  recommence and the distance counters wil  rotate (or go 
blank on digital equipment) until new lock-on is achieved. 
Bearing Measurement by TACAN 
16.  The  system  described  so  far  applies  equal y  to  TACAN  and  DME  equipment.    However,  the  ground 
TACAN  beacon  provides  bearing  information  as  wel   as  range.    The  range  pulses  generated  by  the  ground 
beacon  are  of  constant  shape  and  amplitude.    In  order  to  convey  bearing  information  they  are  amplitude 
modulated by the aerial system.  As the beacon transmits 2,700 pp/sec, the modulation is carried as accurately 
as if a continuous wave (CW) carrier was used. 
17.  The beacon’s aerial system comprises a fixed central vertical aerial around which two concentric fibreglass 
drums rotate at 15 revolutions per second.  Embodied in the surface of the inner and outer drums respectively, 
are one vertical reflector and nine equal y spaced directors (see Fig 4). 
7-7 Fig 4 TACAN Ground Beacon Aerial System 
Fixed
Aerial
Single
Nine 
Reflector on
Direc tors on
Inner Drum
Outer Drum
Rotating 900 rpm
18.  The effect of the reflector is to offset the centre of the resultant polar diagram, as shown in Fig 5. 
7-7 Fig 5 Polar Diagram for Fixed Aerial and Reflector 
Polar Diagram
Rotating
Reflector
a
b
c
a
Fixed Aerial
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
Fig  6  shows  the  effect  of  rotating  the  inner  drum  through  360º.    It  can  be  seen  that,  at  any  one 
point, the amplitude of the received pulse varies through one sinusoidal cycle for each rotation of 
the  polar  diagram.    The  phase  of  the  received  signal  will  depend  on  the  relative  location  of  the 
receiver  from  the  transmitter.    Since  the  reflector  is  rotating  at  15  revolutions  per  second  (900 
rpm),  the  polar  diagram  will  also  rotate  at  the  same  rate,  generating  an  output  signal  amplitude 
modulated at 15 Hz. 
7-7 Fig 6 Amplitude Modulation due to Aerial Rotation 
Amplitude of
signal received 
a
b
a
c
a
by airc raft North
of Beac on
Aerial System Rotation
a
a
c
a
b
Aerial
a
a
b
a
c
Amplitude of
signal received 
a
a
b
a
by airc raft South
of Beac on
19.  In order to calculate a bearing, by utilizing the difference in the phase of the received signal due to 
location of the receiver, a fixed reference signal is needed.  This reference is supplied by the ground 
beacon transmitting a short train of 12 evenly-spaced 12-µsec pulse pairs each time the maximum of 
the polar-diagram passes through magnetic East. 
20.  The airborne receiver recognizes this distinctive pulse train, known as the Main Reference Burst 
(MRB), and measures the phase of the modulated signal relative to it, thereby computing the bearing 
(see  Fig  7).    As  the  MRB  is  transmitted  when  the  polar  diagram  peak  passes  magnetic  East,  if  the 
received reference signal coincides with the peak of the received modulated signals, then the aircraft is 
to  the  East  of  the  beacon.    In  practice,  it  is  easier  to  compare  the  position  of  the  reference  signal 
relative  to  the  zero  point  on  the  modulated  signal  (shown  by  a  black  dot  on  the  graphs  in  Fig  7).  
Relative  bearings  between  the  two  signals  for  aircraft  on  the  cardinal  bearings  from  the  beacon  are 
shown  in  Fig  7.    It  can  be  seen  that,  for  example,  the  position  to  the  East  of  the  beacon  shows  a 
bearing of 270º TO the beacon. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
7-7 Fig 7 Determination of Bearing by Phase Comparison 
180 o
Reference
Received
Signal (MRB)
Pulses
Magnetic
Aerial
North
System
Fixed
Rotation
90o
Aerial
a
270o
b
c
a
Reference
Signal (MRB)
Transmitted
000 o
as Maximum
Passes Magnetic East
Note:  There are two zero points on the sinusoidal wave for each complete cycle.  Electronic circuitry 
within  the  airborne  equipment  ensures  that  the  zero  point  which  occurs  as  the  signal  amplitude  is 
increasing is the one selected. 
21.  In the system described so far, there is a 1:1 relationship between the aircraft bearing and the phase 
of  the  received  signal,  ie  1º  of  phase  difference  corresponds  to  1º  of  bearing.    Therefore,  any  errors  in 
phase  difference,  caused  either  by  measurement  inaccuracies  or  phase  shifts  due  to  reflections  of  the 
signals, would have a direct, and major, effect on the computed bearing. 
22.  The  nine  directors  in  the  aerial’s  outer  rotating  drum  introduce  a  fine  bearing  facility  which 
improves  the  accuracy  of  the measured bearing.  As can be seen from Fig 8, the effect on the polar 
diagram of introducing the directors is to generate nine corresponding lobes.  When this complete aerial 
system is rotated 15 times per second, a further 135 Hz (9 x 15) modulation is superimposed on the 15 
Hz modulation as shown in Fig 9. 
7-7 Fig 8 TACAN Aerial Polar Diagram 
Direc tors
Reflector
Polar Diagram for
Complete Aerial System
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
7-7 Fig 9 Modulation Envelope 
135 Hz Modulation
15 Hz Modulation
Rec eived
Signal
Strength
40°
80°
120°
160°
200°
240°
280°
320°
360°
23.  As  can  be  seen  from  Fig  9,  one  complete  cycle  of  the  135  Hz  component  is  contained  within  a  40º 
phase change in the 15 Hz component, ie there are 9 cycles of the 135 Hz component for each cycle of the 
15 Hz component.  This means that there is now a 1:9 relationship between the aircraft’s bearing and the 
phase of the received 135 Hz signal; a change of 1º in phase of the signal representing only 1/9º bearing 
change.  Therefore, by using the 135 Hz signal, the effect on the accuracy of the measured bearing due to 
distortion of the received signal is reduced. 
24.  The  Auxiliary  Reference  Burst.    A  secondary  reference  signal,  of  six  12-µsec  pulse  pairs,  is 
transmitted when each of the nine maxima of the complete polar diagram passes through magnetic East; 
this  is  known  as  the  Auxiliary  Reference  Burst  (ARB).    These  ARBs  are  used  to  determine  the  aircraft’s 
bearing, since the position of the 135 Hz component relative to the reference signals is also a measure of the 
aircraft’s bearing from the ground beacon. 
25.  Bearing  Ambiguity.    Because  the  phase  of  the  135 Hz  component  changes  through  one 
complete cycle for each 40º change of bearing, the same phase difference could occur in any one 
of  the  nine  40º  sectors  around  the  beacon.    This  ambiguity  is  resolved  by  the  bearing  obtained 
from the 15 Hz component, ie the coarse bearing obtained from the MRB. 
26.  Fine  Bearing  Calculation.    Having  resolved  the  bearing  ambiguity,  the  fine  bearing  could  be 
taken  from  any  of  the  9  detector-generated  lobes,  as  they  should  all  be  the  same.    However,  to 
increase accuracy further, an average of the phase differences of the nine lobes is used.  This method 
is more accurate than relying upon one measurement. 
Beacon Identification 
27.  Coded  pulses  giving  a  two  or  three-letter  aural  callsign  in  Morse  Code  are  transmitted  every 
37.5 sec to identify the beacon. 
28. Unreliability Coding.  When an unserviceable beacon is required to transmit, eg for calibration, 
the  aural  identification  signal  is  followed  by  a  series  of  dots  (normally  five).    Bearing  and  distance 
information from a beacon coding in this manner should be regarded as unreliable. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
X and Y TACAN and DME Beacons 
29.  The ground equipment described so far is classified as an 'X' beacon (TACAN or DME).  In order 
to  increase  the  number  of  channels  from  126  to  252  within  the  same  frequency  allocation,  modified 
beacons known as 'Y' beacons are employed. 
30.  A  Y-type  ground  beacon  receiver  operates  on  the  same  frequency  as  an  X-type  ground  beacon 
receiver of the same channel number, but its transmitter frequency differs by 126 MHz.  To determine 
the receiver frequency for a given TACAN ground installation, add 1024 to the channel number; this will 
give the frequency in MHz.  For example, a channel 27 ground beacon receiver is tuned to 1051 MHz 
and  channel  70  receives  on  1094  MHz.    Setting  the  channel  number  on  the  aircraft  equipment 
determines the frequency of the airborne transmission, thereby selecting the ground station which will 
respond.  The ground station transmitter frequencies are determined as follows: 
a. 
Low Band.  The low band covers the frequency range 962 MHz to 1087 MHz (Channel Nos 
1 to 63).  X beacons in this band transmit on frequencies 63 MHz lower than the corresponding 
receiver  frequencies  whereas  Y  beacons  transmit  on frequencies 63 MHz higher, eg channel 
27X would transmit on 988 MHz (1051 minus 63) while channel 27Y would transmit on 1114 MHz 
(1051 plus 63). 
b. 
High  Band.    The  high  band  covers  the  frequency  range  1088  MHz  to  1213  MHz  (Channel 
Nos  64  to  126).    In  this  band,  the  differences  between  X  and  Y  types  are  reversed  in  that  X 
beacons transmit on frequencies which are 63 MHz higher than the receiver frequencies while Y 
beacons  transmit  on  frequencies  63  MHz  lower,  eg  channel  70X  transmits  on  1157  MHz  (1094 
plus 63), whereas channel 70Y transmits on 1031 MHz (1094 minus 63). 
31.  Normally, TACAN beacons have the suffix X or Y quoted in addition to the actual channel number, 
although  it  can  be  assumed  that  any  beacon  without  a  suffix  is  an  X  beacon.    DME  beacons  are 
distinguished  by  the  final  digit  of  the  VHF  frequency,  a  '5'  signifying  a  Y  beacon,  and  a  '0'  an  X 
beacon,  eg  114.15  is  a  Y  beacon  frequency  while  114.20  is  for  an  X  beacon.    The  other  major 
differences between X and Y beacons are: 
a.
Pulse  Pair  Time  Intervals.    The  time  interval  between  the  pulses  that  make  up  the  pulse 
pairs is different in X and Y beacons.  The X spacing is 12 µsec for both the beacon receiver and 
transmitter, whilst the Y beacon is designed to receive pulses with an interval of 36 µsecs and to 
transmit pulses with an interval of 30 µsecs. 
b.
Reply Delay Time.  The X beacon has a reply delay time of 50 µsecs and the Y beacon one 
of 74 µsecs.  The airborne equipment takes this delay into account when calculating slant range. 
c.
Main and Auxiliary Reference Bursts (TACAN only).  The MRB and ARB are different for 
X  and  Y  TACAN  beacons.    For  X  beacons,  the  MRB  consists  of  12  pulse  pairs  at  30  µsec 
intervals while Y beacons emit 13 single pulses at 30 µsec intervals.  The ARB for X beacons is 6 
pulse pairs at 24 µsec intervals but for Y beacons it is 13 single pulses at 15 µsec intervals. 
32.  In order to operate with a Y beacon the airborne equipment must be modified to: 
a. 
Produce the 36-µsec spaced pulse pairs. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
b. 
Select the appropriate receiver frequency (126 MHz different to the equivalent X channel). 
c. 
React to 30-µsec spread pulse pairs and ignore those spaced at 12 µsec from an X beacon. 
d. 
Compensate for the different Reply Delay Time. 
e. 
React to the different MRB and ARB and ignore those produced by an X beacon (TACAN only). 
33.  Details of TACAN channel allocation, and the corresponding VHF frequencies for setting on DME 
controllers,  are  shown  in  the  'Frequency  and  Channel  Pairing  Tables'  in  the  Flight  Information 
Handbook.    It  can  be  seen  from  these  tables  that  there  are  100  X  channels  and  100  Y  channels 
available  between  108.00  MHz  and  117.95  MHz.    In  addition,  there  are  a  further  26  X  channels  on 
frequencies  between  133.30  MHz  and  135.90  MHz.    As  some  older  VOR/DME  controllers  are 
physically  limited  to  selecting  frequencies  between  108  and  117.95  MHz,  they  can  not  access  the 
additional 26 channels.  This explains the entry in Table 1 under Channel Capacity. 
34.  The majority of the TACAN and DME beacons in use within the UK are of the X type; the number 
of Y types in use worldwide is steadily increasing. 
35.  Note that to use a TACAN airborne equipment with a beacon that has a channel number with a Y 
suffix  (TACAN)  or  with  a  DME  beacon  that  has  a  frequency  ending  in  a  5,  eg  115.35,  the  Y function 
must  be  selected.    For  an  airborne  DME  equipment  that  has  a  Y  capability,  dialling  the  appropriate 
VHF frequency is all that is required.  The X or Y function will be selected automatically. 
USE OF TACAN AND DME 
Navigational Use 
36.  The  maximum  range  of  TACAN  and  DME  primarily  depends  on  the  aircraft  height  since  radio 
waves in the 1,000 MHz band are quasi-optical in character, ie they are 'line-of-sight'. 
37.  Bearing.  Bearings generated by TACAN beacons are magnetic.  A TACAN ground beacon has a 
70º  cone  above  it  in  which  the  bearing  function  is  inoperative.    When  TACAN  bearing  information  is 
displayed,  the  arrowhead  of  the  needle  points  towards  the  beacon.    Therefore,  if  plotting  a  position 
from  the  beacon,  the  tail  end  of  the  needle  should  be  used,  as  this  will  give  the  reciprocal  magnetic 
bearing required. 
38.  Range.    It  should  be  remembered  that  the  distance  shown  on  the  airborne  equipment  is  slant 
range, not ground range, from the beacon. 
Interference 
39.  To  overcome  the  problem  of  possible  mutual  interference,  the  operational  requirement  for  each 
beacon  for  coverage  in  range  and  altitude  has  been  specified.    Each  ground  installation  has  been 
protected  against  interference  up  to  the  stated  range  and  altitude.   Outside this 'protected range and 
altitude', interference may occur and navigational information may be unreliable.  The protected ranges 
and altitudes of beacons are listed in Flight Information Publications. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
Accuracy 
40.  The  bearing  information  from  a  TACAN  system  should  be  accurate  to  ±  0.5º.    Distance 
measurements  for  TACAN  and  DME  are  accurate  to  ±  0.1  nm or ± 1% of the distance, whichever is 
the greater. 
Air-to-Air Mode 
41.  The  air-to-air  mode  of TACAN enables suitably equipped aircraft to measure the range between 
each other, up to a maximum of 195 nm; bearing information is not available.  The maximum number 
of interrogating aircraft to which one 'responder' can reply simultaneously is theoretically 33.  However, 
there  are  many  factors  which  degrade  theoretical  performance  and  it  is  impossible  to  state  precisely 
the maximum number of aircraft that can lock-on simultaneously in practice. 
42.  The  changeover  between  air-to-ground  and  air-to-air  operation  is  control ed  by  a  selector  switch  on  the 
airborne equipment.  This switch affects the way in which the signals are processed internal y and also changes 
the receiving frequency of the airborne equipment; transmitter frequencies are unaltered.  For channel numbers 
in the Low Band, receiver frequencies are increased by 126 MHz compared to the equivalent X channel in Air-
to-Ground mode, eg channel 27X in Air-to-Ground Mode would transmit on 1051 MHz and receive on 988 MHz 
whereas  setting  channel  27  in  Air-to-Air  mode  changes  the  receiver frequency to 1114 MHz (988 plus 126).  
Similarly,  for  channels  in  the  High  Band,  the  receiver  frequencies are lowered by 126 MHz compared to the 
equivalent  X  channel  in  Air-to-Ground  Mode,  eg  channel  90X  transmits  on 1114 MHz and would receive on 
1177 MHz in Air-to-Ground mode, whereas in Air-to-Air mode the receiver frequency becomes 1051 MHz (1177 
minus 126). 
43.  The importance of the changes to receiver frequency discussed in the previous paragraph can be seen 
when the practical issues of air-to-air operation are considered.  For mutual range between two aircraft to be 
available, the transmitter frequency of one aircraft must be the same as the receiver frequency of the other, 
and vice versa.  Therefore, in practice, the two aircraft must set TACAN channels whose numbers are 63 
part.  Using the examples in para 42, if one aircraft sets channel 27, its transmission will be on 1051 MHz 
and reception on 1114 MHz.  In the other aircraft, if the TACAN is set to channel 90 it will receive on 1051 
MHz and transmit on 1114 MHz.  The two aircraft are now matched, and each will receive range information 
from the other aircraft. 
44.  This method of mutual ranging has application in formation flying as well as air-to-air refuelling.  Fig 10 
shows how TACAN could be used in these circumstances.  If the formation leader sets channel 27 on his 
controller, and the other members of the formation select channel 90, then all members of the formation will 
get a readout of their individual range to the leader.  The leader will get an indication of distance to the aircraft 
whose signal is strongest, probably, although not necessarily, the closest one to him. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-7 - Principles of Tacan and DME 
7-7 Fig 10 Use of Air-to-Air TACAN in Formation 
Channel 90
Channel 90
Channel 90
Channel 90
Channel 27
Channel 90
Channel 90
TACAN Offset Computer 
45.  The addition of a TACAN offset computer to an airborne installation enables bearings and distances 
to be obtained from a point which is offset from the TACAN beacon. 
46.  The range and bearing of the offset point relative to the TACAN beacon are manually set on the 
computer  control.    The  computer  then  converts  the  range  and  bearing  into  electrical  signals  and 
transmits  them  to  the  navigation  display  where  they  are  added  to  the  direct  TACAN  signals.    The 
combination of signals causes the display to indicate the range and bearing to the offset point instead 
of to the TACAN beacon itself. 
Range Rate 
47.  The  Range  Rate  capability  shown  in  Table  1  for  DME  equipment  is  a  facility  available  on 
some  airborne  installations  whereby  the  aircraft’s  groundspeed  is  calculated  from  the  rate  of 
change  of  distance  to  a  DME  beacon.    The  feature  only  works  accurately  for  beacons  along  the 
aircraft’s  track,  and  depends  on  having  a  dedicated  microprocessor  to  perform  the  necessary 
calculations. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
CHAPTER 8 - GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) 
Introduction 
1. 
The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) is a US space-based radio positioning system, 
using  a  constellation  of  satellites  to  provide  highly  accurate  position,  velocity,  and  time  (PVT)  data.  
There are three major segments to the system; Space, Control and User (see Fig 1).  The system is 
available  globally,  continuously,  and  under  all  weather  conditions  to  users  at  or  near  the  Earth’s 
surface.    However,  the  signals  are  quasi-optical  and  there  must  be  a  direct  line  of  sight  between the 
satellites and the receiver aerial for full operation.  As the receivers operate passively there can be an 
unlimited number of simultaneous users.  GPS has features designed to deny an accurate service to 
unauthorized users, prevent spoofing and to reduce receiver susceptibility to jamming. 
7-8 Fig 1 Major Segments of GPS System 
SPACE 
CONTROL 
Monitor 
Stations
Ground 
Antennae
Master 
Control 
USER SEGMENT
2. 
Each  satellite broadcasts radio frequency ranging codes and a navigational data message.  The 
GPS  receiver  measures  the  transit  time  of  the  signals  and  can  thereby  determine  its  range  from  a 
satellite.  The data message enables the receiver to determine the position of the satellite at the time of 
transmission, and thus by ranging from 3 or more satellites a fix can be obtained. 
Space Segment 
3. 
The GPS space segment consists of 24 operational satellites (see Fig 2).  There is a continuing 
programme to replace and maintain the space segment to account for technical failures of satellites in 
service  and  faults  during  launch  so  this  figure  of  24  may  vary  slightly  as  new  and  failing  orbiters  are 
exchanged.  The satellites are in six orbital planes with three or four operational satellites in each orbit.  
The orbit height is 20,200 km and the orbital planes are inclined at an angle of 55º to the equator.  A 
satellite takes approximately 12 hours to complete an orbit.  The satellites are positioned such that at 
least 5 satellites are normally observable by a user anywhere on the Earth. 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
7-8 Fig 2 GPS Satellite Constellation 
19
7
6
12
16
21
20
1
10
17
5
15
23
13
2
22
24
14
18
9
3
11
4
8
4. 
The satellites transmit on two frequencies:  Link 1 (L1) on 1575.42 MHz and Link 2 (L2) on 1227.6 
MHz.    A  coarse/acquisition  code  (C/A)  is  transmitted  on  L1 and a precision code (P) on both L1 and 
L2;  either  code  can  be  used  by  a  receiver  to  determine  its  range  from  a  satellite.    Superimposed  on 
both  codes  is  the  NAVIGATION-message  (NAV-msg)  containing  accurate  satellite  orbit  data  (known 
as 'ephemeris data'), ionospheric propagation correction data, and timing information.  These aspects 
are covered more fully in later paragraphs. 
Control Segment 
5. 
The  control  segment  consists  of  one  Master  Control  Station  (MCS)  in  Colorado  Springs  (USA) 
together  with  additional  monitor  stations  at  Hawaii,  Kwajalein  (Western  Pacific), Diego Garcia (Indian 
Ocean),  and  Ascension  (S  Atlantic).    Additional  monitoring  stations,  operated  by  the  US  National 
Imagery  and  Mapping  Agency  (NIMA),  provide  increased  visibility  of  the  GPS  satellites  (see  Fig  3).  
The  monitoring  stations  on  Kwajalein,  Diego  Garcia,  and  Ascension  are  equipped  with  ground 
antennae for communication with the satellites.  The monitor stations passively track all GPS satellites 
in view, collecting ranging data which is passed to the MCS where each satellite ephemeris and clock 
parameters are estimated and predicted.  The MCS periodically uploads this data to each satellite for 
re-transmission in the NAV-msg. 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
7-8 Fig 3 GPS Control Segment Locations 
W
E
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
165 150
135 120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135 150
160
A
R
T
I
C
A
R
C
T
I
C     O
C
E
A
N
o
o
75
O C E A N
75
o
o
60
60
ENGLAND
o
o
45
NORTH AMERICA
45
COLORADO SPRINGS
o
A T L A N T I C
o
30
30
BAHRAIN
HAWAII
P A C I F I C 
CAPE CANAVERAL
o
o
N 15
O C E A N
15 N
o
P
A
C
I
F
I
C
O C E A N
o
0
I N D I A N
0
ECUADOR
O C E A N
o
o
S 15
15
S
o
O
C
E
A
N
o
30
30
o
o
45
ARGENTINA
AUSTRALIA
45
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
165 150
135 120
105
90
75
60
45
30
15
0
15
30
45
60
75
90
105
120
135 150
160
W
E
Master Control Station
Ground Antenna 
Monitor Station 
NIMA Monitoring Station
User Segment 
6. 
The  user  segment  comprises  a  wide  variety  of  military  and  civilian  GPS  receivers  which  can 
decode and process the satellite signals.  The receivers may be 'stand alone' sets, or part of integrated 
systems,  and  can  serve  a  variety  of  applications  such  as  navigation  and  surveying.    Receivers  for 
different applications can vary significantly in their design and function. 
Levels of Service 
7. 
Two levels of navigation accuracy are provided by the GPS: the Precise Positioning Service (PPS) 
and  the  Standard  Positioning  Service  (SPS).    The  PPS  is  a  highly  accurate  positioning,  velocity,  and 
timing  service  which  is  made  available  only  to  authorized  users,  whereas  the  SPS  is  a less accurate 
service available to all GPS users. 
8. 
Precise  Positioning  Service  (PPS).    The  PPS  is  primarily  intended  for  military  users  and  the 
authorization  for  use  is decided by the US Department of Defense.  Authorized users include the US 
and  NATO  military  and  the  Australian  Defence  Forces.    The  PPS  is  specified  to  provide  a  16  metre 
Spherical  Error  Probable  (SEP)  (3-D,  50%)  positioning  accuracy  and  100  nanosecond  UTC  time 
transfer accuracy.  This equates to approximately 37 metres and 200 nanoseconds (3-D, 95%) under 
typical  system  operating  conditions.    Depending  on  receiver  design  it  is  possible  to  obtain  a  3-D 
velocity accuracy of 0.1 metres per second.  A selective availability (SA) feature may be used to reduce 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
the GPS PVT accuracy to unauthorized users by introducing controlled errors into the signals.  The SA 
level of degradation can be varied and might, for example, be increased in time of crisis or war to deny 
accuracy  to  a  potential  enemy.    An  anti-spoofing  (A-S)  feature  is  invoked  to  negate  potential  hostile 
imitation  of  PPS signals.    The  technique  alters  the  P  code  cryptographically  into  a  code  denoted  as 
P(Y) code.  Encryption keys and techniques are provided to PPS users which allow them to remove the 
effects  of  the  SA  and  A-S  features.    PPS  receivers  can  use  either  the  P(Y)  or  the C/A code or both.  
Maximum  accuracy  is  obtained  using  the  P(Y)  code  on  both  L1  and  L2.   The difference in propagation 
delay between the two frequencies is used to calculate ionospheric corrections.  P(Y) capable receivers 
commonly use the C/A code initially to acquire GPS satellites and determine the approximate P(Y) code 
phase although some P(Y) receivers are able to acquire the P(Y) code directly by using a precise clock.  
Some  PPS  receivers  use  only  one  frequency,  L1,  and  in  this  case  they  use  an  ionospheric  model  to 
calculate  corrections.    Typically  this  will  result  in  less  positioning  accuracy  than  dual  frequency  P(Y) 
receivers (approximately 65 metres (3-D, 95%) accuracy). 
9. 
Standard  Positioning  Service  (SPS).    The  SPS  is  primarily  intended  for  civilian  use  and  is 
specified to provide a 100 metre (95%) horizontal positioning and 156 metre 3-D (95%) accuracy.  UTC 
time  dissemination  accuracy  is  within  340  nanoseconds.    The  accuracy  specification  includes  the 
degradation of SA which is the dominant source of error.  SPS users can only access the L1 frequency 
and  therefore  cannot  measure  the  propagation  delays  of  L1  and  L2  signals  in  order  to  determine 
ionospheric  corrections.    Typically,  therefore,  an  SPS  receiver  uses  only  the  C/A  code  and  an 
ionospheric  model  to  calculate  corrections,  which  is  a  less  accurate  technique  than  measuring  dual 
frequency propagation delays.  The accuracy specification also includes this modelling error source. 
Receiver Operation 
10.  In  order  for  the  GPS  receiver  to  navigate,  it  has  to  acquire  and  track  satellite  signals  to  make 
range and velocity measurements, and to collect the NAV-msg data.  Because the clocks in the GPS 
receivers  are  not  synchronized  with  system  time  there  is  a bias in the ranges actually measured and 
they are termed pseudo-ranges. 
11.  Satellite Signal Acquisition.  The satellite signal level near the Earth is less than the background 
noise, therefore correlation techniques are used by the GPS receiver to obtain the navigation signals.  
A typical satellite tracking sequence begins with the receiver determining which satellites are visible for 
it to track.  Satellite visibility is based on the user-entered estimates of present PVT and stored satellite 
almanac  information.    If  no  stored  data  exists  or  if  only  very  poor  estimates  of  position  and  time  are 
available the receiver must search the sky in an attempt to locate randomly and lock on to any satellite 
in  view.    If  the  receiver  can  estimate  satellite  availability  it  will  target  a  satellite  to  track.    Once  one 
satellite has been acquired and tracked the receiver can demodulate the NAV-msg and read almanac 
information about all of the other satellites in the constellation.  The receiver has a carrier-tracking loop 
which is used to track the carrier frequency and a code-tracking loop which tracks the C/A and P code 
signals.  The two tracking loops work together in an iterative process in order to acquire and track the 
satellite signals. 
12.  Carrier  Tracking.    The  receiver’s  carrier-tracking  loop  generates  an  L1  carrier  frequency  which 
differs from the received carrier signal due to a Doppler shift.  This Doppler offset is proportional to the 
relative velocity along the line of sight between the satellite and the receiver, plus a residual bias in the 
receiver frequency standard.  The carrier signal strength is lower than the background and so has to be 
code  correlated  by the code-tracking loop in order to be seen through the noise.  The carrier-tracking 
loop  adjusts  the  frequency  of  the  receiver-generated  carrier  until  it  matches  the  incoming  carrier 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
frequency  and  thereby  determines  the  relative  velocity  between  the  receiver  and  the  satellite  being 
tracked.  The receiver uses the velocity relative to four satellites being tracked to determine its velocity in 
the navigation reference frame.  The velocity output of the carrier-tracking loop is used to aid the code-
tracking loop. 
13.  Code  Tracking.    The  code-tracking  loop  is  used  to  make  pseudo-range  measurements  between 
the receiver and satellites.  The receiver’s code tracking loop generates a replica of the targeted satellite’s 
C/A code with estimated ranging delay.  The phase of the replica code is compared with the phase of the 
received signal code and the difference is directly proportional to the pseudo-range between the receiver 
and satellite.  In general, prior to tracking, the receiver-generated code will not correlate with the received 
code due to the time taken for the satellite signal to reach the receiver and the receiver’s clock bias error.  
The  receiver  will  therefore  slew  its  generated  code  through  a  one-millisecond  cycle  search  window  to 
achieve C/A code tracking.  However, in the case of the P code, every week each satellite is allocated a 
different  7-day  portion  of  a  267-day-long  code  and  an  approximate  P  code  phase  must  therefore  be 
known in order to obtain signal lock.  Information on the P code phase is contained in the NAV-msg and 
the  receiver  uses  this  data,  together  with  the  C/A  code-derived  pseudo-range  to  minimize  the  P  code 
search window.  It is feasible for a P code receiver to acquire the P code without first acquiring the C/A 
code, but this requires a good knowledge of the receiver position and a very good knowledge of the GPS 
time; an external atomic clock would usually be required. 
14.  Navigation.    When  the  receiver  has  acquired  the  satellite  signals  from  four  GPS  satellites, 
achieved  carrier  and  code  tracking,  and  has  read  the  NAV-msg,  the  GPS  receiver  is  ready  to  start 
navigating.    The  GPS  receiver  normally  updates  its  pseudo-range  and  relative  velocities  once  every 
second.    The  next  step  is  to  calculate  the  receiver  position,  velocity,  and  GPS  system  time.    Each 
satellite signal includes its time of transmission in GPS time, and the receiver must determine system 
time  very  accurately  in  order  to  measure  the  reception  of  signals  in  the  same  time  reference.    The 
difference  in  these  times  is  directly  proportional  to  the  actual  range  between  receiver  and  satellite.  
However,  it  is  not  necessary  for  the  receiver  to  have  a  highly  accurate  clock such as an atomic time 
standard.    Instead  a  crystal  oscillator  is  used  and  the  receiver  computes  its  offset  from  GPS  system 
time  by  making  four  pseudo-range  measurements  which  are  used  to  solve  four  simultaneous 
equations with four unknowns.  Once solved the receiver has estimates of its position and GPS system 
time.    The  receiver  velocity  is  calculated  using  similar  equations  with  relative  velocities instead  of 
pseudo-ranges.    GPS  receivers  perform  most  calculations  using  an  Earth  centred,  Earth  fixed  co-
ordinate  system  which  is  subsequently  converted  to  a  geographic  co-ordinate  system  using  an  Earth 
model (World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 84)).  During periods of high jamming the receiver may not 
be  able  to  maintain  both  code  and  carrier  tracking,  although  it  will  normally  be  able  to maintain code 
tracking even when carrier tracking is not possible.  If this is the case the receiver will slew the locally 
generated  carrier  and  code  signals  based  on  predicted  rather  than  measured  Doppler  shifts.    These 
predictions  are  performed  by  the  navigation  processor  which  may  have  additional  PVT  information 
from other sources. 
Types of GPS Receiver 
15.  There are four types of GPS receiver: sequential tracking, continuous tracking, multiplex and 'All-
in  View'.    The  following  descriptions  apply  to  P  code  receivers  which  use  dual  frequency 
measurements  to  determine  ionospheric  corrections.    C/A  code  receivers  are  essentially  the  same 
except that they use a model of the ionosphere to determine corrections. 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
Sequential Tracking Receivers 
16.  A sequential receiver tracks the necessary satellites by using one or two hardware channels.  The 
set  will  track  one  satellite  at  a  time  and  combine  all the four pseudo-range measurements once they 
have been made.  These receivers are amongst the cheapest available but cannot operate under high-
speed scenarios and have the slowest time to first fix. 
17.  A P code, one-channel, sequential receiver makes four pseudo-range measurements on both the 
L1  and  L2  frequencies  in  order  to  determine  a  position  and  compensate  for  ionospheric  delay.    The 
search  for  a  satellite,  code  correlation,  NAV-msg  reading,  data  demodulation  and  ionospheric 
measurement is accomplished for each satellite in turn and the four pseudo-ranges must be corrected 
to a common time before a navigation solution can be achieved.  Any movement of the vehicle during 
the time taken by the receiver to collect the pseudo-ranges will result in a degradation of the navigation 
solution.    The  use  of  one-channel  sequential  receivers  is  therefore  limited  to  low  speed  or  stationary 
applications. 
18.  Two-channel sequential receivers have been developed for use on medium speed vehicles such as 
helicopters.    During  the  initial  power-up  each  channel  operates  like  a  one-channel  sequential  receiver.  
Once four satellites have been acquired one channel is dedicated to navigation while the other reads the 
NAV-msg  from  each  satellite.    Both  channels  are  used  to  perform  dual  frequency  measurements  to 
compensate for ionospheric delay.  Two-channel sequential receivers decrease the time it takes to start 
navigating by better than one minute compared to one-channel sequential receivers. 
Continuous Tracking Receivers 
19.  A  continuous  tracking  receiver  must  have  at  least  four  hardware  channels  in  order  to  track  four 
satellites simultaneously.  GPS receivers are available with up to 12 channels, but, due to their greater 
complexity, multiple channel sets involve proportionally higher costs.  Four and five channel sets offer 
suitable performance and versatility, tracking 4 satellites simultaneously; a five-channel receiver uses 
the fifth channel to read the NAV-msg of the next satellite to be used when the receiver changes the 
satellite  selections.    The  fifth  channel  is  also  used  in  conjunction  with  each  of  the  other  four  for  dual 
frequency measurements.  A continuous tracking receiver is the best for high-speed vehicles such as 
fighter aircraft and those requiring a short time to first fix such as submarines.  It also exhibits a good 
anti-jamming performance. 
Multiplex Receivers 
20.  A  multiplex  receiver  switches  at  a  fast  rate  (typically  50  Hz)  between  the  satellites  being  tracked, 
continuously  collecting  sampled  data  to  maintain  two  to  eight  signal  processing  algorithms  in  software.  
The NAV-msg data is read continuously from all the satellites.  For a receiver tracking four satellites this 
results  in  the  equivalent  of  eight  channels  delivering  20  parameters  continuously;  four  L1  code phases, 
four L2 code phases, four L1 carrier phases, four L2 carrier phases, and four NAV-msgs.  Four pseudo-
ranges, four velocities and the ionospheric delay can be derived from these twenty parameters. 
'All-in-View' Receivers 
21.  GPS receivers traditionally choose the four satellites of those available which give the best geometry 
to  perform  a  position  fix.    However,  in  situations  where  one  or  more  of  the  satellites  are  temporarily 
obscured from the antenna’s view, the receiver will have to acquire additional satellite signals to generate 
a PVT solution.  The solution will be degraded until the new satellite is acquired.  In order to overcome this 
problem  a  receiver  can  be  designed  to  use  all  available  satellites  in  view,  typically  six  or  seven,  to 
generate  the  solution.    If  one  or  two  satellites  are  then  lost  from  view  there  will  be  little  or  no  loss  of 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
accuracy.  The receiver will need a channel for each satellite or will have to use a multiplex technique with 
the attendant penalties of increased hardware, weight, power consumption and cost. 
Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) 
22.  The incorporation of a datalink with a GPS receiver enables the transmission of aircraft location to 
other  aircraft  and/or  air  traffic  control.    This  function,  called  ADS,  is  in  use  in some Oceanic regions.  
The  key  benefit  is  to enable ATC monitoring in regions where radar services are not available.  ADS 
has potential use in many other monitoring situations, including ground control of aircraft and vehicles 
at airfields. 
Differential GPS (DGPS) 
23.  GPS  provides  a  worldwide  navigational  facility  which  is  extremely  accurate  when  compared  to 
systems  previously  available  to  the  aviator.    However,  it  remains  subject  to  system  errors  which  will 
affect the precision at user level.  These errors include: 
a. 
Selective Availability (see para 8). 
b. 
Ionospheric delay to signal propagation, as a result of solar activity (this is also a function of 
time of day). 
c. 
Tropospheric delay to signal propagation, caused by moisture in the lower atmosphere. 
d. 
Satellite  ephemeris  error,  which  is  the  difference  between  actual  and  predicted  satellite 
location. 
e. 
Satellite Clock Error. 
24.  The  method  chosen  to  minimize  some  of  these  errors  is  through  'differencing'.    This  concept 
requires use of a ground reference station, surveyed to a high level of accuracy.  The reference station 
receives the GPS signals, and calculates the difference between GPS and surveyed positions (see Fig 
4).  The reference station then computes corrections and transmits them to the user via UHF or data 
link.  The corrections are applied to the GPS signal at the user receiver.   
7-8 Fig 4 The Principle of Differential GPS 
GPS Satellites
DGPS 
User 
Receiver
Surveyed Antenna
Correction Terms
UHF 
Reference 
GPS Receiver
Transmitter/Receiver
Computer
Ground Reference Station
Revised Sep 12   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
25  Where  a  single  reference  site is used, the improved user accuracy will degrade with range from 
that reference station.  DPGS systems can compensate for accuracy degradations over large areas by 
employing a network of co-ordinated reference receivers. 
26.  A list of Differential GPS (DGPS) reference stations, with their stated area of cover, is contained in 
RAF FLIPs.  In addition to the permanent stations, DGPS reference stations can be portable, and thus 
transported to operational areas.  Outside of DPGS cover user equipment usually reverts to working as 
a 'normal' GPS receiver. 
Integrated Navigation Systems 
27.  Although  extremely  accurate,  GPS  should  not,  be  regarded  as  a  perfect  stand-alone  navigation 
system.    The  aviator  who  relies  solely  on  GPS  is  putting  himself  in  potential  danger,  therefore 
traditional cross-checking of position is essential. 
GPS Geodetic Datum 
28.  The  US  GPS  works  on  the  WGS  84  geodetic  datum,  as  mentioned  in  para  14.    Users  must  be 
aware that plotting positions obtained from a GPS receiver on a map based on any coordinate system 
other than WGS 84 will introduce errors of varying magnitude (see Volume 9, Chapter 2). 
Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) 
29.  ICAO  defines  a  system  that  contains  one  or  more  satellite  navigation  systems  as  a  global 
navigation satellite system (GNSS). 
30.  The  US  NAVSTAR  system  remains  the  most  important  and  reliable  GNSS,  and  improvements 
have been ongoing since full operational capability was declared in 1995.  The system is now capable 
of  much  improved  accuracies  due  to  better  system  monitoring  of  both  clocks  and  ephemeris  data.  
Moreover,  GPS  satellites  are  deliberately  positioned  in  the constellation to give improved accuracy in 
desired locations.  PPS accuracies of 3m are now achievable.  Table 1 shows revised accuracy figures 
for the SPS service, as at 2001. 
Table 1 SPS Accuracy (Revised 2001) 
Global Average 
Worst Site 
2 Sigma Accuracy (m) 
Horizontal 

15 
Vertical 

26 
2 Sigma Availability (%) 
Horizontal 
99.5% at 15m 
92% at 15m 
Vertical 
99.5% at 26m 
92% at 26m 
2 Sigma Time (ns) 
Not specified 
20 
31.  Russia  has  a  satellite  navigation  system,  Global’naya  Navigatsionnaya  Sputnikovaya  Sistema 
(GLONASS).    GLONASS  is  similar  in  concept  to  the  US  GPS,  but  differs  in  several  major  technical 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-8- Global Positioning System (GPS) 
aspects.    Furthermore,  whereas  GPS  works  on  the  WGS  84  datum,  GLONASS  works  on  the  PZ-90 
datum.  The difference between the two geodetic datum systems must be considered (typically, 5 to 15 
metres). 
32.  The  GPS  and  GLONASS  systems  can  be  used  in  combination,  with  suitable  dual-capable 
receivers, to give the user an improved satellite availability.  This first generation of satellite navigation 
systems, along with performance enhancements such as DGPS, is sometimes referred to as GNSS-1. 
33.  A  planned  European  augmentation  system  for  GNSS-1,  known  as  the  European  Geostationary 
Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS), will provide differential positioning over wide areas.  In addition, 
the  European  Commission  is  working  towards  the  development  of  a  second  generation  regional 
GNSS, called Galileo. 
Revised Sep 12   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
CHAPTER 9 - PRINCIPLES OF INERTIAL NAVIGATION 
Introduction 
1. 
In  an  inertial  navigation  system  (INS),  velocity  and  position  are  obtained  by  continuously 
measuring and integrating vehicle acceleration.  Inertial navigation systems are self-contained and are 
capable  of  all-weather  operation.    In  early  systems,  the  sensors  were  mounted  on  gyro-stabilised 
platforms.  Modern systems use 'strapdown' technology where the sensors are mounted directly to the 
airframe and corrections applied digitally.  Both systems are discussed in this chapter. 
BASIC PRINCIPLES 
Acceleration 
2. 
The  basis  of  inertial  navigation  is  the  measurement  of  a  vehicle’s  (aircraft’s)  acceleration  along 
known directions.  Accelerometers detect and measure accelerations along their sensitive axes (input 
axes).  The accelerometer outputs are integrated, once to obtain velocity along the sensitive axis, and 
again to obtain distance travelled along the sensitive axis. 
3. 
Relationship  between  Acceleration,  Velocity  and  Distance.    The  velocity  achieved  and  the 
distance travelled by a vehicle accelerating from rest at a constant rate are obtained from the following 
equations: 
v = at, and s = ½ at2
where, 
a = acceleration  
v = velocity  
s = distance  
t = time 
Aircraft accelerations are not constant, and must be integrated to obtain velocity and distance: 
v =  ∫ a d
. t , and 
s =  ∫ ∫ a d
. t, or s = ∫ d
.
v t
The  basic  principle  of  inertial  navigation  is,  therefore,  the  double  integration  of  acceleration  with 
respect to time (Fig 1). 
7-9 Fig 1 Principle of Inertial Navigation 
a
Integrator
V
Integrator
S
Accelerometer
∫a.dt
∫v.dt
4. 
Measurement  Axes.    Acceleration  must  be  measured  along  two  axes,  usually  orthogonal,  if 
vehicle velocity and displacement are to be defined in a given plane.  Since most accelerometers are 
designed  to  measure  acceleration  along  one  axis  only,  two  accelerometers  are  required  for  inertial 
navigation  in  a  two  dimensional  plane.    In  aircraft  systems,  the  accelerometers  are  usually  mounted 
with their input axes aligned with North and East, and this alignment must be maintained if the correct 
accelerations  are  to  be  measured.    Moreover,  the  sensitive  axes  must  be  kept  perpendicular  to  the 
gravity  vertical,  otherwise,  the  accelerometers  sense  part  of  the  gravity  acceleration.    The  reference 
frame  defined  by  these  directions,  i.e.  local  North,  local  East  and  local  Vertical,  is  called  the  Local 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 1 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Vertical  Reference  Frame.    Other  reference  frames  can  be  used,  but  the  local  vertical  is  the 
fundamental mechanization and is the one primarily considered in this chapter. 
5. 
Gyro Stabilization.  Once the accelerometers have been aligned in the chosen reference frame, 
they must be capable of maintaining that orientation during aircraft manoeuvres.  The accelerometers 
are  therefore  mounted  on  a  platform  which  is  suspended  in  a  gimbal  system  that  isolates  the 
accelerometers  from  aircraft  manoeuvres.    However,  this  platform  is  not  inherently  stable,  and  any 
tendency  for  the  platform  to  rotate  with  the  aircraft  must  be  detected  and  opposed.    Gyros  are 
therefore  mounted  on  the  platform  to  detect  platform  rotation  and  control  platform  attitude.    Three 
single  degree  of  freedom  gyros  are  normally  used;  one  gyro  detects  rotation  about  the  North  axis, 
another rotation about East, and the third rotation about the vertical.  The platform rotations detected 
by the gyros are used to generate error signals, proportional to change in platform attitude, which are 
used to motor the platform back to its correct orientation. 
6. 
Effect  of  Earth  Rotation  and  Vehicle  Movement.    An  INS  operating  in  the  local  vertical 
reference frame must maintain its alignment relative to  Earth directions.   The gyros used to stabilize 
the platform are rigid in space and must therefore be corrected for Earth rate and transport wander to 
make them 'Earth stable'.  Additionally, the accelerometers must be corrected for the effects of coriolis 
acceleration and the central acceleration caused by flying around a rotating spherical Earth. 
7. 
Platform  Control.    The  platform  control  unit  computes  and  applies  the  gyro  and  accelerometer 
correction terms from calculated values of groundspeed and latitude, and stored values of Earth radius and 
Earth rotation rate. 
8. 
Simple INS.   A simple INS, capable of solving the  navigation problem, is illustrated  in Fig  2.    A 
third  vertically  mounted  accelerometer  must  be  added  if  vertical  velocity  is  required,  eg  in  weapon 
aiming  applications.    Conventionally,  velocity  North  is  annotated  'V',  velocity  East  'U',  Latitude  'φ', 
Earth rate 'Ω' and the radius of the Earth 'R'.  Other annotations are self-explanatory and the individual 
INS components are discussed in detail in the following paragraphs. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 2 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 2 A Simple Inertial Navigation System 
a (East Acceleration)
East
Accelerometer
East
Gyro
Azimuth
Platform
Gyro
Gyro
North
C
A
o
Accelerometer
c
r
C
c
r
e
e
o
c
rr
le
t
r
i
e
o
c
o
n
t
m
s
io
e
)
n
te
n
North
s
r
tio
Gyro
ra
le
e
c
c
A
rth
o
A
(N
C
c
Gyro
o
c
a
r
e
Corrections
re
le
c
r
t
o
io
m
Gyro Corrections
n
e
s
ter
∫a. dt
PLATFORM
∫a. dt
CONTROL
(V)
(U)
(V)
(U)
∫v. dt
∫u. dt
R

Ch Lat
Eastings
Lat (φ)
LATITUDE
SECANT GEAR
Ch Long
LONGITUDE
ACCELEROMETERS 
Basic Principles 
9. 
The accelerometer is the fundamental component of an INS.  Its function is to sense acceleration (a) 
along its input axis and to provide an electrical output proportional to sensed acceleration.  The spring and 
mass arrangement illustrated in Fig 3 shows the basic principles.  If the instrument is accelerated along its 
longer  axis,  the  mass  will  move  relative  to  its  neutral  position  until  the  spring  tension  balances  the 
displacing force.  The deflection of the mass is proportional to the acceleration.  A pick-off system could be 
arranged to provide an electrical output that was the analogue of the acceleration. 
10.  An  inertial  grade  accelerometer  requires  a  wide  dynamic  range  (typically  ±  25  g),  a  high 
sensitivity (typically 1 × 10-6 g), and a linear response.  These requirements cannot be accommodated 
in the simple accelerometer of Fig 3.  High sensitivity could be achieved by the use of weak springs, 
but  this  would  necessitate  long  springs  to  achieve  the  required  range  and  the  resulting  instrument 
would be too large for use in a practical INS.  Alternatively, strong springs could be used to achieve a 
wide range but this would preclude high sensitivity. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 3 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 3 Simple Spring and Mass Accelerometer 
11.  A number of accelerometer designs have been developed to overcome these shortcomings.  Some 
of these designs are more suitable for applications other than aircraft, e.g. ballistic missile systems.  In 
aircraft applications, the 'Pendulous Force Balance Accelerometer' is the most common type. 
Pendulous Force Balance Accelerometer 
12.  A  basic  pendulous  force  balance  accelerometer  is  shown  schematically  in  Fig  4.    With  the  case 
horizontal and the instrument at rest or moving at a constant velocity, the pendulous mass is central and no 
pick-off current flows.  When the instrument is accelerated along its sensitive axis the pendulous mass is 
deflected and the deflection is sensed by the pick-off.  A current flows through the restorer coils such that a 
force  is  exerted  on  the  displaced  mass  to  restore  it  to  the  central  position.    The  initial  deflecting  force  is 
proportional to the acceleration experienced since the mass is constant (F = ma).  The restoring force is 
proportional  to  the  current  through  the  restorer  coil  and  is  equal  and  opposite  to  the  initial  force,  ie  the 
restorer  current  is  proportional  to  the  acceleration.    The  pendulous  mass  is  free  to  move  only  along  the 
sensitive axis and accelerations perpendicular to this axis have no effect. 
13.  Instead of the flexure support system, the pendulous element may be floated.  The element has 
its centre of mass displaced from the centre of buoyancy, thus producing a couple in the presence of a 
linear acceleration. 
7-9 Fig 4 Basic Pendulous Force Balance Accelerometer 
Permanent (Torquer) Magnets
N
S
Restoring
Output
(Torquer)
Pendulum
V 
o
a
 Coils
Excitation Coils
Sensitive
(Input) Axis
Pendulous Accelerometer Errors 
14.  Cross-coupling.  The accelerometer is sensitive to accelerations along an axis perpendicular to, 
and  in  the  plane  of,  the  pendulum.    If  the  pendulum  is  displaced  from  the  null  position,  either  by  an 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 4 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
acceleration or by tilting of the platform, then the sensitive axis no longer coincides with the designed 
fixed  input  axis.    Fig  5  shows  the  situation  where  the  pendulum  has  been  displaced  through  a  small 
angle,  θ.    The  input  (sensitive  axis)  IA  is  rotated  through  the  same  angle.    If  the  instrument  is 
accelerated along the displaced axis, the acceleration will have horizontal and vertical components ax 
and ay and the measured acceleration will be: 
ax cos θ + ay sin θ
If θ is small and measured in radians this becomes: 
ax + ay θ
The acceleration that should have been measured is ax and the term ay θ is an error known as cross-
coupling error.  It should be noted that when the input axis is displaced from the horizontal it will sense a 
component of the acceleration due to gravity.  Cross-coupling error can be minimized by ensuring that 
the accelerometer platform is maintained horizontal and by using a high gain feedback loop so that the 
displacement of the pendulum due to accelerations is kept small.  Alternatively, the error (ay θ) can be 
calculated and corrected. 
7-9 Fig 5 Cross-coupling Error 
ax
θ
θ
a
ay
x cosθ
θ
ay sin θ
Null
15.  Vibropendulosity.    When  an  accelerometer  is  operated  in  a  vibration  environment,  below  the 
natural frequency of the accelerometer loop, components of the vibration may act along the input axis 
causing the pendulum to deflect and thus register erroneous accelerations. 
16.  Displaced  Orientation.    Accelerometers  are  arranged,  mutually  at  right  angles,  to  measure 
accelerations in specific directions, normally North and East.  If the platform is misaligned as in Fig 6 
and  accelerated  in  a  North/South  direction,  the  north  sensitive  accelerometer  will  not  detect  the  full 
acceleration and the east accelerometer will detect an unwanted component. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 5 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 6 Accelerometer Misaligned 
Platform
Misalignment
Angle
rtee
rth m
o
ro
N le
E
e
A
a
c
c
s
c
t
e
c
lero
A
meter
Recorded by
North Acceleration
North Accelerometer
Vector
Recorded by
 East Accelerometer
Performance Characteristics 
17.  Accelerometers  are  required  to  give  an  accurate  indication  of  vehicle  acceleration  over  a  wide 
range of accelerations.  Fig 7 shows a typical accelerometer response, and indicates the performance 
parameters  usually  referred  to  in  technical  descriptions.    The  straight  blue  line  represents  the  ideal 
response  from  the  instrument,  i.e.  a  linear  relationship  between  the  actual  acceleration  and  the 
indicated acceleration.  The green curved line represents the actual response; the red line is the 'best-
fit' straight line to this curve. 
a. 
Bias.  Bias is the  electrical output  under conditions of no acceleration input due  to residual 
internal  forces  acting  on  the  mass  after  it  has  been  electrically  or  mechanically  zeroed.    Bias  is 
expressed  as  an  equivalent  error  in  'g's  and  is  usually  less  than  1  ×  10-4g.    An  INS  can  be 
designed to compensate for known accelerometer bias provided the bias is stable. 
b. 
Scale Factor.  Scale factor is the ratio of the change in output to a unit change in input (in units 
of  acceleration).    It  is  usually  expressed  in  millivolts  or  milliamps  per  g  (mV/g  or  mA/g).    In  Fig  7, 
scale  factor  is  the  slope  or  gradient  of  the  straight  lines (y/x).    In  some  technical  literature,  scale 
factor is referred to as 'sensitivity', although some manufacturers use sensitivity to mean change in 
output as a result of secondary or unwanted inputs. 
c. 
Linearity.    Linearity  error  is  defined  as  the  deviation  from  the  best-fit  straight  line  drawn 
through  a  plot  of  the  electrical  output  in  response  to  a  known  acceleration  input.    Typically  this 
would be in the order of 5 × 10-5g up to 1g and less than 0.01% of applied acceleration at higher g 
levels. 
d. 
Threshold.    Threshold  is  the  minimum  acceleration  input  which  causes  an  accelerometer 
electrical  output.    It  is  equivalent  to  scale  factor  (or  sensitivity)  but  with  an  incremental  change 
about a zero input.  A typical value is 1 × 10-6g. 
e. 
Null  (Zero)  Uncertainty.    Null  uncertainty  is  also  known  as  bias  uncertainty  and  is  the 
variation in accelerometer output under conditions of zero acceleration input.  The random drift of 
the accelerometer output at zero acceleration input is known as null (zero) stability. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 6 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 7 Accelerometer Performance Parameters 
Linearity
)
Error
V
m
Actual
'Best-fit'
r
o
Response
Straight Line
A
(m
n
tio
y
ra
esponse
x
le
e
c
c
Ideal R
A
d
y
te
a
x
ic
d
In
Bias
Actual Acceleration (g)
INTEGRATORS 
Function of the Integrator 
18.  The accelerometer outputs are integrated to obtain velocity and again to obtain distance.  The initial 
integration  may  be  carried  out  within  the  accelerometer  or  by  a  separate  integrating  device.    The 
accelerometer output may be in voltage analogue form if analogue techniques are used, or pulse form if 
digital techniques are used. 
Analogue Integrators 
19.  Analogue integrators are normally electronic or electro-mechanical.  Electronic integrators are more 
accurate,  but  are  capable  of  integrating  continuously  for  only  limited  periods  of  time.    The  electro-
mechanical integrators are less accurate, but can integrate indefinitely. 
Digital Integrators 
20.  Many  inertial  systems  use  digital  computers  and  therefore  digital  integration  techniques.    A  digital 
computer integrates by adding small increments of the quantity to be integrated.  As the computer will be 
dealing  with  discrete  quantities  instead  of  continuous  values,  there  will  be  a  certain  amount  of 
approximation in the integration process.   
Revised Apr 14    
Page 7 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
GYROSCOPES 
Terms 
21.  The following terms are included for clarification: 
a.
Degrees of Freedom.  In the convention used throughout this chapter, the gyro rotor axis is 
not counted as a degree of freedom, since it cannot be a sensitive axis.  A free or space gyro is 
therefore defined as a two degree of freedom gyro. 
b. 
Gyro Drift.  The term gyro drift describes any movement of the gyro spin axis away from its 
datum direction. 
c. 
Levelling  Gyros.    Gyros  which  control  the  platform  about  the  horizontal  axes  are  called 
levelling or vertical gyros, irrespective of the direction of their spin axes. 
22.  Inertial Quality.   A  gyro  is  described  as  being of  inertial quality  when  the real drift rate  is  0.01º  per 
hour or less.  Such low drift rates were first achieved with single degree of freedom rate-integrating gyros. 
Single Degree of Freedom (SDF) Gyros 
23.  Rate-integrating Gyro.  The rate-integrating gyro achieves its accuracy by reducing gimbal friction: 
the gimbal and rotor assemblies are floated in a fluid.  A typical floated rate-integrating gyro is illustrated in 
Fig 8; the rotor is pivoted in an inner can (gimbal), which in turn is floated in an outer can.  The outer can 
contains  all  the  controls,  pick-offs,  torquers  and  heaters,  etc.    Rotation  of  the  gyro  about  the  input 
(sensitive) axis causes the gyro inner can to precess about the output axis, ie there is relative motion 
between  the  inner  and  outer  cans.    This  precession  is  sensed  by  the  pick-offs  which  measure  the 
angular  displacement  of  the  inner  can  relative  to  the  outer  can.    Thus,  the  pick-off  output  is 
proportional  to  the  time  integral  of  the  input  turning  rate.    This  output  signal  is  used  to  drive  the 
platform  gimbals  to  maintain  the  platform  in  the  required  orientation.    The  ratio  of  output  to  input 
(gimbal gain) is a function of rotor mass, gimbal size and fluid viscosity.  A high ratio enables the gyro 
to  detect  small  input  rates.    However,  the  fluid  viscosity  varies  with  temperature.    Temperature must 
therefore be controlled to ensure a constant gimbal gain.  With this type of gyro, it is also important to 
limit  the  inner  can  precession;  as  the  inner  can  precesses,  the  rotor  and  the  input  axes  are  also 
precessed.    Unless  this  precession  is  rapidly  detected  and  opposed  (the  gimbal  drives  the  platform 
and  the  gyro  in  opposition  to  the  input),  cross-coupling  errors  are  likely  to  occur.    A  cross-coupling 
error is caused by the gyro sensing a rotation about a displaced input axis. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 8 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 8 Typical SDF Floated Rate-integrating Gyro 
Viscous Fluid
Rotor
Pick-off and
Input Axis  
Torquer
Fluid Expansion
Bellows
Output
Axis
Inner Can
Inner Can
Spin Axis
Pivot
Two Degree of Freedom (TDF) Gyros 
24.  Two  degree  of  freedom  gyros  are  used  in  some  IN  applications.    SDF  and  TDF  gyros  have 
comparable performances, but the TDF gyro has the advantage of being able to detect movement about 
two  axes.  Since the INS  monitors motion about three axes,  two TDF gyros  are not  only sufficient,  but 
also supply a redundant axis; the spare axis is normally utilized to monitor azimuth.  The two TDF gyros 
must have their spin axes at right angles to each other; both axes may be horizontal, or alternatively one 
horizontal and the other vertical. 
Comparison of Single and Two Degree of Freedom Gyros 
25.  The single and two degree of freedom gyros are compared in Table 1. 
7-9 Table 1 Comparison of SDF and TDF Gyros 
Property 
SDF 
TDF 
Number required in IN 
Three 
Two (one redundant axis) 
platform 
Gyro gain 
Normally controlled by fluid 
Output = input 
viscosity 
Cross-coupling 
Limited rotor axis movement 
No cross-coupling - angular 
minimizes cross-coupling 
displacement is measured 
against fixed input axis 
Vehicle movement 
Detected by rotor axis movement 
Detected by gimbal axis 
detection capability 
movement 
Accuracy 
0.003º/hr to 0.1º/hr 
As for SDF 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 9 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Pick-offs and Torquers 
26.  Angular movement about a gyro’s sensitive axis is detected by pick-offs which generate electrical 
signals  proportional  to  the  movement.    The  action  of  the  torquers  is  virtually  the  reverse;  electrical 
signals proportional to the desired correcting torque are applied to the torquers which cause the gyro 
to precess at the desired rate.  The pick-offs and torquers are usually of the induction type, and may 
be separate devices or combined in a single unit; in the latter type, the pick-off would use AC and the 
torquer DC to avoid interaction between the fields. 
PLATFORM STABILIZATION 
Gyro Control of the Platform 
27.  Platform  Mounted  Accelerometers.    The  accelerometers  are  mounted  on  a  platform  which  is 
oriented  to  a  fixed  reference  frame.    The  platform  is  aligned  with  the  desired  reference  frame  and 
subsequently controlled to maintain its alignment. 
28.  Choice of Reference Axes.  A fundamental aircraft INS is aligned in the local vertical reference 
frame,  the  axes  of  which  are  shown  in  Fig  9.    Basic  stabilization  procedures  are  described  for  this 
simple  system,  but  in  practice,  RAF  aircraft  with  a  stable  platform  INS  use  a  modified  local  vertical 
reference  frame  known  as  a  Wander  Azimuth  System.    These  systems  allow  the  azimuth  gyro  to 
wander,  and  the  IN  computer  continually  transforms  position  in  the  wander  azimuth  frame  to  the 
required Earth-fixed co-ordinates. 
29.  Platform  Alignment.    Inertial  platforms  are  aligned  in  attitude  and  azimuth.    Any  platform 
misalignment will cause errors. 
7-9 Fig 9 Local Vertical Reference Frame 
N
Z
N
(Y)
E
(X)
Equator
S
30.  Use  of  Gyros.    The  desired  platform  orientation  is  maintained  by  mounting  reference  gyros  on 
the  platform  to  detect  changes  in  platform  alignment.    The  gyro  outputs  are  used  to  drive  gimbal 
motors which return the platform to its correct orientation. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 10 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
31.  Platform  Arrangement.    The  platform  may  be  arranged  as  shown  in  Fig  10.    The  three  gyros 
have their input axes mutually at right angles and aligned with the local vertical reference frame.  The 
error  pick-offs  and  torquers  are  built  into  the  gyro  cases  and  are  not  shown  in  the  diagram.    The 
platform is gimbal mounted to permit the aircraft freedom of manoeuvre without disturbing the platform 
away from its alignment with the local vertical reference frame.  Each gimbal is driven by a servomotor 
controlled by the error signals from the gyros. 
7-9 Fig 10 Platform Arrangement (Aircraft Heading North) 
Azimuth Gyro
Platform
East Gyro
Pitch Axis
Roll Motor
V
North Gyro
Heading
N
N Accelerometer
E
E Accelerometer
Pitch 
Motor
Roll Axis
Azimuth
Motor
Vertical Axis
32.  Control  on  North.    The  gyros  in  Fig  10  are  arranged  with  their  sensitive  axes  pointing  in  the 
directions about  which rotation is to be detected.  The East gyro has its sensitive axis pointing  East, 
and  is  therefore  capable  of  detecting  rotation  about  East.    On  northerly  headings,  pitch  manoeuvres 
are  detected  by  the  East  gyro  which  generates  an  error  signal.    This  error  signal  activates  the  pitch 
gimbal,  thereby  maintaining  the  platform’s  alignment  with  the  reference  frame.    Similarly,  roll  is 
detected  by  the  North  gyro,  and  yaw  by  the  azimuth  gyro:  the  North  gyro  activates  the  roll  gimbal 
motor, and the azimuth gyro the yaw gimbal motor.  The action is summarized in Table 2. 
7-9 Table 2 Action on North 
Sensing 
Correcting 
Heading
Manoeuvre 
Gyro
Servomotor
Yaw 
Azimuth 
Azimuth 
North 
Pitch 
East 
Pitch 
Roll 
North 
Roll 
33.  Control  on  East.    In  Fig  11,  the  same  platform  is  again  shown,  this  time  heading  East.    The 
action on East is summarized in Table 3. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 11 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Table 3 Action on East 
Sensing 
Correcting 
Heading
Manoeuvre
Gyro
Servomotor
Yaw 
Azimuth 
Azimuth 
East 
Pitch 
North 
Pitch 
Roll 
East 
Roll 
7-9 Fig 11 Platform Arrangement (Aircraft Heading East) 
Vertical Axis
Roll Axis
Pitch Axis
V
East 
Gyroscope
North
Gyroscope
Platform
E
East 
N
Accelerometer
North
Pitch Motor
Accelerometer
Roll Motor
Azimuth
Motor
AircraftFrame
34.  Conclusions.  Two main conclusions may be drawn from Tables 2 and 3: 
a. 
Yaw,  or  change  of  heading,  is  corrected  by  the  azimuth  servomotor  which  is  always 
controlled by the azimuth gyro. 
b. 
Pitch and roll are corrected by the pitch and roll servomotors respectively.  However, the control 
may be exercised by either the North or the East gyros or both, dependent upon aircraft heading. 
35.  Change of Heading.  The action of the azimuth gyro and servomotor keeps the platform aligned 
with the North datum.  However, the pitch and roll gimbals remain oriented to the aircraft pitch and 
roll axes (Figs 10 and 11).  Relative motion about the vertical between the platform and the pitch and 
roll  gimbals  is  yaw,  and  angular  displacement  is  change  of  heading.    A  pick-off  of  the  angular 
displacement relative to true North as defined by the platform, produces an output of heading. 
36.  Control  During  Manoeuvres.    On  northerly  headings,  the  North  gyro  senses  roll  and  wholly 
controls  the  roll  servomotor;  on  easterly  headings  the  East  gyro  controls  the  roll  servomotor.    On 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 12 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
intermediate headings, the control is shared between the North and East gyros, the amount of control 
exercised  being  determined  by  the  heading.    A  sine-cosine  resolver,  set  by  the  azimuth  servomotor, 
determines  the  amount  of  control  and  transmits  the  error  signal  to  the  appropriate  servomotor.    The 
action is shown in Fig 12. 
7-9 Fig 12 Gimbal Control Signals 
Azimuth
Gimbal
Azimuth
M
Gyro
Heading
Pitch
Gimbal
North
M
Gyro
Sin/Cos
Resolver
Roll
Gimbal
East
M
Gyro
PLATFORM MOUNTING 
Gimballed Systems 
37.  The  stable  element  of  the  inertial  platform  is  mounted  in  gimbals  to  isolate  the  platform  from 
vehicle  manoeuvres.    The  two  types  of  gimbal  system  in  common  use  are  the  three-gimbal  system 
and the four-gimbal system. 
38.  Three-gimbal  System.    Figs  10  and  11  are  diagrams  of  a  three-gimbal  system.    In  such  a 
system, there are three input/output axes, azimuth, pitch and roll.  Each gimbal imparts freedom about 
one particular axis, the particular gimbal being named after that axis. 
a.
The Gimbals.
(1) Azimuth Gimbal.  The stable element is rigidly attached to the azimuth, or first, gimbal.  
In allowing relative motion between the stable element and the pitch gimbal, the platform is 
isolated from vehicle movement about the vertical axis. 
(2) Pitch Gimbal.  The pitch gimbal isolates the platform from pitch manoeuvres. 
(3)  Roll Gimbal.  The roll gimbal isolates the platform from roll manoeuvres. 
In some installations, the pitch and roll gimbals are reversed in order of position. 
b. 
Gimbal  Lock.    Gimbal  lock  occurs  when  two  axes  of  rotation  become  co-linear  and,  as  a 
result,  one  degree  of  freedom  is  lost.    Fig  13  illustrates  how  gimbal  lock  can  occur  in  a  three-
gimbal  system.    If  the  vehicle  pitches  through  90º  the  first  and  third  gimbal  axes  become 
coincident, and the platform stable element is no longer isolated from yaw. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 13 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 13 Gimbal Lock 
Fig 13a  Straight and Level Flight
Fig 13b  Pitch and Roll Gimbals Coincident
Yaw
Pitch Gimbal
Roll Gimbal
Azimuth Gimbal
Azimuth Gimbal
Aircraft
Fore and
90°
Aft Axis
Pitch
Pitch Gimbal
Roll Gimbal
Aircraft Fore 
and Aft Axis
Axes Co-linear
Roll
c. 
Gimbal Error.  In a three-gimbal system (gimbal order; Azimuth, Pitch and Roll) the roll gimbal 
axis, which is parallel to the aircraft roll axis, assumes an angle relative to the plane of the platform 
stable element whenever the aircraft pitches through large angles.  When this occurs, the gimbal roll 
axis and the plane of the levelling gyros’ input axes are no longer parallel.  Should the aircraft now roll, 
the gyros sense only a component of roll angle (roll × cos pitch angle), and the roll servo displaces the 
roll gimbal by an amount (roll × cos pitch angle) instead of the full value of roll angle. 
39.  Four-gimbal  System.    In  a  four-gimbal  system,  the  order  of  the  gimbals  is  azimuth,  inner  roll, 
pitch and outer roll. 
a. 
Gimbals.    The  fourth  gimbal  is  introduced  to  keep  the  second  and  third  gimbals  at  right 
angles, thereby avoiding both gimbal lock and gimbal error.  The fourth gimbal is controlled by a 
pick-off which detects changes in the angle between the second and third gimbals. 
b. 
Gimbal  Flip.    With  a  four-gimbal  system,  heading  change  is  picked  off  from  the  relative 
motion between the azimuth and inner roll gimbals.  If, however, the aircraft completes a half loop 
and roll-out manoeuvre, the aircraft heading changes by 180º but there is no motion between the 
azimuth  and  inner  roll  gimbals,  and  the  indicated  heading  remains  unchanged.   This  problem  is 
overcome  by  employing  gimbal  flip.    As  the  pitch  angle  passes  through  90º,  the  outer  gimbal  is 
driven through 180º (ie flips), tending to drive the platform through 180º about the vertical.  This 
tendency  is  detected  by  the  azimuth  gyro  which  provides  an  appropriate  output  signal.    This 
signal keeps the platform correctly orientated by driving the platform in opposition to the flip.  One 
hundred  and  eighty  degree  relative  motion  is  produced  between  the  azimuth  and  inner  roll 
gimbals and the heading output remains correct. 
40.  Comparison of Three- and Four-gimbal Systems.  A four-gimbal system is heavier, larger and 
costs more than a three-gimbal system.  However, since the second and the third gimbals of the four-
gimbal  system  are kept  at  right  angles,  the  aircraft  has  full  freedom  of manoeuvre  without  disturbing 
the platform. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 14 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Non-gimballed Systems - Strapdown Systems 
41.  In  gimballed  systems,  the  accelerometers  are  mounted  on  a  stable  platform  which  is  kept  in  the 
correct  orientation  by  torqueing  in  response  to  signals  from  the  gyroscopes  detecting  movement  about 
three orthogonal axes. 
42.  In a strapdown system (Fig 14), the inertial sensors are fixed to the vehicle and their orientation 
within  the  navigation  reference  frame  is  computed  using  the  outputs  of  gyroscopes  which  detect 
angular displacement about the aircraft axes.  Thus in a strapdown system the gimbals are effectively 
replaced by a computer.  Although a strapdown mechanization is more demanding technically in terms 
of  computing  and  gyroscope  performance,  it  is  potentially  cheaper,  more  reliable  and  more  rugged 
than a gimballed system. 
7-9 Fig 14 Strapdown System Block Diagram 
Angular
Angular Rate 
Gyros
Rates
Converter
Vehicle
Orientation
Axial
Co-ordinate
Accelerometers
Accelerations
Converter
Directional
Accelerators
Latitude
Position
Altimeter
Inertial
Vector
Computer
Displacement
Solver
Longitude
43.  Gyroscopes.  In a strapdown system, the function of the gyroscope is to measure accurately angular 
changes about a specific  axis  of rotation.  This requires a  very  wide range  of performance,  as  the  gyros 
may  well  need  the  capability  to  detect  rotation  rates  ranging  from  0.001º/hr  to  400º/sec.    Although 
conventional gyros could be used for strapdown applications, gyros with no moving parts are better suited  
44.  Computing Requirements.  The main computing task in a strapdown system is to compute the 
instantaneous  aircraft  attitude  and  to  resolve  and  integrate  the  accelerometer  outputs  to  obtain 
velocity information in a useful geographic reference frame.  These calculations need to be carried out 
at very high speed and accuracy.  Whereas in a gimballed system the platform reference frame rotates 
relatively slowly due to transport wander and Earth rate, in a strapdown system the platform reference 
frame, i.e. the airframe, can be rotating at very high rates.  The integration process must therefore be 
carried out very rapidly to avoid large errors being induced; an iteration rate of 200 Hz would be typical 
and a dedicated microprocessor may be required. 
45.  Reference  Frames.    The  platform  reference  frame  in  a  strapdown  system  is  the  same  as  the 
airframe and is therefore of no use for navigation.  However, an advantage of this configuration is that 
outputs  can  be  used  for  an  automatic  flight  control  system.    Strapdown  systems  commonly  use  a 
space-referenced  frame  for  the  navigation  solutions  and  then  convert  to  a  geographic  frame  to  give 
the  desired  outputs  of  position  and  velocity.    Fig  14  shows  the  functional  layout  of  a  typical  system.  
The outputs of the accelerometers are resolved along the space axes and the cartesian co-ordinates 
of the aircraft position within the space frame calculated.  These are then converted to the geographic 
frame to give latitude and longitude. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 15 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
CORRECTIONS TO INERTIAL SENSORS 
Introduction 
46. It is normal to navigate aircraft with reference to the local Earth co-ordinates of latitude, longitude and 
height.  Aircraft INS are therefore normally aligned as described in para 29; each of the 3 axes of the local 
vertical  reference  frame  has  an  accelerometer  to  detect  movement  along  it  and  a  gyro  to  provide 
stabilization  against  rotation  around  it.    Accelerometers  and  gyros  are  both  inertial  devices  in  that  their 
sensitive axes extend infinitely in straight lines; in other words, they operate with reference to the constant 
axes  of  inertial space.    Local  vertical axes  however  are  not constant.   For an  aircraft system using  local 
vertical Earth co-ordinates, it is therefore necessary to change the orientation of the platform axes relative 
to inertial space in order that the accelerometers are kept aligned with the local vertical axes.  This means 
that the stabilizing effect of the gyros must be adjusted by the rates at which local vertical axes diverge from 
inertial  axes.    These  rates  are  due  to  Earth  rotation  and  vehicle  movement  as  shown  in  Table  4.    The 
changing orientation of the platform also makes corrections to the accelerometer outputs necessary. 
7-9 Table 4 Platform Correction Terms 
Earth Rate
Vehicle Movement
U
North Gyro 
Ω cos φ
R
V
East Gyro 
zero 
− R
U
Azimuth Gyro 
Ω sin φ
tan φ
R
47.  It  is  now  necessary  to  analyse  Earth  and  transport  rates  into  components  affecting  the  local 
vertical  axes.    These  are  the  rates  which  are  applied  to  the  platform’s  axes  to  correct  it  from  inertial 
space stabilization to local vertical stabilization.  The method used in the following discussion is that of 
vector analysis.  A rate of rotation is represented by a vector shown parallel to the axis of the rotation.  
Its length is proportional to the rate of rotation and its direction is the direction an ordinary right hand 
threaded  screw  would  move  if  subjected  to  the  rotation  in  question.    This  is  shown  in  Fig  15  which 
shows the Earth’s rotation vector.  The vector is parallel to the Earth’s spin axis, its length represents 
15.04º/hr (Ω) and its direction is from South to North. 
7-9 Fig 15 Earth’s Rotation Vector 

15.04°/hr
Revised Apr 14    
Page 16 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Gyro Corrections 
48.  Earth  Rate  ().    The  Earth’s  rotation  vector  may  be  analysed  into  components  acting  about  the 
local vertical axes at any point on the Earth’s surface.  The component acting about local East is always 
zero because local East is always at 90º to the rotation vector.  At the poles, the rotation vector coincides 
with the local vertical axis, and at the equator it coincides with the local North axis.  This means that an 
INS not corrected for Earth rotation will appear to drift, but not topple, at the pole; whereas at the Equator 
it  will  topple  about  local  North  but  not  drift.    Fig 16  shows  how  the  Earth  rotation  rate  is  resolved  into 
vector components acting about local North and local vertical axes at intermediate latitudes. 
7-9 Fig 16 Earth Rate Vector Components 

Ω cos φ
Ω sin φ
 
Local North Axis
φ
Local Vertical
Axis
φ
49.  Transport Rates.  Fig 17 shows that any movement around the circumference of a circle equates 
to  a  rotation  about  the  centre  of  the  circle.    The  angle  θ,  in  radians,  is  found  by  dividing  the 
circumferential distance A-B by the radius of the circle.  Similarly, the rate of rotation may be found by 
dividing the rate of movement from A to B by the radius.  The axis of the rotation is perpendicular to 
both the radius and the tangent, ie, normal to the surface of the page. 
7-9 Fig 17 Circular Movement 
A
θ
θ
B
Revised Apr 14    
Page 17 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Fig  18  shows  how  a  total  aircraft  velocity  vector  Vg  may  be  resolved  with  North  and  East 
V
components.    Component  V  produces  a  rotation  rate  of 
  radians/hr  about  an  axis  parallel  to  the 
R
local  East  axis  and  through  the  centre  of  the  Earth;  (where  V  is  in  knots  and  R  is  the  radius  of  the 
Earth in nautical miles). 
7-9 Fig 18 Components of Velocity Vector 
NP
V
Vg
U
Component  U,  however,  acts  along  a  parallel  of  latitude,  ie  a  small  circle;  U  therefore  produces  a 
U
rotation rate of 
 about the Earth’s polar axis as shown in Fig 19. 
R cos φ
7-9 Fig 19 Rotation Rates 
U
R cos φ
U
U
× cos φ =
R cos φ
R
φ
R cos φ
U
× sin φ
φ
R cos φ
U tan φ
R
=
φ
R
φ
This  rate  must  be  resolved  into  rates  about  the  local  North  and  local  vertical  axes,  U and  U tan
R
R
respectively, before it can be applied to the IN platform.  This is achieved using the same analysis by 
vectors  as  was  used  for  Earth  rate,  for  the  axis  of  rotation  is  the  same:  the  Earth’s  spin  axis.    The 
quantities arrived at by this analysis are in radians per hour; they may be approximated to degrees per 
hour by substituting 60 for R in the final expressions. 
50.  Correction Method.  The drift due to the error rate is eliminated by applying an equal and opposite 
correction to the gyro output axis.  The correction is applied through a torque motor on the gyro output axis, 
which turns the gyro about its output axis at the same rate but in the opposite direction to the precession 
caused by the error rate. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 18 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Accelerometer Corrections 
51.  Stabilizing a platform to local Earth axes requires that it be rotated relative to a spatial reference in 
order  to compensate for the effects of Earth rotations  and vehicle movement.  The resulting change  in 
the local axes relative to spatial references makes two types of accelerometer corrections necessary: 
a.
Central or Centripetal Acceleration.  A body moving at a constant speed v in a circle radius r 
v2
has  a  constant  acceleration  of 
directed  towards  the  centre  of  the  circle.    This  is  a  central  or 
r
centripetal acceleration and affects a local vertical INS because as the platform is transported over 
a spherical surface it is rotated to maintain its alignment with local North and the local vertical. 
b.
Coriolis Acceleration.  Coriolis acceleration results from the combination of aircraft velocity 
and  the  rotation  of  the  Earth  over  which  it  flies.    A  lateral  acceleration  relative  to  inertial 
references  is  necessary  to  make  good  a  desired  track  measured  against  meridians  which  are 
themselves in motion. 
52.  Central Accelerations.  At any instant when an INS is moving over the Earth’s surface it is moving 
Vg2
along an arc of a great circle.  An acceleration of 
therefore affects the vertical accelerometer where 
R
Vg is along track velocity and R is the radius of the Earth.  Pythagoras’ theorem enables us to convert this 
V2 + U2
term  to  its  component  form 
  and  thus  make  use  of  the  1st  integrals  of  the  North  and  East 
R
channels  accelerations.    This  quantity  as  a  correction  must  be  added  to  the  output  of  the  vertical 
accelerometer.  (See note at end of para 57).  Central acceleration corrections must also be applied to the 
horizontal accelerometers because of meridian convergence.  Any East component of velocity acts along a 
U2
small circle of latitude whose radius is R cos φ.  There is thus a central acceleration of 
 along this 
R cos φ
radius, that is, along an axis inclined at φ to the local vertical.  This is shown in Fig 20. 
7-9 Fig 20 Axis of Central Acceleration 
NP
Local Vertical
  Axis of
R cos φ
 
φ
  Central
φ
U2
Acceleration
R cos φ
φ
53.  Resolution  of  Total  Acceleration.    Because  of  this  inclination,  the  total  acceleration  may  be 
resolved  by  vector  analysis  into  two  components,  one  affecting  the  North  accelerometer  and  the  other 
2
the  vertical  accelerometer.    These  are  shown  in  Fig  21.    The  component  U   is  contained  within  the 
R
U2 tan φ
vertical  accelerometer  correction  already  discussed.    The  acceleration  component 
  however, 
R
must  be  subtracted  from  the  output  of  the  North  accelerometer  because  it  is  caused  entirely  by  an 
Eastward motion.  This apparent contradiction arises because while 'East' is a constant direction in terms 
of navigation over the surface of the Earth, it is a direction which constantly changes with respect to the 
fixed  axes  of inertial space.  We thus have an  Eastward  velocity component producing an  output from 
the North accelerometer; this must be removed for purposes of navigation. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 19 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
7-9 Fig 21 Components of Central Acceleration 
2
2
U sin φ
U tan φ
=
R cos φ
R
Local North
Local
Vertical
U2
φ
R cos φ
2
2
U cos φ
U
=
R cos φ
R
54.  Application.    Now  consider  an  aircraft  flying  a  great  circle  track  at  a  constant  groundspeed.    The 
track  angle  is  constantly  changing  and,  therefore,  so  are  U  and  the  North  accelerometer  correction.    In 
order that a constant total velocity vector results, the output of the East accelerometer must be adjusted in 
inverse proportion to the North accelerometer correction.  The horizontal accelerometer central corrections 
thus  produce  varying  V  and  U  components  of  total  velocity  as  track  angle  changes  relative  to  the 
converging  meridians.    Table  5  shows  that  if  there  is  no  East  component  of  velocity  there  is  no  central 
correction to either horizontal axis.  If there is no North component, only the North accelerometer correction 
is  applied,  as  discussed  earlier.    In  addition,  the  magnitude  of  the  corrections  to  the  horizontal 
accelerometers increases as latitude increases, ie as meridian convergence increases. 
55.  Coriolis  Acceleration.    An  aircraft flying  a constant  track over  a spherical rotating  Earth follows  a 
path  which  is  curved  relative  to  the  constant  axes  of  inertial  space.    As  shown  in  para  46,  there  is  a 
component of Earth rotation which acts about the local vertical axis.  This component, Ω sin φ, varies with 
latitude.  An observer may thus be regarded as being at the centre of a rotating disc of Earth’s surface; the 
direction of rotation being anti-clockwise when viewed from above, in the Northern hemisphere.  An aircraft 
flying towards a given point on the horizon is therefore flying to a destination which is moving constantly to 
the left.  A straight track over the ground thus produces a track which is curved relative to a constant spatial 
direction;  this  can  only  be  achieved  if  there  is  a  sideways  acceleration.    This  acceleration  is  the  Coriolis 
effect and is detected by the horizontal accelerometers.  It must, however, be removed if the system is to 
produce  navigation  information  which  is  correct  relative  to  Earth  co-ordinates.    A  similar  correction  is 
applied  to  the  vertical  accelerometer  because  of  the  component  of  Earth  rotation  acting  about  the  local 
North horizontal axis.  The corrections are given below: 
a. 
−2Ω U sin φ applied to the North accelerometer. 
b. 
2Ω V sin φ applied to the East accelerometer. 
c. 
2Ω U cos φ applied to the Vertical accelerometer. 
56.  Gravity  Corrections.
When  a  third  accelerometer  is  used  in  the  vertical  channel  to  measure 
vertical  acceleration  for  weapon  aiming  purposes  its  sensitive  axis  will  necessarily  be  in  line  with  the 
gravity  vector;  the  accelerometer  will  sense  the  acceleration  due  to  gravity  as  well  as  aircraft  vertical 
acceleration.    Its  output  must  therefore,  be  corrected  for  gravity,  in  addition  to  coriolis,  and  centripetal 
accelerations.  Because the gravity acceleration decreases as the distance from the centre of the Earth 
increases, the correction is dependent on aircraft altitude.  The correction is given by: 
2h

go 
− 
1
 R

where go is the standard gravity at the surface of the Earth and h is the aircraft altitude. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 20 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 -7-9  Principles of Inertial Navigation 
Summary 
57.  The gyro and accelerometer correction terms are summarized in Table 5. 
7-9 Table 5 Gyro and Accelerometer Terms 
Gyros
Accelerometers
Transport 
Axis 
Earth Rate 
Central 
Coriolis 
Gravity 
Wander
U
− U2 tan φ
North 
Ω cos φ
−2ΩU sin φ
nil 
R
R
V
UV tan φ
East 
nil 

2Ω V sin φ
nil 
R
R
Azimuth/ 
U
U2 + V2
2h

Ω sin φ
tan φ
2ΩU cos φ
go 
− 
1
Vertical 
R
R
 R

Note: In the Southern Hemisphere, the signs of the azimuth gyro correction terms are reversed.  
That is, Earth rate (Ω) and velocity East (U) are negative. 
Revised Apr 14    
Page 21 of 21 Pages 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
CHAPTER 11 - INS ERRORS AND MIXED SYSTEMS 
Schuler Tuning 
1. 
When  a  pendulum  is  accelerated,  the  bob  lags  behind  the  suspension  point  in  the  opposite 
direction  to  the  acceleration  (Newton’s  First  Law).    When  the  acceleration  stops,  the  pendulum 
oscillates with a period (T) equal to: 
L
T  =  2π 
g
where: 
T is in seconds, 
 
 
L is the length of the pendulum in feet 
 
 
g is the gravity acceleration in feet/second2
2. 
The Earth Pendulum.  Imagine a pendulum whose bob lies at the Earth’s centre.  If the suspension 
point  were  accelerated  around  the  Earth,  the  bob  would  remain  vertically  below  the  suspension  point 
because it is at the Earth’s centre of gravity.  A platform mounted on the suspension point tangential to the 
Earth’s surface, ie horizontal, would therefore remain horizontal irrespective of the acceleration experienced.  
The vertical defined by the normal to the platform is therefore unaffected by acceleration.  If, for any reason, 
the  bob  on  the  Earth  pendulum  became  displaced  from  the  Earth’s  centre,  the  pendulum  would  start  to 
oscillate.  The oscillation period would be 84.4 minutes (obtained by substituting the Earth radius in feet for L 
in the equation in para 1). 
3. 
The Platform Pendulum.  The INS stable element is maintained normal to the local vertical by feeding 
back  the  aircraft’s  radial  velocity  as  levelling  gyro  control  signals,  and  in  this  way  the  north  and  east 
accelerometers  are  prevented  from  detecting  components  of  the  gravity acceleration.  The control signals 
V
U
are  the 
  and 
  terms  for  vehicle  movement  (transport  wander)  applied  as  shown  in  Fig  1.    By 
R
R
mechanizing  the  platform  to  remain  horizontal,  an  analogue  of  the  Earth  pendulum  of  period  84.4 
minutes  is  produced.    Should  the  platform  be  displaced  from  the  horizontal  it  would  oscillate  with  a 
period  of  84.4  minutes.    This  period  is  known  as  the  Schuler  period  after Dr Maximilian Schuler who 
discovered  the  properties  of  the  Earth  pendulum.    A  platform  is  said  to  be  'Schuler  Tuned'  if  its 
oscillation period is 84.4 minutes. 
7-11 Fig 1 Schuler Tuning 
To Second
a
V or U
Integrator
Accelerometer
w
Platform
Gyro
1
R
V
U
or
R
R
ERRORS 
Error Sources 
4. 
The following errors affect inertial navigation systems: 
a. 
Initial levelling error. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
b. 
Accelerometer error. 
c. 
Integrator error. 
d. 
Levelling gyro drift. 
e. 
Initial azimuth misalignment error. 
f. 
Azimuth gyro drift. 
g. 
Vertical channel errors. 
5. 
Bounded Errors.  Errors originating in, or effective within, the Schuler loops, are oscillatory and 
propagate  at  the  Schuler  frequency.    These  errors,  which  oscillate  about  a  constant  mean  and 
therefore do not grow continuously with time, are termed bounded errors. 
Initial Levelling Error 
6. 
Oscillation.    No  matter  how  carefully  the  stable  element  (platform)  and  its  sensors  are  aligned, 
there  is  always  some  residual  error  in  the  vertical,  ie  the  platform  is  not  completely  level.    When  the 
'navigate' mode is selected (at the conclusion of the alignment phase) the following  sequence  takes 
place.  (Note: The lettering of the sub-paragraphs corresponds with the lettering in Fig, 2): 
a. 
The  accelerometer  detects  the  component  of  gravity,  gΦo  (strictly  gsin  Φo  but  the 
approximation is correct for small angles and Φo expressed in radians).  Following the convention 
that  clockwise  tilts  produce  positive  acceleration,  gΦo  is  sensed  as  a  positive  acceleration.    The 
integration of the accelerometer output takes a finite time, and therefore, velocity and distance are 
zero at the instant the 'navigate' mode is selected. 
b. 
The  integration  of  the  detected  acceleration  produces  a  positive  velocity  which  drives  the 
platform  anti-clockwise  to  the  horizontal.    The  accelerometer  now  detects  zero  acceleration,  but 
the positive velocity continues to drive the platform. 
c. 
After the platform passes the horizontal the accelerometer detects the opposite gravity effect, 
sensed as a negative acceleration.  The positive velocity reduces to zero at angle Φo (the original 
tilt  error)  and  for  an  instant  the  platform  drive  stops.    However,  the  negative  acceleration  is 
integrated into negative velocity which drives the platform clockwise. 
d. 
The  clockwise  drive  brings  the  platform  once  again  to  the  level  position,  resulting  in  zero 
output  from  the  accelerometer.    However,  the  negative  velocity  continues  to  drive  the  platform 
clockwise. 
e. 
After the platform passes the horizontal, the accelerometer detects the gravity effect, sensed 
as  a  positive  acceleration.    This  reduces  the  negative  velocity  to  zero  at  angle  Φo.    The  cycle is 
then repeated. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
7-11 Fig 2 Initial Levelling Misalignment – Oscillation 
Acc
Vel
Acc
Vel
+ −
+ −
+
+ −
Dist
Dist
1 0 1
1 0 1
2
2




2
+
2

+ −
Φ
Φ0
0
G
G
1
1
R
R
a & e
c
Acc
Vel
Acc
Vel
+ −
+ −
+ −
+ −
Dist
Dist
1 0 1


1 0 1
2
2
2
2
+ −


+ −
G
G
1
1
R
R
b
d
7. 
Initial  Tilt  Errors.    The  errors  caused  by  an  initial  tilt  are  shown  in  Fig  3.    Note: the  errors  are 
bounded and do not increase with time.  An initial levelling error of 6 seconds of arc is shown to cause 
a velocity error bounded by ±0.75 feet per second (0.45 kt) and a mean distance error of 0.1 nm.  After 
one complete Schuler period, both the velocity and distance errors have returned to zero.  The a, b, c, 
d and e positions of the error curve are labelled to correspond to the sub-figure lettering of Fig 2. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
7-11 Fig 3 Initial Levelling Misalignment – Errors 
a
b
c
d
e(a)
+6
Platform
Tilt
0
(secs arc)
− 6
+0.75
Velocity
Error ε v
0
(ft/sec)
− 0.75
0.2
Distance
Error εD 0.1
(nms)
0
21
42
63
84
Minutes
Accelerometer Errors 
8. 
Acceleration errors may be due to bias, cross-coupling, or vibropendulosity (Volume 7 Chapter 9).  
The  error  is integrated into an erroneous velocity which torques the platform at an incorrect rate.  As 
with levelling errors, an oscillation is set up because the velocity error is fed back through the Schuler 
loop.  Fig 4 shows the error curves generated by a bias error of 0.001 ft/sec2. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
7-11 Fig 4 Accelerometer Bias – Errors 
a
b
c
d
e(a)
12
Platform
Tilt
6
(secs arc)
0
+0.001
Acc
Error
0
2
(ft/sec  )
− 0.001
+0.75
Velocity
Error
0
(ft/sec)
− 0.75
0.2
Distance
Error
0.1
(nms)
0
21
42
63
84
Integrator Errors 
9. 
The  first  integrator  is  within  the  Schuler  loop.    Any  error  in  the  integration  results  in  an  incorrect 
velocity  output  which  produces  a  platform  oscillation  and  associated  error  curves  similar  to  those 
previously  discussed.    The  second  integrator  is  outside  the  Schuler  loop  and  any  errors  caused  by it 
produce a position error that increases linearly with time. 
Levelling Gyro Drift 
10.  Although the desired drift for an IN gyro is of the order of 0.001 º/hr it is probable that the drift rate 
in  flight  will  be  greater.    A  typical  figure  of  0.01  º/hr  is  used  to  illustrate  the  effect  of  gyro  drift  on  the 
platform: 
a. 
Oscillation.    The  stable element is turned away from the horizontal at the rate of 0.01 º/hr.  
The rotation is bounded by the Schuler loop, and the platform tilt curve is shown at Fig 5a. 
b.
Velocity Error.  The acceleration error follows the same curve as that shown for platform 
tilt  (Fig  5a).    After  integration  the  velocity  curve  at  Fig 5b  is  obtained,  which  shows  that  a mean 
velocity error develops over the Schuler period. 
c
Distance Error.  The second integration results in the distance error which grows with time 
because  of  the  mean  velocity  error.    The  growth  rate  is  oscillatory  about  a  mean  ramp 
increase  (Fig 5c).    The  distance  error  due  to  levelling  gyro  drift  is  unbounded,  and  for  a  drift  of 
0.01 º/hr, the ramp grows at approximately 0.6 nm/hr and has an oscillation of ±0.13 nm. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
7-11 Fig 5 Errors Caused by Gyro Drift 
a
b
c
d
e(a)
+8
Platform
Tilt
0
(secs arc)
− 8
a
2
Velocity
Error
1
(ft/sec)
0
b
0.83
Distance
Error
0.41
(nms)
0
21
42
63
84
c
Initial Azimuth Misalignment 
11.  If an INS is properly aligned in azimuth the East gyro senses zero component of Earth-rate and 
the North gyro outputs a signal proportional to −Ω cos φ.  If the INS is misaligned in azimuth by an 
angle ψ, the East gyro will output Ω cos φ sin ψ, and the North gyro Ω cos φ cos ψ. 
12.  The North gyro is torqued for Earth-rate by Ω cos φ and therefore the torqueing error will be: 
Ω cos φ − Ω cos φ cos ψ = Ω cos φ (1 − cos ψ) º/hr 
Since  the  magnitude  of  the  misalignment  angle  is  unlikely  to  exceed  0.5º,  this  error  may  be 
disregarded.  eg at Latitude 55º and ψ = 0.5º the error is: 
15.04 cos 55º (1 − 0.99996) º/hr = 0.0003 º/hr 
13.  The  error  for  the  East  gyro,  given  by  Ω cos φ sin ψ º/hr,  is  appreciable  even  when  ψ  is  smal .    At 
Latitude 55º and ψ of 0.1º, the error is 0.015 º/hr.  This error appears as East level ing gyro drift which 
causes  the  platform  to  oscillate  about  East  and  affects  the  North  accelerometer,  northern  velocity,  and 
latitude  determination.    The  error  curves  produced  in  the  latitude  channel  by  an  initial  azimuth 
misalignment  are  similar to those caused by levelling gyro drift.  The unbounded nature of the resulting 
distance  error  makes  it  essential  to  keep  the  initial  azimuth  alignment  error  as  small  as  possible,  and 
preferably less than 0.1º.  The effect of various misalignment angles is shown in Table 1. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
Table 1 Effect of Initial Azimuth Misalignment (North Channel) - LAT 55º N 
Resultant 
Distance 
Max 
Azimuth 
East Gyro 
Error after 
Velocity 
Error 
Drift 
1 hour 
Error 
0.03º 
0.005º/hr 
2,220 ft 
1 ft/sec 
0.1º 
0.015º/hr 
6,600 ft 
3 ft/sec 
0.2º 
0.030º/hr 
13,310 ft 
6 ft/sec 
0.3º 
0.045º/hr 
19,970 ft 
9 ft/sec 
14.  Azimuth  misalignment  also  results  in  slightly  incorrect  accelerations  being  sensed  by  the 
misaligned  accelerometers.    The  resultant  errors  may  become  significant  under  prolonged 
accelerations, e.g. during long accelerated climbs. 
Azimuth Gyro Drift 
15.  Azimuth  gyro  drift  (δψ),  like  azimuth  misalignment,  registers  as  East  level ing  gyro  drift  and 
produces  an  increasing  azimuth  alignment  error.    The  errors  produced  oscillate  about  means  which 
increase with time.  The increasing mean velocity error produces an unbounded distance error which 
follows a parabolic growth rate (illustrated in Fig 6). 
7-11 Fig 6 Azimuth Gyro Drift - Distance Error 
Oscillating errors
2460
(max every 42 mins)
Mean error line
(ft)
r
rro
E
e 1045
c
n
ta
is
D
240
0 Hrs
1
2
3
Mins
42
84
126
168
Time
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
Errors in the Vertical Channel 
16.  Most  of  the  errors  in  the  horizontal  channels  have  been  shown  to  be  bounded  by  the  Schuler 
oscillations  but  this  is  not  the  case  in  the  vertical  channel.    The  vertical  accelerometer  must  be 
corrected  for  the  acceleration  due  to  gravity  (gh)  at  the  particular  height  before  its  output  can  be 
integrated to give rate of change and change of height.  Gravity decreases with height according to the 
following relationship: 
2
2g h
R
g = g
or   g
 
= g
o
-
h
o
2
h
o
R
(R + h)
Where go = surface value of g 
 
 
 
 
H = height 
 
 
 
 
R = Earth radius 
Any  error  in  determining  h  will  affect  the  calculation  of  gh  which  in  turn  will  increase  the  error.  
Therefore, errors in the height channel are not self-limiting and the channel is unstable. 
17.  The  error  growth  is  approximately  exponential  and,  as  an  example,  a  step  input  error  in  vertical 
velocity  of  0.1  ft/sec  would  generate  a  height  error  of  670  ft  after  half  an  hour  and  15,000  ft  after  1 
hour.  Thus, for most aircraft applications an INS vertical channel must be aided by another source - in 
the first instance by barometric altimetry. 
Summary 
18.  A  local  vertical  INS  is  inherently  'Schuler  Tuned'  and  errors  induced  within  the  Schuler  loop  will 
cause the platform to oscillate about the horizontal.  This oscillation results in some, but not all, errors 
being bounded as follows: 
a. 
Accelerometer errors, first stage integrator errors, and initial platform tilt errors yield a system 
velocity error which oscillates about a zero mean and so the distance error is bounded. 
b. 
Levelling  gyro  drift,  azimuth  misalignment  and  azimuth  gyro  drift  cause  a  system  velocity 
error  which  oscillates  about  a  non-zero  mean  and  thus  the  distance  error  is  unbounded  and 
oscillates about a ramp function of time, or a parabolic function in the case of azimuth gyro drift. 
19.  The  vertical  channel  is  not  governed  by  Schuler  oscillation  and  is  inherently  unstable  due  to  the 
change of gravity with height. 
20.  Although the Schuler oscillations predominate in the short term (less than 4 hours), over the long 
term there are other periodic oscillations caused by interactions between the three axes. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
MIXED INERTIAL SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
21.  An  INS  is  very  accurate  in  the  short  term,  but  the  introduction  of  errors  is  inevitable,  and  in  a 
conventional  local  vertical  system  these  cause  the  platform  to  oscillate  about  the  horizontal.    The 
shortcomings of such a system can be summarized as follows: 
a. 
The  velocity  error  resulting  from  gyro  drift  oscillates  about  a  non-zero  mean  and  several 
applications, such as weapon aiming, require a very accurate velocity. 
b. 
The position error resulting from gyro drift is unbounded. 
c. 
High long-term accuracy requires very expensive components to minimize the errors. 
d. 
The system cannot be aligned in flight. 
e. 
The vertical channel is inherently unstable. 
22.  It  is  possible  to  overcome  these  disadvantages  by  'mixing'  the  INS  outputs  with  those  of  other 
navigation aids.  These aids have errors which, although relatively large, do not increase with time and 
so  a  mixed  system  combines  the  short-term  accuracy  of  a  pure  INS  with  the  long  term  accuracy  of 
another aid, thus enhancing the overall accuracy of both systems.  Additionally, a mixed system can be 
aligned in flight. 
23.  The  most  common  mixed  systems  are  those  which  use  Doppler  as  a  reference  velocity  source 
which is used to damp the Schuler oscillations.  Alternatively, an accurate fixing aid such as GPS could 
be  used  to  bound  the  position  error.    In  addition,  it  is  possible  to  stabilize  the  vertical  channel  using 
barometric  height.    Sophisticated  forms  of  mixing  may  involve  several  aids  and  use  a  software 
controlled  statistical  technique,  such  as  Kalman  Filtering,  to  continuously  monitor  and  analyse  the 
outputs to give the best results. 
Doppler/IN Mixing 
24.  In  a  Doppler/IN  system  the  Doppler  and  inertial  velocities  are  compared  to  give  an  error  signal 
which  can  be  used  in  various  configurations  to  modify  the  system  performance  and  in  particular  to 
damp  the  Schuler  oscillations.    In  a  simple  system  the  error  signal  is  fed  to  the  input  of  the  first 
integrator, however in practice this leads to an unacceptable long time to reduce the error.  In order to 
reduce  the  errors  more  quickly  the  error  signal  is  in  addition  fed  forward  directly  to  modify  the  gyro 
torqueing signal; this arrangement is known as a 'Tuned Second Order' system. 
25.  The reductions in velocity error achieved with a tuned second order Doppler/IN system will have a 
significant  effect  on  the  accuracy  of  weapon  delivery  when  compared  with  a  pure  INS.    However, 
although  the  position  error  is  slightly  reduced,  there  is  in  general  little  to  be  gained  in  positional 
accuracy when the two systems are compared during the first 4 to 6 hours of flight. 
Fix Monitored System 
26.  The  problem  of  the  unbounded  position  error  in  a  pure  INS  or  Doppler/INS  can  be  reduced  by 
coupling the system with an accurate fixing aid such as GPS.  The latitude and longitude outputs from the 
fixing aid are compared with those from the INS and the resulting error signals are fed through suitable 
gains to update the inertial position.  The difference signals are also used to provide a degree of damping 
to the platform.  The fix-monitored arrangement has the disadvantage of relying to a certain extent on an 
external source of information whereas the pure INS and Doppler/INS are self-contained. 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
Airborne Alignment 
27.  The  self alignment and reference alignment techniques are restricted to a fixed base as it is not 
possible  for  a  pure  INS  to  distinguish  between  the  accelerations due to aircraft movement and those 
due to platform misalignment.  An INS which is combined with an alternative velocity source or position 
information can however be aligned in flight.  The platform is roughly aligned and then the error signals 
from  either  the  external  velocity  or  position  information  are  used  to  level  the  platform  and  align  it  in 
azimuth.    The  accuracy  of  an  airborne  alignment  is  not  as  high  as  that  obtained  from  a  full  self-
alignment, but the technique does give the aircraft a rapid reaction capability and the ability to update 
the system during a long flight or after a transient equipment failure. 
Vertical Channel Stabilization 
28.  The vertical channel does not display the same characteristics as the horizontal channels as it is 
inherently  unstable  due  to  the  fact  that  the  value  of  g  varies  with  height.    It  is  therefore  necessary to 
supplement  the  vertical  channel  with  another  source  of  height  reference  in  order  to  provide  the 
accurate values of height and vertical velocity which are essential for weapon aiming calculations. 
29.  The barometric altimeter whilst inaccurate in the short term is very accurate in the long term and this 
characteristic can be used to stabilize the INS height and vertical velocity outputs.  The inertial height output 
is compared with the barometric height to give an error signal which is fed back to the first integrator and this 
has the effect of stabilizing the accuracy in the long term whilst maintaining it in the short term. 
KALMAN FILTERING 
Introduction 
30.  The  hardwired  mixed  systems  described  in  the  preceding  paragraphs  are  inflexible  because  the 
feedback gains are fixed and have to be carefully chosen at the design stage, thus assigning a fixed level of 
relative performance to the sensors.  In reality, the relative merits of each sensor will vary considerably and 
depend  on  such  parameters  as  time  of  flight,  range  from  a  ground  aid,  flight  conditions,  and  altitude.  
Consequently, the weighting factor applied to each sensor of a mixed system by a fixed gain loop is unlikely 
to be the true measure of the relative merits of the sensors and could possibly be significantly in error.  By 
using  a  software  controlled  statistical  technique,  such  as  Kalman  Filtering,  these  weighting  factors  can  be 
optimized  and  continuously  updated  for  any  operating  conditions.    This  method  can  use  any  number  of 
sensors and can select the best information available at any particular time. 
Kalman Filter Design 
31.  The Kalman Filtering process estimates each of the parameters which give rise to an error between 
the  INS  and  one  or  more  external  sensors  on  the  basis  of  maximum  likelihood.    By  using  a  weighting 
factor which is continually revised the error between the external data and the INS is apportioned among 
all the possible error sources so that the probability of these errors occurring is greatest. 
32.  The computer holds an estimate of the system errors and uses known error propagation equations 
to forecast how these errors will behave with passing time.  Thus, this error model will always maintain up 
to date values.  When an external measurement is made the error held in the computer is compared with 
the  measured  error.    All  the  quantities  in  the  error  model  are  then  corrected  in  the  light  of  the  known 
variances of the external information and the variances of each quantity in the error model.  The variances 
of the system errors are recalculated after each external measurement has been processed so that the 
errors of the next measurement can be apportioned in the optimum manner. 
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-11 - INS Errors and Mixed Systems 
33.  The design of a practical Kalman Filter for use in an aircraft system is complex.  The first problem 
is to define a set of variables that specify the system.  In practice, there is never enough information to 
enable  the  system  to  be  perfectly  modelled  and  there  will  frequently  be  limitations  on  computer  time 
and storage.  Extensive trials and simulation are necessary to enable the designer to define the error 
model  and  variables  as  accurately  as  possible  within  the  computer  limitations.    Once  designed 
however  the  filter  performance  is  not  affected  by  changes  in  aircraft  role  or  tactics,  and  additional 
sensors can be incorporated into the system with relatively minor changes to the computer software. 
Advantages of Kalman Filtering 
34.  By  making  better  use  of  the  information  available,  Kalman  Filtering  increases  the  flexibility  and 
enhances  the  accuracy  of  a  mixed  system  thus  overcoming  the  disadvantages  of  a  hardwired  mixed 
system.  Other important advantages are: 
a. 
Alignment and gyro drift trimming are improved. 
b. 
Weapon aiming accuracy is improved including the elimination of fixed bias errors. 
c. 
Post flight analysis of the navigation system and fault detection can be carried out. 
d. 
An estimate of system accuracy can be continuously displayed to the crew. 
35.  Alignment and Gyro Drift Trimming.  A Kalman Filter can be used during alignment and for drift 
trimming the gyros.  The times for full and rapid alignments can be reduced and the overall accuracy of 
the process improved.  The filter can compensate for aircraft movement such as wind buffeting during 
ground  alignment  and  also  take  account  of  the  changing  characteristics  of  components  during  the 
warm-up phase. 
36.  Weapon Aiming Errors.  The Kalman Filter will directly affect weapon-aiming accuracy because 
of the improved navigation performance.  It can also take account of fixed bias errors and in particular 
harmonization and windscreen distortion.  By calculating the errors in the delivery of practice weapons 
in training sorties, the aircraft can be calibrated, and the filter programmed to eliminate these fixed bias 
errors.  Kalman Filtering also improves the height and vertical velocity outputs which are essential for 
accurate weapon aiming. 
37.  Post  Flight  Analysis  and  Fault  Detection.    An  important  secondary  application  of  Kalman 
Filtering  is  the  post  flight  analysis  of  the  navigation  system.    During  flight,  all  reference  data  can  be 
recorded  and  subsequently  fed  into  a  computer  containing  a  much more comprehensive error model 
than it is possible to accommodate in an airborne computer.  The method of using the data is the same 
as  in  flight  but  as  the  error  model  is  more  complete  maximum  use  can  be  made  of  data  which  was 
previously  unused.    This  post  flight  analysis  highlights  shortcomings  in  the  airborne  filter  which  may 
then be amended.  By the use of post flight analysis data can be used to show when any sensor is not 
presenting  navigation  information  within  the  expected  variance  due  perhaps  to  progressive 
deterioration  of  components  or  incipient  failure.    Such  a  facility  enables  the  thorough  testing  of  the 
sensor to be carried out at an earlier stage than might otherwise have been possible. 
38.  Estimate of System Accuracy.  When using statistical filtering an estimate of the navigation system 
accuracy is continuously available.  This information may be displayed to the crew directly as a figure of merit 
reflecting the accuracy of the navigation outputs.  Alternatively, the filter can automatically reject input data 
that is in error by more than 3 or 4 standard deviations and an indication given to the crew. 
Summary 
39.  A  navigation  system  using  a  Kalman  Filtering  technique  is  far more flexible and accurate than a 
more  conventional  system  and  has  several  secondary  benefits.    The  advantages  obtained  from 
Kalman Filtering are limited only by the ability to accurately model the system parameters and the likely 
errors, within the computer time and space available. 
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
CHAPTER 12 - GROUND CONTROLLED APPROACH (GCA) 
Introduction 
1. 
A Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) is a procedure by which air traffic controllers pass a series 
of  verbal  instructions,  based  on  radar  observations,  to  enable  the  pilot  to  make  an  approach  to  the 
runway  in  conditions  of  bad  weather  and  poor  visibility.    This  chapter  describes  a  GCA  in  general 
terms,  but  full  definitions  and  explanations  of  the  procedure,  responsibilities  and  associated  R/T 
phraseology,  are  contained  in  the  Civil  Aviation  Authority  (CAA)  Radiotelephony  Manual  (CAP  413).  
NATO  standard,  AATCP-2,  Radiotelephony  Phraseology  also  details  R/T  procedures.    Provided  that  the 
pilot  is  proficient  at  instrument  flying,  the  procedure  is  relatively  straightforward,  but  variations  can 
occur to take account of local conditions and the prevailing air traffic situation.  Procedures at civilian 
airfields,  and  at  military  airfields  of  other  nations,  may  vary  in  detail  from  those  described,  but  the 
principles remain the same. 
2. 
A full GCA consists of two elements:  
a. 
A  Surveillance  Radar  element,  at  which  stage  the  aircraft  will  be  identified  and  then  vectored 
onto the final approach path. 
b. 
A Precision Approach Radar (PAR) element, during which the pilot will be given instructions 
in height and azimuth, with respect to the runway touchdown point. 
3. 
Air  Traffic  Control  (ATC).    A  complete  GCA  procedure  will  normally  involve  three  ATC 
controllers, in sequence: 
a. 
The  Approach  Controller.    The  Radar  Approach  Controller  will  carry  out  the  initial 
identification of aircraft wishing to enter the Military Air Traffic Control Zone (MATZ). 
b. 
The Radar Director.  The Radar Director will action the sequencing of aircraft for an ordered 
approach to the runway. 
c. 
The Talkdown Controller.  The Talkdown Controller will interpret the information presented 
by the PAR equipment and pass precise heading and height instructions to the pilot, to enable him 
to complete the final approach. 
THE SURVEILLANCE RADAR ELEMENT 
Approach Control 
4. 
Aircraft  wishing  to  penetrate  a  MATZ  should  make  initial  contact  with  the  Radar  Approach 
Controller  (RAC)  on  the  designated  'Approach'  frequency,  unless  the  airfield’s  promulgated  Terminal 
Procedures dictate otherwise.  The RAC will utilize the surveillance radar display to locate and identify 
the aircraft and vector it towards the final approach path to the runway in use.  Aircraft are identified by 
IFF/SSR equipment, or by their response to manoeuvring instructions.   
5. 
After identification, the RAC will pass any information necessary, and then, having positioned the 
aircraft at a suitable height, will hand over control to the Radar Director. 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
Radar Direction 
6. 
The Radar Director will sequence aircraft for an ordered approach to the runway in use, by means 
of 'normal pattern' and 'short pattern' radar circuits: 
a. 
The  Normal  Pattern  Circuit.    The  main  elements  of  a  normal  pattern  are  a  base  leg,  a 
converging heading and the final approach (see Fig 1).  For multiple circuits, a downwind leg will 
also  be  included.    The  pattern  is  orientated  upon  the  bearing  of  the  runway  centreline  (the 
magnetic bearing of the runway centreline is referred to as 'QFU').  
b. 
The  Short  Pattern  Circuit.    An  aircraft  overshooting  from  an  instrument  approach,  and 
precluded  by  weather  conditions,  or  other  reasons,  from  carrying  out  a  visual  circuit  or  a 
normal  pattern  radar  circuit,  may  be  repositioned  on  the  final  approach  using  the  short 
pattern  circuit  procedure.    This  will  consist  of  a  reciprocal  track,  parallel  to  the  runway 
centreline, with an inbound turn to position the aircraft back on the centreline, at a point just 
before it intercepts the glidepath. 
7. 
Downwind Leg.  The Director will pass magnetic headings and heights to fly (based on QFE) to 
the pilot, in order to vector the aircraft to the downwind leg.  The downwind leg extends from a point 
abeam the runway threshold, to a point situated at a range of 10 nm from touchdown and ± 25º from 
the  reciprocal  of  the  runway  centreline  (Point  A  in  Fig  1).    The  pilot  should  acknowledge  all 
messages;  executive  instructions  are  to  be  read  back  verbatim.    The  Director  will  pass  the 
Instrument  Approach  Minima  (IAM)  for  the  runway  in  use  (missed  approach  and  communications 
failure  (MACF)  instructions  will  also  be  passed  to  pilots  not familiar with the airfield).  The pilot will 
be asked for his decision height (DH) based on the IAM, the pilot’s instrument rating and any other 
allowances  necessary  (see  Flight  Information  Handbook).    The  pilot  will  also  be  asked  for  his 
intentions at the end of the approach (e.g. to land, join circuit, depart etc).  During the downwind leg, 
the aircrew will carry out pre-landing checks.  
8. 
Base Leg At a range of approximately 10 nm downwind (depending on aircraft type, the needs 
of separation and controller availability) the aircraft is directed on to a base leg, the track of which is at 
an angle of 90º to the runway QFU.  On Fig 1, the base leg is shown as from Point A to Point B (the 
point where a line bearing ± 10º from the reciprocal of the runway QFU intercepts the base leg). 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
7-12 Fig 1 Standard GCA - Normal Pattern 
TOUCHDOWN POINT
Aircraft homing
Identity established by turn,
to the Aerodrome
which in this example is also
heading for point 'A'
0.5 NM
Advice on 
approach
to the decision
height
2 NM
Set QFE 
during approach
10°
Check gear,
acknowledge
between  3 and 5 nm
25°
DO
5 NM
Normal start
W
G
of descent
N
E
-
L
W
L
IN
A
D
IN
L
F
EG
Handover to
On this leg, information
Talkdown Controller
relevant to the procedure
7 NM
and check
is given to or obtained
of QFE
from the pilot.  The 
(see note 3)
sequence is optional but
is to include or update as 
required the following 
8 NM
)
items:
°
G
E
0
L
4
    Cockpit checks
° +
0 U
    Positioning instructions
4 F
    Weather information
(Q
    Aerodrome information
    Radio frequency information
    MACF procedures
    Descent minima
    Pilot's intentions
10 NM
A
BASE LEG
B
Notes:         
(QFU + 90 )
°
(1)  The 10-mile distance can be 
varied to suit the aircraft type and 
adjacent traffic patterns
(2) Position of handover to Talkdown 
Controller may be varied to suit 
aircraft type
(3)  QFE to be set prior to 
commencing final approach
9. 
Converging Heading.  The use of a converging heading, ± 40º from the QFU, alleviates the use 
of  a  90º  turn  and  provides  a  gradual,  smooth  closure  with  the  final  track,  to  the  advantage  of  both 
the  pilot  and  the  controller.    Depending  upon  the  precise  distance  flown  downwind,  the  aircraft  will 
normally intercept the extended centreline of the runway at about 7 nm from touchdown. 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
10.  Height  Control.    The  final  talkdown  is  normally  started  from  1,500  ft  above  touchdown  zone 
elevation  (TDZE).    If,  because  of  terrain  clearance  or  other  air  traffic  considerations,  it  is  not 
possible to fly the whole circuit at 1,500 ft, the pilot is normally instructed to reduce height to 1,500 ft 
before the glidepath is reached. 
11.  Handover  for  Final  Approach.    From  the  converging  40º  Leg,  the  aircraft  is  turned  to  close 
with  the  extended  centreline  of  the  runway.    At  this  point, the Director will hand the aircraft over to 
the Talkdown Controller, for the final precision approach. 
The Surveillance Radar Equipment 
12.  There  are  two  types  of Surveillance Radar Equipment (SRE) in current use; the 'Watchman' 
and  the  AR  15/2A  radar  equipment.    Both  systems  are  primary  radar,  and  each  provides  360º 
scan, plan position indicator (PPI) displays for use by controllers.   
a. 
Watchman  Radar.    The  Watchman  radar  operates  in  frequency  diversity  in  the  E  and  F 
bands.  The azimuth beam width is nominally 1.5º.  This radar can produce short pulse widths for 
improved  target  discrimination  at  short  ranges,  and  a  long  'chirp'  pulse  for  detecting  targets  of 
small radar echoing areas at long range.  It also has a Moving Target Indicator (MTI) capability, to 
assist with discriminating between moving targets and 'clutter'.  The maximum range is 60, 80 or 
120 nm, depending upon the particular installation. 
b. 
AR  15/2A  Radar.    The  AR  15/2A  radar  operates  in  the  E/F  band.    It  has  duplicate 
transmitter/receiver circuits, which utilize the common aerial, but can use two discrete frequencies by 
transmitting fractionally apart.  It has an MTI facility, and a maximum range of 60 nm. 
13.  If  necessary,  the  surveillance  radar  PPI  display  can  be  used  to  provide  a  Surveillance  Radar 
Approach (SRA) to the runway touchdown point (see para 25). 
THE PRECISION APPROACH RADAR ELEMENT 
The Talkdown 
14.  The Talkdown Controller will interpret the information presented by the PAR displays (Fig 2), and 
will  pass  precise  heading  and  height  instructions  to  the  pilot,  to  enable  him  to  follow  the  designated 
glidepath and thus complete the approach. 
15.  The  aim  of  a  PAR  'talkdown'  is  to  enable  the  pilot  to  obtain  at  least  one  of  the  required  visual 
references at, or before, decision height (DH), and to be in a position to continue the approach to land.  
The accuracy of a PAR procedure depends to a large extent on the proficiency of both the pilot and the 
Talkdown Controller. 
16.  The  Talkdown  Controller  takes  over  at  about  7  nm  from  touchdown,  usually  on  a  different 
frequency  from  that  used  by  the  Director.    When  positive  contact  has  been  established,  the 
Talkdown Controller will ask the pilot to read back the altimeter pressure setting.  The Controller will 
then instruct the pilot not to acknowledge further instructions.  Immediately prior to the descent point, 
the Controller will warn the pilot of the impending descent.  The slope of the PAR elevation centreline 
(the glideslope) is normally set for 3º, although 2.5º may sometimes be offered.  For a 3º glideslope, 
the  descent  point  will  be  at  a  range  of  5  nm,  provided  the  aircraft  is  at  1,500  ft  on  the  QFE.    At  this 
point, the Controller will instruct the pilot to start a descent, and thereafter he will pass instructions to 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
enable  the  pilot  to  fly  the  aircraft  down  the  glidepath  whilst  maintaining  the  azimuth  centreline.    The 
Talkdown  Controller  will  interrupt  his  instructions  with  short,  regular  breaks  in  transmission.    These 
breaks  provide  the  pilot  with  an  opportunity,  where  necessary,  to  pass  a  short  message  to  the 
Controller without detracting from the continuity of the procedure.  At a range between 5 nm and 3 nm 
from touchdown, the Controller instructs the pilot to confirm that the undercarriage is down (this check 
is  not  required  for  aircraft  with  fixed  undercarriage).    After  obtaining  suitable  clearance  from  the 
Aerodrome  Controller,  the  Talkdown  Controller  will  pass  authority  for  the  pilot  to  land.    Descent 
instructions  are  continued  until  the  Talkdown  Controller  advises  the  pilot  that  he  is  approaching  his 
DH.  From this point onwards, only advisory information is passed, and the pilot must continue the 
descent visually or carry out the missed approach procedure if conditions do not permit a landing.  The 
pilot will normally remain on the Talkdown frequency until safely landed. 
7-12 Fig 2 The Precision Approach Radar Display 
Width Height Indicator
Glidepath (Elevation) Display
Visual Alert Box
16000
+500
12000
-1000
+1000
-500
8000
UA34  S
TW 122  L
176    6.5
182   13.2
+100    
-2740    
4000
A
B
Wx
Obs
Map
WHI
Radar
Syn
Bird
Hist
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Cover
Video
Areas
-2000
GS: 3.0     RWY:  161     DH  200FT    TIME:  14:20:05  REC TAPE
Sel
Lead
Color
DBFld
Dir
Legnd
Az
El
Az
Text
32000
Scale
Scale
Offset
Size
Clear
Set #
Shut
24000
Hist
Hist
Down
Glide Slope / Decsn Hgt
16000
TW 122  L
3.0
2.5
1
3.5
3G S
182   13.2
UA34  S
+4352    
200
1 1
500
1
3 5
00
D H
176    6.5
8000
B
+186    
Range Scale (nmi)
A


11
3 3
6
1 1
0 0
15
1
20
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
Main Controls
-8000
Reset
Sm
S al
m lall
Large
Default
  A/C
A/C
A/C
-16000
Runway
Display
Select
Control
-24000
Radar
WHI Tgt
Control
  Cycle
-32000
Clear
ACID
Status
Alerts
Entry
Azimuth Display
Information Service  Block
Control/Status Panel
17.  PAR  is  classed  as  a  'precision'  approach  aid.    Equipment  limitations,  which  take  into  account 
obstacles on the approach path, are published as Instrument Approach Minima (IAM) in the Terminal 
Approach Procedures for each airfield. 
The Precision Approach Radar Equipment 
18.  The aircraft’s final approach path to the runway is scanned accurately by the precision approach 
radar (PAR).  The 'PAR-2000' equipment is a short wavelength (three centimetre) radar, with two linear 
phased  array  aerials,  each  transmitting  a  narrow  beam.    The  vertical  aerial  defines  the  aircraft’s 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
elevation, whilst the horizontal aerial defines the aircraft’s azimuth.  The PAR-2000 is less susceptible 
to weather interference than previous equipment.  
19.  The PAR-2000 Display.  The PAR-2000 screen (Fig 2) will display multiple aircraft tracks to the 
controller.    The  position  of  each aircraft is shown simultaneously on two displays.  The upper display 
shows range and height (see expanded illustration at Fig 3), whilst the lower display shows range and 
azimuth.    An  Information  Service  Block,  located  vertically  between  the  two  displays,  provides  the 
controller  with  approach  data.    The  right-hand  part  of  the  screen  incorporates  a  control/status  panel 
which facilitates operator interface by means of a 'trackball' (combination roller ball/mouse).  
7-12 Fig 3 Detail from the Glidepath Display 
Aircraft and
Track History Trail
Elevation Scale (Ft)
Designated Track Data Block
Glideslope Cursor
UA34  S
4000
176    6.5
+100    

A
DH Cursor
Radar 
Sensor 
Position
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
-2000
Range Scale (nm)
Information Service Block
Safety Cursor
Touchdown Point
for Glideslope
20.  Change of Parameters.  Being a computerized, digital format, the PAR-2000 display provides a 
large degree of inherent flexibility for the operator, including:   
a. 
Change of Scale.  The displays can be presented at different range scales (from 1 nm to 20 nm). 
b. 
Glideslope.  The glideslope can be adjusted from 2.0º to 6.0º, in steps of 0.1º. 
c. 
Decision Height.  The controller can set and display the pilot’s DH in 10 ft increments (see Fig 3). 
21.  Designated  Track  Data  Block.    When  an  aircraft  has  been  designated  by  a  controller,  a 
Designated  Track  Data  Block  appears  on  each  display  alongside  its  respective  track  symbol.    This 
data  block  contains  three  rows  of  information  -  the  top  row  contains  aircraft  details,  the  middle  row 
gives  groundspeed  and  distance  from  touchdown,  whilst  the  bottom  row  shows  data  on  vertical  and 
lateral  displacement  from  the  PAR  centreline.    An  example  of  a  Designated  Track  Data  Block  is 
illustrated in Fig 4. 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
7-12 Fig 4 Example of a Designated Track Data Block 
Aircraft
Callsign
Distance to
Size
Touchdown
in nm
Groundspeed
Readout (kt)
UA34  S
Vertical
Correction
Deviation
176     7.5
Direction
Direction
+ 850
 
+ = Right
← +100
- = Left
Vertical Deviation 
from Glideslope
Lateral Deviation
from Centreline
Deviation
Direction
Lateral
+ = High
Correction
- = Low
Direction
22.  The Width Height Indicator.  In addition to showing a representation of the aircraft’s flight path, 
the  display  shows  its  precise  displacement  from  the  glideslope  and  azimuth  centrelines  in  several 
formats.  One such format is the Width Height Indicator (WHI), which illustrates azimuth and elevation 
displacement against a scale in feet, as seen from the pilot’s viewpoint.  In the example shown in Fig 5, 
the aircraft is slightly high, and slightly right of the PAR centreline. 
7-12 Fig 5 The Width Height Indicator 
+500
Aircraft
Symbol
A
-1000
+1000
Horizontal 
and
-500
Vertical Scales
23.  Runway  Changes.    The  PAR-2000  system  can  provide  radar  cover  for  approaches  on  up  to  3 
runways  (i.e.  6  touchdown  points),  although,  at  some  airfields  this  number  may  be  reduced  due  to 
sighting  restrictions.    The  touchdown  point  for  each  runway  is  pre-set  into  the  PAR  computer  as  an 
offset value relative to the location of the aerial.  To re-align the PAR to suit a change of runway, the 
radar  aerial  assembly,  shown  in  Fig  6,  is  rotated  in  azimuth,  whereupon  it  automatically  locates  a 
surveyed  radar  reflector, to confirm the correct re-alignment.  When this action is complete, the PAR 
screen  will  display  an  "Available  for  Operational  Use"  message.    If  the  radar  becomes  misaligned  or 
loses  sight  of  the  runway  reflector  for  a  prolonged  period  of  time,  the  system  will  generate  a  'critical' 
alert  message  on  the  display  screen.    The  whole  re-alignment  process  can  be  completed  in 
approximately 1½ minutes. 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 7 of 8 


AP3456 – 7-12 - Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) 
7-12   
Fig 6 The PAR Airfield Installation 
OTHER APPROACHES 
Straight-in Approach 
24.  As a variation on a full GCA procedure an aircraft may be fed directly into the GCA pattern from 
an airfield approach aid such as an NDB, VOR, or TACAN.  The pattern is arranged so that the aircraft 
is  vectored  onto  the  extended centreline at a range of 10 to 15 nm.  The radar controller vectors the 
aircraft  in  to  seven  miles,  where  the  Talkdown  Controller  takes  over  for  the  final  approach.    This 
procedure  is  often  used when an aircraft is handed over from an Air Traffic Control Radar Unit to an 
airfield, under the Centralized Approach Control (CAC) procedure. 
Surveillance Radar Approach 
25.  When precision approach radar is not available, the surveillance radar may be used to carry out a 
surveillance  radar  approach  (SRA).    Using  the  PPI  display,  the  controller  has  no  electronic  glidepath 
information  and  there  is  less  accuracy  in  azimuth  when  compared  with  a  PAR.    An  SRA  is  therefore 
classed as a non-precision approach. 
26.  The  controller  passes  headings  to  fly  and  other  instructions  to  enable  the  pilot  to  fly  a  pattern 
similar to that of a standard GCA procedure. 
27.  The controller will pass advisory heights with range information, to assist the pilot to maintain the 
correct  rate  of  descent  for  an  equivalent  glideslope  angle.    At  5  nm  the  pilot  is  requested  to  start  a 
descent.  If a 3º glideslope is used the approach height will be 1,500 ft and the rate of descent will be 
300 ft per mile. 
Revised Jul 11 
 
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
CHAPTER 13 - INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM (ILS) 
Introduction 
1. 
The Instrument Landing System (ILS) is a pilot interpreted aid which provides azimuth, elevation, 
and  limited  range  information  to  enable  a  runway  approach  to  be  made  under  instrument  flight 
conditions.    The  ILS  system  comprises  ground  radar  installations  and  an  airborne  receiver.    The 
ground radar transmits an azimuth beam (localizer) defining the approximate centreline of the runway, 
and  an  elevation  beam  (glidepath)  defining  a  slope  for  a  safe  descent.    The  ILS  is  classed  as  a 
precision approach aid. 
Principle of Operation 
2. 
The  ground  transmitters  emit  localizer  and  glidepath  signals  simultaneously.    These  define  the 
approach  path  to  the  runway  using  the  principle  of  lobe  comparison.    The  airborne  receivers  provide 
signals of aircraft displacement from the ILS centreline and glidepath which can be used to feed an ILS 
indicator  on  an  HSI,  a  flight  director,  or  a  separate  ILS  indicator.    They  can  also  feed  directly  to  an 
autopilot system.  Ground marker beacons radiate vertically to provide range checks. 
The Localizer 
3. 
The ground localizer transmitter is usually installed approximately 1,000 ft beyond the upwind end 
of  the  instrument  runway,  with  the  aerial  in  line  with  the  runway  centreline.    In  some  military 
installations  the  approach  path  is  offset  from  the  runway  centreline  because  of  siting  difficulties.   For 
this  reason,  the  runway  centreline  and  the  localizer  front  course  line  are  not  necessarily  coincident.  
Any  angle  of  offset  is  generally  less  than  3º  and  the  magnetic  orientation  of  the  runway  and  ILS 
centrelines are listed in the En-Route Supplement and TAPs. 
4. 
The  localizer  operates  on  VHF  frequencies  in  the  range  108.1  MHz  to  111.95  MHz,  utilizing  those 
frequencies with an ODD first decimal place (e.g. 109.10 MHz, 111.35 MHz).  The transmitter emits two 
lobes  which  overlap.  The  centre  of  the  region  of  overlap  provides  an  area  of  equal  signal  amplitude 
defining the approach path (see Fig 1).  The two lobes are modulated at different frequencies, the beam 
to the right of the centreline (when approaching to land) at 150 Hz; that to the left at 90 Hz.  The localizer 
transmitter also emits the identification code for the installation.  This code consists of a two letter morse 
code signal transmitted every ten seconds, which can be received aurally by the pilot.  In an emergency, 
ATC can interrupt the localizer channel and use that frequency for speech transmissions to the aircraft, 
but not vice versa.  The range of the localizer signal is 25 nm at 2,000 ft within plus or minus 10º of the 
localizer front course line or 17 nm between 10º and 35º of the localizer front course line.  Above 2,000 ft 
these ranges may be reduced. 
7-13 Fig 1 ILS Localizer Lobes 
Area of Signal Overlap
150 Hz Lobe
Localizer Aerials
Localizer Centreline, 
         or 
Localizer Front 
Course  Line
Localizer
Transmit er
Runway
90 Hz Lobe
Revised Mar 14   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
5. 
The aircraft localizer receiver detects the two signals and produces two output voltages which are 
compared and the difference displayed as a deflection of the display deviation bar as shown in Fig 2.  
The aircraft at position A will receive a signal from the 150 Hz modulation which is stronger than that 
from  the  90  Hz  modulation.    This  will  cause  a  large  deflection  of  the  deviation  bar.    Conversely  an 
aircraft at B will receive a stronger signal from the 90 Hz lobe and the deflection will be equally large 
but  in  the  opposite  sense  to  that  experienced  at  A.    At  position  C,  the  two  signals  will  be  equal  and 
there  will  be  no  deviation  bar  deflection.    The  display  convention  is  such  that  the  display  centre 
represents  the  aircraft,  and  the  deviation  bar  the  ILS  centreline,  so,  for  example,  at  position  A  the 
deviation bar to the left indicates that the ILS centreline is to the left. 
7-13  Fig 2 Behaviour of HSI Deviation Bar 
Localizer 
Aerials
Runway
Beamwidth
90 Hz
Signal
150 Hz
Signal
B
C
A
S
S
S
N
N
N
B
C
A
6. 
Display  Sensitivity.    Variations  in  azimuth  between  positions  A  and  B  in  Fig 2  will  cause  the 
deviation bar to vary between the deflections shown. The display sensitivity will dictate at what angle, 
either  side  of  the  centreline,  full-scale  deflection  occurs.    This  is  normally  adjusted  so  that  full-scale 
deflection corresponds to ± 2.5º, which in turn corresponds to the beamwidth shown in Fig 2 where the 
two signals overlap.  It should be noted that the displacement of the deviation bar reflects the angular 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
distance  of  the  aircraft  from  the  centreline  and,  thus,  the  closer  the  aircraft  is  to  the  transmitter  the 
larger is the displacement of the deviation bar for any given linear distance from the centreline. 
7. 
Back  Beams.    The  majority  of  localizer  transmitters  have  some  signal  'spillage',  and  produce 
sidelobes in the direction opposite to the front course line.  These signals may form lobes known as a 
'back beam' (Fig 3).  Back beam signals should not normally be used for navigation.  However, a few 
ILS  installations  transmit  a  back  beam  intentionally.    These  facilities  are  promulgated  in  Flight 
Information Publications (FLIPs) and can be used by aircraft to fly a 'back course' towards the airfield 
overhead.    Care  is  essential  when  flying  a  back  course,  as  it  is  less  accurate  than  the  front  course 
beam,  and  there  is  no  associated  glidepath  information.    In  addition,  because  the  back  beam  is 
narrower than the main beam, minor heading changes will cause large deflections of the Deviation Bar.  
When  approaching  the  aerodrome  along  a  back  course,  the  localizer  needle  on  a  basic  ILS  indicator  will 
operate  in  the  reverse  sense  (i.e.  if  the  aircraft  is  right  of  the  centreline,  the  demand  will  show  'go  right' 
instead of 'go left').  This problem can be overcome if using a Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI), by setting 
the reciprocal of the back course centreline (i.e. set the front course centreline).  The ILS demands will 
then  be  displayed  in  the  correct  sense.    As  an  example,  in  Fig  3,  if  approaching  on  a  back  beam 
centreline of 090º, the pilot should set the HSI course to 270º. 
7-13  Fig 3 ILS Back Beam 
Main Beam Lobes
Back Beam Lobes
150 Hz
150 Hz
Runway
90 Hz
90 Hz 
Localizer
Localizer
Back Course Centreline
Front Course Centreline
The Glidepath 
8. 
The glidepath transmitter frequency is paired with the localizer frequency, but operates on UHF, in 
the  range  328.6  MHz  -  335.4  MHz.   The glidepath produces two overlapping lobes, analogous to the 
localizer but in the vertical sense, as shown in Fig 4.  The transmitter is offset some 300 to 400 ft to the 
side  of  the  runway  at  a  position  approximately  750  to  1,000 ft  from  the  threshold  depending  on  the 
runway length and the touchdown point.  The upper lobe is modulated at 90 Hz and the lower lobe at 
150  Hz.    The  range  of  the  glidepath  signal  is  10 nm at 2,000 ft up to 8º in azimuth either side of the 
localizer front course line. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
7-13  Fig 4 ILS Glidepath Lobes 
B
 Glidepath
Upper Lobe
 Centreline
      90 Hz
(Glideslope)
A
Glidepath
Beam
Glidepath
C
θ
Transmitter
 (Beam Angle)
.45 θ
1.75 θ
Glidepath
Surface
Aerials
9. 
As with the localizer, the glidepath receiver compares the signal strength received from each lobe 
and  deflects  an  indicator  accordingly.    The  type  of  display  found  on  an  HSI  is  shown  in  Fig 5,  which 
illustrates  the  three  cases  corresponding  to  positions  of  the  aircraft  in  Fig 4.    As  with  the  localizer 
display, the centre of the indicator represents the aircraft, and the needle the glidepath. 
7-13  Fig 5 ILS Glidepath Indicator (HSI Display) 
A
B
C
On Glidepath
Above Glidepath
Below Glidepath
Demand Central
Fly Down Demand
Fly Up Demand
10.  Beamwidth.    The  centreline  of  the  glidepath  beam  is  usually  set  at  an  angle  of  3º  but  can  be 
varied  between  2º  and  4º  to  suit  local  requirements.    The  beamwidth  is  a  function  of  the  beam 
angle (θ) and extends from 0.45θ to 1.75θ above the horizontal.  For a 3º beam angle this equates to 
1.35º to 5.25º above the horizontal.  The edges of the beam correspond to full scale deflection of the 
indicator needle. 
Marker Transmitters and Range Information 
11.  Limited information about the range from touchdown is provided by up to three marker beacon  
transmitters  operating  on  a  frequency  of  75  Hz.    The  beacons  are  situated  in  line  with  the  approach 
path and at fixed distances from the touchdown point (see Fig 6).  These distances are promulgated to 
users in FLIPs.  The marker beacons each radiate signals in a vertical fan-shaped beam, to a height of 
at least 6,000 ft above the beacons.  As the aircraft crosses each fan beam, the marker identifies itself 
by  audio  signal  through  the  pilot’s  headset  and  by  visual  lamp.    The  outer  marker  (usually  situated 
approximately 4.5 nm from touchdown) transmits a series of dashes at 400 Hz.  The middle marker is 
located approximately 3,000 ft from touchdown at the beginning of the runway bar lighting system.  The 
transmission  consists  of  alternate  dots  and  dashes  at  1,300  Hz.    An  inner  marker,  if  employed,  is 
situated about 1,000 ft from touchdown, and will transmit a series of dots at 3,000 Hz. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
7-13  Fig 6 ILS Marker Beams 
6,000 ft above beacons
Vertical 
Beams 
Glideslope Intercept
Glidepath
Touchdown Point
Middle Marker
Outer Marker
Surface
Marker Beam 
Distances as 
Promulgated
12.  Distance  Measuring  Equipment  (DME).    A  DME  is  sometimes  frequency  paired  with  the  ILS 
system,  such  that  DME  selection  is  automatic  when  the  localizer  frequency  is selected.  The DME is 
automatically  adjusted  to  provide  a  readout  of  range  from  touchdown.    The  DME  is  used  to  either 
supplement or replace the ILS marker beacons. 
13.  Locator Beacons.  A locator beacon is a low-powered non-directional beacon (NDB), which can 
be collocated with an ILS marker beacon.   At some airfields, the locator beacon may replace one of 
the  marker  beacons.    The  locator  beacon  can  be  used  for  tracking  purposes  when  positioning  the 
aircraft to commence an ILS approach.  It can also be used for a holding pattern. 
Procedure 
14.  Navigation  to  acquire  the  localizer  may  be  accomplished  using  self-navigation  techniques,  radar 
vectors,  or  a  terminal  procedure.    Typically,  the  localizer  is  intercepted  at  an  angle  of  approximately 
40º.    When  the  localizer  needle  begins  to  centralize,  the  aircraft  is  turned  on  to  the  centreline  and  a 
heading  is  taken  up  to  allow  for  drift.    Fairly  coarse  corrections  may  be  necessary  to  maintain  the 
centre of the beam, which is quite wide in the early stages.  
15.  If  approaching  at  1,500  ft  QFE,  the  aircraft  will  intercept  the  glidepath  at  5  nm  from  touchdown, 
approximately at the position of the outer marker.  The indicator needle will start to move down from its 
full deflection up position.  The aircraft descent should be initiated so that the descent is established as 
the  needle  centres.    Since  the  beam  is  only  about  500  ft  deep  at  this  point  the  aircraft  must  be 
established on the correct descent path as quickly as possible.  
16.  As  the  runway  is  approached,  the  beams  become  more  sensitive  and  accurate,  steady  flying  is 
necessary to follow the indications; for example the glidepath beam is only 70 ft deep at a height of 200 
ft.    Particular  care  must  be  taken  not  to  descend  below  the  glidepath  since  this  increases  the  risk  of 
striking an obstruction, and the localizer signal is weaker in that region.  Where the localizer is offset, 
the beam centreline is positioned so that it crosses the runway centreline at about 4,000 ft to 4,500 ft 
from the glidepath origin, coinciding approximately with a height of 200 ft.  On transferring to a visual 
approach,  the  aircraft  may  have  to  be  turned  through  a  few  degrees  to  achieve  alignment  with  the 
runway centreline. 
17.  Back-up  Timing.    The  middle  marker  often  coincides  with  the  Missed  Approach  Point  (MAP).  
Where this is the case, the Terminal Approach Chart sometimes includes a table of time intervals, at 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
varying  speeds,  between  the  outer  and  middle  markers.    This  will  enable  the  use  of  a  stopwatch, 
started overhead the outer marker, as a back-up for the MAP, in the event of a middle marker failure. 
Interference 
18.  Interference  with  ILS  Reception.    The  ILS  system  can  be  susceptible  to  unwanted  reflected 
energy  arriving  at  the  airborne  receiver,  after  re-radiation  from  terrain  or  airport  buildings.    Such 
interfering signals arriving at the ILS receiver may manifest themselves in one of two ways: 
a. 
Scalloping.  Interference may be displayed as oscillating demands ('scalloping'). 
b. 
Beam Bend.  Interference may be present as a 'beam bend' in the course centreline. 
To protect against interference from static objects, the accuracy of ILS centreline beams is checked by 
periodic  airborne  calibration.    However,  in  certain  mountainous  areas,  and  locations  with  difficult 
topographical detail, successful ILS operation is impossible.  Extreme interference can also be caused 
by re-radiation of the ILS signals from moving objects, particularly other aircraft taxying close to the ILS 
installations, or aircraft taking-off. 
19.  Interference  from  FM  Transmissions.    More  recently,  high  power  FM  broadcasts  have  been 
permitted in the band 88 - 108 MHz, adjacent to the localizer band.  FM interference can manifest itself 
in  the  same  forms  as  other  interference.    It  can  be  overcome  by  including  improved  discrimination 
circuits in the aircraft ILS receiver.  
20.  ILS  Warning  Flags.    At  some  stage,  during  the  processing  of  received  signals,  the  Localizer  and 
Glidepath signals will each be sampled.  Provided each signal exceeds an acceptable level, a separate 
signal  voltage  is  generated  to  withdraw  its  associated  warning  flag  (Glidepath  or  Localizer)  on  the  ILS 
display.  Therefore, the appearance of a warning flag will indicate only one of two possible conditions: 
a. 
The signal strength in the equipment is inadequate. 
b. 
The warning flag power supply has failed. 
Warning flags are therefore not indicative of any interference.  Whether the ILS equipment is protected 
against  FM  interference  or  not,  aircrew  should  always  carry  out  identification  of  the  ILS  transmission 
callsign,  and  monitor  indications  during  the  procedure,  using  all  available  cross-checks,  including 
markers and DME information. 
ILS Categories 
21.  Facility  Performance  Categories.    ICAO  grades  the  specification  and  performance  of  ILS 
ground facilities as Category I, II or III: 
a. 
Facility  Performance  Category  I.    A  Category  I  ILS  provides  guidance  down  to  200 ft  or 
less, above the ILS reference point. 
b. 
Facility  Performance  Category  II.    A  Category  II  ILS  provides  guidance  down  to  50 ft  or 
less, above the ILS reference point. 
c. 
Facility  Performance  Category  III.    A  Category  III  ILS,  with  the  aid  of  ancillary  equipment 
where necessary, provides guidance down to, and along the surface of the runway. 
22.  Operational  Performance  Categories.    The  operational  performance  categories  for  aircraft 
approaches using ILS are shown in Table 1. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
Table 1 Precision Approaches - Categories of Operation 
A  Category  I  operation  is  a  precision  instrument  approach  and  landing  using  ILS, 
Category I 
Microwave  Landing  System  (MLS)  or  Precision  Approach  Radar  (PAR)  with  a  decision 
height not lower than 200 ft and with a runway visual range (RVR) not less than 550 m. 
A Category II operation is a precision instrument approach and landing using ILS or MLS 
Category II 
with  a  decision  height  below  200  ft  but  not  lower  than  100  ft,  and  with  a  RVR  of not less 
than 300 m. 
A  Category  IIIA  operation  is  a  precision  instrument  approach  and  landing  using  ILS  or 
Category IIIA 
MLS, with a decision height lower than 100 ft, and a RVR of not less then 200 m. 
A  Category  IIIB  operation  is  a  precision  instrument  approach  and  landing  using  ILS  or 
Category IIIB 
MLS, with a decision height lower than 50 ft, or no decision height and a RVR lower than 
200 m but not less than 75 m. 
Category IIIC operation has no decision height limitation, and will provide guidance to, and 
Category IIIC 
along the runway and taxiways without reliance on external visual reference (see Note). 
Note:    Table  1  is  a  summary,  based  on  the  operational  figures  promulgated  in  JAR-OPS  1  (Subpart  E)  for 
Categories  I  to  IIIB  inclusive.    Category  IIIC  is  defined  by  ICAO  International  Standards  and  Recommended 
Practices (Annex 10, Vol 1). 
23.  ILS Category II/III Operations.  To operate aircraft to the limits of Category II or III, the following 
requirements must be met: 
a. 
The aircraft must be appropriately equipped and certificated. 
b. 
The aerodrome must be approved for such operations by the national authorities. 
c. 
The crew must be trained and qualified specific to the operation and the aircraft type. 
24.  Low Visibility Procedures (LVP).  LVP is the term used to describe those procedures applied at 
an aerodrome for the purpose of ensuring safe operations during Category II and III approaches, and 
low  visibility  take-offs  (where  the  RVR  is  less  than  400 m).    LVP  may  include  special  taxi  routes, 
runway turn-off points and runway holding points; details will be promulgated in the AIP and FLIPs.  To 
protect  ILS  signals,  pre-take-off  holding  positions  are  more  distant  from  the  runway  than  the  holding 
positions used in good weather.  Taxiways lying within the ILS Sensitive Area are marked by a colour-
coded  taxiway  centreline  (alternate  yellow/green  lights).    Pilots  should  avoid  stopping  their  aircraft 
within  the  ILS  Sensitive  Area,  and  should  make  their  "Runway  Vacated"  call  only  after  the  aircraft  is 
clear of the Sensitive Area. 
25.  Instrument  Approach  Criteria.    Instrument  approach  criteria  for  ILS  equipped  and  cleared 
aircraft  are  promulgated  in  the  Manual  of  Military  Air  Traffic  Management  (Chapter  1)  and  the  Flight 
Information Handbook. 
False ILS Glide Slope Capture 
26.  Different  types  of  ILS  glide  slope  systems  are  in  use  worldwide,  with  different  signal 
characteristics in the area above the standard 3º glide slope.  Sidelobes typically exist above the main 
3º beam at 6º and 9º.  If the ILS glide slope is intercepted from above the 3º beam, with the automatic 
flight control system engaged, the aircraft can capture a false glide slope within a sidelobe, resulting in 
an unexpected pitch-up command and causing the airspeed to drop towards a stall situation. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 -7-13 - Instrument Landing System (ILS) 
7-13  Fig 7 Typical ILS Glide Slope Lobe Pattern 
9 Degree Glidepath (Sidelobe)
6 Degree Glidepath (Sidelobe)
3 Degree Glidepath (Main Lobe)
Procedure
Turn
(Glideslope angles are exaggerated for clarity)
27.  Between  the  3º  and  the  9º  glide  paths,  the  signal  strength  changes  which  can  result  in  an 
observable  movement  of  the  ILS  glide  slope  on  the  primary  flight  display.    A  signal  reversal  may  be 
present  in  the  9º  sidelobe  and  is  sometimes  present  in  the  6º  sidelobe.    This  reversal  activates  the 
glide  slope  capture  mode  after  which  the  autopilot  follows  the  glide  slope  signal  without  restrictions.  
During  flight  tests  the  reversal  resulted  in  the  automatic  flight  control  system  commanding  a  severe 
pitch-up attitude. 
28.  The  ILS  Glide  Path  is  designed  to  be  captured from below after aligning on the Localiser, either 
via ATC vectors or a published procedure.  Ideally, if the aircraft is above the Glide Path, pilots should 
request  an  ATC  reposition  for  a  normal  intercept  and  capture  from  below.    If  the  operational 
circumstances  prevent  this,  then  a  capture  from  above  should  only  be  done  with  extreme  caution, 
using  the  expected  aircraft  height  versus  distance  profile  as  a  check,  and  only  using  basic  flight 
director  modes  such  as  Vertical  Speed  until  the  aircraft  is  confirmed  on  the  real  Glide  Path.    Type 
specific  procedures  may  limit  rates  of  descent  on  an  approach,  and  flying  it  as  a  non-precision 
approach, obeying any step-fixes and the MDH/A, should be considered. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-14 - IFF/SSR 
CHAPTER 14 - IFF/SSR 
Introduction 
1. 
The  military  system,  Identification,  Friend  or  Foe  (IFF),  and  the  equivalent  civilian  system, 
Secondary Surveillance Radar (SSR), are examples of secondary radar systems.  Whereas a primary 
radar system depends on receiving a radar echo reflected passively by a target, in a secondary radar 
system a transmitted radar signal is used to trigger a response from equipment in the target. 
2. 
IFF/SSR is used by air defence (AD) and air traffic control ground installations, and increasingly by 
AD aircraft, to identify radar returns.  The systems are normally operated in conjunction with a primary 
radar, the two aerials being either co-mounted, or arranged to scan synchronously.  The arrangement 
of a typical system is shown schematically in Fig 1.  The ground (or AD aircraft) transmitter, known as 
the interrogator, transmits a coded interrogation signal which is received and decoded by transponders 
in  friendly  aircraft.    Depending  on  the  mode  to  which  the  transponder  is  set,  a  coded  reply  signal  is 
transmitted back to the interrogator.  This reply signal is decoded and shown on the radar display along 
with the primary radar response. 
7-14  Fig 1 Secondary Identification and Primary Radar Systems 
Transponder
Primary Radar
Interrogation
1030 MHz
Reply
1090 MHz
Echo
Ground
Synchronizer
Primary
Interrogator
Radar
Display
3. 
Although IFF and SSR have a number of differences, the operating principle of each is basically 
the same and RAF aircraft are fitted with transponders which can operate with both systems. 
4. 
Operating  Modes.    Military  IFF  has  three  operating  modes,  1,  2,  and  3.    Civilian  SSR  has 
potentially five modes, A, B, C, D, and S, although Mode D is not currently used.  IFF Mode 3 and SSR 
Mode A are identical and normally referred to as Mode 3/A. 
Interrogation Signal 
5. 
The basic interrogation signal is transmitted at a frequency of 1030 MHz and consists of a pair of 
pulses,  each  pulse  having  a  width  of  0.85  µs.    The  separation  of  the  pulses  determines  the  mode  of 
interrogation as shown in Table 1. 
Revised Nov 11   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-14 - IFF/SSR 
7-14  Table 1 Interrogation Signal Formats 
Mode 
Pulse Pair Spacing (µs) 




3/A 


17 

21 

25 

Multiple Pulses 
Normal Replies 
6. 
If the transponder has been set to LOW or NORM, it will reply to an interrogation signal provided 
that the appropriate mode has been selected. 
7. 
A normal reply is transmitted on a frequency of 1090 MHz and consists of a pair of pulses (known as the 
framing pulses) separated by 20.3 µs, with up to twelve information pulses in between.  The framing pulses are 
referred to as F1 and F2, while the twelve information pulses are in four groups of three, designated A, B, C and 
D.  Within a group, the pulses are annotated 1, 2, and 4, (A1, A2, A4; B1, B2, B4 etc), each pulse representing 
one digit of a three-digit binary number.  In this way, the presence or absence of pulses al ows each group to 
represent a decimal number from 0 to 7.  For example, in group A: 
A4 
A2 
A1 
 




No A pulse 
= 0




A1 pulse only 
= 1




A2 pulse only 
= 2




A2 + A1 
= 3




A4 pulse only 
= 4




A4 + A1 
= 5




A4 + A2 
= 6




A4 + A2 + A1 
= 7
It  is  thus  possible  to  transmit  4096  codes,  the  code  being  set  on  the  controller.    For  example,  to 
transmit a code of 4167 the transmitted pulses would be: 
A4 
B1 
C2 + C4 
D1 + D2 + D4 




The transmitted code is displayed on a digital indicator alongside the PPI radar display. 
8. 
There are a total of seven normal reply modes: 
a. 
Military  Mode  1.    Military  Mode  1  replies  comprise  the  framing  pulses  and  the  information 
pulses reflecting the Mode 1 code set on the cockpit control panel. 
b. 
Military  Mode  2.    Military  Mode  2  has  the  same  form  as  Mode  1.    However,  the  code  is  not 
selectable in flight, but is preset on the transponder unit. 
Revised Nov 11   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-14 - IFF/SSR 
c. 
Common  Mode  3/A.    Mode  3/A  has  the  same  form  as  Mode  1,  but  the  controller  has  a 
separate  set  of  code  selection  switches  so  that  replies  can  be  made  to  Mode  1  and  Mode  3/A 
simultaneously.  Mode 3/A is the mode normally used by ATC agencies to establish and maintain 
the identity of an aircraft, to assist in the transfer of control between agencies, and to supplement 
primary radar information. 
d. 
Civil  Mode  B.  Mode B is the same as Mode 3/A but can only be used as an alternative to the 
latter. 
e. 
Civil Mode C.  Mode C is used for the automatic reporting of altitude.  The transponder, in 
association  with  an  encoding  altimeter,  replies  with  a  code  train  indicating  the  aircraft’s  height 
relative to a 1013.25 mb pressure datum.  The code uses 11 of the 12 information pulses and a 
change  occurs  every  100  ft.    Mode  C  is used by air traffic controllers to confirm that aircraft are 
maintaining,  vacating,  reaching,  or  passing  assigned  flight  levels,  and  to  monitor  the  vertical 
separation between transponding aircraft, without recourse to ground/air communication. 
f. 
Civil Mode D.  Mode D is not currently used. 
g. 
Civil  Mode  S.  Mode S was introduced to support the automation of some ATC functions.  Its ful  
title is 'Mode Select' and it provides a two-way data link facility.  Mode S has al  the functionality of Modes A 
and C, in addition to providing other information (Mode S transponders can be installed on their own to 
replace Modes A and C).  One feature of the system is that each aircraft fitted with Mode S is assigned a 
unique address code.  The address, together with the other information, is transmitted once per second in 
a signal known as a 'squitter'.  This signal can be received by ATC units and other Mode S capable aircraft.  
Mode  S  is  a  required  component  of  the  Traffic  Alert  and  Col ision  Avoidance  System  (see  Volume  7, 
Chapter 16), now mandatory in many ATC regions. 
Identification Replies 
9. 
In addition to the normal replies discussed so far, identification replies may be initiated, when required, 
by a switch on the control panel.  These identification replies consist of the normal code followed by a pulse, 
or pulses, which is transmitted for 20 seconds after operation of the switch.  The switch is spring-loaded to 
the off position and is normally marked I/P or IDENT.  Transmission of the signal enables the ground control er 
to  carry  out  rapid  identification  of  a  particular  aircraft  among  the  many  which  may  appear  on  the  display, 
operating in the same mode. 
10.  Military Ident Reply.  This reply is given only on military Mode 1 when the I/P switch is operated.  
It  consists  of  the  selected  information  pulse  train  followed  by  a  second  identical  pulse  train  with  the 
second F1 pulse 4.35 µs after the first F2 pulse. 
11.  Civil Ident Reply.  Civil identification replies are given on military Mode 2, common Mode 3/A, and civil 
Mode B when the identification facility is selected.  It consists of a normal information code train fol owed by a 
further pulse, known as the SP1 pulse, 4.35 µs after the F2 pulse. 
Emergency and Special Purpose Replies 
12.  Operation of the emergency facility allows an emergency reply to be transmitted on military Modes 
1 and 2, common Mode 3/A, and civil Mode B.  This reply consists of a coded information pulse train 
followed by three repeats containing the framing pulses only, with no information pulses.  On common 
Revised Nov 11   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-14 - IFF/SSR 
Mode 3/A or civil Mode B the information pulses contained in the first frame depend on the position of a 
civil/military  emergency  switch.    With  the  switch  set  to  CIV,  the  first  frame  consists  of  an  automatic 
transmission of code 7700.  With the switch to MIL, the first frame consists of the code which is already 
selected.  In reply to military Modes 1 and 2, the first frame consists of the selected information pulse 
code.    No  emergency  reply  is  transmitted  on  civil  Mode  C.    Selection  of  the  emergency  facility 
overrides  identification  replies.    Additionally,  Code  3/A  7500  (unlawful  interference)  and  7600 
(communications failure) are internationally recognized.   
R/T Phraseology 
13.  A  full  list  of  standard  phrases  used  in  connection  with  IFF/SSR  is  published  in  Civil  Aviation 
Publication  Radiotelephony  Manual  (CAP  413).    The  more  frequently  used  standard  phrases  are 
shown in Table 2. 
Table 2 Standard ATC IFF/SSR Phraseology 
Phrase 
Meaning 
Squawk (code) 
Set the code as instructed 
Confirm squawk 
Confirm the code set on the transponder 
Reset squawk (code) 
Reselect assigned code 
Squawk Ident 
Operate the special position identification 
feature 
Squawk Mayday 
Select Emergency 
Squawk Standby 
Select the standby feature 
Squawk Charlie 
Select altitude reporting feature 
Check altimeter setting and confirm (level) 
Check pressure setting and confirm your level 
Stop squawk Charlie 
Deselect altitude reporting 
Stop squawk Charlie, wrong indication 
Stop altitude report, incorrect level readout 
* Confirm (level) 
Check and confirm your level 
** Check selected level. Cleared level is (correct 
Check and confirm your cleared level 
cleared level) 
Confirm you are squawking assigned code (code  To verify that 7500 has been set intentionally 
assigned to the aircraft by ATC) 
Notes: 
*Used to verify the accuracy of the Mode C derived level information displayed to the controller. 
**Where selected flight level is seen to be at variance with an ATC clearance, controllers shall not 
state on the frequency the incorrect SFL as observed on the situation display.  However, 
controllers may query the discrepancy using this phraseology.  For ATC purposes, the generic 
phrase 'selected level' is used to encompass both altitude and flight level. 
SYSTEM REFINEMENTS 
Three-pulse Sidelobe Suppression 
14.  In  secondary  radar,  sidelobes  are  effective  at  greater  ranges  than  in  primary  radar  since 
transponder  transmissions  are  detected  rather  than  target  echoes.    It  is  thus  necessary  to  suppress 
Revised Nov 11   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-14 - IFF/SSR 
any  interrogator  sidelobes  which  would  be  capable  of  triggering  responses  and  the  3-pulse  sidelobe 
suppression system has been adopted as the international standard technique. 
15.  Each  interrogation  consists  of  a  group  of  three  pulses  denoted  P1,  P2,  and  P3.    The  spacing  of  the 
pulses  is  shown  in  Fig  2;  P2,  known  as  the  control  pulse,  is  spaced  at  a  constant  2  µs  from  P1,  and  the 
spacing between P1 and P3, the interrogation pulses, is according to the mode as listed in Table 1. 
7-14  Fig 2 3-Pulse Sidelobe Suppression - Pulse Spacing 
Interrogator 
Interrogator 
Pulse
Pulse
Control
Transponder
Pulse
Suppressed
P1
P2
P3
May or
9
Grey
 
- may not
dB
Area transpond
Replies
2 s
µ
Mode Spacing
16.  The  interrogation  pulses  P1  and  P3  are  transmitted  from  a  rotating  interrogator  aerial,  and  the 
interrogation  pulse  P2  is  transmitted  from  the  control  aerial,  producing  radiation  patterns  as  shown  in 
Fig 3.    The  interrogator  aerial  produces  a  high-power,  narrow  beam  with  lower-power  sidelobes.    The 
control aerial radiates an omnidirectional signal which is modified to produce a radiation pattern trough in 
the direction of interrogation. 
7-14  Fig 3 3-Pulse Sidelobe Suppression - Aerial Polar Diagrams 
P1 & P3
Interrogator
P2
Control
17.  By  comparing  the  relative  amplitudes  of  the  control  and  interrogator  pulses,  the  transponder 
determines  whether  the  interrogation  is  a  correct,  main  lobe  one,  or  due  to  a  sidelobe.    P1  and  P3 
amplitudes  are  greater  than  a  P2  amplitude  only  for  a  correct  main  lobe  interrogation  and  the 
transponder  will  then  reply;  if  P2  is  greater  than  P1  and  P3  the  transponder  is  suppressed.    The 
discrimination  levels  are  indicated  on  Fig  2  which  shows  that  there  is  a  'grey  area'  where  the 
transponder may or may not reply. 
Revised Nov 11   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-14 - IFF/SSR 
Defruiting 
18.  Since  all  IFF/SSR  equipments  work  on  the  same  transmit  and  receive  frequencies,  any 
interrogator  can  trigger  any  transponder  which  is  within  range  and  selected  to  the  appropriate  mode.  
Thus  any  ground  station  can  receive  replies  from  transponders  interrogated  by  other  nearby  ground 
stations.    These unwanted replies appear as interference or 'fruit'.  Defruiting is the process whereby 
this  interference  is  removed.    Adjacent  interrogators  are  operated  at  different  pulse  recurrence 
frequencies (PRFs) and comparator circuits only pass replies at the correct home station PRF. 
Garbling 
19.  Because the length of a transponder code train is about 20 µs it is not always possible to decipher 
replies from aircraft closer than 2 or 3 miles to each other on a radial from the interrogator.  The reply 
signals may garble and the decoder equipment can cause the generation of false targets between the 
aircraft or cause cancellation of all or part of either or both actual returns.  False targets or cancellation 
may occur even though altitude separation between aircraft exists.  Circuits in the decoder equipment 
are  used  to  cancel  garbled  replies,  and  controllers  will  often  ensure  that  only  one  aircraft  within  a 
formation has a transponder operating. 
Mode Interlacing 
20.  In  order  to  use  the  different  modes  for  various  functions,  it  is  necessary  for  them  to  be 
transmitted  separately  from  each  other,  and  on  a  sequential  basis.    The  mixing  of  the  mode 
transmissions is known as mode interlacing.  Each mode is selected at its PRF rate, and each mode 
sequence is selected at aerial rotation rate.  Generally speaking, the use of more than three-mode 
interlace  is  not  satisfactory  operationally,  since  the  number  of  hits  per  scan  for  each  mode 
transmitted  falls  to  a  non-effective  level.    However,  the  interlacing  of  four  or  five  modes  can  be 
achieved if necessary. 
Revised Nov 11   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
CHAPTER 15 - GROUND PROXIMITY WARNING SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
Ground  Proximity  Warning  Systems  (GPWS)  are  designed  to  aid  aircrew  with  their  situational 
awareness,  specifically  with  respect  to  the  terrain  below  and  ahead  of  the  aircraft.    Some  advanced 
GPWS  also  give  advice  of  potential  conflict  with  obstacles,  and  can  be  used  for secondary functions 
such as navigation solutions and weapon aiming. 
Non-predictive Ground Collision Avoidance Systems 
2. 
The first generation of GPWS consist of little more than a radar altimeter (radalt), as described in 
Volume  5,  Chapter  3.    In  such  a  system,  the  radalt  obtains  an  accurate  vertical  measurement  of  the 
distance  from  the  aircraft  to  the  Earth’s  surface  immediately  below  it.    This  height  measurement  is 
compared,  continually,  with  a  Minimum  Height  (MH),  preset  by  the  crew.    When  the  radalt  pointer 
indicates a height less than the MH, a set of electrical contacts will close, resulting in the illumination of 
a low-level warning lamp.  These contacts may also operate an audio warning tone. 
3. 
However,  such  a  system  works  on  an  instantaneous  height reference, based immediately below 
the  aircraft.    It  is  incapable  of  predicting  the  relationship  of  the  aircraft’s  flight  path  and  the  terrain 
ahead  of  the  aircraft  (see  Fig  1).    In  the  case  illustrated,  there  would  be  no  warning  until  the  radalt 
height  is  less  than  the  MH  set.    Such  a  system  is  known  as  a  Non-predictive  Ground  Collision 
Avoidance System. 
7-15  Fig 1 A Simple GPWS with no Predictive Capability 
Aircraft s’
Flight Path
No Prediction
Minimum
of Confliction
Height
Set
Radar Altimeter
Height
Surface
4. 
The development of terrain-referenced navigation systems, and digital terrain databases provided 
the impetus for more capable and advanced GPWS. 
TERRAIN-REFERENCED NAVIGATION SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
5. 
Terrain-referenced navigation (TRN) was developed in the 1960s and 1970s, to provide US cruise 
missiles with a means of updating their INS guidance systems.  A TRN system obtains a sequence of 
radalt  readings,  which,  when  subtracted  from  the  barometric  height,  produces  a  sequence  of  ground 
heights  (see  Fig  2).    The  system  then  searches  a  digital  terrain  database  for  a  match  against  the 
radalt-generated data.  When a precise match is found, the missile’s position can be established.  This 
missile system was called TERrain-COntour Matching (TERCOM). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 10 


AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
7-15  Fig 2 The Principle of Operation of a simple Terrain-referenced Navigation System 
6. 
Because the TRN utilises the changing height profile to determine horizontal position, TRN works 
best when the terrain is of reasonable undulation.  Extremely flat terrain would lead to a larger circle of 
uncertainty  for  position.    For  this  reason,  TERCOM  is  integrated  with  an  inertial  navigation  system 
(INS).    The  TRN  will  take  planned  'waypoint  fixes'  in  areas  of  distinctive  topography,  with  the  INS 
steering from one fix area to another.  From the results of the planned 'waypoint fixes', corrections can 
be made to the missile’s navigation system. 
7. 
TRN systems are not reliant on other external aids, and are unaffected by jamming environments. 
TERPROM 
8. 
One  of  the  more  recent,  commercially  developed  TRN  systems  is  TERPROM  (TERrain  PROfile 
Matching).    This  uses  a  Kalman  filter-based  model  of  the  navigation  system  to  examine  the  terrain 
database and predict the next radalt reading.  The difference between the predicted and actual readings 
is then fed back as an error signal to refine the system accuracy.  TERPROM continues to be developed, 
and can now provide obstacle/terrain avoidance, navigation and weapon aiming solutions.  TERPROM is 
primarily  a  software  product,  and  can  be  hosted  on  an  aircraft’s  mission  computer  hardware.    It  will 
produce  a  quoted  navigational  accuracy  of  better  than  30  metres  circular  error  probable  (CEP) 
horizontally and 5 metres root-mean-square (RMS) vertically, when flying at low level (below 5,000 feet). 
The Digital Terrain Elevation Database (DTED) 
9. 
All  TRN  systems  require  a  terrain  database  in  digital  form.    The  main  agency  developing  and 
compiling  such  databases  for  military  applications  is  the  US  National  Imagery  and  Mapping  Agency 
(NIMA).  NIMA has lead the development of a series of standard digital datasets, termed Digital Terrain 
Elevation Data (DTED). 
10.  A  DTED  is  a  geographic  matrix  of  terrain  elevation  data  points  at  precise  increments  of  latitude 
and  longitude.    These  data  points  are  converted  into  a  numerical  format  for  computer  storage  and 
analysis. 
11.  DTED  Data  Files.    The  DTED  data  files  are  structured  by  geographical  areas,  each  'cell' 
containing data within an area of one degree of latitude by one degree of longitude.  To provide overlap 
between  adjacent  data  files,  the  cell  coverage  includes  the  integer  degree  values  on  all  sides  of  the 
cell. 
12.  Elevation Posts.  Within each cell, the terrain elevation is expressed in metres, at precise points.  Each 
point of elevation is known as an elevation 'post' (Fig 3).  The locations of elevation posts are defined by the 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
intersection of rows and columns within the matrix.  The required matrix intervals, defined in geographic arc 
seconds, may vary slightly within each data set, dependent upon the latitude. 
7-15  Fig 3 Illustration showing a sample of Digital Terrain Elevation Database 
Elevation Posts
03"
N53  00' 15"
03"
06"
03"
06"
W002  00' 00"
03"
06"
06"
03"
06"
N53  00' 00"
W002  00' 30"
13.  DTED  Levels.    By  varying  the  horizontal  distance  between  elevation  posts,  different  levels  of 
DTED standard can be defined.  The present DTED levels are: 
a. 
DTED  Level  0.    DTED  Level  0  has  an  elevation  post  spacing  of  30  arc  seconds.    It  was 
generated  with  the  support  of  select  international  mapping  organizations,  and  is  of  value  to 
scientific, technical and other communities.  It allows a gross representation of the Earth’s surface 
for  general  modelling  and  assessment  activities.    It  is  not  intended  for  any  precision  activity 
involving the safety of the public. 
b. 
DTED Level 1.  DTED Level 1 is a medium resolution elevation data source for military and other 
activities, and is a uniform matrix with post spacing every 3 arc seconds.  The information content is 
approximately equivalent to the contour information represented on a map of 1:250,000 scale. 
c. 
DTED  Level  2.    DTED  Level  2  is  a  high  resolution  elevation  data  source  for  military  and  other 
activities,  and  is  a  uniform  matrix  with  post  spacing  of  one  arc  second.    The  information  content  is 
approximately equivalent to the contour information represented on a map of 1:50,000 scale. 
d. 
DTED Level 3, 4 and 5.  At present, DTED levels 3, 4 and 5 are only proposals. 
Table 1 summarizes post spacings for the various levels of DTED. 
Table 1 DTED Levels 
Approx Ground 
DTED Level 
Post Spacing 
Distance 

30 seconds arc 
~ 1,000 m 

3.0 seconds arc 
~ 100 m 

1.0 second arc 
~  30 m 

0.333 seconds arc 
~  10 m 

0.111 seconds arc 
~   3 m 

0.0370 seconds arc 
~   1 m 
14.  Thinning of Databases.  To save software storage, a terrain database can be 'thinned' in size.  In this 
process, selected columns or rows of elevation posts, deemed not to be significant, can be deleted. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 10 





AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
PREDICTIVE GROUND COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEMS 
Requirements of a Predictive System 
15.  The latest GPWS are capable of analysing: 
a. 
The aircraft’s position in space. 
b. 
The aircraft’s instantaneous velocities. 
c. 
The terrain within a specified search area ('scan' area) ahead of the aircraft. 
By  carrying  out  comparisons  with  this  data,  it  is  possible  to  predict  imminent  conflict  with  the  terrain.  
This  function  is  called  a  Predictive  Ground  Collision  Avoidance  System  (PGCAS).    The  basic 
requirements of a PGCAS are illustrated in Fig 4 and described in the following paragraphs. 
4-29  Fig 4 Requirements of a Typical PGCAS 
Aircraft Position
Digital Search
and Velocity
(Scan) Area
Set Warning
Height
Terrain Database
16.  Aircraft Position and Velocity.  The aircraft’s position and kinematic state will be provided by the 
aircraft’s navigation system, which may be based upon: 
a. 
Inertial Navigation System (INS). 
b. 
Global Positioning System (GPS). 
Most systems will use a mixture of sensor sources to allow a measure of redundancy. 
17.  Database  Storage.    The  terrain  database  is  held  in  digital  format  in  the  aircraft.    The  aircraft’s 
concept of operations will dictate the requirements for the level of terrain data held.  A typical fast-jet 
will  require  the  most  precise  and  concentrated  database  available,  but  only  over  a  limited  theatre  of 
operations.    If deployed to another geographical area, then a 'theatre upload' of terrain database can 
take place.  On the other hand, a strategic transport aircraft might require a world-wide database on-
board at all times.  Even in this latter case, memory storage space might be limited, therefore the data 
density  level  will  have  to  be  varied,  to  be  less  concentrated  for  'en  route'  areas,  and  perhaps  highly 
concentrated in the surrounds of terminal airfields. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
18.  Scan  Area.    The  PGCAS  must  mathematically  search  an  area  of  the  digital  terrain  database, 
forward  from  the  aircraft’s  present  position.    The  size  and  shape  of  this  'scan'  area  is  defined  by  the 
PGCAS.  In some systems, the size and shape of the scan area will be responsive to: 
a. 
Groundspeed  Changes.    The  faster  the  aircraft’s  speed,  the  longer  the  length  of  the  scan 
area. 
b. 
Navigational  Accuracy.    Any  variations  in  the  estimated  accuracy  of  the  positional  output 
from the navigational system may be used to adjust the scan pattern or size. 
c. 
Turns.  A scan area based purely ahead of the aircraft is insufficient if predictive warning is 
required  during  turning  manoeuvres.    A  sophisticated  system  will  expand  the  width  of  the  scan 
area to look into the turn, in addition to monitoring directly ahead. 
19.  Set  Warning  Height.    A  PGCAS  will  have  the  capability  to  store  a  Set  Warning  Height  (SWH).  
This SWH might be set by: 
a. 
The pilot.  The pilot will be able to set the required warning height to suit the required ground 
clearance.  A cockpit indication will show the height set. 
b. 
The  Aircraft.    The  PGCAS  might  store  and  utilize  a  series  of  built-in  minimum  heights, 
dependent upon the stage of flight. 
In  some  PGCAS,  the  SWH  is  automatically  factored  for  safety;  it  will  be  increased  if  the  navigation 
system detects inaccuracy in either position or velocity data. 
20.  Warnings If the predicted aircraft flight path penetrates the SWH, the PGCAS will give warning 
to the crew by Audio and/or Visual means. 
Operation of the PGCAS 
21.  The  PGCAS  uses  the  known  aircraft  position,  the  aircraft’s  velocities,  the  scan  area  and  the 
stored terrain data to provide a warning whenever the aircraft is going to penetrate the SWH. 
22.  The PGCAS carries out continuous calculations based upon the following (see Fig 5): 
a. 
The  profile  of  the  terrain  ahead  of  the  aircraft,  increased  according  to  the  SWH and known 
obstacles. 
b. 
A timed recovery manoeuvre based upon: 
(1)  A set period to allow for the pilot’s reactions. 
(2)  A time for the aircraft to roll to wings level, using a set roll rate. 
(3)  A recovery 'pull' at a pre-set 'g' level, with an allowance for a specific 'g' onset rate. 
c. 
The  time  remaining  on  present  flight  parameters  before  the  recovery  manoeuvre 
intersects the SWH/terrain profile. 
As  the  time  remaining,  at  c  above,  approaches  zero, a cautionary warning can be generated.  When 
the time variable reaches zero, a survival warning is generated, and the pilot must initiate a pull-up. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
7-15  Fig 5 Operation of the Predictive Ground Collision Avoidance System 
Aircraft s’ Flight Path
Roll to
Wings Level
Pilot
Fixed 'g' Pull 
Reaction
GPWS
Time
Warning
'g' Onset
Set Warning
Height
+ Safety 
Factor
Surface
23.  The  PGCAS  does  not  make  direct  use  of  the  radalt  data,  therefore  warnings  can  be 
provided regardless of aircraft attitude, turn rate or roll rate. 
24.  Worst-case  Profile.    As  previously  mentioned,  the  SWH,  illustrated  in  Fig  5,  may  be 
increased by a safety factor if errors are detected in position or velocity information.  In addition, 
any  known  obstructions  can  be  added  to  the  terrain  (see  para  30).    In  some  PCGAS,  this 
amended SWH profile is referred to as the 'worst-case profile'. 
Crew Warnings 
25.  The GPWS can give warnings to the crew in either audio or visual formats. 
a. 
Audio  Warnings.    Audio  warnings  might  be  in  the  form  of  a  warning  tone  or  as  a  pre-
recorded voice message.  The voice message is generally chosen as the prime method in most 
GPWS.  A typical voice warning might say "PULL-UP, PULL-UP".   
b. 
Visual Cues.  Visual warnings can be presented as cues in the Head-up Display (HUD).  The 
cue  might  take  the  form  of  a  breakaway  cross  (Fig  6a),  or  an  arrow  indicating  direction  to  fly  in 
order to achieve safe terrain separation (Fig 6b). 
7-15  Fig 6 GPWS HUD Warnings 
a  Breakaway Cross Cue
b  Arrow Cue
26.  Audio Levels.  An audio warning must be capable of being heard, even over aircraft and cockpit 
noise  levels  in  a  busy  environment.    During  evaluation  trials,  assessment  can  be  made  of  the 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
background noise for a specific aircraft type.  A volume setting can then be established, giving 100% 
chance of a warning being heard. 
27.  Nuisance Warnings.  Due to the design constraints within a GPWS, it is possible that the crew 
will  continue  to  receive  warnings,  even  though  they  have  taken  action  to  remedy  the  situation.    A 
continual  flow  of  audio  warnings  can  be  a  nuisance,  and  provides  potential  for  distraction,  even  to 
experienced aircrew.  For this reason, the GPWS can usually be manually deselected if required. 
System Failures 
28.  The predictive system does not rely on a continuous input from the radalt.  Therefore, the PGCAS 
ground proximity warnings will still be provided, irrespective of radalt status. 
29.  The system will revert to a non-predictive system if: 
a. 
The GPWS leaves the geographical coverage of DTED. 
b. 
Position  or  velocity  sensor  failures  are  detected  (this  reversionary  mode  does  require  a 
serviceable radalt). 
SECONDARY FUNCTIONS OF THE GPWS 
Obstacle Warning and Cueing 
30.  Some  GPWS  are  capable  of  providing  warnings  to  the  pilot,  to  advise  of  proximity  to  vertical 
obstructions.  Details of the location and elevation of known obstructions (man-made features such as 
radio  masts,  chimneys,  etc)  will  be  held  in  digital  format  in  files that are separate to the main DTED.  
This  obstruction  data  can  be  included  as  part  of  the  PGCAS  to  add  obstacle  avoidance  into  the 
predictive  avoidance.    In  addition, obstruction warnings can be used to assist low level operations, in 
order to increase aircrew situational awareness. 
31.  Digital  Vertical  Obstruction  Files.    The  obstruction  data  within  the  TRN  is  provided  by  the 
Defence Mapping Agency (DMA) by means of the Digital Vertical Obstruction File (DVOF).  The DVOF 
will  be  updated  regularly,  and  will  contain  all  known  obstacles  above  a  stated  height  above  ground 
level, plus a selection of smaller obstacles.  The DVOF can be amended or changed quickly to meet 
theatre requirements. 
32.  Obstacle  Warning  and  Cueing.    The  obstacle  warning and cueing (OWC) facility searches the 
database within its own specified scan area.  When an obstacle is detected ahead of, or to either side 
of  the  aircraft,  the  system  will  generate  audio  and/or  visual  cues.    An  audio  cue  might  be  a  voice 
warning saying "OBSTRUCTION".  A visual cue can be presented in the HUD.  A simple HUD format is 
to  use  just  a  text  warning  ("OBST")  for  obstacles  directly  ahead,  or  combined with an arrow showing 
that the obstacle is left or right of the aircraft’s fore-aft axis.  The arrow cue will not point directly at the 
obstruction;  it  merely  advises  the  pilot  which  side  of  the  nose  he  must  look  to  search  visually  for  the 
obstruction.    Fig  7  shows  a  HUD  indicating  an  obstruction  to  the  right.    More  complex  HUD  displays 
may overlay a warning marker on an image of the obstacle. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
7-15  Fig 7 HUD Obstacle Cueing 
Obstacle Cueing
     Symbol
33.  Obstacle Priority System.  A priority system will be built into the obstacle cueing, such that the 
HUD displays the most significant obstacle at that moment (this might be the largest obstruction, or the 
one closest to track).  Because multiple obstacles may lie within the scan area, but only the priority one 
is  cued,  it  is  important  for  aircrew  to  scan  visually  for  other  obstructions,  as  normal.    Furthermore, 
although the OWC will indicate obstructions such as radio masts, it may not account for any associated 
guide wires. 
Terrain Avoidance Cueing 
34.  Some  GPWS  systems  have  a  terrain  avoidance  cueing  (TAC)  mode.    The  TAC  mode  provides 
pitch commands to give an indication as to how close the aircraft is to the minimum height setting.  The 
pitch commands can be sent to the autopilot for automatic terrain following, or to the HUD for the pilot 
to follow manually.  The HUD illustration in Fig 8 shows a 'fly-up' symbol above the aircraft’s Velocity 
Vector  (VV)  symbol.    The  TAC  facility  is  a  passive  software  solution.    As  such,  it  not  to  be  confused 
with active warning systems like Terrain Following Radar.   
7-15  Fig 8 HUD Terrain Avoidance Cueing 
Fly-up Symbol
VV Symbol
Navigation Solution 
35.  As  described  in  paras  5  to  7,  the  TRN  component  of  the  GPWS  is  capable  of  determining  the 
aircraft position in 3D.  The TRN can therefore be used as a stand-alone sensor, or be integrated with 
the  other  navigation  sensors,  to  produce  a  navigation  solution  giving  a  high  level  of  accuracy  in 
horizontal and vertical planes.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
Weapon Aiming 
36.  The TRN can provide a passive target ranging facility, based on its accurate knowledge of aircraft 
height and target elevation.  The system can calculate an instantaneous range from the aircraft to any 
point  in  the  terrain  database  (Fig  9).    This  range  can  be  used  for  weapon  aiming  calculations.  
Additionally,  it  can  be  integrated  with  some  forward-looking  sensor  or  HUD  to  provide  the  range, 
bearing and elevation of a target in the pilot’s field of view.  Such a system has the advantages of being 
totally self-contained and resistant to countermeasures. 
7-15  Fig 9 Weapon Aiming Function 
Weapon
Trajectory
Height above
Computed
Target
Impact 
Point
Plan Range
SUMMARY 
General 
37.  The combination of trade names and abbreviations concerned with GPWS operation can appear 
confusing  (e.g.  GPWS,  E(nhanced)GPWS,  TAWS  (Terrain  Awareness  and  Warning  System)).  
However, a predictive GPWS must employ the principles described within this chapter, ie to compare 
the  aircraft’s  position  and  velocity  with  an  area  of  digital  terrain  database  ahead  of  the  aircraft,  to 
determine whether the aircraft is about to intercept a pre-set minimum height. 
38.  The  ability  to  choose  and  mix  component  parts  gives  an  endless  permutation  for  design.    The 
precise  components  of  a  GPWS  will  depend  upon  the  manufacturer’s  choice  for  the  TRN  system, 
navigational sensors and radar altimeter.  A typical fit for a high-performance military front-line aircraft 
might be: 
a. 
INS/GPS mix, for position and velocity sources. 
b. 
Radar Altimeter. 
c. 
TERPROM, hosted on a Terrain Processing Module in the mission computer. 
d. 
DTED Level 1. 
e. 
A DVOF. 
39.  A GPWS system in a civilian transport aircraft will not require the full TRN elements and functions 
needed for military aircraft. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 10 


AP3456 -7-15 - Ground Proximity Warning Systems 
Future Developments 
40.  GPWS and TRN systems are developing continuously.  Terrain database information can be used 
for many purposes, and might, for example, be displayed to aircrew in plan format, on colour screens. 
41.  It  is  possible  to  produce  a  three-dimensional  lattice  by  joining  the  tops  of  the  DTED  elevation 
posts.    In  this  manner,  a  synthetic  view  of  the  terrain  ahead  of  the  aircraft  can  be  constructed  (see 
Fig 10).    It  may  be  possible  to  display  this  terrain  as  ridge  lines, superimposed on the HUD, or other 
optical displays. 
4-29  Fig 10 Illustration of a Synthetic Terrain Matrix 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
CHAPTER 16 - AIRBORNE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  increasing  intensity  of  air  traffic  has  led  to  an  increased  risk  of  an  airborne  collision.    In  an 
effort to improve airborne safety, most civil aircraft and increasingly more military aircraft are fitted with 
equipment designed to provide collision  warning.  Airborne Collision Avoidance  Systems (ACAS) are 
designed to provide collision avoidance protection and airspace situational awareness between aircraft 
independent  of  air  traffic  control.    The  principal  benefit  of  ACAS  as  a  ‘last  resort’  collision  avoidance 
system  is  enhanced  safety  rather  than  operational  benefits.    A  Traffic  Alert  and  Collision  Avoidance 
System (TCAS) is a type of an Airborne Collision Avoidance System.  A detailed description of ACAS 
can be found in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Document 9863, Airborne Collision 
Avoidance System (ACAS) Manual. 
TRAFFIC ALERT AND COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM (TCAS) 
General Description 
2. 
TCAS  utilizes  Secondary  Surveillance  Radar  (SSR)  technology  and  is  an  example  of  a  secondary 
radar  system.    The  system  operates  without  any  reference  to  ground-based  systems  and  utilizes  the 
transmissions made by aircraft on IFF frequencies for ATC purposes.  TCAS monitors the airspace around 
an  aircraft  for  other  aircraft  equipped  with  a  corresponding  active  transponder.    It  warns  pilots  of  the 
presence  of  other  transponder-equipped  aircraft,  which  may  present  a  threat  of  mid-air  collision.    The 
equipment  interrogates  the  transponders  of  other  aircraft  and  using  the  replies,  tracks  the  slant  range, 
altitude (Mode C) and relative bearing of each contact.  Using successive replies, TCAS calculates the time 
to reach the Closest Point of Approach (CPA) with the intruder aircraft by dividing the range by the closure 
rate.  The time to CPA is the parameter used for issuing alerts.  With Mode C equipped aircraft, TCAS also 
calculates the time to co-altitude. 
Capability Levels 
3. 
There are three levels of capability within TCAS technology: 
a. 
TCAS  
TCAS  Ⅰ  provides  the  aircraft  crew  with  bearing  and  distance  information  of  a 
possible hazard, which helps them to visually identify the traffic by issuing a Traffic Advisory (TA) alert 
(see para 6a).  The TA display will indicate the traffic’s range and bearing but will not recommend an 
escape manoeuvre. 
b. 
TCAS .  
 TCAS Ⅱ provides the same information as TCAS Ⅰ, but, in addition, gives a 
recommended  vertical  escape  manoeuvre  by  issuing  a  Resolution  Advisory  (RA)  alert  (see 
para 6b).    Although  bearing  information  is  provided  on  the  traffic,  it  is  only  to  aid  visual 
identification. 
c. 
TCAS  
 TCAS Ⅲ is an improvement on TCAS Ⅱ, since it has all the features of TCAS Ⅱ
but can provide RAs in the horizontal as well as vertical plane.  This system is not yet fully developed. 
4. 
ACAS  carriage  requirements  are  detailed  in  Article  39(2)  and  Schedule  5  of  the  Air  Navigation 
Order 2009. Military Requirements are contained within: 
Revised Aug 13  Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
a. 
MAA Regulatory Publications: Air Traffic Management (ATM) 3000 Series Regulatory Article 
RA 3013 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems.  
b. 
MAA Manual of Military Air Traffic Management Chapter 13: Airborne Collision Avoidance  
System: Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System Regulatory Cross-Reference.   
Some  aircraft  in  UK  military  service  employ  a  Traffic  Advisory  System  (TAS).  TAS  is  a  TCAS  I 
derivative that interrogates aircraft out to 20 nautical miles (nm), but only displays aircraft out to 7nm.  
Because of this similar capability, yet reduced functionality of a TCAS I, it is designated as a TAS.  
Components 
5. 
The equipment required to provide a TCAS Ⅱ system consists of (see Fig 1): 
a. 
A  TCAS  Computer  with  Transmit/Receive  Unit  and  two  aerials.    The  upper  aerial  is 
directional; the lower aerial may be either directional or omni-directional. 
b. 
A Mode S transponder with top and bottom omni-directional aerial. 
c. 
A combined Mode S/TCAS control panel. 
d. 
A cockpit display and aural warning generator. 
7-16 Fig 1 TCAS II Component Diagram 
Radar Altitude &
Top Directional
Discrete Inputs
Pressure
Antenna
Altitude
TCAS
Computer
Mode s
Unit
Transponder
Bottom
RA
RA
Onmni
Display
Display
Antenna
(Optional
Aural
Directional
Annunciation
Mode S/TCAS
Antenna)
Control
Panel
TA
Display
Revised Aug 13  Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
Alerts 
6. 
Airborne  Collision  Avoidance  Systems  can  issue  two  types  of  alert,  a  Traffic  Advisory  (TA)  and  a 
Resolution Advisory (RA). 
a. 
Traffic Advisory. 
TA alerts warn the pilot of possible conflicting aircraft but do not recommend 
avoiding maneuvers.  They help the pilot in the visual search for the intruder aircraft and prepare for a 
possible RA. 
b. 
Resolution Advisory. 
RA  alerts  recommend  vertical  manoeuvres  that  will  either  increase  or 
maintain the existing vertical separation between aircraft.  Where both aircraft are fitted with TCAS II, 
the  ACASs  co-ordinate  their  RAs  through  the  Mode  S  data  link  in  order  to  select  complementary 
resolution senses (one may recommend a climb, the other may recommend a descent or to maintain 
level in order to provide separation between aircraft).  
Protected Airspace 
7. 
The  idea  of  protected  airspace  is  based  on  studies  carried  out  by  Dr  John  Morrell  into  the 
fundamental  physics  of  the  collision  avoidance  problem.    Morrell  published  his  findings  in  1956  and 
introduced  the  concept  of  Tau  (τ  -  the  Greek  letter  't'),  which  he  defined  as  the  range  of  a  conflicting 
aircraft divided by its closure rate, thus the defining parameter for TCAS is time.  All TCAS technology is 
based on this concept.  TCAS II Protected Airspace is illustrated in Fig 2.  The use of the term ‘protected 
airspace’  around  a  TCAS  equipped  aircraft  does  not  prevent  an  intruder  aircraft  from  penetrating  that 
airspace.  The protected airspace merely defines the volume of air in which a TA or RA is triggered. 
7-16 Fig 2 TCAS II Protected Airspace 
Traffic Advisory Area
TAU = 20 - 48 secs
Resolution Advisory Area
TAU = 15 - 35 secs
Host Aircraft (TCAS Equipped)
Intruder Aircraft
Vertical extent dependant
upon vertical Tau and fixed
altitude thresholds (see Table 1)
Sensitivity Levels 
8. 
Sensitivity levels (SL).  The values of Tau which are used to trigger either TA or RA warnings 
depend  on  the  sensitivity  level  (SL)  of  the  equipment  and  are  between  20 and 48  seconds  and 
15 to 35  seconds  respectively.    Increasing  the  SL  increases  the  trigger  values  of  Tau.    The 
highest values (48 secs TA and 35 secs RA) apply  to level 7, which is used above 20,000 ft; the 
lowest  values  (20  secs  TA  and  15  secs  RA)  are  used  at  lower  levels  (see  Table  1).    The  longer 
warning  times  are  necessary  at  high  levels  where  manoeuvres  take  longer  to  take  effect  and 
speeds are generally higher.  The SL mode is selected by the pilot via the TCAS Control Panel. 
Revised Aug 13  Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
a. 
Standby. 
 
When  selected  to  Standby,  TCAS  operates  at  SL  1  and  TCAS  does 
not transmit any interrogations.  Standby is normally only selected on the ground or if TCAS 
has failed and is the only way that SL 1 is selected. 
b. 
TA-ONLY. 
When  selected  to  TA-ONLY,  TCAS  is  placed  into  SL  2.    At  this  setting, 
TCAS performs all surveillance functions and will issue TAs as required but will inhibit RAs. 
c. 
TA-RA.  When selected to TA-RA TCAS automatically selects the appropriate SL based 
on the altitude of the host aircraft.  The SL settings are given in Table 1. 
d. 
Ground Based Control. 
TCAS II has the capability for ground-based control of the SL 
built  into  its  design,  allowing  the  SL  to  be  reduced  from  the  ground  using  a  Mode  S  uplink 
message.  This facility is already being used at major international airfields with complex taxi 
patterns as an aid to the ATC ground controller. 
Fig 3 shows the relationship between Range and Closure Speed for sensitivity level 5 for both TA and 
RA.  Note that the boundary lines are modified at close range to provide added protection against slow 
closure encounters (see Note 2, Table 1). 
Table 1 Sensitivity Level Definition and Alarm Thresholds 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(4) 
Own Altitude 
Sensitivity 
Tau 
DMOD 
ZTHR (ft) 
ALIM 
(feet) 
Level 
(seconds) 
(nm) 
Alt Threshold 
(ft) 
TA
RA
TA
RA
TA
RA
RA
< 1000 (AGL)
2
20
N/A
0.30
N/A
850
N/A
N/A
1000 – 2350 (AGL)
3
25
15
0.33
0.20
850
600
300
2350 – 5000
4
30
20
0.48
0.35
850
600
300
5000 – 10000
5
40
25
0.75
0.55
850
600
350
10000 – 20000
6
45
30
1.00
0.80
850
600
400
20000 – 42000
7
48
35
1.30
1.10
850
700
600
> 42000
7
48
35
1.30
1.10
1200
800
700
Notes:
1. 
Tau – Time to go to CPA.  Time to CPA is the range Tau, and time to co-altitude is the vertical Tau. 
Range Tau = slant range (nm) / closing speed (kt) x 3600 
Vertical Tau = altitude separation (ft) / vertical closing speed (ft/min) x 60
2. 
DMOD – With very low closure rates, intruder aircraft can get very close in range without crossing the Tau 
boundaries and thus triggering a TA or RA.  In these circumstances, a modified definition of range Tau is used 
where the system uses a set range to trigger alerts.  This range is called Distance MODification (DMOD).
3. 
ZTHR – Where the vertical closure rate between the TCAS and intruder aircraft is low, or when they are 
close but diverging in altitude, TCAS uses a fixed altitude threshold, in conjunction with the vertical Tau, to 
determine whether a TA or RA should be issued.  This value is referred to as ZTHR.
4. 
ALIM – The latest software issue for TCAS introduced a horizontal miss distance (HMD) filter to reduce the 
number of RAs against intruder aircraft having a large horizontal separation at CPA.  As part of the range test, the 
HMD filter can also terminate an RA prior to the Altitude LIMit (ALIM) being obtained to minimize altitude 
displacement when the filter predicts that the horizontal separation at CPA will be large.
Revised Aug 13  Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
7-16 Fig 3 TA/RA Tau Values for Sensitivity Level 5 
6
5
4
)
S
M
40 sec Tau (TA)
25 sec Tau (RA)
(N
E
G
3
N
A
R
2
1
100
200
300
400
500
RATE OF CLOSURE (KTS)
9. 
Non-threat  Traffic.    Apart  from  traffic  which  generates  RAs  and  TAs,  as  described  earlier, 
TCAS will also show all other transponding traffic within range, giving the pilot a good situational 
awareness.    All  intruder  aircraft  more  than  1,200  feet  above  or  below  the  host  aircraft,  or  more 
than  6  nm  away  are  considered  to  be  non-threat  traffic.    When  the  relative  height  is  less  than 
1,200  ft  or  the  range  is  less  than  6  nm,  the  traffic  is  considered  as  'Proximity'  traffic,  although  it 
may still not be treated as a threat.  
Operation 
10.  TCAS  uses  the  same  transponder  principle,  and  the  same  frequencies,  as  the  ground-based 
IFF/SSR  system,  which  has  been  in  use  by  Air  Traffic  Control  for  many  years.    For  successful 
operation, TCAS depends on all aircraft carrying a serviceable IFF/SSR transponder; any aircraft not 
so equipped will be invisible to the system. 
11.  TCAS  equipped  aircraft  will  elicit  information  from  all  aircraft  within  range  by  sending  out  an 
interrogation  signal  on  1030  MHz.    Suitably  equipped  aircraft  will  respond  to  this  interrogation  on 
1090 MHz.    The  directional  antenna  enables  TCAS  to  calculate  the  responding  aircrafts’  bearings 
while the times to reply permit range calculations to be carried out.  Aircraft with IFF/SSR Mode C also 
transmit  their  altitudes.    In  addition,  TCAS  equipped  aircraft  transmit  an  omni-directional  signal  from 
Mode S transponders, known as 'Squitter', once per  second, on 1090  MHz.  This will alert  any other 
TCAS equipped aircraft of their location. 
12.  TCAS  aircraft  use  the  data  they  have  collected  to  compile  a  list  of  aircraft  in  their  vicinity.    The 
system can hold information on up to 45 contacts, of which it can display 30 and calculate RAs on 3 
simultaneously.  Once the TCAS equipped aircraft has compiled its list, it updates it once per second, 
thereby ensuring that it is operating on current data. 
Revised Aug 13  Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
13.  Using this compiled list, TCAS determines which, if any, of the contacts represents a potential collision 
threat.    It  does  this  by  predicting  the  future  positions  of  all  contacts  by  applying  the  appropriate  rates  of 
change of range and altitude to their current positions.  Once the threats have been determined, TCAS will 
provide the appropriate warnings to ensure that vertical separation is at least 300 ft at low altitudes or 700ft 
at high altitudes (see Table 1, ALIM).  When the potential conflict is another TCAS equipped aircraft, the 
two TCAS computers will 'agree' a course of action and co-ordinate their respective RAs. 
TCAS Aural / Visual Warnings 
14.  Aural Warnings.    If  the  criteria  for  issuing  a  TA  or  RA  are  met,  the  crew  will  be  alerted  with  an 
aural  warning.    The  warning  will  depend  on  the  version  of  the  equipment  software  and  operators 
should be familiar with the current state of their equipment.  Warnings in use at the time of publication 
are given in Table 2. 
Table 2 TCAS Aural Annunciations 
TCAS Advisory
Version 7.1
Version 7.0
Version 6.04a
Traffic Advisory (TA) 
Traffic, Traffic 
Climb RA 
Climb, Climb
Climb, Climb, Climb
Descend, Descend, 
Descend RA 
Descend, Descend 
Descend
Altitude Crossing Climb RA 
Climb, Crossing Climb; Climb, Crossing Climb
Altitude Crossing Descend 
Descend, Crossing Descend; Descend, Crossing Descend 
RA 
Adjust Vertical Speed, 
Reduce Climb, 
Reduce Climb RA 
Level Off, Level Off 
Adjust
Reduce Climb
Adjust Vertical Speed, 
Reduce Descent, 
Reduce Descent RA 
Level Off, Level Off 
Adjust
Reduce Descent
RA Reversal to Climb RA 
Climb, Climb NOW; Climb, Climb NOW
RA Reversal to Descend RA 
Descend, Descend NOW; Descend, Descend NOW
Increase Climb RA 
Increase Climb, Increase Climb
Increase Descent RA 
Increase Descent, Increase Descent
Maintain Rate RA 
Maintain Vertical Speed, Maintain
Monitor Vertical Speed
Altitude Crossing 
Maintain Rate RA 
Maintain Vertical Speed, Crossing Maintain 
Monitor Vertical Speed 
(Climb and Descend) 
Adjust Vertical Speed, 
Weakening of RA 
Level Off, Level Off 
Monitor Vertical Speed 
Adjust
Preventive RA (no change in 
Monitor Vertical Speed, 
Monitor Vertical Speed 
vertical speed required) 
Monitor Vertical Speed
RA Removed 
Clear of Conflict
15.  Visual  Warnings.    In  'non-glass'  cockpits,  TCAS  information  is  normally  presented  on  a 
combined  TCAS/VSI  display.    The  precise  implementation  in  glass  cockpit  aircraft  (Electronic  Flight 
Information  Systems  (EFIS))  will  vary,  but  RA  information  is  normally  shown  as  a  commanded  pitch 
manoeuvre  via the flight director system on the  Primary Flight Display, or Head-up Display,  whereas 
TA information will appear separately on the Navigation Display. 
Revised Aug 13  Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
16.  The TCAS/VSI  display.    Fig  4  shows  a  combined  TCAS  and  VSI  display.    The  pointer  and  the 
scale  round  the  perimeter  represent  an  electronic  version  of  a  VSI.    RA  information  is  shown  by  the 
red and green arcs; the aircraft should ideally fly at a rate of climb or descent shown by the green arc 
and should avoid the red arc.  In order to de-clutter the number of traffic symbols, displays are usually 
configurable  in  terms  of  range  and  ABOVE/BELOW.  When  in  normal  mode  the  display  will  show 
transponding  aircraft  2700’  above  and  below  the  host  aircraft  to  a  range  selected.   When  ABOVE  is 
selected the upper height, range displayed is extended and when BELOW is selected the lower height 
range displayed is extended.  Depending on software this allows the display to show traffic up to 9900’ 
vertically displaced from the host aircraft for climb/descent phases of flight. The ABOVE/BELOW and 
range selections have no control over which IFF equipped aircraft are interrogated by the host aircraft. 
If  an  intruder  which  generates  a  TA  is  outside  the  parameters  selected  for  the  display  it  will 
automatically generate a TA warning symbol irrespective of the display settings. 
7-16 Fig 4 TCAS/VSI Display 
KEY
8 N
  M
Own A
  ircraft
1
2
Threat A
  irc
r raft Resolution 
A
Rd
e v
s i
oslo
u rty
i  
o L
n ev
e
A e
d l
.5
+11
4
visory Level
4
Threat A
  irc
r raft Traffic 
+25
+0
+ 1
-02
Tr
A
T a
d
r ff
vfiic
s  
oA
r
  d
y  v
Lis
e o
v r
e y
lr  L
  evel
+2
+ 5
0
6
Proximate A
  ircra
r ft (w
( ithin 
or
-02
0
12
, 0
2 0
0 ’
0 a
f n
t  d
a  6
n  
d n
  m
6  )
nm)
- 02
+11
1
or
Non T
  hreat A
  ircr
c aft
f
.5
4
Ve
V rt
r ical speed of more 
1
than 500ft/
t min
2
+11
1    
    
  Relative A
  ltitude
-
Display Symbology 
17.  Display Symbology.  In Fig 4, the aircraft symbol represents the user’s position and is surrounded 
by a circle of dots at a range of 2 nm.  The display scale, 8 nm in the diagram, usually has ranges of 4, 8 
and  16  nm which are  user-selectable.   The coloured shapes represent  the  various threat and  non-threat 
aircraft.  The symbols may have an altitude tag associated with them.  This tag shows the relative altitude 
in hundreds of feet; a + sign indicates that the intruder is above the host aircraft, while a – sign shows that it 
is below.  If the intruder is climbing or descending at a rate of 500 ft per minute or greater, a trend arrow, in 
the  appropriate sense,  will be shown  next  to  the symbol.  If the  intruder is  not reporting altitude, then  no 
numbers or trend arrows will appear.  A decode of the various symbols is given in the KEY to Fig 4; a more 
detailed explanation, with examples, is given in the following sub-paragraphs. 
a. 
Non-threat Traffic.  The basic symbol for non-threat traffic is an open white diamond, as shown in 
Fig 5, with the alternative being an open blue (Cyan) diamond (Fig 6).  In the example at Fig 5, there is 
no  altitude  information  associated  with  the  symbol,  indicating  that  it  is  from  an  aircraft  which  is  not 
reporting altitude, but since it is not a threat then it must be more than 6 nm away.  In the example at 
Fig 6, the contact is 1,700 ft below the host aircraft and is climbing at a rate of at least 500 ft per minute. 
Revised Aug 13  Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
7-16 Fig 5 Non-threat traffic, not reporting altitude 
7-16 Fig 6 Alternative display for non-threat contact – Cyan instead of White 
b. 
Proximate (or Proximity) Traffic.  A filled white diamond (Fig 7) represents traffic which is 
within  1,200  ft  vertically  or  6  nm  laterally.    This  is  known  as  'Proximate  Traffic’  but  is  not 
considered to be a threat.  As with non-threat traffic, the symbol may also be Cyan in colour. 
7-16 Fig 7 Proximity Traffic 1,100 ft below, climbing at 500 ft/min or more 
c. 
Traffic Advisory.  Traffic considered to be a potential threat is displayed as a yellow circle 
(Fig 8).  In the example shown, the traffic is 900 feet above the host aircraft and is descending at 
a rate of at least 500 ft per minute. 
7-16 Fig 8 Traffic Advisory traffic 900 ft above, descending at 500 ft/min or more 
d. 
Resolution  Advisory.    A  solid  red  square  (Fig  9)  indicates  that  the  intruder  aircraft  is 
considered  to  be  a  collision  hazard.    This  symbol  appears  together  with  an  aural  warning  and  a 
vertical manoeuvre indication on the VSI.  An RA can also be upgraded or altered once issued – for 
example an aircraft that has responded to a ‘CLIMB CLIMB’ RA may then be issued an enhanced 
RA  (‘ADJUST  VERTICAL  SPEED,  ADJUST’)  or  an  RA  reversal  (‘DESCEND,  DESCEND  NOW’).  
In Fig 8, the contact is now 500 feet below the host aircraft at a steady altitude. 
Revised Aug 13  Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
7-16 Fig 9 Resolution Advisory traffic 500 ft below 
Reaction to TACS II Warnings 
18.  Reaction to TCAS II Warnings.  The  appropriate  reactions  to  TCAS  warnings  are  summarized 
below: 
a. 
TCAS II equipment reacts to the transponders of other aircraft. 
b. 
Warnings are based on the time to the predicted Closest Point of Approach (CPA) of vertical 
and horizontal distances preset in the software.  
c. 
When  given  a  Traffic  Advisory  (TA)  warning,  pilots  are  advised  not  to  take  avoiding  action 
but to look for the conflicting traffic. 
d. 
When  given  a  Resolution  Advisory  (RA)  warning,  pilots  are  expected  to  react  immediately 
(within 3 secs) and advise the ATC unit as soon as is practicable.  
e. 
When  given  an  enhanced  RA  or  an  RA  reversal,  pilots  are  expected  to  react  within  1  sec. 
This  reaction  time  is  possible  due  to  the  heightened  awareness  of  the  pilot,  having  already 
followed an initial RA warning. 
Any intruder traffic with basic IFF (no mode C or S) will generate a non-threat or proximate symbol as the 
TCAS cannot judge a relative altitude.  A TA warning will also be generated if the horizontal separation is 
degraded because the TCAS assumes that there is no vertical separation.  In this case an RA warning is 
not  possible  as  the  TCAS  has  no  altitude  information  to  base  its  vertical  avoidance  on.  Some  detail  is 
given  in  the  CAA  Radiotelephony  Manual  (CAP  413)  which  includes  the  R/T  phraseology  to  be  used 
when reacting to a TCAS RA.  TCAS RAs should be reported using the Air Traffic Control Occurrence 
Reporting (ATCOR) scheme. 
Operating Restrictions 
19.  TCAS  may  need  to  be  restricted  to  some  degree  to  avoid  safety  conflicts  in  certain  flight 
scenarios.  Typical restrictions will include: 
a. 
If a stall or ground proximity warning takes priority. 
b. 
RAs are inhibited below 500 ft AGL. 
c. 
Descend RAs are inhibited below 1,000 feet AGL. 
d. 
RAs which call for an increased rate of descent are suppressed below 1,800 ft AGL. 
e. 
There may be situations where RAs may be inhibited by the user by selecting TA-ONLY (see 
para 8b)  
(1)  Aircrew  manuals  or  regulations  may  direct  operators  to  inhibit  RAs  in  situations  where 
the aircraft does not have normal levels of performance.  For example, when a multi-engined 
Revised Aug 13  Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
aircraft has an engine shut down, the crew may not be able to comply  with an RA  warning 
and so operating in TA only mode may be more appropriate. 
(2)  To prevent RAs between aircraft flying in formation. 
(3)  In  the  visual  circuit.    For  example,  the  TCAS  would  issue  a  RA  between  an  aircraft 
turning  finals  against  initials  join  traffic.    Other  procedures  and  airmanship  negate  the 
collision  risk.    By  operating  TCAS  in  TA-RA  in  the  circuit,  there  is  also  a  danger  that  pilots 
would get used to ignoring RAs. 
Limitations 
20.  TCAS is designed to complement, not replace, air traffic control systems and good airmanship.  It has 
limitations in that: 
a. 
The system only works with transponding aircraft.  Thus, a TCAS fitted aircraft will not detect a 
non-transponding aircraft. 
b. 
TAs are intended to enhance situational awareness and assist in visual acquisition of conflicting 
traffic, however, visually acquired traffic may not be the same traffic causing the TA. 
c. 
TAs  can  be  issued  against  any  transponder-equipped  aircraft  that  respond  to  Mode  C 
interrogations, even if the aircraft does not have altitude-reporting capability. 
d. 
Avoiding action will only be given against transponding aircraft if that aircraft is operating Mode C 
IFF.  TCAS cannot take RA action on an aircraft which is only using Mode A since it has no height 
information on the other aircraft. 
e. 
The system relies on the pilot taking immediate avoiding action based on the TCAS alert.  Unless 
there is a clear safety reason not to act on an RA, then the pilot should react.  Choosing to ignore the 
advisory under the belief that the threat has been identified may be worse than having no TCAS at all, 
since the  pilot  is  not  necessarily  aware  of the coordination that has taken place  between  the TCAS 
units.  There is also the possibility that TCAS has reacted to a pop-up contact that the pilot was not 
aware of but needs to avoid. 
f. 
TCAS  does  not  provide  the  precise  location  of  an  intruder  aircraft,  but  rather  its  FL,  range 
and closure.  The information allows the pilot to look for the intruder under TA conditions or react 
to the intruder under RA conditions. 
g. 
The  depicted  position  of  an  aircraft  may  be  in  error  due  to  limitations  in  the  azimuth 
performance of the TCAS directional antenna and computer.  The displayed position may lag the 
actual location of the aircraft due to processing delays or the host aircraft manoeuvring.  
Legislation 
21.  ACAS  carriage  requirements  are  detailed  in  Article  39(2)  and  Schedule  5  of  the  Air  Navigation 
Order (CAP 393), issued by the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).  Similar regulations apply in many 
other  countries  around  the  world  and  military  aircraft  will  become  increasingly  restricted  in  their 
operations if they cannot comply with these directives.  Guidance for operators of UK military aircraft 
fitted with TCAS is given in the Manual of Military Air Traffic Management (Chapter 13). 
Revised Aug 13  Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
The Future 
22.  Although working TCAS Ⅲ  systems have been trialled, problems still exist with achieving sufficiently 
accurate azimuth information to enable horizontal RAs to be given.  TCAS Ⅳ is a separate development of 
TCAS Ⅱ, which aims to achieve horizontal RAs using the advanced datalink capabilities of Mode S which 
will enable TCAS equipped aircraft to exchange more accurate navigational information. 
23.  There are other  areas  of research currently  being pursued,  which could  lead to  radical changes 
within  the  Air  Traffic  Control  regime.    One  such  concept  is  the  Automatic  Dependant  Surveillance  – 
Broadcast  (ADS-B)  system  in  which  an  aircraft’s  position,  altitude,  vector  and  other  information  are 
broadcast via datalink rather than being supplied on demand by the conventional transponder system. 
FLARM 
Introduction 
24.  FLARM (Flight Alarm) is a collision avoidance system designed for use in gliders.  The equipment 
gives warning of the risk of collision with other FLARM equipped aircraft and also the location of non-
threatening FLARM equipped aircraft. 
Principle of Operation 
25.  FLARM  uses  a  barometric  sensor  and  in-built  GPS  receiver  to  determine  the  aircraft  position  in 
space.    The  equipment  uses  this  data  every  second  to  determine  the  predicted  flight  path  of  the 
aircraft  and  transmits  the  information  via  radio  to  other  FLARM  equipped  aircraft  within  range.    The 
operating  range  is  dependent  upon  the  antenna  installation  and  is  typically  2  to  5  km.    Signals 
received from other aircraft are processed and compared to the predicted flight  path of the receiving 
aircraft.  If the unit determines that there is a risk of collision, audio and visual warnings of the greatest 
danger is given.  Some FLARM systems can be loaded with a database to provide collision warnings 
against ground obstacles such as radio masts. 
26.  In each one second cycle, the equipment determines the aircrafts’ absolute position in space, in terms 
of  latitude,  longitude  and  altitude,  and  also  the  track  of  the  aircraft.    From  this  information,  the  projected 
flight  path  of  the  aircraft  over  the  next  18  seconds  is  determined.    This  digital  data  is  transmitted  over  a 
common FLARM radio frequency and data from other FLARM equipped aircraft within range is received.  
Own aircraft data is compared to other aircraft data to determine whether the projected flight paths coincide 
and hence present a risk of collision.  Fig 10, illustrates a possible scenario, in plan view, where several 
gliders are in close proximity utilizing the same thermal to gain height. 
7-16 Fig 10 Illustration of FLARM Confliction Scenario 
E
D
(1500 ft
C
Below)
B
Own Aircraft
A
Revised Aug 13  Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
27.  In  Fig  10,  the  blue  cone  represents  the  volume  of  space  that  an  aircraft  could  occupy  over  the 
following 18 seconds, based on the predicted flight path of the on board FLARM.  Aircraft A, B, C and 
D are in close proximity  using the same thermal.   Aircraft E is joining the thermal.   Aircraft A  is  very 
close but moving away and so does not pose a collision risk.  Aircraft B and C are also very close and 
although at a similar altitude do not pose a threat within the next 18 seconds.  Aircraft D does not pose 
a threat due to the altitude difference.  Aircraft E, while more distant than the other aircraft is predicted 
to be within the volume of space that one’s own aircraft may occupy within the next 18 seconds, and 
thus poses a risk of collision.   The potential for a dangerous risk developing  is  increased by the fact 
that  the  aircraft  within  the  thermal  are  turning  to  the  left,  and  thus  aircraft  E  may  not  be  visible  from 
one’s  own  aircraft  as  it  will  be  hidden  below  the  fuselage.    It  must  be  remembered  that  the  FLARM 
data  is  updated  each  second,  and  as  such  the  scenario  represented  in  Fig  10  will  be  continually 
changing.  Thus, aircraft E may quickly cease to be a collision risk while the other aircraft may become 
so. 
28.  FLARM determines future time windows of up to 18 seconds.  For each of these time windows the 
equipment calculates the  volume of space that the aircraft could occupy.    At  the  same time, it checks, 
using the received data from other aircraft, whether the flight paths of those aircraft could intersect that 
volume of space.  Due to the way the data is processed, FLARM can not only predict potential collision 
risks, but also the time that any collision might take place.  Thus, it can predict how imminent the threat is 
and indicate this through its warning display.  Fig 11 illustrates the development of a potential collision.  It 
can be seen that the calculated volume of space close to the aircraft is smaller than that furthest from the 
aircraft, due to the time differences.  Thus, with multiple aircraft in close proximity, FLARM can determine 
which aircraft poses the greater threat and warn the pilot accordingly. 
7-16 Fig 11 Illustration of Predicted Flight Paths 
Revised Aug 13  Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
Warnings, Displays and Modes of Operation 
29.  Different  equipments  display  the  alert  information  in  different  ways,  but  all  systems  should  give 
both  aural  and  visual  warnings.    Fig  12  shows  a  typical  FLARM  display  using  bi-colour  LEDs,  but 
conflicting aircraft can also be shown on moving map displays within the cockpit. 
7-16 Fig 12 Typical LED FLARM Display 
Receive
above
Send
GPS
Power
below
Modes of Operation.  FLARM operates in two modes, Nearest and Collision Modes. 
a.  Nearest Mode. 
When operating in Nearest Mode, FLARM indicates the presence of other 
aircraft within range even though they do not pose a threat of collision.  The information is limited 
to  a  configurable  radius  and  a  vertical  separation  of  500  m.    Only  one  aircraft  is  displayed,  by 
means of a green LED (see Fig 13 a and b) and the threat intensity is not indicated.  When the 
equipment detects the risk of collision, it switches automatically to Collision Mode. 
b.  Collision Mode.  When operating in Collision Mode, FLARM indicates the presence of the 
aircraft giving the most immediate risk of collision using aural and visual warnings (see Fig XX 
a, b and c).  In this example, the number of illuminated LEDs and their flash rate indicates the 
threat  level.    When  the  risk  of  collision  is  over,  the  equipment  will  revert  to  Nearest  Mode.  
Collision Mode can be selected as the default setting. 
30.  FLARM  uses  aircraft  track  to  predict  the  flight  path  and  so,  in  strong  wind  conditions,  with  high 
values of drift, distorted threat bearings can be indicated. 
7-16 Fig 13 Examples of FLARM Alerts in Nearest Mode 
A
B
above
above
below
below
Traffic around 2 o’clock
Traffic around 7 o’clock
Solid LED
Solid LED
Revised Aug 13  Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 7-16 Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems 
7-16 Fig 14 Examples of FLARM Alerts in Collision Mode 
A
B
C
above
above
above
below
below
below
Moderate threat from  3 o’ clock,
Medium threat from  1 o’ clock,
Immediate threat from  1 to 2 o’ clock,
conflicting aircraft above
conflicting aircraft below
conflicting aircraft above
(< 19 to 25 seconds to calculated collision)
(< 14 to 18 seconds to calculated collision)
(< 6 to 8 seconds to calculated collision)
LED flash rate is 2 Hz
LED flash rate is 4 Hz
LED flash rate is 6 Hz
The vertical indication of 4 LEDs shows the bearing from the horizontal plane and is independent of the aircraft attitude.
The uppermost and lowest LEDs illuminate when the vertical bearing to the conflicting aircraft exceeds 14 degrees.
The flash frequency is identical and syncronous with that of the horizontal display.
PowerFlarm 
31.  A  development  of  the  basic  FLARM  is  PowerFlarm.    Whereas  FLARM  has  the  ability  to  detect 
other  FLARM  equipped  aircraft,  PowerFlarm  also  has  the  ability  to  detect,  and  give  warnings  with 
regard to Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) equipped aircraft and those fitted with 
Mode C or S transponders.  ADS-B is a surveillance tracking system for aircraft that transmits aircraft 
position and  velocity  data  each second.   ADS-B Out  transmits aircraft identification, position,  altitude 
and velocity, providing Air Traffic Controllers with real time information on aircraft in their area.  ADS-B 
will be mandated on most aircraft in the USA by 2020 and on aircraft weighing over 5,700 kg or having 
a maximum cruising speed of over 250 kt, in Europe from 2017. 
Limitations of FLARM 
32.  FLARM  is  designed  for  situational  awareness  only.    It  has  several  limitations  and  must  not  be 
expected to give totally reliable warnings. 
a.  Basic  FLARM  will  only  indicate  the  presence  of  other  FLARM  equipped  aircraft,  however 
PowerFlarm has increased functionality (Para 31). 
b.  FLARM  operates  at  short  range  which  can  be  compromised  by  equipment  fit  and  poor 
antenna positioning. 
c.  Basic FLARM does  not ‘communicate’  with conventional transponders or  Airborne Collision 
Avoidance Systems (ACAS). 
d.  FLARM relies on good quality GPS reception to determine the current aircraft position accurately. 
e.  With high values of drift, inaccurate threat bearings may be displayed. 
f.  FLARM warns of only the most immediate threat and the warning time is very short.  Other 
aircraft  may  pose  a  threat  but  not  be  displayed.    As  a  result,  FLARM  does  not  replace  good 
airmanship  practices  and  lookout.    The  short  range  of  the  system  makes  it  unsuitable  for  fast 
moving aircraft. 
g.  FLARM only warns of the risk of collision, it does not offer avoiding action. 
h.  FLARM  radio  communication  frequencies  are  unprotected  and  so  the  possibility  of 
interference is always present. 
Revised Aug 13  Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
CHAPTER 17 - TELEVISION, LOW-LIGHT TELEVISION AND NIGHT VISION GOGGLES 
TELEVISION 
Introduction 
1. 
Television  has  a  number  of  applications  in  avionic  systems,  probably  the  most  familiar  being 
reconnaissance  and  missile  guidance.    Although  airborne  television  is  different  from  its  commercial 
and domestic counterparts in terms of size and ruggedness, the principles of operation are identical. 
Television Principles 
2. 
A television camera receives light energy from a scene and converts it into electrical energy, using 
either or both of the following techniques: 
a. 
Photoemission The photoemission technique relies on the fact that light energies are sufficient 
to  cause  the  ejection  of  electrons  from  the  surface  of  materials  such  as  sodium,  caesium,  and 
potassium.  The number of electrons emitted is directly proportional to the incident light levels. 
b. 
Photoconduction.    Photoconduction  is  the  process  by  which  the  conductivity  of  materials 
such as selenium, arsenic trisulphide, and lead monoxide is increased by exposure to higher light 
levels.  Electrons are not ejected, but are moved to a higher energy level. 
3. 
Cameras  can  be  either  scanning  or  non-scanning.    The  former  scan  the  scene  with  a  tube  which 
converts  incident  light  into  voltages  proportional  to  the  changing  light  intensity.    Staring arrays are used in 
non-scanning  cameras;  these  employ  a  detector  for  each point of the picture (pixel).  The varying voltage 
from scanning, or the output from the staring array, can be amplified and transmitted by wire or fibre optic 
cable, or it can be modulated onto a radio frequency carrier wave and radiated to another area. 
4. 
The  photoemission  principle  is  used  in  the  imaging  orthicon  type  of  camera  (para  6);  the 
photoconduction  principle  is  used  in  the  vidicon  camera  (para 9).  Non-scanning, solid state, charge-
coupled device cameras use both principles (para 11). 
5. 
The  display,  or  TV  receiver,  synthesizes  the  original  scene  by  deflecting  an  electron  beam  spot 
across  the  fluorescent  screen  of  a  CRT  and  varying  its  brightness  in  accordance  with  the  received 
signals.    The  scanning  process  is  carried  out  sufficiently  rapidly  that  an  illusion  of  continuous,  non-
flickering, motion is achieved. 
The Imaging Orthicon 
6. 
The elements of an imaging orthicon are contained in a cylindrical glass tube envelope which has 
an  enlarged  section  at  one  end  (Fig  l).    The  device  is  closed  at  the  enlarged  end  by  an  optically  flat 
glass plate which has a continuous photosensitive coating (photocathode) deposited on the inside. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 1 Simplified Construction of an Image Orthicon Tube 
Target
Mesh Screen
Plate
Lens
Glass Envelope
Photo -
Electrons
Scanning Beam
Electron Gun
& Multiplier
Secondary
Photocathode
Electrons
7. 
The optical image is focused on the lens side of the glass plate, and photoelectrons are liberated 
from the photocathode, in proportion to the light intensity at any point.  These electrons stream through 
the  enlarged  cylindrical  portion  of  the  tube,  and  a  fine  mesh  screen,  until  they  encounter  the  target 
plate.  At the target, they induce a secondary emission of electrons from the surface.  These electrons 
are  collected  by  the  fine  mesh  screen  that  lies  parallel  and  close to the target.  The departure of the 
secondary  electrons  leaves  positive  charges  on  the  target,  with  an  intensity  proportional  to  the  light 
distribution of the original optical image.  The changes in electrical potential, induced by the secondary 
emissions, are transferred to the opposite face of the target and, as the streams of electrons from the 
photocathode continue to fall on the target, the intensity of electrical image continually increases.  As 
the  target  is  very  thin,  there  is  negligible  leakage  of  the  charge  parallel  to  the  target  surface,  which 
would otherwise degrade the image detail. 
8. 
The  stored  charge  image  on  the  reverse  side  of  the  target  is scanned by an electron beam; the 
current  in  the  returning  beam  varies  in  amplitude  according  to  the  variations  in  the  intensity  of  the 
successive  portions  of  the  image  being  scanned.    An  electron  multiplier  produces  an  amplified 
reproduction of the current in the returning beam; the output is an analogue video signal which can be 
displayed or stored.
The Vidicon 
9. 
The elements of the vidicon camera are contained in a cylindrical glass envelope, as shown in Fig 
2.  The signal plate, onto which the optical image is focused, has a very thin layer of photoconductive 
material  deposited  on  it.    This  material  has  high  electrical  resistance  in  the  dark,  but  becomes 
progressively less resistant as the amount of light increases.  Thus, the optical image induces a pattern 
of  varying  conductivity,  which  matches  the  distribution  of  brightness  in  the  image.    The  target  is 
scanned by an electron beam and the resulting video signal may be displayed or stored. 
7-17 Fig 2 Simplified Construction of a Vidicon Tube 
Glass Envelope
Mesh
Signal Plate
Scanning Beam
Photoconducting Material
Lens
Revised Jan 13   
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
10.  The  scanning  electron  beam  spot  size  imposes  the  only  limitation  on  resolution.    It  is,  therefore, 
possible  to  derive  a  high  quality  image  from  a  photosensitive  area  no  larger  than  about  1.3  cm2.    This 
permits the use of small and comparatively inexpensive lenses, with a correspondingly large depth of field 
for any given aperture.  In addition, the structure of the tube is simple and small, so cameras based on the 
vidicon principle are adaptable to a wide range of broadcasting, industrial, and military applications (e.g. 
missile guidance). 
Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Systems 
11.  Television tubes are susceptible to shock, overload, and stray magnetic fields.  They impose size 
and weight penalties in some applications, and they have a relatively short life expectancy.  Solid state 
charge coupled devices, which are more rugged and reliable, have lower power requirements, and can 
be used to produce small, lightweight cameras with a long life. 
12.  A typical CCD sensor chip, about 8 mm × 10 mm in size, contains a matrix of many thousands of 
silicon  photodiodes.    Each  of  these  photodiodes  effectively  forms  a  capacitor  which  accumulates  a 
charge  proportional  to  the  brightness  of  the  light  incident  upon  it.    Fig  3  illustrates,  schematically,  a 
simplified arrangement in which Cl, C2, C3, and C4 represent four such capacitors, which would form 
the first four pixels in one television line.  The charge accumulated by each capacitor (eg Cl) appears 
as a voltage at the output of the associated amplifier (eg Al).  If all the switches, Sl to S3, were closed 
momentarily, the charge on Cl would be passed into C2, C2’s charge would be transferred into C3, and 
so  on  all  the  way  along  the  line.    Thus,  by  momentarily  closing  all  the  switches  synchronously,  the 
charge  representing  the  brightness  level  for  each  pixel  can  be  made  to  proceed  along  the  line  of 
capacitors, at a rate dependent on the switching frequency, and can be detected at the end of the line 
and read serially as the pattern of the light level at each pixel.  In practice, the stored charge in each 
capacitor is relayed to a second set of capacitors before being shifted, thus allowing the photodiodes to 
register the next pattern of illumination with no appreciable blank period. 
7-17 Fig 3 Simplified Schematic CCD Arrangement 
A1
S1
A2
S2
A3
S3
C1
C2
C3
C4
LOW-LIGHT TELEVISION (LLTV) 
Introduction 
13.  There  is  a  requirement  for  military  aircraft  to  operate  both  by  day  and  by  night,  and  a  television 
system  could  provide  a  solution  to  the  visual  acquisition  problem  of  night  operations.    However,  the 
systems described so far are, in general, only capable of producing a usable image down to the light 
levels  associated  with  twilight.    Variations  of  the  vidicon  and  orthicon  cameras  can  operate  at  lower 
light levels, but it is normally necessary to attach an image intensifier system to the camera for it to be 
usable  down  to  the  illumination  level  of  starlight.    Before  describing  the  operation  of  these  image 
intensifiers, the night environment will be reviewed. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
The Night Environment 
14.  Fig 4 shows the range of natural illumination (lux is the SI unit of luminance; foot candles (fc) is the 
imperial unit).  The human eye is at its maximum efficiency in daylight but can adjust to operate in lower 
light  levels,  albeit  with  a  reduction  in  capability.    Colour  perception  is  lost  once  the  illumination  level  is 
down to less than 1 lux; below this, the eye’s resolving power is degraded rapidly such that at 10-4 lux the 
eye  is  only  capable  of  discerning  large,  high-contrast  objects, and then only after a prolonged period of 
dark adaptation.  Clearly, unaided, the eye is not suitable for night operations; hence the need for some 
form of imaging system. 
7-17 Fig 4 The Range of Natural Illumination 
Human Vision Lux
fc
105
104
Sun on Snow
104
103
Full Daylight
Photopic
103
102
Overcast Daylight
(good acuity, 102
10
colour)
Very Poor Daylight
10
1
Twilight
1
10-1
Deep Twilight
10-1
10-2
Scotopic
Full Moon
(poor acuity,  10-2
10-3
Quarter Moon
no colour)
10-3
10-4
Starlight
10-4
10-5
Overcast Starlight
15.  A  television  camera  forms  an  image  of  the  scene being viewed by utilizing a small proportion of 
the radiant energy which is incident upon the scene.  The amount of energy which reaches the camera 
sensor  depends  mainly  on  the  incident  radiation  level,  the  reflectance  of  the  subject,  and  the  light-
collecting power of the optical system.  Furthermore, the video signal current obtained from the sensor 
will be dependent upon the spectral energy distribution of the illuminant, and the spectral response and 
sensitivity of the sensor. 
16.  Incident  Radiation.
The  level  of  incident  radiation  depends  on  many  geographical  and 
meteorological factors, such as the time of night, the latitude, the declination of the sun (season), the 
phase  of  the  moon,  and  the  degree  of  cloud  cover.    Worldwide  surveys  indicate  that  minimum 
illumination levels are practically constant everywhere at a value of about 1 × 10-4 lux; values less than 
this are rare, and in temperate regions the light level is above 10-3 lux for 82% of the time.  Under clear, 
moonless conditions, the incident radiation has the following components: 
a. 
30% direct or scattered starlight. 
b. 
15% of zodiacal origin (caused by small particles reflecting sunlight). 
c. 
5% of galactic origin. 
d. 
40% from airglow (permanent luminescence of the night sky). 
e. 
10% scattered light from these various sources. 
The  airglow  phenomenon  contributes  nearly  half  of  the  incident  radiation  and  originates  from  the 
ionization of rare gases in the upper atmosphere.  Natural night sky spectral irradiance contains nearly 
10 times as many incident photons per unit wavelength at 0.8 µm as at 0.4 µm.  In order to make use 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
of this high energy content, it is desirable that a sensor has the highest sensitivity in the red and near 
infra-red parts of the spectrum. 
17.  Subject  Reflectance.    The  apparent  brightness  of  an  object  depends  not  only  on  the  level  of 
incident  radiation,  but  also  on  the  manner  in  which  the  object  reflects  that  illumination.    If  all  objects 
reflected  an  equal  amount  of  light,  there  would  be  no  contrast  between  a  target  and  its  background, 
and it would probably not be seen.  The reflectance of an object (the ratio of reflected to incident light) 
depends principally on the nature of the surface  (eg its colour and texture), the wavelength and angle 
of the illumination, and the viewing angle.  Table 1 shows some typical values of reflectance. 
7-17  Table 1 Typical Reflectance Values 
 
Snow 
 
0.7 to 0.86 
 
Clouds 
 
0.5 to 0.75 
 
Limestone 
 
0.63 
 
Dry Sand 
 
0.24 
 
Wet Sand 
 
0.18 
 
Bare Ground 
 
0.03 to 0.2 
 
Water 
 
0.03 to 0.1 
 
Forest 
 
0.03 to 0.15 
 
Grass 
 
0.10 to 0.25 
 
Rock 
 
0.12 to 0.30 
 
Concrete 
 
0.15 to 0.35 
 
Blacktop Roads 
 
0.08 to 0.09 
18.  Contrast.  Contrast is defined as: 
B
− B
max
min
Bmax
where  Bmax  is  the  maximum  luminance  and  Bmin  is  the  minimum  luminance  in  the  scene;  it  is  usually 
expressed  as  a  percentage.    At  the  camera,  the  contrast  will  often  be  reduced  by  the  effect  of  the 
intervening medium, and in particular by haze, fog, and rain, resulting in a reduction in the effective range 
of the system. 
19.  Optical  System.    The  larger  the diameter of the lens, the more capable it is of operating at low 
light levels.  However, the maximum size of the lens will often be constrained by the physical limits of 
the airframe, by considerations of the increase in drag due to the flat plate effect, and by the need for 
the lens to resist the aerodynamic forces imposed by high-speed flight. 
Image Intensification 
20.  A  basic  image  intensifier  is  an  electronic  device  which  reproduces  an  image  on  a  fluorescent 
screen.  Fig 5 shows a schematic construction of such a device. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 5 Construction of a Single Stage Image Intensifier 
Photocathode
Electron
Phosphor Screen
Trajectories
(anode)
Light Input
Fibre Optic
Input Plate
Fibre Optic
Output Plate
Light Output
Electrostatic Focusing Elements
EHT
+
The  input  and  output  plates  are  fibre  optic  plates  which  are  made  up  of  a  complex  of  minute  glass 
tubes  clad  with  another  type  of  glass  of  lower  refractive  index,  thus  preventing  cross-talk  between 
adjacent fibres (Fig 6).  These tubes form light guides, in which light entering at one end is trapped until 
it emerges at the other end.  The shaped fibre optic plates also transform the flat optical image into a 
curved  image,  necessary  for  the  electrostatic  lens  in  the  intensifier.    Electrostatic  focusing  elements 
ensure  that  electrons  released  from  a  particular  spot  on  the  photocathode  are  focused  onto  a 
corresponding spot on the phosphor screen. 
7-17 Fig 6 Construction of Fibre Optic Plat 
µ     µ 
z < I
Fibre,  µ I
Cladding,  µ z
21.  The input plate is coated with a photocathode, and the output plate with a phosphor anode.  When 
light falls on the photocathode, electrons are released which are accelerated towards the phosphor by 
the  15 kV  field  across  the  device.    The  increased  energy  acquired  by  the  electrons  is  expended  in 
exciting the phosphor, such that the image formed can be 40 to 50 times brighter than the original. 
22.  An extension of the basic intensifier is to arrange two or three tubes together in series to form a 
'cascade'  intensifier  (Fig  7)  which  can  achieve  gains  of  up  to  50,000  times  at  0.4  µm.    A  3-stage 
cascade intensifier would be sufficient to make a simple vidicon into a LLTV tube, and similar devices 
have  been  used  as  simple,  hand-held,  direct  view  image  intensifiers.    The  multi-stage  systems  have 
the disadvantages of lower picture quality, and increased size, weight, and cost. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 7 Schematic Diagram of Modular-type Cascade Image Intensifier 
Photocathode
0
+13 kV
+26 kV
+39 kV
Dim Image In
Intensified 
Image Out
Eyepiece
Objective
Fibre Optic
Plate
Luminescent Screen
23.  If a LLTV system is used in a moving vehicle, there is likely to be some angular vibration which will 
degrade its resolution.  To accommodate this problem, an image intensifier has been designed in which 
the output image can be magnetically deflected to counter the movement.  The construction is shown in 
Fig 8.  The front end is the same as a conventional image intensifier, but the output end has a relatively 
long,  field-free,  section  where  the  electron  beams  are  moving  essentially  parallel  to  each  other.    A 
transverse  magnetic  field  in  this  area,  controlled  by  position  gyros,  deflects  the  image  as  a  whole  to 
compensate precisely for the angular movement of the system. 
7-17 Fig 8 Motion Compensated Intensifier 
0 V
+2 kV
+15 kV
Image Movement
Compensator Coil
Light 
Input
Electron
Paths
Light
Output
Fibre
Fibre
Optic
Optic
Plate
Plate
Ceramic Insulator
24.  Microchannel Plate (MCP) Intensifiers.  Microchannel plate intensifiers are capable of gains of 
up to 104.  A MCP is a thin plate of special glass with a matrix of fine holes (channels) through it.  The 
holes are from 10 µm to 12 µm in diameter, and about l mm in length.  The inside of each channel is 
coated with an electron rich material and, when a primary electron from the photocathode strikes the 
channel wall, secondary electrons are released.  These, in turn, release more electrons as they move 
along  the  channel  (Fig  9)  and  the  channel  thus  acts  as  a  miniature  photomultiplier  tube.    A  potential 
gradient  is  provided  along  the  wall  of  the  channel,  accelerating  the  electrons  before  they  strike  the 
phosphor.    MCP  image  intensifiers  have  the  advantage  of  greater  sensitivity,  smaller  size,  and  less 
weight than cascade devices. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 7 of 14 


AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 9 Microchannel Plate - Principle of Operation 
Primary 
Phosphor Screen
Electron
− EHT +
Secondary
Electrons
LLTV Limitations 
25.  The main limitations of LLTV are the limited field of view and blooming.  The field of view (FOV) is 
typically  30º  ×  40º,  which  is  barely  adequate  for  the  purpose  of  low-level  visual  navigation,  for  which  a 
look-into-turn capability is needed.  A narrower FOV may be useful for reconnaissance purposes, as this 
implies greater magnification and greater range.  Blooming results from the amplification of a bright light 
such as a flare, beacon, or searchlight, in an otherwise low-light scene.  This problem can be reduced 
by using filters which make light levels above a set threshold appear black. 
NIGHT VISION GOGGLES (NVGS) 
General 
26.  Night vision goggles (NVGs) are one means of solving the FOV problem associated with a fixed 
LLTV  system.    The  image  intensifiers  are  mounted  onto  a  helmet  (see  Fig  10)  so  that,  although  the 
instantaneous FOV is smaller than that of a LLTV, the crew member can look into the turn.  NVGs are 
lightweight  binocular  devices  and  are  sufficient  for  the  rapid  recognition  of  terrain  obstacles  at  light 
levels down to overcast starlight. 
7-17 Fig 10 Helmet-mounted Night Vision Goggles 
27.  Fig 11 shows a tanker aircraft viewed through NVGs from the cockpit of a fighter aircraft (note the 
clear example of blooming). 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 8 of 14 


AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 11 Tanker Aircraft viewed through NVGs 
28.  The prime disadvantages of NVGs are that their weight causes fatigue, they are a potential hazard in 
the event of ejection, and they amplify all light entering them, including that from internal cockpit displays.  
Operational aspects of using NVGs are discussed in more detail in Volume 12, Chapter 12. 
29.  Study of the spectral distribution of the night sky shows that there are ten times as many photons 
in the red and near infra-red region than there are in the blue region.  Image intensifiers make use of 
this fact by being more sensitive to the red and near infra-red region of the spectrum.  Unfortunately, 
cockpit displays contain light sources which are also rich in the red and near infra-red region, but at 
levels  of  radiation  significantly  higher  than  those  emanating  from  the  night  scene.    Consequently, 
NVGs can be blinded by cockpit illumination. 
30.  To overcome this problem, the spectral response of intensifiers used in NVGs must be modified 
by  filtration  to  allow  the  use  of  the  blue-green  region  of  the  visible  spectrum  for  cockpit  lights  and 
displays.    The  cockpit  lights  are  also  filtered  to  reduce  transmissions  in  the  red  and  near  infra-red 
regions  of  the  spectrum.    NVGs  provide  the  user  with  improved  night  vision  by  the  amplification  of 
available  natural  light  from  the  sky  achieved  using  image  intensification.    Cockpit  instruments  lit  by 
suitable NVG compatible lighting are viewed peripherally by the unaided eye.  
Principles of Operation 
31.  The  visible  image  produced  by  the  NVG  is  derived  solely  from  amplification  of  available  light; 
NVGs cannot work in total darkness.  However, very small amounts of light from cultural lighting, the 
moon and the stars provide sufficient illumination for flight on NVGs, even if the night is overcast.  Dual 
optical channels (monocular) give stereoscopic vision which allows depth and speed perception.  
32.  Reflected  light  from  the  viewed  scene  is  collected  by  an  objective  lens  in  each  monocular 
assembly and focused onto the image intensifier tube.  
33.  The  intensifier  tube  consists  of  an  input  window,  photocathode,  microchannel  plate,  phosphor 
screen, fibre optic image inverter and annular power supply all in a sealed assembly about the size of a 
cotton reel.  This is the core of any NVG system.  (see Fig 12)  
Revised Jan 13   
Page 9 of 14 



AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 12 Optical System Schematic Diagram 
Objective
Image Intensifier
Eyepiece
Eye
Lens
Tube
Lens
34.  The  annular  power  supply  uses  switch-mode  techniques  to  generate  three  EHT  voltages,  V1 
(approx 800V), V2 (approx 800V) and V3 (approx 5.6 kV), from the 3.6V dc supplied by the battery.  
35.  Light entering each NVG monocular is focused onto the photocathode of the intensifier tube by the 
objective  lens,  where  the  emission  of  electrons  from  the  photocathode  converts  the  light  image  to  an 
electron image.  V1 then attracts electrons from the photocathode to the microchannel plate (see Fig 13). 
7-17 Fig 13 Generation III Image Intensifier Tube (IIT) 
36.  The  microchannel  plate  is  the  main  gain  producing  component  of  the  intensifier  tube.    It  is  the 
modern  solid  state  equivalent  of  early  vacuum  tube  devices  (1st  generation)  and  is  a  disc  less than 0.4 
mm  in  thickness,  made  from  glass,  which  incorporates  a  series  of  minute  holes  (microchannels)  (see 
Para 24).  The walls of the microchannels are processed to enable electrons to be released.  As electrons 
from  the  photocathode  are  accelerated  down  the  microchannel  by  V2  they  undergo  collisions  with  the 
walls  releasing  additional  electrons,  avalanching  at  a  rate  of  multiplication  dependant  upon  V2  which  is 
applied  between  the  faces  of  the  microchannel  plate.    The  microchannel  plate  is  in  effect  a  disc  of 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
miniature  photo-multiplier  tubes,  where  the  output  from  each  microchannel  forms  a  pixel  within  the 
intensified image.  
37.  When  these  electrons  emerge  from  the  microchannels  they  are  accelerated  by  V3  until  they  hit 
the  phosphor  screen  where  the  electron  image  is  converted  back  into  light.    The  image  from  the 
phosphor screen is then passed through an inverting fibre optic converter to correct the orientation of 
the  image.    A  fibre  optic  element  is  used  in  lieu  of  a  lens  to  invert  the  image  with  minimum  weight, 
assembly size and distortion. 
38.  The  microchannel  bore  and  individual  fibre  optic  strand  size,  together  with  the  size  of  the  gaps 
between the photocathode, microchannel plate and phosphor screen (smallest is best), determine the 
limiting resolution of the tube.  
39.  Beyond a certain threshold the tube EHT power supply is current-regulated to maintain the same 
tube  output  brightness  regardless  of  light  input  level;  effectively  a  type  of  automatic  gain  control. 
However,  at  very  low  light  levels  with  virtually  no  incident  photons  at  the  photocathode,  electrons 
released by random ionisation events account for most light output from the phosphor screen.  This is 
seen as scintillation (sparkling) and is normal when the tube is working hard.  The output image is of 
the order of 20,000 times brighter than the input when the tube is working efficiently.  
40.  The final image from the intensifier tube is viewed through the monocular assembly eyepiece lens 
which can be adjusted (see para 51) to accommodate variations in the users eyes. 
41.  The optical magnification factor of the NVG is unity; the image presented to the user is actual size. 
Caution 
42.  Where  there  is  sufficient  light  to  see  with  the  naked  eye,  damage  may  occur  to  the  unprotected 
image intensifier tubes even without power applied.  NVGs should never be exposed to direct sunlight or 
pointed at the sun, even when switched off.  Lens caps or daylight training filters should be fitted to the 
NVG when not in use to prevent inadvertent damage.  They should also be protected from extremes of 
heat. 
NVG Cockpit Compatibility  
43.  By careful filtering of cockpit lighting and the NVGs, compatibility is achieved which allows the cockpit 
instruments  and  warning  captions  to  be  readable  with  the  unassisted  eye  whilst  at  the  same  time  not 
affecting the performance of the NVGs.  This is achieved by filtering the NVGs to amplify only light with a 
wavelength greater than around 665 mm, from red through to near-infra-red.  This makes optimum use of 
the  light  energy  available  from  the  night  sky.    Conversely,  the  cockpit  lighting  is  filtered  to  prevent 
emissions  in  this  part  of  the  spectrum,  making  use  of  shorter  wavelengths  and  avoiding  most red light.  
Thus  NVG  compatible  lighting  is  predominantly  green  in  colour,  although  special  NVG  compatible  red 
warning captions have now been developed which can be seen even in bright daylight conditions. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
Associated Aircraft Modifications  
44.  There are several considerations to the integration of NVGs to a given aircraft type. 
a. 
Cockpit lighting must be compatible with NVG operation (see para 30). 
b. 
External  lighting  needs  to  be  NVG  compatible,    both  visible  aircraft  lights and Infra-red 
(IR) light which is invisible to the naked eye.  All external lighting must be considered including 
formation, anti-collision, taxi and landing lights.  
c. 
Cockpit stowage of NVGs needs to be considered when the equipment is not in use.  
d. 
Helmets are required to provide a mounting platform for the NVGs. 
Technical Description  
45.  The following paragraphs describe NVGs in service at the time of writing.  Users should refer to 
DAP 112G-1623-123 ; Night Vision Goggles, for the latest information. 
46.  FEN NG 201 goggles (see fig 14) for fast-jet use consists of a binocular assembly, and utilise an 
auto  detach  bracket  which  embodies  a  gas  motor  that  causes  separation  from  the  helmet  during 
unpremeditated  ejection.    The  objective  lens  can  be  focused  anywhere  from  around  1  m  distance  to 
infinity and the eyepiece dioptre setting can be adjusted to accommodate the normal range of eyesight 
variations between individual users.  
47.  FEN  NG  700  OCB  is  very  similar  but  with  a  manual  detach  mount  and  the  ON/OFF  switch 
mounted on the left side of the bracket to facilitate its use in rotary wing aircraft. Focusing range is the 
same as FEN NG 201 and eyepiece dioptre range is similar.  
48.  FEN NG 2000 OCB is a lightened version of FEN NG 700 OCB, being fitted with the same mounting 
bracket but smaller objective lenses with focus fixed at infinity and is intended for use by the Royal Navy.  
These may be fitted with a neutral density filter which allows the goggles to be switched on in daylight 
conditions,  however  on  bright  sunny  days,  tube  life  may  be  reduced  by  burning  if  the  sun  or  its 
reflection is imaged directly. 
49.  FEN  NG  2000A OCB is further reduced in weight by utilising a lighter mounting bracket with the 
same smaller fixed focus objective lenses and is primarily for use in Hercules J type aircraft.  
Revised Jan 13   
Page 12 of 14 







AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
7-17 Fig 14 NVG Types 
Monocular housing  
50.  The  monocular  housing  (Fig  14)  holds  the  intensifier  tube  and  supports  both  the  eyepiece  and 
objective  lens.    Each  monocular  housing  is  fitted  with  a  bleed  nipple  to  enable  purging  with  dry 
nitrogen.  A gas-tight seal is provided by integrated O-ring seals fitted between the monocular housing 
and the objective and eyepiece lens cells.  Purging with dry nitrogen is carried out to exclude air and 
water vapour. Water vapour can render the NVG unserviceable by encouraging mould growth on the 
optical  coatings  of  the  lens,  or  causing  breakdown  of  the  insulation  within  the  EHT  power  supply 
leading  to  total  failure  of  the  intensifier  tube.    Air  contains  small  amounts  of  helium,  which  has  very 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-17 - Television, Low-Light Television and Night Vision Goggles 
small  molecules  that  are  very  difficult  to  exclude  from  the  vacuum  of  the  intensifier  tube  as  they  can 
diffuse  through  the  seals.    Once  gas  enters  the  vacuum  it  inhibits  the  acceleration  of  electrons, 
reducing tube gain, ultimately leading to shaded areas or complete tube failure which is why nitrogen 
purging is important.  
NVG Adjustment  
51.  NVGs  can  be  adjusted  in  the  vertical  and  fore  and  aft  axis.    The  fore  and  aft  axis  is  particularly 
important as it allows the NVG to be adjusted for adequate clearance from Face Protection Visors (FPV) 
or aircrew respirators and for optimum field-of-view.  FEN NGs 700 OCB, 2000 OCB and 2000A OCB are 
designed to be used at 30 mm eye relief, allowing face protection visors or aircrew NBC respirators to be 
fitted behind the NVGs.  FEN NG 201 is designed to be used at 25 mm eye relief but can be used at 30 
mm eye relief, allowing these items to be fitted but with a consequential reduction in the field of view, e.g. 
at 30 mm eye relief the FOV. is 39.5° ± 2.8°.  As a general rule, eye relief should be adjusted to provide a 
3  to  5  mm  clearance  between  the  FPV/respirator  transparency  and  the  eyepiece  lens.  This  will  give  a 
maximum  intensified  FOV  with  minimum  vignetting  (obscuration of the intensified image) while allowing 
peripheral viewing of the cockpit instruments.  The distance between the monocular sub-assemblies can 
be adjusted, with the monoculars being simultaneously moved inwards or outwards to suit the user’s eye 
spacing.    This  in  known  as  the  Interpupillary  Distance  (IPD)  Adjustment.    Tilt  adjustment  is  provided  to 
enable the user to alter the sightline of the NVGs in elevation. 
Face Protection Visor  
52.  The NVG mount assembly prevents the deployment of the standard helmet visor when attached 
to the helmet and it is recommended that a FPV is worn instead.  The FPV is made of polycarbonate, 
and when used in conjunction with a Mk 4 series aircrew protective helmet, provides adequate eye and 
face  protection  from  wind  blast  at  speeds  of  up  to  400  kts  and  from  the  NVGs  in  the  event  of  a 
survivable  crash.    The  FPV  is  compatible  with  aircrew  NBC  spectacles  but  not  with  conventional 
aircrew spectacles. 
Revised Jan 13   
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 – 7-18 - Infra-red Radiation 
CHAPTER 18 - INFRA-RED RADIATION 
Characteristics of Infra-red Radiation 
1. 
Infra-red (IR) radiation is electro-magnetic radiation and occupies that part of the electro-magnetic 
spectrum between visible light and microwaves.  The IR part of the spectrum is sub-divided into Near 
IR,  Middle  IR,  Far  IR  and  Extreme  IR.    The  position  and  division  of  the  IR  band,  together  with  the 
appropriate wavelengths and frequencies, is shown in Fig 1. 
7-18  Fig 1 Infra-red in the Electromagnetic Spectrum
Frequency (Hz)
4
6
8
10
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Ultra
Radio Waves
Microwaves
Infra-red
X-rays
Gamma Rays
Cosmic Rays
Violet
4
2
–2
–4
–6
–8
–10
–12
–14
10
10
1
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
Wavelength(  
λ) m
Microwaves
Extreme IR
Far IR
Middle IR
Near IR
Visible
Ultra Violet
3
10
15
6
3
0.7
0.4
Wavelength (microns)
Note: One  micron (µ) = 10–6 metres and is now known as one micro-metre in the SI system.
2. 
All  bodies  with  a  temperature  greater  than  absolute  zero  (0  K,  –273  °C)  emit  IR  radiation  and  it 
may  be  propagated  both  in  a  vacuum  and  in  a  physical  medium.    As  a  part  of  the  electro-magnetic 
spectrum  it  shares  many  of  the  attributes  of,  for  example,  light  and  radio  waves;  thus  it  can  be 
reflected,  refracted,  diffracted  and  polarized,  and  it  can  be  transmitted through many materials which 
are opaque to visible light. 
Absorption and Emission 
3. 
Black body.  The radiation incident upon a body can be absorbed, reflected or transmitted by that 
body.    If  a body absorbs all of the incident radiation then it is termed a 'black body'.  A black body is 
also an ideal emitter in that the radiation from a black body is greater than that from any other similar 
body at the same temperature. 
4. 
Emissivity  (ε).    In  IR,  the  black  body  is  used  as  a  standard  and  its  absorbing  and  emitting 
efficiency is said to be unity; i.e. ε = 1.  Objects which are less efficient radiators, (ε < 1), are termed 
'grey bodies'.  Emissivity is a function of the type of material and its surface finish, and it can vary with 
wavelength and temperature.  When ε varies with wavelength the body is termed a selective radiator.  
The ε for metals is low, typical y 0.1, and increases with increasing temperature; the ε for non-metals is 
high, typically 0.9, and decreases with increasing temperature. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-18 - Infra-red Radiation 
Spectral Emittance 
5. 
Planck’s Law.  A black body whose temperature is above absolute zero emits IR radiation over a 
range of wavelengths with different amounts of energy radiated at each wavelength.  A description of 
this energy distribution is provided by the spectral emittance, Wλ, which is the power emitted by unit 
area  of  the  radiating  surface,  per  unit  interval  of  wavelength.    Max  Planck  determined  that  the 
distribution of energy is governed by the equation: 
2
1
hc




Wλ =
c h
kTλ
e
−1
5
λ


where 
λ 

Wavelength 
 
 


Planck’s constant 
 
 


Absolute temperature 
 
 


Velocity of light 
 
 


Boltzmann’s constant 
6. 
Temperature/Emittance  Relationship.    This  rather  complex  relationship  is  best  shown 
graphically,  as  in  Fig  2  in  which  the  spectral  emittance  is  plotted  against  wavelength  for  a  variety  of 
temperatures.    It  will  be  seen  that  the  total  emittance,  which  is  given  by  the  area  under  the  curve, 
increases  rapidly  with  increasing  temperature  and  that  the  wavelength  of  maximum  emittance  shifts 
towards the shorter wavelengths as the temperature is increased. 
7-18  Fig 2 Distribution of IR Energy with Temperature 
0.8
900 K
0.7
)
Wavelength of Max Emittance
1

µ2 0.6

m
c
0.5
(W
e
c
n
800 K
0.4
itta
m
E
0.3
t
n
ia
d
700 K
0.2
a
R
l
600 K
tra
0.1
c
e
500 K
p
S
0 0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
Wavelength (microns)
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-18 - Infra-red Radiation 
7. 
Stefan-Boltzmann Law.  The total emittance of a black body is obtained by integrating the Max 
Planck equation which gives the result: 
W = σT4
where 
W  = 
Total emittance  
 
 
σ 

Stefan Boltzmann constant  
 
 


Absolute temperature 
For a grey body, the total radiant emittance is modified by the emissivity, thus: 
W = εσT4
8. 
Wien’s Displacement Law.  The wavelength corresponding to the peak of radiation is governed 
by Wien’s displacement law which states that the wavelength of peak radiation (λm), multiplied by the 
absolute temperature is a constant.  Thus: 
λmT = 2900 μK 
By substituting λm = 2900/T into Planck’s expression it is found that: 
Wλm = 1.3 × 10-15 T5 expressed in Watts cm-2μ-1 
ie the maximum spectral radiant emittance depends upon the fifth power of the temperature. 
Geometric Spreading 
9. 
The laws so far discussed relate to the radiation intensity at the surface of the radiating object.  In 
general,  radiation  is  detected  at  some  distance  from  the  object  and  the  radiation  intensity  decreases 
with  distance  from  the  source  as  it  spreads  into  an  ever-increasing  volume  of  space.    Two  types  of 
source are of interest; the point source and the plane extended source. 
10.  Point  Source.    A  point  source  radiates  uniformly  into  a  spherical  volume.    In  this  case  the 
intensity of radiation varies as the inverse square of the distance between source and detector. 
11.  Plane Extended Source.  When the radiating surface is a plane of finite dimensions radiating uniformly 
from all parts of the surface then the radiant intensity received by a detector varies with the angle between 
the line of sight and the normal to the surface.  For a source of area A the total radiant emittance is WA.  The 
radiant emittance received at a distance d and at an angle θ from the normal is given by: 
WA cosθ
2πd2
IR Sources 
12.  It  is  convenient  to  classify  IR  sources  by  the  part  they  play  in  IR  systems;  ie  as  targets,  as 
background,  or  as  controlled  sources.    A  target  is  an  object  which  is  to  be  detected,  located  or 
identified  by  means  of  IR  techniques,  while  a  background  is  any  distribution  or  pattern  of  radiation, 
external  to  the  observing  equipment,  which  is  capable  of  interfering  with  the  desired  observations.  
Clearly what might be considered a target in one situation could be regarded as background in another.  
As  an  example  terrain  features  would  be  regarded  as  targets  in  a  reconnaissance  application  but 
would be background in a low-level air intercept situation.  Controlled sources are those which supply 
the power required for active IR systems (e.g. communications), or provide the standard for calibrating 
IR devices. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-18 - Infra-red Radiation 
Targets 
13.  Aircraft Target.  A supersonic aircraft generates three principle sources of detectable and usable IR 
energy.  The typical jet pipe temperature of 773 K produces a peak of radiation, (from Wien’s law), at 3.75μ.  
The exhaust plume produces two peaks generated by the gas constituents; one at 2.5 to 3.2μ due to carbon 
dioxide, the other at 4.2 tο 4.5μ due to water vapour.  The third source is due to leading edge kinetic heating 
giving a typical temperature of 338 K with a corresponding radiation peak at about 7μ. 
14.  Reconnaissance.  Terrestrial IR reconnaissance and imaging relies on the IR radiation from the 
Earth  which  has  a  typical  temperature  of  300  K.    The  peak  of  radiation  corresponding  to  this 
temperature is about 10μ and so systems must be designed to work at this wavelength. 
Background Sources 
15.  Regardless of the nature of the target source, a certain amount of background or interfering radiation 
will  be  present,  appearing  in  the  detection  system  as  noise.    The  natural  sources  which  produce  this 
background radiation may be broadly classified as terrestrial or atmospheric and celestial. 
16.  Terrestrial  Sources.    Whenever  an  IR  system  is  looking  below  the  horizon  it  encounters  the 
terrestrial background radiation.  As all terrestrial constituents are above absolute zero they will radiate 
in  the  infra-red,  and  in  addition  IR  radiation  from  the  sun  will  be  reflected.    Green  vegetation  is  a 
particularly strong reflector which accounts for its bright image in IR photographs or imaging systems.  
Conversely, water, which is a good reflector in the visible part of the spectrum, is a good absorber of 
IR, and therefore appears dark in IR images. 
17.  Atmospheric and Celestial Sources.  Whenever an IR device looks above the horizon the sky 
provides  the  background  radiation.    The  radiation  characteristics  of  celestial  sources  depend  on  the 
source temperature together with modifications by the atmosphere. 
a. 
The  Sun.    The  sun  approximates  to  a black body radiator at a temperature of 6,000 K and 
thus  has  a  peak  of  radiation  at  0.5μ,  which  corresponds  to  yel ow-green  light.    The 
distribution  of  energy  is  shown  in  Fig  3  from  which  it  will  be  seen  that  half  of  the  radiant 
power occurs in the infra-red.  The Earth’s atmosphere changes the spectrum by absorption, 
scattering and some re-radiation such that although the distribution curve has essentially the 
same  shape,  the  intensity  is  decreased and the shorter, ultraviolet, wavelengths are filtered 
out.    The  proportion  of  IR  energy  remains  the  same  or  perhaps  may  be  slightly  higher.  
Sunlight reflected from clouds, terrain and sea shows a similar energy distribution. 
7-18  Fig 3 Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation 
IR Spectral Region
y
rg
e
n
E
Above Atmosphere
d
te
ia
d
Through Atmosphere 
a
R
at Earth's Surface
e
tiv
la
e
R
0.1
0.3 0.5 0.7 1.0
5.0
Wavelength ( )
µ
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-18 - Infra-red Radiation 
b. 
The  Moon.    The  bulk  of  the  energy  received  from  the  moon  is  re-radiated  solar  radiation, 
modified  by  reflection  from  the  lunar  surface,  slight  absorption  by  any  lunar  atmosphere  and  by 
the Earth’s atmosphere.  The moon is also a natural radiating source with a lunar daytime surface 
temperature up to 373 K and lunar night time temperature of about 120 K.  The near sub-surface 
temperature remains constant at 230 K, corresponding to peak radiation at 12.6μ. 
b. 
Sky.    Fig  4  shows  a  comparison  of  the  spectral  distribution  due  to  a  clear  day  and  a  clear 
night  sky.    At  night,  the  short  wavelength  background  radiation  caused  by  the  scattering  of 
sunlight by air molecules, dust and other particles, disappears.  At night there is a tendency 
for the Earth’s surface and the atmosphere to blend with a loss of horizon since both are at 
the same temperature and have similar emissivities. 
c. 
 
7-18  Fig 4 Spectral Energy Distribution of Background Radiation from the Sky 
y
Clear Day Sky
rg
e
Clear Night Sky
e
n
tiv
E
la
d
e
te
R
ia
d
a
R
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
Wavelength (µ)
d. 
Clouds.  Clouds produce considerable variation in sky background, both by day and by night, 
with  the  greatest  effect  occurring  at  wavelengths  shorter  than  3μ  due  to  solar  radiation 
reflected  from  cloud  surfaces.    At  wavelengths  longer  than  3μ,  the  background  radiation 
intensity caused by clouds is higher than that of the clear sky.  Low bright clouds produce a 
larger increase in background radiation intensity at this wavelength than do darker or higher 
clouds.  As the cloud formation changes the sky background changes and the IR observer is 
presented with a varying background both in time and space.  The most serious cloud effect 
on IR detection systems is that of the bright cloud edge.  A small local area of IR radiation is 
produced which may be comparable in area to that of the target, and also brighter.  Early IR 
homing  missiles  showed  a  greater  affinity  for  cumulus  cloud  types  than  the  target  aircraft.  
Discrimination from this background effect requires the use of spectral and spatial filtering. 
IR Transmission in the Atmosphere 
18.  Atmospheric  Absorption.    The  periodic  motions  of  the  electrons  in  the  atoms  of  a  substance, 
vibrating and rotating at certain frequencies, give rise to the radiation of electro-magnetic waves at the 
same frequencies.  However, the constituents of the Earth’s atmosphere also contain electrons which 
have  certain  natural  frequencies.    When  these  natural  frequencies  are  matched  by  those  of  the 
radiation  which  strikes  them,  resonance  absorption  occurs  and  the  energy  is  re-radiated  in  all 
directions.    The  effect  of  this  phenomenon  is  to  attenuate  certain  IR  frequencies.   Water vapour and 
carbon  dioxide  are  the  principle  attenuators  of  IR  radiation  in  the  atmosphere.    Figs  5a,  5b  and  5c 
show the transmission characteristics of the atmosphere at sea-level, at 30,000 ft and at 40,000 ft. 
19.  Scattering.  The amount of scattering depends upon particle size and particles in the atmosphere 
are rarely bigger than 0.5μ, and thus they have little effect on wavelengths of 3μ or greater.  However, 
once moisture condenses on to the particles to form fog or clouds, the droplet size can range between 
0.5 and 80μ, with the peak of the size distribution between 5 and 15μ.  Thus fog and cloud particles are 
comparable  in  size  to  IR  wavelengths  and  transmittance becomes poor.  Raindrops are considerably 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 7-18 - Infra-red Radiation 
larger than IR wavelengths and consequently scattering is not so pronounced.  Rain, however, tends to 
even out the temperature difference between a target and its surroundings. 
7-18  Fig 5 Atmospheric Transmittance vs. Altitude 
Fig 5a Transmittance at Sea Level 
) 100
(%
80
n
tic
io
60
s
ris
is
te
m
c
40
s
n
ra
a
20
ra
h
T
C
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wavelength (Microns)
Fig 5b Transmittance at 30,000 ft 
) 100
(%
80
n
tic
io
60
s
ris
is
te
m
c
40
s
n
ra
a
20
ra
h
T
C
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wavelength (Microns)
Fig 5c Transmittance at 40,000 ft 
) 100
(%
80
n
tic
io
60
s
ris
is
te
c
40
m
s
n
ra
a
20
ra
h
T
C
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Wavelength (Microns)
20.  Scintillation.  Where a beam of IR passes through regions of temperature variation it is refracted 
from  its  original  direction.    Since  such  regions  of  air  are  unstable,  the  deviation  of  the  beam  is  a 
random, time varying quantity.  The effect is most pronounced when the line of sight passes close to 
the earth and gives rise to unwanted modulations of the signal, and incorrect direction information for 
distant targets. 
Revised Jul 10 
 
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
CHAPTER 19 - INFRA-RED SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
Objects  with  a  temperature  above  absolute  zero  (−273  ºC)  will  emit  infra-red  (IR)  radiation 
and,  in  addition,  will  reflect  or  absorb  incident  IR  radiation  to  varying  degrees.    An  IR  sensing 
system  can  use  these  variations  in  emitted  and  reflected  IR  to  form  an  image,  in  the  same  way 
that a sensor operating within the visible part of the spectrum uses variations in visual brightness 
to  form  an  image.    IR  imaging  systems,  therefore,  rely  on  detecting  differences  in  IR  intensity, 
rather  than  on  measuring  absolute  values.    Such  systems  have  the  advantages  of  being 
independent of natural or artificial visual illumination, and are not easily deceived by camouflage. 
2. 
The  basic  physics  of  IR  are  covered  in  Volume  7,  Chapter  18,  where  it  is  shown  that  the 
wavelength  at  which  maximum  radiation  occurs  (λmax)  is  a  function  of  the  absolute  temperature  (T), 
and is governed by Wien’s Displacement Law: 
2900
λ
=
μm
max
T
By substituting typical terrestrial temperatures (270 to 300 Κ) into this equation, it will be seen that the 
peak of radiation occurs in the far infra-red range between 9 µm and 11 µm. 
3. 
Fig 1 shows the relative transmittance of IR wavelengths in the atmosphere at sea level.  Terrestrial 
IR falls within a transmission 'window' which covers wavelengths from about 8 µm to 13 µm.  IR imaging 
systems have, therefore, to be designed to operate in this band. 
7-19  Fig 1 Relative Transmittance of IR Wavelengths in the Atmosphere (at Sea Level) 
Near Infra-red
Middle Infra-red
Far Infra-red
100
80
t)
n
e
60
rc
e
(p
e
c
n
40
itta
m
s
n
20
ra
T
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Wavelength (Microns)
Atmospheric Attenuation 
4. 
The  transmission  of  IR  energy  through  the  atmosphere  may  be  impeded  due  to  scattering  by 
suspended particles and absorption by constituent gases.  If the suspended particles are small, as in 
haze and battlefield smoke, an IR system will not be affected, even in what appears as zero visibility to 
the naked eye.  If the particles are larger, as in cloud, fog, mist, and rain, IR will be no better than the 
eye,  and  the  range  of  the  system  will  be  limited  to  the  visual  range.    In  addition,  some  energy  in  the 
wavelengths between 8 µm and 13 µm is absorbed by gaseous water vapour. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
Imagery Interpretation 
5. 
Detecting  and  identifying  IR  images  requires  the  same  integration  of  size,  shape,  shadow, 
surroundings, and tone as is employed in the interpretation of conventional, visual-light imagery. 
6. 
When considering size and shape, there are two aspects which must be considered.  Firstly, the 
resolution of IR images is lower than that of visual images and some detail may be lost.  Secondly, the 
true size and shape of hot objects may be exaggerated or disguised by blooming and halation effects.  
Blooming  is  the  spreading  of  light  around  bright  objects  in  an  otherwise dark scene, while halation is 
the formation of 'haloes' around bright objects. 
7. 
Thermal shadows often mirror their visible counterparts, and they are caused by areas being shaded 
from  direct  radiation.    As  with  visual  shadows,  they  are  liable  to  change  with  changes  in  the  direction  of 
illumination, and to dissipate when the illumination lessens, eg after sunset or with cloud cover.  The rate of 
dissipation will, however, vary with the physical characteristics of the shaded area (thermal conductivity and 
capacity), and with the meteorological conditions.  Thermal shadows from movable objects (eg aircraft on the 
ground) can often be seen long after the object has moved. 
8. 
The  key  factor  in interpreting IR images is relative tone.  The common materials encountered in 
night  IR  imagery  are  metal,  pavement  (e.g.  runways),  soil,  grass,  trees,  and  water  and,  although  the 
appearance of these can vary with meteorological and physical parameters, some generalizations can 
be made (assuming the conventional cold is black, hot is white display): 
a. 
Metal  Surfaces.    Thin,  unheated,  metal  appears  black,  as  metals  have  low  emissivity 
compared to other substances.  Although such surfaces are good reflectors and will reflect energy 
incident  upon  them  from  the  sky,  the  intensity  of  radiation  at  night  is  quite  low,  so  any  reflected 
component  will  also  be  weak.    Metal  could  reflect  radiation  from  a  nearby  warm  object,  but  this 
effect does not occur often enough to be significant. 
b. 
Pavement.  Pavement has relatively high emissivity and is in good thermal contact with the earth 
which acts as a constant heat source.  It also has a high thermal capacity, and therefore retains any 
heat  received  from  the  sun  during  the  day.    These  characteristics  are  generally  true  for  all  types  of 
pavement, including concrete and asphalt, therefore they all appear light grey to white in IR imagery. 
c. 
Soil.  Soil, including most earths, sand, and rock, have the same characteristics as pavement 
and similarly appear in a light grey tone. 
d. 
Grass.    Grass  has  poor  thermal  contact  with  the  ground  and  cools  rapidly  by  radiation.    It 
therefore appears black. 
e. 
Trees.  Trees appear medium to light grey.  The tone is thought to be the result of a number 
of causes.  There is some convective warming of the trees by the air in conjunction with the night 
temperature inversion (air temperature at night is usually lower at the surface than it is a few feet 
above the ground), some retention of heat from daytime solar heating, and some heat generation 
from  the  trees’  life  processes.    In  daytime  imagery,  the  same  leaves  appear  colder  than  the 
ground as temperature at tree-top height is cooler than at ground level. 
f. 
Water.    In  night  IR  imagery,  water  ranges  in  tone  from  light  grey  to  white,  as  a  result  of  its 
high  emissivity  and  good  heat  transfer  properties.    Conversely,  by  day,  water  appears  dark;  the 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
main source of IR energy in daytime is reflected solar radiation, and water is a poor reflector at IR 
wavelengths. 
9. 
Man-made,  heated  objects,  such  as  buildings  and  vehicles,  are  easily  seen  as  IR  images.  
However, the same applies to living things, such as farm animals, and it can be difficult to distinguish 
between  these  groups,  other  than  at  close  range,  due  to  the  relatively  poor  IR  resolution,  and  the 
blooming and halation effects referred to earlier. 
FORWARD LOOKING INFRA-RED (FLIR) 
Optical System Requirements 
10.  The  optical  system  collects  the  IR  radiation  and  focuses  an  image  onto  one  or  more  detectors.  
The problems inherent in achieving this are more severe than those encountered in visible-light optics.  
The  bandwidth  in  which  FLIR  operates  (8  µm  to  13  µm)  is  significantly  wider  than  that  in  the  visible 
band  (0.4  µm  to  0.7  µm),  and  this  increases  the  optical  design  problems.    Conventional  glass  is 
essentially opaque to IR at wavelengths in excess of 3 µm, thus special materials must be employed; 
these generally have higher refractive indices than glass.  The combination of relatively wide bandwidth 
operation  and  high  refractive  index  optics,  results  in  much  greater  aberrations  than  have  to  be 
contended with in visible-light optics.  Furthermore, many of the materials suitable for IR optics are not 
ideal  for  military  and  airborne  applications,  where  they  may  be  subject  to  pressure,  vibration,  shock, 
and extremes of temperature. 
IR Detection 
11.  The detectors used in FLIR systems are made of semi-conductor material and are photo-conductive, 
i.e.  their  electrical  conductivity  increases  in  proportion  to  the number of incident IR photons.  Cooling is 
essential  for  optimum  performance.  Two of the main characteristics of a detector are its time constant 
and  its  detectivity.    The  time  constant  is  a  measure  of  the  time  required  for  the  detector  to  respond  to 
radiation  on  its  surface;  detectivity  is  essentially  a  measure  of  sensitivity,  ie  the  amount  of  incident  IR 
energy necessary to generate an output signal over and above the detector noise. 
12.  Although IR Charge Coupled Devices (CCD) are under development, current FLIR systems use a 
rectilinear scanning action to examine the field of view.  The two most common techniques are: 
a. 
Serial  processing  (Fig  2a),  in  which  a  single  detector,  or  a  linear  array  using  time  delay 
integration (TDI), is used to scan a scene line by line and element by element. 
b. 
Parallel processing (Fig 2b), in which an array of detectors is used to scan the scene element 
by  element.    Usually,  the  elevation  field  of  view  is  covered  by  the  line  array  and  the  scanning 
action covers the azimuth field of view. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
7-19  Fig 2 FLIR Scanning Principle for Parallel Processing 
a  Serial Scan using Time Delay Integration (TDI)
Raster Scan
Delay
Delay
Delay
Delay
To Display
b  Parallel Scan with a Linear Array
Key
Detector
Direction of
Interlaced Scan
Pre-Amplifier
Delay
TDI Module
To Display
13.  Serial  processing  produces  a  good  quality  TV-like  display,  but  requires  very  high  speed  scanning, 
calling  for  detectors  of  very  short  time  constant  or  high  detectivity.    Parallel  processing  allows  a  slower 
scan  rate,  but  requires  multiple  channels  to  handle  the  simultaneous  line  output  signals,  and  the signal 
processing is complicated by the inevitable differences in performance of the detectors forming the array. 
14.  In practice, the detectors remain stationary and the scanning is achieved by mechanical movement of 
an optical system.  Such electro-mechanical hardware carries a significant penalty in terms of reliability and 
weight,  and  much  effort  is  being  directed  towards  the  development  of  non-scanning,  solid  state,  devices, 
which, in addition, may dispense with the need for cooling. 
Display 
15.  FLIR imagery is presented on a CRT as a real-time raster scan, in a similar manner to TV.  The 
display  is  usually  arranged  such  that  an  increase  in  relative  temperature  corresponds  to  a  transition 
from  black,  through  shades  of  grey,  to  white.    This  tonal  correspondence  can  be  reversed,  if  it  is 
considered appropriate for particular applications. 
INFRA-RED LINESCAN (IRLS) 
Introduction 
16.  Infra-red Linescan (IRLS) is a passive, airborne, infra-red mapping system that scans the ground 
along the flight path and produces a high resolution film map of the terrain.  Radiated infra-red energy 
from the ground is received by an optical scanner in the IRLS and detected in the 8 µm to 13 µm band 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
Recording and Display 
17.  Instead of an instantaneous view of the entire area beneath the aircraft, narrow strips are scanned 
by  a  rotating  mirror  assembly.    These  scans  are  perpendicular  to  the  heading  of  the  aircraft.    The 
forward motion of the aircraft accounts for the scanning strips being parallel to each other in the line of 
flight.  This linescan procedure is shown in Fig 3. 
7-19  Fig 3 Infra-red Linescan Techniques 
Scan
Angle
Aircraft
Heading
The equipment scans an area of about 60º either side of the nadir (a total 120º scan).  At any instant, 
the optical system is collecting IR radiation emitted from a small rectangular area on the ground.  This 
area  is  called  the  'Instantaneous  Field  of  View'  (IFV)  (as  shown  in  Fig  4).    The  IFV  is  an  important 
factor in determining the resolution of the system, and is proportional to the altitude of the aircraft. 
7-19  Fig 4 Instantaneous Field of View (IFV) 
IFV
(Instantaneous
Field of View)
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 7 


AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
Height Limitation 
18.  The  IRLS  system  is  intended  to  be  used  at  low  levels,  but  is  capable  of  being  used  at  medium 
altitudes.  The velocity-to-height (V/H) ratio is in the order of 0.06 to 1.6 kt per foot, equating to heights 
of between 200 ft and 5,300 ft at 320 kt. 
Operation 
19.  Detection.    The  IR  energy  is focused, by the scanner optical system, on to two detectors which 
change  the  ground  emissions  into  fluctuating  electrical  signals.    Objects  emit  infra-red  energy  if  they 
are  above  a  temperature  of  absolute  zero  (–273  ºC/0  K).    In  order  to  reduce  interference  from  the 
inherent infra-red emissions coming from the detectors, they are cooled in a cryogenerator; helium is 
usually used to refrigerate them to as close to 0 K as possible.  This action brings the sensitivity of the 
detectors  within  satisfactory  limits.    If  the  cooling  system  fails,  the  results  become  unacceptable  in  a 
very  short  time.    One  detector  provides  a  wide,  and  the  other  a  narrow,  field  of  view  of  the  ground 
along track.  Infra-red energy in the 8 µm to 13 µm band, radiated from successive IFV, is received at 
the  detectors  in  the  IRLS.    The  size  of  the  IFV  at  any  given  time  is  determined  by  which  of  the  two 
detectors is selected.  The selection is made automatically and depends on the V/H ratio. 
20.  Video  and  Film  Presentation.    The  detected  energy  is  processed  in  the  receiver  to  obtain  a 
video signal which is fed to a recorder where, after correction, the video is displayed on a CRT.  The 
displayed video is optically focused onto film moving at a speed dependent on V/H.  Flight data digital 
inputs (mainly aircraft position, height and heading) are projected by the optical system on to one edge 
of the film.  Similarly, reference and event markers are projected onto the film between the video and 
data recordings.  The result is an annotated continuous map of the terrain.  An IRLS frame, with data 
markings suppressed, is shown in Fig 5, together with a comparative photograph. 
7-19  Fig 5 Infra-red Linescan 
Fig 5a Air-Ground Photograph of Line Feature 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 7 


AP3456 -7-19 - Infra-Red Systems 
Fig 5b Infra-red Linescan Image of same Feature 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
CHAPTER 20 - HEAD-UP AND HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAYS 
Introduction 
1. 
Normal  cockpit  displays  entail  the  pilot  dividing  his  time  between  observing  the  outside  world  and 
reading  the  instruments.    Thus,  the  pilot’s  eyes  have  frequently  to  switch  between  reading  instruments 
situated at no more than a few feet away, and surveying the outside world, which is effectively at infinity.  This 
requires not only a change of focus, but also an adjustment to light conditions which are often considerably 
different.  It is a far more satisfactory arrangement if the instruments are read under the same conditions of 
focus and illumination as the outside world; this can be achieved by the use of head-up or helmet mounted 
displays. 
THE COLLIMATED HEAD-UP DISPLAY 
Principle 
2. 
The collimated head-up display (HUD) is a development of the gyro gunsight and is used to project an 
instrument display at the pilot’s eye level.  The symbols are produced in a waveform generator, displayed on 
a  CRT,  and  reflected  on  a  glass  screen  in  front  of  the  pilot.    The  symbols  may  be  driven  by  a  variety  of 
aircraft sensors (eg IN, ADC, Radar, LRMTS) to provide aircraft attitude, altitude, and velocity, together with 
navigation  and  weapon  aiming  information.    A  control  unit  is  provided  to  allow  the  pilot  to  select  the 
appropriate  symbols  for  any  particular  stage  of  flight.    Initially,  the  display  brightness  can  be  adjusted 
manually by the pilot, after which it is controlled by a photocell to compensate for changes in the illumination 
of the outside scene.  Fig 1 shows a block diagram of a typical HUD installation. 
7-20 Fig 1 Block Diagram of Typical Fighter Aircraft HUD Installation 
Reflector (Combiner Glass)
Image of Cathode
Ray Tube Screen
Collimated Display
at Infinity
indshield
W
Photo
Pilot's Display Unit
CRT
Cell
Pilot's
Control
Panel
Inputs from
Sensor
EHT Unit
Waveform Generator
and Interface Unit
3. 
The  pilot’s  display  unit  (PDU)  incorporates  a  very bright CRT to ensure that the symbols can be 
viewed  against  a  very  high  background  brightness,  equivalent  to  sunlight  on  cloud.    The  reflector,  or 
combiner glass, is semi-transparent and reflects the CRT image while allowing the outside world to be 
viewed through it.  The presented image is collimated, ie focused at infinity, so that the CRT symbols 
and the outside scene can be viewed as a composite image, without the need to change eye focus. 
Revised May 10)   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
4. 
The  optical  system  in  the  HUD  may  be  either  refractive  (lenses  and  prisms)  or  diffractive 
(holographic);  reflective  optics  have  been  used,  but  any  advantages  in  terms  of  field  of  view  (FOV) 
have been outweighed by considerations of size, cost, weight, and optical efficiency. 
5. 
In  addition  to  symbolic  displays,  the  use  of  holographic  technology  has  the  potential  to  allow 
sensor imagery to be shown, such as LLTV, FLIR, or radar. 
Refractive Optics 
6. 
The use of refractive optics is still the most common technique although there are disadvantages 
in terms of restricted field of view, low optical efficiency, and bulky, heavy components. 
7. 
Field  of  View.    The field of view of a conventional refractive HUD is determined principally by the 
size of the output lens, and the distance between it and the eye (via the combiner).  The reflected output 
lens acts as a porthole through which the virtual image produced by the HUD is viewed (Fig 2).  As an 
example,  for  a  12  cm  diameter  lens  at  an  eye  to  lens  distance  of  70  cm,  the  single  eye  FOV  will  be 
approximately 10º.  In practice, the total FOV in azimuth will be extended due to the separation between 
the  pilot’s  eyes,  and  a  further  increase  will  result  from  small  head  movements  (Fig  3).    Some  PDUs 
increase the vertical FOV by using a movable combiner glass.  A servomechanism moves the glass, thus 
shifting the FOV in the vertical plane and increasing the total, but not the instantaneous, FOV (Fig 4).  The 
major problem with a limited FOV is that of marking a target, or updating from a visual pinpoint, which is 
at  a large angle-off from the aircraft centre line.  In addition, the effect of the porthole and the resultant 
restrictions on head movement can be tedious for the pilot. 
7-20 Fig 2 Single Eye Instantaneous Field of View 
Eye to Lens Distance
(Typically 35 -100 cm)
Eye
Instantaneous Field
Position
of View
Reflected Image
of Output Lens
forming
'Porthole'
Output Lens
(Typically 7 -18 cm)
7-20 Fig 3 Increased FOV due to Binocular Vision and Head Movement 
'Porthole'
Total Field of View
Revised May 10)   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
7-20 Fig 4 Increasing the Vertical FOV by Moving the Combiner 
Movement of Combiner
Increased Size
of 'Porthole'
Output
Lens
8. 
Optical Efficiency.  In any optical system, there will be losses in light transmission.  Typically, only 
40% of the light produced by the CRT will reach the pilot’s eye, and to compensate for this loss the CRT 
must be run at a very high output level, leading to a reduction in its life.  Light entering from the outside 
scene may be reduced to about 70% which may cause a significant reduction in forward visibility. 
9. 
Size and Weight.  High quality lenses and prisms are heavy and expensive items, and since the 
output lens and the associated optics must be mounted on the pilot’s side of the combiner, they tend to 
protrude into the cockpit.  The equipment must be installed such that adequate clearance for ejection is 
maintained, while at the same time being close enough to the pilot’s eye to yield an acceptable FOV. 
Diffractive Optics 
10.  The  trend  in  HUD  construction  is  towards  the  use  of  diffractive  optics  in  which  a  holographic 
element,  tuned  to  the  frequency  of  the  CRT  light  output,  is  used  as  the  combiner.    Compared  to  the 
refractive system, the holographic combiner has a higher transmission efficiency, improved reflectivity, 
and variable geometry. 
11.  The combiner is produced by exposing a film of photosensitive emulsion to laser light under specific 
conditions.  The recorded diffraction pattern in the emulsion has the property of acting as a mirror to light 
of  the  same  wavelength  as  the  laser  used  in  production,  while  being  transparent  to  light  of  other 
wavelengths.  After development, the film is sealed between glass plates, and the resulting unit is used as 
the combiner glass. 
12.  The reflectance of the narrow band of CRT frequencies can reach 80%, while the transmission of 
other  frequencies  from  the  outside  world  is  typically  in  excess  of  90%.    Thus,  the  technique  allows 
CRTs to be run at lower power levels, with the attendant gains in life, and allows the outside scene to 
be viewed with only minimal reductions in brightness and contrast. 
13.  The  element  can  be  produced  in  either  a  curved  or  a  flat  form  as  necessary  to  fit  the  space 
available in the cockpit and this permits a wider FOV and less intrusion into the ejection line. 
HUD Symbology 
14.  A HUD can be designed to portray virtually any information in an infinite variety of formats.  The 
format  used  will  vary  from  manufacturer  to  manufacturer,  and  from  aircraft  type  to  aircraft  type.  
Furthermore,  the  symbology  may  be  amended  during  the  lifetime  of  an  aircraft  as  its  role,  or 
Revised May 10)   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
equipments, change.  It is not possible in this chapter to describe all of the displays available; rather a 
typical fast jet format will be illustrated in both a general and a weapon aiming mode. 
7-20 Fig 5 Example of Typical UK HUD Symbology - General Mode 
5
(c)
325
17,950
(d)
(e)
(b)
(a)
(g)
(f)
22
23
24
(h)
-5
(c)
15.  Fig 5 shows a typical HUD general mode which would be used during all stages of flight except for 
weapon delivery.  The symbology used is as follows: 
a. 
Aircraft  symbol  denoting  either  the  fore  and  aft  aircraft  axis,  the  aircraft  velocity  vector,  or 
some computed vector as required by a particular flight mode. 
b. 
Horizon bars, representing zero pitch. 
c. 
Pitch bars at 5º intervals with a 1:1 scaling. 
d. 
Airspeed  indication,  either  IAS  or  Mach  No,  both  as  a  digital  read-out  and  as  a  pointer 
movement indicating rate of change. 
e. 
Height.  As shown, the display indicates barometric height, but alternatively radar height may 
be shown, in which case the figures will be preceded by a letter 'R'. 
f. 
Angle of attack.  The values associated with the scale will vary with aircraft type. 
g. 
Vertical speed.  The values associated with the scale will vary with aircraft type. 
h. 
Heading (or track) scale with a superimposed steering bug (∪). 
16.  A  HUD  will  have  a  number  of  different  modes  and  sub-modes,  some  of  which  will  be  selected 
automatically  dependent  on  the  mode  of  operation  of  the  navigation  and  attack  system,  and  others 
Revised May 10)   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
which  may  be  selected  manually.    An  example  of  an  air-to-ground  weapon  aiming  mode  is  shown  in 
Fig 6 with the following symbology: 
7-20 Fig 6 HUD in Air-to-Ground Weapon Aiming Mode 
(b)
(a)
(c)
(d)
a. 
Target bar.  The gapped target bar represents the system’s computed target position.  Once 
the pilot can see the target, delivery accuracy can be refined by changing phase and slewing the 
target bar, now a solid line, to overlie the target, where it will be stabilized by the system. 
b. 
Time circle.  The time circle unwinds anti-clockwise from 60 seconds to release (50 seconds 
to release illustrated). 
c. 
Impact line.  The impact line represents the track along which the weapons will fall, and the 
pilot’s task is to fly the aircraft such that the impact line overlies the target position.  The top of the 
line represents the minimum safe pass distance, and the gap 1½ times the pass distance. 
d. 
Continuously  Computed  Impact  Point  (CCIP).    The  CCIP  represents  the  point  on  the 
ground where the weapons will impact if released at that instant. 
17.  The  weapon  is  released,  normally  automatically,  when  the  target  bar  and  CCIP  coincide.    Until 
then, the pilot must ensure that the impact line overlies the target bar, and, for safe clearance, that the 
CCIP  and  target  bar  coincide  before  the  target  reaches  the  top  of  the  impact  line.    In  some  systems 
and modes, additional symbols may be used, for example, to indicate LRMTS pointing and operation, 
air-to-air missile aiming, and gun aiming solutions, or to enable the navigation system to be updated by 
slewing the symbol to overlie a visual pinpoint. 
HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAY (HMD) SYSTEMS 
General 
18.  With  the  increasing  complexity  of  airborne  detection  and  display  systems  and  the  associated 
additional  workload  on  the  pilot,  more  and  more  designers  are  focusing  on  integrating  sensor 
information into the flying helmet.  This is aimed at removing the disadvantage of the Head-up Display 
(HUD) in that the display is only available to the pilot whilst he is looking at the HUD combiner and not 
when  he  looks  away.    Although  not  yet  widespread  in  use,  HMDS  technology  was  first  used 
operationally in attack helicopters where the need to meet ejection safety criteria did not exist.  These 
HMD systems allow the pilot to benefit from displays of aircraft symbology superimposed, on demand, 
on his normal field of vision.  HMD systems (often termed Integrated Helmet Systems (IHS)) become 
an  inherent  part  of  the  aircraft  avionics  and  weapons  systems enabling off boresight weapon aiming, 
target designation, and pilot cueing, for example. 
Displays 
19.  To  permit  aircraft  to  operate  throughout  the  24-hour  spectrum,  a  HMD  normally  incorporates  a 
miniature cathode ray tube (CRT) and an image intensifier tube (IIT).  The display of thermal imagery 
Revised May 10)   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
(TI)  or  output  from  other  electro-optical  (EO)  sensors  is  provided  to  the  pilot  by  means  of  the  CRT.  
Miniature  CRTs  may  present  the  forward-looking  infra-red (FLIR) imagery and also provide flight and 
weapon  aiming  information  in  a  similar  manner  to  a  conventional  HUD.    Alone,  the  TI  may  be 
dangerous for the 24-hour mission since the emissivity of natural materials will vary over the period.  A 
so-called  zero  contrast  (or  washout  effect)  during  rainfall  is  sometimes  observed  especially  during 
twilight or at dawn.  At these times, foreground is not detectable against background and, for example, 
pylons or cables become an extreme hazard.  To overcome this, the IIT and TI may be combined.  A 
HMD may be designed to allow the pilot to switch between IIT and TI at will, select both, or switch off 
the  flight  symbology  altogether.    In  twilight  or  dawn  periods,  it  might  be  better  to  present  only  one 
sensor  at  any  one  time.    The  IIT  works  on  a  different  principle  from  the  TI  and  is  better  suited  to 
adverse  weather  conditions  during  night  or  twilight.    Thus,  a  true  IHS  will  be  configured  with  the  day 
and night capabilities combined as shown in Fig 7. 
7-20 Fig 7 IHS Configuration 
CRT
Combiner 2
IIT
Combiner 1
Direct
View
Visor
The TI and IIT images are integrated in Combiner 2 and the resultant image is superimposed on the 
direct view in Combiner 1.  There are drawbacks, however.  High brightness is required because of the 
complicated optical train that HMDs use whether the image is displayed on a combiner eyepiece or on 
the visor.  Between source and projection, the pathway can attenuate both brightness and definition - 
affording a resolution of some 50% of that of the human eye.  Moreover, once symbology is projected 
on to the eyepiece or visor, transmissivity to the real world is affected.  The dichroic coatings necessary 
for image projection and the laser protection elements reduce real world transmissivity to about 70%.  
Clearly,  some  compromise  and  adjustment  is  necessary  to  provide  the  right  balance  of  real  world 
transmissivity  and  symbology  brilliance.    Fig  8  shows  the  combined  optical  paths  and  an  example  of 
their attenuation. 
Revised May 10)   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
7-20 Fig 8 Optical Paths and Attenuation 
Combiner 2
~
~ 3-5 ftL
~
~100 to 4000 ftL
Outside World
IIT
CRT
Transmission x%
Transmission (100-x) %
Removable
Relay Tube
Eye
Outside World
Cockpit Window
Tinted Visor
Combiner 1
(~
~
   90%)
(~
~
   15%)
Transmission From Outside: 
    
~
~ 70% (currently 50%)
Protection and Comfort 
20.  Wherever possible, all electro-optical parts are protected by the helmet shell.  As few electronics as 
possible are actually located on the helmet.  Rather they are mounted in a cockpit unit or main equipment 
bay  electronic  unit.    A  schematic  diagram  of  the  layout  is  shown  in  Fig  9.    In  most  cases,  the  display 
module,  containing  the  minimal  electronic  components,  is  clipped  over  the  personalized  helmet,  thus 
allowing use by more than one pilot.  The requirements of the display system have to integrate with the 
flying  helmet  in  such  a  way  that  the  fundamental  properties  of  the  flying  helmet  are  not  compromised.  
The  aim  is  always  to  avoid  an  increase  in  weight  whilst  retaining  helmet  impact  resistance.    Therefore, 
equipment  has  to  be  positioned  carefully  to  maintain  the  optimum  helmet  C  of  G  and  keep  the  helmet 
moment of inertia within acceptable limits.  This is essential to avoid an increase in tiredness leading to 
loss of concentration and for safety in conditions encountered during ejection or during forced landings.  
Optical  surfaces  are  either  made  of  glass  or  optical  plastics,  the  latter  having  the  advantage  of  lower 
weight.  The design must take into account the range of interpupillary distances and allow the eye to be 
positioned in the centre of the exit pupil with a correctly fitting helmet.  The exit pupil is the optical 'window' 
through  which  the  superimposed  image  is  viewed.    An  exit  pupil  larger  than  15  mm  provides  a  very 
acceptable system in that if the helmet moves, the wearer does not suddenly lose the image.  An increase 
in exit pupil necessitates an increase in weight so there has to be a sensible trade-off if comfort is to be 
maintained.    Whilst  helmet  comfort  is  of  paramount  importance,  in  general  the  fitting  requirements  of 
HMDs assume more significance.  The helmet fit, and therefore its stability, must be such as to maintain 
the  eye(s)  within  the  exit  pupil(s).    A  visor  (or  visors)  to  attenuate  glare  and  prevent  eye  damage  from 
lasers is part of the helmet. 
Tracking 
21.  A  HMD  will  not  function  without  a  helmet  tracking  system  to  determine  the  pilot’s  head  position 
relative to the cockpit.  Losses in the system which depend largely on processing power may result in 
the  display  lagging or jumping as the pilot moves his head.  This is reduced by increasing the image 
refresh  rate  and  introducing  predictive  algorithms.    The  potential  of  eye  pointing  has  yet  to  be 
determined  but  it  could  provide  a  more  natural  method  of  designating  objects.    Furthermore,  the 
natural  stability  of  the  eye  could  de-couple  involuntary  head  motion  (due  to  turbulence  for  example) 
from the aiming system.
Revised May 10)   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
7-20 Fig 9 Distribution of Components 
HMD
Helmet
Tracker
Transmitter
Electronics Unit
Cockpit Unit
Quick
Disconnect
Connector
Aircraft
Processors
Pilot's
Interfaces
&
Control
Aircraft
Panel
Video
Interfaces
Inputs
Properties 
22.  To give binocular advantage and to cover for failure, two CRTs (for the thermal or other imagery) 
and two IIT units are usually fitted.  When respective units are being employed separately, the single 
image  is  still  viewed  from  two  different  sources.    A  binocular  capability  is  preferred  to  retain  depth 
perception although there are systems which project symbology to one eye only.  Monocular systems 
are satisfactory for short-term tasks or during daytime.  For enduring tasks, especially at night, such as 
en-route navigation, a binocular device overcomes binocular rivalry problems.  Brightness and contrast 
are adjustable - or autocontrast can be selected to counter extremes of ambient light.  A diagram of a 
typical IHS is shown in Fig 10.  Overall, the HMDS requires the following properties: 
a. 
Parallelism of both IITs. 
b. 
No obscuration of IIT and CRT-based images. 
c. 
Low weight and correct CG for helmet. 
d. 
Parallelism and stability of combiners. 
e. 
Combiners preferably in one plane but must have high stability. 
f. 
Exact and easy adjustment of interpupillary distance if exit pupil is restricted. 
g. 
Large exit pupil for flexibility. 
h. 
Optimum  adjustment  of  combiners  should  not  change  on  switching  between  IIT  and  CRT 
channels. 
i. 
Field of view between 35° and 40°, although lower figures can be acceptable for specific 
tasks. 
j. 
Helmet tracker system with low image lag rates. 
Revised May 10)   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-20 - Head-up and Helmet Mounted Displays 
7-20 Fig 10 A Typical IHS 
Flight Nav.
Head
Weapon
Sensor
Angles
Data
Video
1 inch CRT
Graphics
Processor
Deflection
Coils
12kV
Relay Lens
Helmet
Quick
Shell
Disconnect
Receiver
Helmet
Electronic
Displays
Visor
Objective
Image
Battery
Intensifier
and HT
Helmet
Tube
Positioning
Sensing
Electronics
Transmitter
Revised May 10)   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
CHAPTER 21 – DIGITAL INSTRUMENT AND SENSOR DISPLAYS 
Introduction 
1. 
Conventional  cockpit  displays,  involving  banks  of  analogue  instruments  of  all  shapes  and  sizes, 
crammed  into  the  available  space  on  the  instrument  panel  and  adjacent  consoles,  have,  for  some  time, 
given way to compact flat screen digital presentations in new aircraft.  This follows the wide acceptance in 
the aviation industry of active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD) (see Volume 7, Chapter 29 Para 12).  
Earlier attempts at applying TV screen technology employed bulky cathode ray tubes (CRT).  These were 
found  to  be  difficult  to  read  in  changing  light  patterns  and  too  unreliable  in  that  they  were  fragile  and 
estimated  to  fail  every  300  hours.    Conversely,  the  AMLCD  has  a mean time between failures (MTBF) of 
some  15,000  to  20,000  hours, is extremely rugged, and offers true sunlight readability.  The AMLCD also 
provides high resolution and a wide field of view.  One disadvantage, fast being overcome, is the relatively 
high-power consumption of the AMLCD, the bulky power supply for which represents an undesirable weight 
consideration  for  small,  tactical  aircraft.    Experiments  with  cholesteric  techniques  (no  back  lighting)  have 
shown  a  considerable  saving  in  power  requirements  and  are  cheaper  than  AMLCDs  but  they  generally 
provide too little brightness.  Flat display technology will continue to advance, and the results will tend to be 
incorporated  into  new  aircraft  types.    However,  whatever  the  method,  the  principle  of  the  glass  cockpit, 
described below, is only marginally affected. 
THE ‘GLASS’ COCKPIT 
Principle 
2. 
The  term  ‘Glass  Cockpit’  describes  the  concept  of  having  a  number  of  multi-functional  display 
(MFD)  screens  (each  measuring  some  25  by  20  cm)  in  front  of  the  pilots  rather  than  a  conventional 
instrument panel.  In fact, the panel becomes composite in nature in that it generally houses both the 
display  screens  and  vital  standby  instruments  and  their  associated  switches  and  adjusters.    The 
conventional  instrument  panel  is,  in  the  main,  dominated  by  circular  dials  with  pointers  moving 
clockwise  to  increase  and  anti-clockwise  to  decrease  the  readings.    In  the  glass  cockpit,  in  order  to 
make data recognition more intuitive, many such presentations have been superseded by the moving 
‘tape’ symbology.  In a tape display, the tape moves up or down and the pointer remains fixed.  This, in 
development,  led  to  many  disagreements  as  to  whether  the  tape  should  move  up  to  increase  the 
reading or down, the latter finally prevailing. 
Typical Layout 
3. 
Designers  have  striven  with  some  success  to  standardize  MFD  presentations,  not  least  in  an 
effort  to  reduce  aircraft  type  cross-training  difficulties.    Fig  1  shows  a  typical  MFD  in  primary  flight 
display mode which contains all critical flight instruments.  Although the arrangement cannot be called 
standard, it represents the general consensus on where and what to display.  Data is provided by the 
Air  Data  System  (ADS)  and  other  sensors  and  is  controlled  through  an  Avionics  Management  Unit 
(AMU).  Invalid data is normally indicated by an X where the data should appear. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
7-21 Fig 1 Typical Primary Flight Instrument Display 
ST
S A
T L
A L
L
2
MM
1
10 
10
10 
10
G
1
10

 
–10

2
GS 
MIN
 270 
AGL
MB
9510
     1.4  G
TA   4.0  ± 05

      NO BRNG
TCAS  TA/RA
2228:47 
0003:16 
  T1
  V2
126Y 116.9
MCN  ATL
35.0
Airspeed Data 
4.
Airspeed Indicator (ASI).  Calibrated Air Speed (CAS) or True Air Speed (TAS) may be selected 
for display and is represented by a tape as shown in Fig 2.  As speed increases, the tape moves down 
and the (increasing) numbers are read against a fixed pointer.  It can be interpreted from this intuitive 
presentation  that  the  pointer  is  advancing,  in  the  correct  sense,  upwards  (or  forwards).    Similarly, 
reducing airspeed has the tape moving upwards with decreasing numbers passing the pointer.  Thus, 
the  pointer  appears  to  move  down  or  backwards  as  the  speed  falls.    The  pointer  generally takes the 
form  of  an  enlarged  ‘window’  in  which  a  more  accurate  reading  of  airspeed  to  the  exact knot can be 
readily  seen.    On  most  systems,  when  CAS  is  selected,  a  reference  CAS  may  be  chosen  and,  is 
marked  on  the  ASI  by  a  coloured  (usually  cyan)  caret  or  bug.    The  speed  so  selected  also  appears 
above the ASI tape in the same colour as the caret.  If the reference speed disappears off the top or 
bottom of the display, half of the caret normally remains visible to the pilot.  Once the reference speed 
reappears  in  the  displayed  range,  the  caret  re-attaches  itself  and  moves  again  with  the  tape.    A  red 
horizontal line marks the Never Exceed speed (VNE).  Groundspeed appears in a separate window just 
below the main display. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
7-21 Fig 2 Airspeed 'Tape' Symbology 
Digital Reference
Airspeed
VNE
Digital
Airspeed
Reference
Window
Airspeed
Caret
GS
Digital 
 270
Groundspeed
5. 
Stall Warning.  Stalling speed is a function of weight, aircraft configuration, and engine power.  A 
selectable  stall-warning  feature  (see  Fig  3)  is  usually  configured  to  appear  as  a  red  and  white 
diagonally  striped  area  starting  at  a  point  just  above  the  calculated  stalling  speed.    The  AMU  will 
interrogate other systems, such as the Ground Collision Avoidance System and flap and undercarriage 
sensors in order, automatically, to configure the stall warning tape correctly. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
7-21 Fig 3 Tape showing Stall Warning 
Stall
Warning
Tape
6. 
Take-off Speed Carets.  Carets may be displayed against the following critical take-off speeds: 
a. 
Decision Speed (V1). 
b. 
Rotation Speed (VR). 
c. 
Take-off Safety Speed (V2). 
The carets for V1 and VR are removed automatically once the main wheels leave the ground. 
Altitude Data 
7. 
Altimeter.  The altimeter tape symbol is shown in Fig 4.  It displays the barometric altitude of the 
aircraft derived from the ADS with invalid data denoted as Xs.  Some, or all, of the following altimeter 
components may be selected for display, depending on aircraft type: 
a. 
Altitude scale. 
b. 
Digital altitude window and index. 
c. 
Reference altitude and caret. 
d. 
Minimum altitude indicator. 
e. 
Barometric pressure setting. 
f. 
Digital radar altitude. 
g. 
Reference radar altitude setting. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
8. 
Altitude Scale.  The altitude figures and scale tick marks appear in colour (green in Fig 4).  The range 
is in the order of 1,000 to 50,000 ft with tick marks at 100 ft intervals.  Increasing altitude is indicated by a 
downward movement of the tape which, like airspeed, may be interpreted intuitively as the pointer moving 
upwards for increasing, and downwards for decreasing, altitude. 
7-21 Fig 4 Altimeter, VSI, and TCAS Displays 
Upper/Lower
VVI Box
Digital Reference
Altitude
Altitude Scale

Reference

Altitude Caret
Digital Altitude
Window and Index
VVI Caret

VVI Scale

TCAS Climb/Dive
Indicator Strip
Minimum Altitude
Indicator
MIN
AGL 
Barometric Pressure
Setting
MB
9510
Radar Altitude and
Reference Setting
9. 
Digital Altitude Window and Index.  A white pointer window depicts the exact barometric altitude 
in  enlarged  digits  reading  in  10  ft  increments.    Digits  rotate  downward  to  indicate  increasing  altitude 
and vice versa. 
10.  Reference  Altitude  and  Caret.    A  reference  altitude  may  be  selected  by  positioning  a  coloured 
caret against the selected value.  This altitude is then displayed digitally, and in the same colour as the 
caret, immediately above the altitude scale. 
11.  Minimum Altitude Indicator and Barometric Pressure Setting.  The minimum altitude can be set 
and appears (shown as MIN and coloured cyan in Fig 4) above the barometric pressure setting and below 
the altitude scale.  It also appears as a (cyan) line on the altitude tape.  The barometric pressure setting 
can be selected to read in millibars (shown as MB) or inches of mercury (shown as IN HG). 
Note:    The  hectopascal  (hPa)  is  the  standard  unit  of  pressure  although  the  millibar  (mb)  is  still 
common in aviation.  The hPa and the mb have equivalent values and so can be considered to be 
identical for all practical purposes. 
12.  Digital Radar Altitude.  Digital radar altitude is presented as figures in a boxed read-out below and to 
the left of the barometric pressure setting and is labelled AGL. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
13.  Reference Radar Altitude Setting.  A radar altitude reference setting, when selected, appears in 
cyan immediately below the digital radar altitude. 
Vertical Velocity Data 
14.  Vertical Velocity Indicator (VVI).  The VVI (see also Fig 4) is a fixed scale located to the left of 
the altimeter.  It displays rate of change of altitude using data from the ADS.  The scale contains tick 
marks every 100 fpm between 1,000 and –1,000 fpm and every 500 fpm between 1,500 and 3,000 fpm 
and –1,500 and -3,000 fpm.  The current velocity is indicated by a caret which expands from the centre 
of the fixed scale, upwards for positive vertical velocity and downwards for negative values.  An upper 
and a lower VVI read-out are presented at the top and bottom of the scale respectively.  This remains 
as  a  numeric  3.0  until  the  VVI  tape  caret  becomes  fully  elongated  at  ±3,000  fpm  or  greater.    The 
numeric  3.0  then  becomes  boxed  in  white,  changes  from  green  to  white  and  displays  the  actual 
velocity, at 300 fpm intervals, up to a maximum of 9,900 fpm rate of climb or descent. 
Flight Path Data 
15.  Flight Path Director.  The Flight Path Director Indicator (FPDI) is positioned in the top centre of 
the MFD.  Some of the selectable features are depicted in Fig 5.  The FPDI is the primary instrument 
for displaying: 
a. 
The flight path - the actual trajectory of the aircraft through the air using data derived from the 
Inertial Navigation Unit (INU). 
b. 
Aircraft pitch and roll. 
c. 
Flight director information. 
7-21 Fig 5 Flight Path Director Indicator 
Special Alerts
Marker Beacon
Annunciator
STA
T L
A L
L
Attitude Indicator
Glideslope
MM
Pitch Ladder Label
 Scale
10
1 0
1
1 0
0  
Pitch Ladder Bars
G
Climb/Dive Marker
Glideslope
1
– 0 
–1
– 0
Roll Indicator
Deviation
Indicator
Acceleration Cue
Horizon Bar
Roll Scale
Reference Flight Path Angle
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
16.  FPDI Features.  The more important features available on the FPDI are: 
a. 
Climb/Dive  Marker  (CDM).    The  CDM  is  represented  by  a  circle  with  a  horizontal  line  on 
either  side  except  with  the  autopilot  engaged  when  the  circle  changes  to  a  diamond.   The CDM 
indicates the vertical flight path angle through space. 
b. 
Pitch Ladder Bars.  The pitch ladder bars indicate, relative to the CDM, whether the aircraft is 
in a climb or a dive.  The bars are displayed at 5º increments, with the horizon representing the 0º 
vertical flight path. 
c. 
Horizon Bar.  The flight path scale is divided by the horizon bar into two contrasting coloured 
areas  to  represent  the  sky  and  the  ground.    Nose  up  pitch  is  indicated  by  blue  and  nose  down 
pitch by a brown background. 
d. 
Roll  Scale  and  Indicator.    The  roll  scale  indicator  shows  the  amount  of  aircraft  roll.    The 
scale is marked in 10º increments between 0º and 30º roll and 15º intervals between 30º and 60º 
roll.  The roll pointer moves along the curved scale centred on the CDM.  At angles above 60º roll, 
the pointer continues to traverse the vertical sides of the FPDI at the correct relative angle and is 
free to complete a circuit of the instrument if the aircraft continues to roll. 
e. 
Aircraft  Pitch/Attitude  Indicator.    The  aircraft  pitch indicator is represented by a W with a 
horizontal line on each side, the W containing the angles of 30º and 60º for easy interpretation of 
bank.  It represents the longitudinal axis of the aircraft and moves vertically.  Pitch is indicated by 
the position of the pitch indicator relative to the horizon bar. 
f
Flight  Path  Angle  (FPA)  Reference.    The  FPA  reference  can  be  set  from  defined positive 
and negative limits, usually in 1º increments.  The FPA reference is in the form of a split horizontal 
dashed line (shown in amber on Fig 5).  Its position is in direct relationship to the value set by the 
pilot and is shown as a deviation from the horizon line. 
g. 
Special  Alerts.    Special  alerts  are  centred  at  the  top  of  the  FPDI.    Normally  up  to  20 
characters  can  be  displayed.    Alerts  may  be  sourced  from  any  of  the  management  or  sensor 
systems. 
h. 
Marker  Beacon  Annunciator.    Inner,  middle  and  outer  marker  identification  annunciations 
are displayed when the aircraft is in range of the appropriate transmitters. 
i. 
Acceleration Cue.  The white acceleration cue appears alongside the left wing on the CDM.  
The  cue  is  above  the  wing  when  the  aircraft  is  accelerating  and  below  the  wing  to  indicate 
deceleration.  It remains in line with the wing at constant speed. 
j. 
Glideslope Scale and Deviation Indicator.  The glideslope scale gives raw glideslope data 
with the aircraft positioned in the centre of the scale.  The pointer (a small arrow with a G inside) 
indicates the centre of the glideslope beam and is a 'fly to' indicator.  The relationship between the 
scale and the pointer denotes the displacement of the aircraft from the centre of the beam.  Thus, 
when  the  pointer  is  in  the  centre  of  the  scale,  the  aircraft  is  on  the  glideslope.    The  glideslope 
indicator  is  only  displayed  when  the  navigation  source  is  tuned  to  an  ILS  frequency;  an  invalid 
glideslope signal presents a red box with the letters GS inside at the bottom of the scale. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
Horizontal Situation Data 
17.  Horizontal  Situation  Indicator  (HSI).    The  HSI  (see  Fig  6)  is  a  development  of  the  EHSI 
described  in  Volume  5,  Chapter  13,  Para  3.    It  is  positioned  centrally  at  the  bottom  of  the  MFD  and 
displays heading, track and navigation information derived from the INU and other appropriate sensors: 
a. 
Heading and Track.  Track and heading information displays are superimposed on a green 
compass rose.  Heading is always indicated by the lubber line at the top of the HSI with a boxed 
green digital heading read-out immediately above.  The compass rose is marked every 5º with a 
tick mark and every 30º with numerals.  Green cardinal initial letters appear at the 90º, 180º, 270º, 
and  360º  positions.    As  the  card  rotates,  the  numerals  and  cardinal  letters  remain  upright  with 
respect to the top of the display.  A magenta track marker in the shape of a 'T' rotates around the 
outside of the compass rose and points to the calculated track azimuth. 
b. 
Heading  Marker.    A 'Set Heading' knob enables a cyan heading bug or caret to be rotated 
and positioned on a desired heading.  When set, the caret rotates with the compass card as the 
aircraft is turned on to the desired heading.  A cyan digital read-out of the setting appears to the 
lower left of the current heading read-out box. 
7-21 Fig 6 Horizontal Situation Indicator 
Heading Marker Digital Read-out
Heading Read-out
Bearing Pointer #2 Head
Track Marker
Bearing Pointer #1 Head
Desired Heading Caret
Course Deviation Indicator 
TCAS TA Intruder Information
Head
To/From Arrow
Course Deviation 
Indicator Dots
TCAS RA Intruder
Course Deviation Indicator 
Altitude (500 ft above)
Needle
TCAS RA Intruder
Information
Aircraft Symbol
Nav
Details
2 nm Circle
Course Deviation Indicator 
Tail
Bearing Pointer #1 Tail
Bearing Pointer #2 Tail
c. 
Course  Deviation  Indicator  (CDI).    The  CDI  is  split.    It  has  a  head  and  tail  portion  and  a 
central  needle which shows displacement to the right or left of the selected course.  The needle 
traverses 4 CDI dots, 2 on each side of the aircraft symbol, and which indicate the extent of the 
deviation.  The degree of displacement indicated depends upon the navigation aid selected. 
d. 
Bearing  Pointers.    There  are  three  bearing  pointers  which  rotate  around  the  compass  card.  
The heads numbered 1 and 2 (Fig 4) each have a corresponding tail depicted 180º removed.  These 
pointers indicate the bearings of any two navigational aids selected, the details of which are placed in 
a read-out box to the bottom left of the HSI.  If no aids are selected, neither the pointers nor the read-
outs are displayed.  The third, unnumbered, bearing pointer is shown as a white triangle beneath the 
lubber line.  It moves within the compass card and points to the CDI source. 
e. 
Aircraft Symbol.  A symbol representing the aircraft is placed in the centre of the HSI. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
ASSOCIATED FEATURES 
Other Symbology 
18.  Timekeeping Functions.  Time and stopwatch read-outs are placed on the left of the HSI.  The 
upper  digits  represent  the  clock  which  displays  current  time  in  hours,  minutes,  and  seconds.    The 
stopwatch format below the clock has an identical format. 
19.  Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS)The TCAS gives derived information in 
three areas of the MFD. 
a. 
Vertical  resolution  guidance  is  presented  to  the  left  of  the  VVI.    The  display  may  be  set  to 
give  ‘avoid’  or  ‘fly-to’  instructions.    A  typical  indication  is  shown  in  Fig  4  where  a  ‘fly-to’  climb 
command  is  displayed  by  a  red  band  extending  from  the  –3,000  fpm  mark  on  the  adjacent  VVI 
scale to +1,500 fpm followed by a green band from +1,500 fpm to +2,000 fpm.  The pilot should 
respond smoothly to achieve the rate of climb which matches the green sector.  When the threat 
ceases, the display is removed, and the original flight path may then be resumed. 
b. 
Text messages and modes are displayed in the space to the right of the HSI (see Fig 1). 
c. 
Traffic  advisories  (TA)  or  resolution  advisories  (RA)  may  be  selected  to  appear  on  the  HSI 
plan view (see Fig 6).  Symbols vary between systems and are shown in the appropriate Aircrew 
Manuals.  The details are positioned to show the bearing and distance of the intruder.  The outer 
ring of the compass card represents a range of 6 nm and an inner, dashed circle denotes a range 
of 2 nm.  Intruder altitude relative to own aircraft is shown in hundreds of feet with a positive (+) or 
negative  (–)  sign  preceding  the  figure.    Positive  data  tags  are  shown  above,  and  negative  tags 
below, the threat symbol.  The display can be switched to show the absolute flight level (FL) of the 
threat  in  hundreds  of  feet  above  MSL.    Intruder  FL  is  always  denoted  by  three  digits  but  is  still 
positioned above or below the threat symbol in relation to own aircraft FL. 
20  Safety  Features.    An  advantage  in  the  use  of  an  MFD  is  the  feasibility  of  providing  on-board 
surveillance  of  flying  surfaces,  undercarriage  position  or  icing  build-up,  via  miniature  digital  cameras.  
Many other services may be monitored electronically or by camera in this way but all remain selectable 
so  as  to  relieve  the  MFD  of  unnecessary  clutter.    A  g-meter  readout  can  be  selected  to  display  in  a 
white box to the left of the HSI.  The maximum positive and negative g units recorded are displayed in 
green respectively above and below the g-meter box. 
Head-up Display Functions 
21.  The  Head-up  Display  (HUD)  (see  Volume  7,  Chapter  20)  repeats  attitude  and  flight  path 
symbology,  essential  basic  flight  symbology  and  navigation  and  approach  data  as  selected  on  the 
MFDs.  In addition, battle symbology and safety features can also be selected thus allowing a head-up 
view of practically all flight and battle parameters. 
Electronic Warfare Symbology 
22.  Instead of having a standalone electronic warfare scope, the targeting, weapons and engagement 
system displays can be put on any of the MFDs or the HUD to give an integrated view of the emitter 
battlefield.  Emitter engagement rings can be included to show lethality zones and can be adjusted to 
compensate  for  own  aircraft  altitude  and  terrain  masking  considerations.    This  reduces  the  cockpit 
workload  and  makes  the  pilot’s  task  of  circumventing,  suppressing,  or  destroying  the  threat  much 
easier to accomplish. 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-21 - Digital Instrument and Sensor Displays 
Helmet-mounted Display 
23.  Flight  reference  data  may  be  displayed  on  a  helmet-mounted  visor  (see  Volume  7,  Chapter 20 
Para 18  for  details).    This  can  be  configured  to  permit  target  acquisition,  weapon  aiming  and 
engagement  at  large  off-boresight  angles.    The  helmet  may  also  incorporate  night  vision  aids,  using 
light intensification features, and FLIR imagery. 
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 7-22 - Autopilot and Flight Director Systems 
CHAPTER 22 - AUTOPILOT AND FLIGHT DIRECTOR SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
Automatic flight control systems (AFCS) are discussed in Volume 4, Chapter 7.  This chapter will 
examine  the  practical  applications  of  autopilots  to  show  how  the  AFCS  can  be  used  to  alleviate  pilot 
work load and to carry out tasks which, without autopilot assistance, would impose a considerable work 
load upon the pilot and in some cases would be impossible. 
Autopilot Control of Aircraft Attitude 
2. 
The control of aircraft attitude is essential to the manoeuvring of the aircraft by autopilot.  Long term 
attitude  monitoring  is  usually  provided  by  a  displacement  gyro  system  (see  Fig  1).    Aircraft  attitude 
information is passed to a memory unit in the amplifier/processor where it is stored.  When attitude hold is 
selected, the input to the memory is disconnected so that the recorded attitude becomes a fixed datum.  
The  attitude  store  output  is  compared  with  the  direct  attitude  signal  in  a  summing  amplifier  -  the  signal 
inputs  are  equal  at  the  moment  of  engagement  and  the  output  of  the  amplifier  is  zero.    If  the  aircraft 
deviates from its set attitude, the two signals are no longer equal and the summing amplifier produces an 
error  signal.    The  error  signal  is  passed  to  a  demand  actuator  which  moves  the  appropriate  control  to 
return  the  aircraft  to  its  original  attitude.    A  position  feedback  loop  ensures  that  the  control  applied  is 
proportional to the demand signal.  A rate feedback loop controls the rate at which the aircraft responds to 
the  demand  signal,  thus  preventing  over  controlling  and  the  possible  overstressing  of  the  aircraft.    A 
three-axis autopilot has loops for pitch, roll, and yaw rate. 
7-21 Fig 1 Attitude Hold Loop 
Engage
Switching
Attitude
Store
Attitude
Sensor
Summing
Actuator
(eg IN platform)
Amp
Control
Position Feedback
Surface
Displacement
Gyro
Amplifier Processor Unit
Automatic Throttle Control 
3. 
Complete  automatic  control  of  an  aircraft  requires  an  automatic  throttle  control  system  so  that 
speed  can  be  controlled  during  changes  of  altitude  or  whilst  manoeuvring.    The  automatic  throttle 
control  system  monitors  airspeed  and  pitch  rate  against  datum  parameters  set  by  the  pilot  or  as  a 
product of auto ILS, TFR, or weapons aiming and attack systems.  The system can also control engine 
power to achieve ideal range or endurance speeds. 
Autopilot Sensors 
4. 
The attitude of an aircraft may be defined by its position in pitch, roll, and yaw.  Datum information 
for roll and pitch can be provided by vertical gyros and yaw rate information can be provided by lateral 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-22 - Autopilot and Flight Director Systems 
accelerometers.    A  heading  reference  may  be  a  gyro-magnetic  compass  or  an  INS.    Using  these 
sensors, the autopilot is able to fly the aircraft straight and level on a constant heading. 
Manoeuvring the Aircraft 
5. 
Attitude  demands  may  be  pilot  or  autopilot  initiated.    Pitch,  roll,  and  yaw  demand  signals  are 
passed  directly  into  the  computer/amplifier/servo  system.    The  autopilot  responds  by  operating  the 
appropriate controls to reduce the error signal as described in para 2. 
a. 
Manual Control Facilities.  If the pilot wishes to enter attitude demands manually, he can do 
so by using switches or potentiometers to produce electrical signals which are fed directly to the 
autopilot as pitch, roll and yaw demands.  The controls for entering demands manually may be on 
a control panel or on the control column of a fast-jet aircraft. 
b. 
Automatic  Control  Facilities.    The  outputs  of  various  aircraft  systems  can  be  fed  into  the 
autopilot manoeuvring facility by selection.  Typically, signals may be derived from: 
(1)  Flight Instrument Systems.  The pilot may set a heading or track demand by moving 
an index marker on the horizontal situation indicator. 
(2)  Radio  Navigation  Aids.    Inbound  or  outbound  radials  can  be  derived  to  steer  the 
aircraft towards or away from VOR, TACAN, or ILS localizers. 
(3)  Air  Data  Systems.    Datum  signals  can  be  produced  to  fly  the  aircraft  at  constant 
barometric height, airspeed, or Mach number. 
(4)  Terrain Following Radars and Radio Altimeters.  Signals can be derived from terrain 
following  radar  or  radio  altimeters  to  fly  the  aircraft  automatically  at  selected  heights  above 
the ground. 
(5)  Navigation  Computers.    Signals  can  be  derived  to  steer  the  aircraft  towards  a 
navigation feature or turning point. 
(6)  Weapon  Aiming/Attack/Search  Systems.    Signals  from  weapon  aiming,  attack  or 
search systems can be used to fly the aircraft in predetermined search and attack patterns. 
The ability to use these systems enables the pilot to select the appropriate inputs to the autopilot for a 
very  wide  range  of  flying  activities  from  a  relatively  undemanding  navigation  task  to  very  demanding 
low level navigation and attack mission, possibly at night or in bad weather. 
Autopilot Safety 
6. 
An  autopilot  must  not  be  capable  of  endangering  the  aircraft  or  its  crew.    Autopilot  safety  is 
ensured by a variety of design features and devices to ensure at least a 'fail-safe' capability.  Features 
and devices vary greatly but typical examples are: 
a. 
Design Features.  Circuits are designed to be as simple as possible and components are used 
at a fraction of their rated values to ensure high reliability.  Additionally, switching circuits are given 
clearly defined priorities to avoid inadvertent selection of dangerous flight configurations and to avoid 
selection of incompatible flight control modes. 
b. 
Safety Devices.  The following safety devices are typical: 
(1)  Pilot’s Instinctive Cut-out.  The instinctive cut-out is positioned on the control column 
and can be quickly and easily operated to disengage the autopilot giving full manual control 
authority to the pilot. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-22 - Autopilot and Flight Director Systems 
(2)  Rate and Angle Limiters.  The rate and angle limiters prevent the overstressing of the 
aircraft by limiting the rate of response or angle achievable in any channel. 
(3)  Control Limit Switches.  Control limit switches are microswitches which operate when 
a  control  reaches  the  end  of  its  allowable  travel.    These  switches  are  able  to  prevent  any 
damage from servo runaway. 
(4)  Excess  Torque  Devices.    Excess  torque  devices  are  used  either  to  prevent 
overstressing of the aircraft or to detect excessive current demands such as might occur if an 
electrical servo was attempting to overcome a control restriction. 
(5)  Monitoring Facilities.  Most autopilot functions are continuously monitored by a built-in 
test equipment system which is able to generate warnings and initiate automatic reversionary 
modes.    Commonly  monitored  functions  are  power  supplies,  the  accuracy  of  datum 
information  on  attitude  and  heading  and  the  serviceability  states  of  systems  which  provide 
inputs to the autopilot. 
Flight Information System 
7. 
Autopilots  include  a  flight  information  system  which  provides  aircrew  with  an  integrated 
presentation of: 
a. 
Primary flight information showing attitude and heading. 
b. 
Flight  director  information  showing  indices  and  markers  which  indicate  the  horizontal  and 
vertical control required to regain a demanded flight path. 
Flight  information  systems  range  from  simple  displays  to  fully  processed  electronic  head-up  or 
head-down  displays.    The  system  enables  the  pilot  to  fly  the  aircraft  manually  to  meet  the 
autopilot demands, or to check that the autopilot is following the demands correctly. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-23 - UHF Homing 
CHAPTER 23 - UHF HOMING 
Introduction 
1. 
For  the  purpose  of  this  description,  only  azimuth  Direction  Finding  (D/F)  will  be  considered, 
although, the principles are also relevant to elevation D/F.  UHF Homing is used in conjunction with the 
UHF  Transmitter/Receiver  (T/R)  to  provide  relative  azimuth  indications  from  sources  of  Continuous 
Wave  (CW),  Modulated  Continuous  Wave  (MCW)  or  Radio/Telephony  (R/T)  transmissions  on  any 
selected frequency in the 225 MHz - 400 MHz band. 
Leading Particulars 
2. 
The equipment is used during SAR operations to enable an aircraft to home towards a Personal 
Locator Beacon (PLB).  The effective range is 100 nm maximum, decreasing with decreasing altitude. 
3. 
The relative azimuth of a signal is shown by the deflection of the vertical pointer of an indicator. 
Power Requirements 
4. 
The power supplies for the equipment are obtained from the UHF T/R and from the aircraft 28V 
DC supply. 
Equipment Components 
5. 
The units comprising a typical UHF homing system are: 
a. 
Radio Frequency (RF) unit. 
b. 
Audio Frequency (AF) unit. 
c. 
D/F aerials. 
d. 
Indicator. 
e. 
Control switches. 
6. 
RF Unit.  The RF unit converts the phase difference of the two received signals into an amplitude 
modulation of the carrier wave. 
7. 
AF  Unit.   After amplification and de-modulation in the UHF T/R the AF unit converts the signals 
into a form suitable to operate the indicator’s pointer. 
8. 
D/F  Aerials.    Port  and  starboard  aerials  mounted  close  together  on  the  upper  surface  of  the 
fuselage are used for azimuth D/F. 
9. 
Indicator.    Either  the  Horizontal  Situation  Indicator  (HSI)  or  Radio  Magnetic  Indicator  (RMI)  will 
provide  azimuth  indications  during  homing  operations.    The  'OFF'  flag  appears  when  homing  signals 
become unreliable. 
Principle of Operation 
10.  Depending on the relative bearing of a transmitting PLB, there will be a small time lag - and hence 
a phase difference - between the signals received in the port and starboard aerials. 
11.  The  signals  are  processed  electronically  to  produce  a  DC  voltage  to  the  indicator  which  is  a 
function  of  the  displacement  of  the  signal  source  from  the  fore  and  aft  axis  of  the  aircraft.    The 
polarity of the DC voltage depends on the phase relationship of the incoming signals, and determine 
which way the pointer deflects. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 7-23 - UHF Homing 
12.  If the two signals are received at the same time then the transmitting source is directly ahead of or 
directly behind the aircraft.  Fig 1 shows a simplified block diagram of a typical UHF homing system. 
7-23 Fig 1 Block Diagram of a Typical UHF Homing System 
Port
Stbd
Comms
RF UNIT
AF UNIT
UHF
Transceiver
providing
Amplification
AF
Phase
Indicator
and 
Amplifier
Discrim
Detection
Modulator
Delay
Delay
RF
Amplifier
Square
Wave
Generator
Operating Procedures 
13.  Selection  of  the  homing  function  on  the  UHF  T/R  control  unit  brings  the  UHF  homing  into 
operation. 
14.  It should be noted that signals received from astern the aircraft displace the HSI lateral deviation 
bar in the same sense as those ahead. 
15.  Operation of the transmit button causes the D/F aerial relay to be de-energized and the previously 
selected UHF aerial to be reconnected. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 7-24 - Central Communications Systems 
CHAPTER 24 - CENTRAL COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
In  multi-crew  aircraft,  crew  members  are  able  to  communicate  with  each  other  by  means  of  an 
intercommunication  (intercom)  facility.    Where  this  facility  also  enables  the  crew  to  select  the  required 
aircraft radio and communication equipment, it forms a 'communications control system' (CCS).  By use 
of  a  CCS,  most  crew  positions  are  able  to  select  radio  transmitter/receiver  facilities,  whilst  other  crew 
positions  may  have  'receive  only'  services.    In  addition  to  the  main  intercom  facility,  independent 
subsidiary and conference intercom circuits may be available. 
General Description of System 
2. 
Since  the  detailed  requirements  of  individual  aircraft  may  vary  considerably,  there  is  no  standard 
CCS installation.  However, the control system normally consists of a number of units, each with different 
functions, which can be interconnected in various ways to provide the facilities required.  The underlying 
principles are the same, irrespective of how the system has been connected. 
3. 
Fig  1  shows  the  layout  of  a  typical  intercom  installation.    This  example  provides  intercom  and 
radio facilities for the aircrew, and external ground inputs from groundcrew and telebriefing facility.  The 
major components are: 
a. 
Junction  Box.    All  the  services  are  connected  through  the  junction box.  The various flight 
crew,  cabin  crew  and  ground  crew  circuits  radiate  from  it  to  the  different  aircraft  positions.    The 
system is powered by a 28V DC supply. 
b. 
Intercom  Station  Box.    An  intercom  station  box  is  provided  at  each  of  the  principal  crew 
positions.    This  unit  permits  individual  selection  of  transmitters  and  receivers  as  required.    The 
crew member’s headset is connected to the station box. 
7-24 Fig 1 Intercom System - Simplified Block Schematic 
Crash
Cockpit Voice
VHF/UHF
Recorder
Recorder
Station Box
Control
Unit
Aircrew 
Audio
Headset
VHF/UHF
Control
Station Box
Unit
Aircrew 
Headset
HF Control
Junction
Unit
Box
Station Box
ILS
Audio
Aircrew 
RWR
Headset
Nav Aids
Auxiliary
Crew
Jack Box
Telebrief 
Facility
Telebrief 
Groundcrew 
Groundcrew 
Connector
Jackbox
Headset
c. 
Radio  Transmitter/Receiver  Control  Units.  The  intercom  system  provides  the  connection 
from  the  crew’s  headsets  to  the  VHF,  UHF  and  HF  radio  transmitter/receiver  control  units 
(see Volume 7, Chapter 1 and Chapter 7 Chapter 3). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 7-24 - Central Communications Systems 
d. 
Auxiliary Jack Boxes.  Cabin/ground crew can use the normal intercom by plugging a headset 
into a convenient jack box.  This action closes a switch, which provides a path for the 28V DC supply to 
the relays in the crew amplifier. 
e. 
Telebrief Facility.  The telebrief facility gives a secure briefing capability whilst the aircraft is 
on the ground. 
4. 
To increase reliability, the systems are decentralized with each intercom station containing its own 
transistor  amplifier  and  emergency  operation  facility.    To  reduce  the  risk  of  failure  due  to  damaged 
components, the intercom stations are usually wired in a continuous loop or ring main circuit between 
the main distribution boxes.  By this means, single unit or cable  failure will not affect the operation of 
other stations. 
Intercom Station Boxes 
5. 
The  intercom  station  box  provides  crew  members  with  a  convenient  means  of  selecting  and 
controlling  the  various  services  available  (see  Fig  2).    The  main  facilities  provided  by  the  station  box 
include: 
a. 
Crew  Intercom.    The  intercom  facility  is  selected  by  means  of  the  Push-ON,  Push-OFF 
button,  which  remains  latched  (partially  depressed)  when  ON.    The  button  incorporates  a  rotary 
volume control. 
b. 
Receiver  Push  Buttons.    Audio  from  radio  facilities  can  be  selected  by  the  appropriate 
pushbutton.    Any  combination  of  facilities  can  be  listened  to  by  each  crew  member,  simply  by 
pressing the required button ON and rotating it to the desired volume level. 
c. 
Radio  Transmitter  Selection.    A  multi-position  rotary  switch  allows  the  crew  member  to 
select a specific transmitter.  The position of the switch determines which service the operator can 
transmit and receive on.  The corresponding receiver button does not need to be depressed, but 
is still used to adjust volume. 
d. 
Override  Facility.  The OVERRIDE pushbutton or switch permits high-priority messages to 
be  fed  at  high  volume  to  all  other  intercom  stations  in  the  system,  irrespective  of  the  services 
which they have selected. 
e. 
Call  Light  Facility.    When  any  call  light  is  pressed,  all  call  lights  on  all  station  boxes 
illuminate.  This  serves  to  attract  the  attention  of  all  crew  members,  even  those  not  currently 
listening to the intercom. 
f. 
Voice/Range  Buttons.    Voice/range filters are used with the aircraft automatic direction finding 
(ADF), VHF omni-range (VOR) and Instrument Landing System (ILS) installations to separate the range 
and voice elements of the received signals.  The installation provides a choice of voice, range, or voice 
and range audio signal inputs. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 7-24 - Central Communications Systems 
7-24 Fig 2 Typical Intercom Station Box 
Push Buttons
for Receiver
Functions
COMMUNICATIONS
UHF 1
UHF 2
VHF 1
VHF 2
HF 1
HF 2
VOICE
VOICE
VOICE
PANEL
PANEL
LIGHT
LIGHT
N
A
V
ADF 1
VOR 1
VOR 2
ADF 2
AID RANGE MXA
RANGE
RX
RANGE
S
VHF 1
VHF 2
PANEL
Override
PANEL
UHF 2
HF 1
LIGHT
LIGHT
Push Button
TACAN
UHF 1
HF 2
OVERRIDE
CALL
EMERGENCY
OFF
NORMAL/
TRANSMITTERS
EMERGENCY
Switch
FUSE
LIGHT
I/C
NORMAL
Rotary Switch
Push Button
for Transmitter/
for Intercom
Call Light
Receiver Function
OFF - ON
6. 
The  unit  usually  contains  a  two-section  amplifier.    This  amplifies  incoming  radio  and  intercom 
signals  before  feeding  them  to  the  headset.    It  also  provides  the  appropriate  level  of  output  from  the 
crew member’s microphone, before feeding it to the selected transmitter. 
7. 
The  NORMAL/EMERGENCY  switch  can  be  set  to  restore  intercom  and  receiver  services  in  the 
event of a failure in the two-section amplifier.  The switch works in two stages: 
a. 
The intercom microphone signals are switched to the transmitter selector switch. 
b. 
The receiver signals, once selected by the appropriate pushbutton, are switched direct to the 
headset, bypassing all volume controls. 
Intercom  may  then  be  restored  by  utilizing  the  sidetone  output  of  a  convenient  transmitter.    All  other 
crew  members  requiring  intercom  with  the  faulty  station  must  set  their  own  selector  switches  to  the 
same transmitter. 
Intercom Discipline 
8. 
To  maintain  smooth  and  efficient  communications,  an  intercom  discipline  is  essential.    The 
following basic rules normally apply: 
a. 
The  operator’s  headset  microphone  should  be  switched  off  unless  actually  speaking,  as 
background  noise  will  cause  interference.    (Some  aircrew  headsets  have  microphones  that  are 
speech-activated.) 
b. 
The  operator  should  monitor  the  radio  in  use  before,  during  and  after  speaking,  to  avoid 
interrupting radio transmissions to and from the aircraft. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 7-24 - Central Communications Systems 
c. 
In a large multi-crew environment, crew procedures should be followed.  Usually, the operator will 
nominate  to  whom  they  wish  to  speak,  state  who  is  speaking,  and  ensure  that  the  recipient 
acknowledges before passing the message. 
d. 
Crew  members  should  not  switch  off  audio,  or  leave  intercom,  without  first  informing  other 
crew members. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 7-25 - Radio Airborne Teletype (RATT) 
CHAPTER 25 - RADIO AIRBORNE TELETYPE (RATT) 
Introduction 
1. 
In some circumstances it is preferable to communicate between aircraft, and between aircraft and 
surface stations, using a teleprinter system rather than voice.  The system in use in the RAF is known 
as  the  Radio  Airborne  Teletype  (RATT),  and  both  the  equipment,  and  the  operating  techniques  and 
procedures,  are  compatible  with  other  national  systems  within NATO.  The UK Glossary of Joint and 
Multinational  Terms  and  Definitions,  JDP  0-01.1,  defines  RATT  as  Radio  Teletype.    This  definition  is 
modified  to  include  'Airborne'  within  the  RAF,  while  the  Royal  Navy  and  Army  use  the  term  Radio 
Automated Teletype. 
2. 
The equipment incorporates an automatic on-line encryption/decryption facility and is thus capable 
of  combining  a  high  level  of  communications  security  and  accuracy.    The  use  of  RATT  reduces  the 
transmission  time  of  messages  compared  to  other  methods,  reduces  errors  in  coding  and  decoding, 
and  since  hard  copies  of  messages  are  available  to  both  operators,  subsequent  enquiries  and 
corrections  are  easily  resolved.    Fully  formatted  messages  can  be  sent  between,  and  are  readily 
understood  by,  all  NATO  members  which  helps  to  avoid  ambiguity  and  overcome  any  language 
problems. 
Equipment and Operation 
3. 
A  RATT  system  uses  a  basic  radio  modified  for  telegraphy  and  incorporating  a  crypro  unit 
(BID).   
4. 
A  simplified  diagram  of  a  RATT  system  is  shown  in  Fig  1.    Switching  on  the  MODEM 
(modulator/demodulator)  initiates  a  tone  transmission  containing  no  data.    A  Phase  Indicator  and 
Message Indicator (PIMI) superimposes a signal on this tone which enables remote receivers to lock 
on  to  the  phase  of  the  transmitter,  using  a  Pseudo  Random  Sequence  (PRS)  technique,  and  so 
synchronize their equipment ready to receive the message. 
7-25 Fig 1 RATT System – Schematic 
Tape
Punch 
BID
Modem
TX
RX
Modem
BID
Tele
Reader
Printer
Transmit Chain
Receive Chain
5. 
Prepared messages are released via the Tape Punch Reader (TPR), automatically encrypted by 
the  BID,  converted  into  Murray  code,  and  then  sent  by  modulating  the  transmission  with  tones 
corresponding to the marks and spaces. 
6. 
The RATT can operate in the HF, UHF, and LF bands: 
a. 
HF.  In HF the operation is simplex, i.e. transmission and reception is on the same frequency 
and so cannot be accomplished simultaneously.  The transmission uses single sideband (upper) 
suppressed  carrier  techniques,  with  the  mark  being  represented  by  a  tone  of  1575 Hz  and  the 
space by 2425 Hz. 
Revised Apr 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 7-25 - Radio Airborne Teletype (RATT) 
b. 
UHF.    UHF  operation  is  also  simplex  but  uses  double  sideband  transmission.   The mark is 
represented by a 700 Hz tone and the space by a 500 Hz tone. 
c. 
LF.    LF  is  a  receive  only  mode  using  frequency  shift  telegraphy.    There  is  an  85  Hz  shift 
between mark and space with the mark low,  i.e. f0 – 42.5 Hz, as shown in Fig 2. 
7-25 Fig 2 LF Frequency Shift Telegraphy 
Frequency
Space
f + 42.5
0
f0
Time
f   – 42.5
0
Mark
7. 
Switching  the  transmitter  to  standby  at  the  MODEM  returns  the  equipment  to  the  receive  state, 
which  is  automatically  activated  by  incoming  PIMIs.    The  receive  chain  is  almost  the  reverse  of  the 
transmit  chain  with  any  correctly  phased  traffic  being  printed  out  in  clear  at  the  teleprinter;  any  other 
traffic will be indecipherable. 
Revised Apr 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 7-26 - Voice Recorders 
CHAPTER 26 - VOICE RECORDERS 
Introduction 
1. 
A typical cockpit voice recorder (CVR) operates as an audio flight log for crew members and also 
provides  a  rapid  data  entry  (RDE)  facility  for  the  insertion of data into the main computer (MC).  The 
CVR  works  on  the  same  principle  as  a  domestic  tape  recorder.    The  following  description  is  for  the 
Tornado installation. 
Control Panel 
2. 
The control panel, shown in Fig 1 controls the operating mode, power supply and position of the 
tape.    The  cassette  housing  is  located  behind  the  control  panel  and is accessed by pulling the panel 
up, using the recessed handle (see Fig 2).  This permits the cassette to be inserted or changed. 
7-26 Fig 1 CVR Control Panel 
Recessed Handle
DATA ENTRY
NORM
START REPLAY
REV
FWD
S
MAN
T
B
AUTO
Y
0 0 0
OFF
1 1 1
7-26 Fig 2 Cassette Location
Operation 
3. 
Rapid Data Entry (RDE).  Before take-off, pre-recorded information can be entered into the MC via 
the  CVR,  ie  operational  flight  program  (OFP),  map  definition  data  or  mission  data.    The  information  is 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 7-26 - Voice Recorders 
used  by  other  avionics  systems  during  the  flight  and,  if  necessary,  further  data  can  be  entered  as  the 
mission progresses. 
4. 
To  replace  or  insert  a  cassette,  the  operator  should  select  REPLAY  and  then  OFF  on  the  CVR 
control panel, before opening the unit.  Once the tape is loaded, standby (STBY) should be selected and 
using  the  reverse/normal/forward  (REV/NORM/FWD)  control,  the  tape  wound  to  the  required  position, 
watching  the  tape  position  indicator.    Prior  to  selecting  START  and  DATA  ENTRY  on  the  CVR  control 
panel, the MC and TV Tabular Displays (TV Tabs) need to be switched to ON. 
a. 
Operational  Flight  Programme.    When  loading  the  OFP,  the  LOAD  light  on  the  main 
computer control panel (MCCP) will illuminate.  Should a failure occur, the FAIL light on the MCCP 
will illuminate and the LOAD light will extinguish. 
b. 
Map Definition/Mission Data.  While loading map definition data or mission data, one of the 
following messages will be displayed on the TV Tabs: 
(1)  RDE COMPLETE, which indicates that the data has been loaded correctly. 
(2)  RDE FAULT, which indicates one, two or three faults in the data loaded. 
(3)  RDE FAILED, which indicates there are four or more faults in the data loaded. 
5. 
Automatic  Voice  Recording.    The  CVR  records automatically with START and AUTO selected 
on the control panel and when audio signals exist.  Recording ceases approximately five seconds after 
the  audio  input  ceases.    To  facilitate  separate  recordings  for  each  crew  member,  the  tape  has  two 
tracks, each track designated to a crew position. 
6. 
Manual  Voice  Recording.    With  START  and  manual  (MAN)  selected  on  the  control  panel,  the 
CVR  will  record  continuously  (the  length  of  time  depending  on  the  length  of  the  cassette  tape).    The 
CVR rotary/push switch on the intercom box must also be selected. 
7. 
Replay.    With  START  and  REPLAY  selected  on  the  CVR  control  panel and the CVR control on 
the  intercom  box  adjusted  to  give  the  required  volume,  previously  recorded  information  can  be 
replayed.    A  separate  switch  on  the  intercom  box,  track  1/off/track  2  (TRK1/OFF/TRK2),  is  used  to 
enable the crew member to select which track they replay. 
8. 
Faults.  If a failure occurs in data loading, or if a recording sounds garbled, the CVR heads should 
be cleaned using the prescribed head cleaner. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
CHAPTER 27 - AIRBORNE COMPUTERS 
Introduction 
1. 
Since  1975,  computer  technology  has  made  rapid  advances  in  the  fields  of  speed,  memory 
capacity,  and  reliability,  while  at  the  same  time  there  have  been  reductions  in  physical  size,  power 
consumption,  and  cost.    This  chapter,  however,  deals  specifically  with  computers  in  the  airborne 
environment and reviews the tasks undertaken and the types of computer available.  It also examines 
the  computer  architectures  best  suited  to  meet  the  requirements,  and  briefly  discusses  the  various 
peripheral  devices  which  are  commonly  used  for  the  input  and  output  of  data.    Since  computers  are 
often required to control and integrate data obtained from a variety of disparate sources, the manner in 
which data is transmitted between equipments will also be discussed. 
Airborne Computer Tasks 
2. 
Airborne computing tasks can be broadly divided into three main groups: 
a. 
Navigation and weapon aiming. 
b. 
Control and management. 
c. 
Data processing. 
3. 
Navigation  and  Weapon  Aiming.    Examples  of  the  navigation  and  weapon  aiming  problems 
which are normally solved by computer are: 
a. 
Control  of  inertial,  doppler  and  satellite  navigation  systems,  including  the  use  of  Kalman 
filtering techniques to provide mixed solutions. 
b. 
Co-ordinate conversion (eg Lat/Long to Grid, geoid to geoid). 
c. 
Air data processing. 
d. 
Weapon aiming calculations, including: 
(1)  Ballistics 
(2)  Continuous Computed Impact Points. 
(3)  Offset and range calculations. 
(4)  Target recognition and tracking. 
4. 
Control  and  Management.    The  control  and  management  functions  carried  out  by  computers 
include: 
a. 
Flight control systems, eg fly-by-wire. 
b. 
Fuel and engine monitoring and control. 
c. 
In-flight recording. 
d. 
Equipment self-test routines. 
e. 
Data transmission control and management. 
f. 
Electronic warfare (EW) equipment management. 
g. 
Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS), eg fatigue life monitoring. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
5. 
Data Processing.  Examples of data processing applications are: 
a. 
Image processing (eg IR and television). 
b. 
Radar data processing. 
c. 
EW data processing. 
d. 
Digital land mass data manipulation. 
e. 
Data collation tasks. 
6. 
Data  Updates.    Many  of  the  functions  carried  out  by  the  computer  could  be  completed 
automatically with no human intervention.  However, it is normally desirable that the crew should 
be  able  to  maintain  some  measure  of  control  over  the  computer  and  contribute  to  the  decision-
making  process.    In  addition,  mission-specific  data  (such  as  flight  plans  and  target  information) 
can  be  prepared  before  flight  and  saved  onto  the  appropriate  magnetic  or  optical  medium,  to  be 
loaded into the aircraft computer during start-up. 
Airborne Computer Types 
7. 
There are three types of computer currently being used in airborne applications: 
a. 
Analogue. 
b. 
Hybrid (mixed analogue and digital). 
c. 
Digital - General Purpose and Special Purpose. 
A further type, the optical computer, is still at the development stage.  The characteristics of analogue 
and hybrid computers will be summarized, but the remainder of this chapter will be concerned with the 
digital computer. 
8. 
Analogue  Computers.    Analogue  computers  accept  and  process  data  as  continually  varying 
quantities, represented by physical parameters, eg voltage or shaft angle.  In the early days of digital 
computers,  analogue  machines  had  the  advantages  of  avoiding  the  sampling  errors  associated  with 
digital techniques, and of being inherently 'real time'.  However the analogue computer is inflexible in 
its  applications,  and  does  not  have  the  ability  to  store  large  quantities  of  data.    The  development  of 
digital  computers  has  been  such  that  their  sampling  errors  are  now  generally much lower than those 
generated by the mechanical tolerances in the analogue computer.  In addition, modern digital systems 
are now able to operate at speeds which make them essentially 'real time'. 
9. 
Hybrid  Computers.    Hybrid  computers  use  a  mixture  of analogue and digital techniques.  They 
were  originally  used  to  overcome  the  slow  speed  of  digital  machines  where  real-time  operation  was 
required,  while  still  retaining  memory,  accuracy,  reliability,  and  programming  flexibility.    In  addition  to 
suffering to some extent from the drawbacks of analogue machines, they also require analogue/digital 
and  digital/analogue  conversion  devices.    Hybrid  computers  are  still  sometimes  used  in  older  inertial 
navigation systems, but they have largely been superseded by digital computers. 
10.  Digital Computers.  Digital computers are in widespread use for airborne applications.  There are 
two main types: 
a. 
The  general-purpose  computer  which  can  be  adapted  for  a  variety  of  uses  by  suitable 
programming. 
b. 
The special-purpose computer which is designed by the manufacturer to perform a specific task. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
The  general-purpose  computer  is  much  cheaper to produce and easier to upgrade, particularly when 
commercial  off-the-shelf  (COTS)  components  are  used  in  the  manufacturing  process.    The 
characteristics of the special-purpose type are optimized for the task in hand and it therefore tends to 
be  more  efficient.    However,  this  advantage  must  be  weighed  against  additional  cost  of  production, 
options for growth, and how quickly the unit becomes obsolete. 
11.  The Benefits from Digital Computers.  The programmability and versatility of digital computers 
has enabled interconnectivity between aircraft state sensors (speed, angle of attack, etc) and sensors 
which  provide  situational  awareness  (target  range,  terrain  elevation,  collision  avoidance,  etc).    Digital 
processing provides precise solutions over a large range of flight, weapon and sensor conditions.  The 
reliance on specific hardware has reduced, and software has become more important in controlling the 
interaction between avionics components. 
The Airborne Environment 
12.  Ground based computers usually operate in clean air-conditioned surroundings with little chance 
of  physical  damage,  whereas  the  airborne  environment  is  essentially  hostile  to  electronic  equipment 
which may be subjected to large temperature changes, vibration, and acceleration forces.  Thus, high 
standards of hardware ruggedness are necessary.  It is clearly advantageous for the computer to have 
low size, weight, and power requirements, but although developments in integrated circuitry have been 
beneficial in these respects, the dense packing of components in airborne systems has increased the 
problems of heat dissipation and the provision of essential cooling. 
Precision 
13.  The  precision  to  which  a  digital  computer  can  work  is  a  function  of  wordlength  and  the  required 
wordlength  will  be  determined  by  the  quality  of  the  various  sensor  inputs,  and  the  requirements  of  the 
systems that the computer is required to drive.  Whereas an 18-bit word is sufficient for most navigation, 
weapon  aiming,  control,  and  management  functions,  other  systems  (such  as  imaging  tasks)  require 
greater precision, and the current trend is away from 18 or 24 bit words to 32 or 64 bit words. 
Input/Output Devices 
14.  The  processed  information  from  an  airborne  computer  will  be  needed  either  by  other  aircraft 
systems, or by the crew.  Where it is necessary for the crew to input or receive data it must be in a 
form, which is readily interpreted, rather than as a digital data stream.  Various devices are used in 
aircraft to accomplish this, so enabling the crew to interact with the computer.  In addition to simple 
warning lights and flight instruments, the following devices may be encountered: 
a. 
Storage Media.  Types of storage media include: 
(1)  Magnetic Tape.  Magnetic tape may be used both to input and output information.  The 
principle  is  essentially  the  same  as  that  used  in  domestic  recording  equipment.    Because 
magnetic tape is a serial device it tends to be rather slow in operation. 
(2)  Ruggedised Hard Disk.  Hard disks may be used both to input and output information.  
The  'ruggedised'  hard  disk  is  similar  in  all  respects  to  the  hard  drive  used  in  personal 
computers, but has been adapted and strengthened for in-flight conditions.  Hard drives have 
very large data storage capabilities, and are much quicker than tape because information is 
more accessible and easier to find. 
(3)  Optical  Disk.    Optical  disks  are  high  capacity  storage  devices  that  can  be  used  in  a 
similar  manner  to  hard  drives.    Optical  disks  do  require  highly  stable  conditions  in  which  to 
operate, as the lasers used to read disks are susceptible to vibration. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
(4)  Solid-state Memory Devices.  Recent development in solid-state memory devices has 
seen  marked  improvement  in  storage  capability  and  speed  of  data  access.    Current 
procurement trends are towards solid-state memory devices due to their rugged nature, high 
capacity and flexibility.  The main disadvantage with this form of memory is its cost. 
b. 
Printers.  Printers are output devices and may be classed as impact or non-impact.  Impact 
printers operate by means of a print head striking an inked sheet or ribbon overlaying the paper.  
These  printers  are  noisy,  relatively  slow  (typically  1000  lines/minute),  but  generally cheap.  Non-
impact printers are typified by ink-jet and laser printers, which, although significantly faster (24,000 
lines/minute) and much quieter, are more expensive. 
c. 
Control and Display Unit (CDU) and Keyboard.  A CDU can be either a high quality cathode 
ray  tube  (colour  or  monochrome  screen)  or  a  high  resolution  Liquid  Crystal  Display  (LCD).    With 
suitable software it can display both alphanumerics and diagrams, and data can easily be edited.  The 
CDU is normally associated with a keyboard to enable manual entry of data by the crew.  This may be 
either a standard QWERTY type as found on a typewriter, or a special type designed to fulfil a specific 
function.  In some systems there is a 'soft' keyboard in which the function of a key is dictated by the 
computer  software  according to the mode of operation, and is displayed on the CDU adjacent to the 
key.    Some  modern  systems  use  touch-sensitive  screens  which  are  generally  more  accurate  than 
keyboards and are favoured by some operators who find them faster and easier to use. 
d. 
Direct  Voice  Input  (DVI).    In  a  DVI  system  the  computer  is  programmed  to  recognize  a 
limited  vocabulary  of  command  and  data  words,  having  first  been  taught  the  operator’s  speech 
characteristics.  The system is inherently faster than keyboard entry. 
e. 
Manual Input Devices.  A variety of hand controllers (joysticks and roller balls), and switches 
may  be  used  to  input  data.    Hand  controllers  are  typically  used  to  move  cursors  on  a  radar, 
moving map display, or HUD. 
DATA TRANSMISSION 
Introduction 
15.  Once a digital computer is installed in an aircraft there will be a need to transmit data between the 
computer  and  other  systems  such  as  sensors  and  displays,  or  indeed  other  computers.    There  is  a 
requirement for this data to have a high degree of reliability and integrity.  Reliability refers to ensuring 
that  the  message  arrives  at  the  intended  recipient,  and  is  of  the  same  format  that  was  transmitted.  
Integrity  refers  to  the  accuracy  of  the  message  itself  and  the  fact  that  errors  can  be  detected  and 
corrected if required. 
16.  Digital Data Transmission.  With digital data, there are three transmission protocols which can 
be followed: 
a. 
Simplex.  Simplex is one-way flow of information down a transmission media. 
b. 
Duplex.  Duplex  has  a  simultaneous  two-way  flow  of  information  across  a  transmission 
media. 
c. 
Half-duplex.    Half-duplex  protocol  is  similar  to  duplex,  in  that  data  flows  in  both  directions, 
but  can  only  do  so  in  one  direction  at  a  time.    Half-duplex  systems  will  use  some  form  of 
controlling mechanism to achieve directional flow. 
17.  Analogue  Data  Transmission.    Analogue  data  transmission  methods  are  still  widely  used  in 
aircraft  systems  (see  Volume  5,  Chapter  24).    When  analogue  systems  are  present  in  a  digital 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
network,  they  must  be  connected  to  digital  transmission  systems  by  means  of  analogue/digital 
converters.  This creates problems for the digital system, as analogue data must be digitally sampled.  
This can produce errors associated with the size of the sample and sampling rate. 
Transmission Media 
18.  Copper  Wire.  Copper wire is still the commonest form of transmission medium, and may be in 
the  form  of  a  screened  twisted  pair,  or  co-axial  cable.    Binary  signals  are  represented  by  electrical 
pulses.    Cables  of  this  type  are  relatively  inexpensive  and  easily  handled,  but  have  the  following 
disadvantages: 
a. 
They are bulky and heavy. 
b. 
They permit only a limited bandwidth. 
c. 
They create fields which give rise to electro-magnetic interference (EMI) and are also prone 
to EMI from other sources. 
19.  Optical Fibre.  Optical fibres are in common use as transmission media.  They consist of lengths 
of glass fibre, usually clad in plastic, along which binary signals are transmitted in the form of pulses of 
light.  The light sources are either light-emitting diodes (LEDs), or injection laser diodes (ILDs), which 
operate  in  the  near  infrared  region  of  the  spectrum.    Photodiodes  at  the  receiving  end  of  the  cable 
convert the light signals back into electrical signals.  Because optical fibres use light waves to transmit 
signals  they  do  not  suffer  from  electrical  interference  caused  by  high  voltages,  radio  frequencies, 
magnetic fields, lightning, or electro-magnetic pulse.  Similarly they are themselves non-radiating and 
therefore do not interfere with other electronic equipment.  They have inherent security, and are safer 
to use in a potentially explosive environment.  The bandwidth of the medium far exceeds that of copper 
wire; LED sources can operate at bandwidths up to 100 MHz, and ILDs at up to 100 GHz.  In summary, 
compared  to  copper  wire,  optical  fibres  can  transmit  greater  amounts  of  data  over  longer  distances, 
are  impervious  to  electro-magnetic  interference,  and  are  physically  much  smaller,  lighter,  and  less 
cumbersome. 
Channel Configurations 
20.  A  channel  is  the  connection  needed  to  transmit  a  data  word.    The  number  of  wires  required 
depends on the form in which data is to be transmitted.  The four options available are illustrated in Fig 
1 which shows three data words of 8 bits each.  An explanation of each of the options is given in the 
following sub-paragraphs: 
a. 
Bit  Serial  Word  Serial  (BSWS).    In  BSWS  format,  both  the  words  in the data stream, and 
the constituent bits of a data word are transmitted serially. 
b. 
Bit  Serial  Word  Parallel  (BSWP).    In  BSWP  format,  the  words  within  the  data  stream  are 
transmitted in parallel but the bits within a word are transmitted serially.  
c. 
Bit  Parallel  Word  Serial  (BPWS).    In  BPWS  format,  the  bits  within  a  data  word  are 
transmitted in parallel but the words in the stream are transmitted serially. 
d. 
Bit  Parallel  Word  Parallel  (BPWP).    In  BPWP  format,  both  blocks  of  words  and  their 
constituent bits are transmitted in parallel. 
Serial  transmission  requires  fewer  wires  and  is  relatively  cheap  and  light,  but  slow.    Parallel 
transmission is more expensive, complex, and heavier, but faster. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
7-27 Fig 1 Channel Configurations 
Word
Bit Serial
Word Serial
Bits
Bit Serial
Word Parallel
Bit Parallel
Word Serial
Bit Parallel
Word Parallel
Time
Transmission Control 
21.  In most systems, data is transmitted as a stream of data words, preceded by a command word.  
The  command  word  contains  such  details  as  the  number  of  words  in  the  ensuing  stream,  and  the 
destination address.  The data will often have inbuilt error detection and correction by using bits within 
words (eg Parity Checking) or additional words (eg Checksum Words). 
22.  The  transmission  of  data  streams  must  be  controlled  to  ensure  that  the  appropriate  information 
reaches the correct destination.  There are two types of control, synchronous and asynchronous: 
a. 
Synchronous.  Under synchronous control, peripherals will be accessed in a strict sequence 
under some form of central control, normally based on a clock.  Each peripheral is connected for 
the length of time necessary to pass the maximum number of permitted data words regardless of 
how  much  information  is  actually  transmitted.    Therefore,  although  such  a  system  is  relatively 
simple to design and construct, it tends to be slow, inflexible, and inefficient. 
b. 
Asynchronous.  In an asynchronous system, when a peripheral has information to transmit it 
tells  the  processor  which  arranges  a  connection,  and  maintains  it  until  the  message  has  been 
passed.  On completion, the connection is broken, allowing another peripheral to use the line.  An 
asynchronous system is more complex than a synchronous one, but is faster and more efficient.  
Asynchronous control is becoming more widely used as experience and technology improves. 
23.  Multiplexing.    Multiplexing  provides  a  means  of  reducing  the  amount  of  hardware  required  by 
sharing  transmission  channels.    The concept is illustrated in Fig 2 where T1, T2, etc are transmitters 
and R1, R2, etc are receivers.  There is a single shared link through which signals between each pair 
of  transmitters  and  receivers  are  synchronized  and  processed.    This  link  can  be  2-way.    There  are 
three  main  types;  frequency  division  multiplexing  (FDM),  time  division  multiplexing  (TDM)  and  code 
division multiplexing (CDM)  
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
7-27 Fig 2 Multiplexing 
T1
R1
T2
r
R2
r
e
Transmission 
e
x
Link
x
T3
le
le
R3
ltip
ltip
u
u
T4
M
M
R4
T5
R5
COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE 
Processing Options 
24.  The decision as to which computer arrangement is appropriate in any aircraft will depend on the 
scale of the computing task and the number of systems to be controlled or integrated, and on whether 
real-time operation is required.  The four main architectures currently in use are: 
a. 
Single processing. 
b. 
Dual processing. 
c. 
Multiprocessing. 
d. 
Distributed processing. 
25.  Single  Processing.    In  a  single  processing  arrangement  all  tasks  are  performed  in  a  single 
computer.    This  organization  was  favoured  when  computers  were  first  installed  into  aircraft.    The 
arrangement often has very low integrity, as there is no redundancy or reversionary capability; failure of 
the single processor results in the loss of all computing capability (Fig 3). 
7-27 Fig 3 Example of Single Processing 
Sensor
Processor
Output
26.  Dual  Processing.    In  a  dual  processing  organization,  two  digital  computers  work  independently, 
sharing  the  same  function.    It  is  possible  for  this  arrangement  to  provide  better  integrity than the single 
system if essential programs and data are stored in both computers, such that if the primary processor for 
any particular function fails, the other can take over the task (this may of course entail the loss of some 
less essential capabilities).  Dual systems can offer a limited real-time performance, but, if this capability is 
required, a multiprocessing or distributed organization is much to be preferred. 
27.  Multiprocessing.  In a multiprocessing arrangement two or more central processing units (CPUs) 
operate  with  one  memory.    An  elaborate  supervisory  program  allocates  processor  time  according  to 
predetermined  priorities.    The  multiprocessing  system  has  high  integrity  and  good  real-time 
performance, but at the cost of complex and difficult programming. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
28.  Distributed Processing.  In a distributed system, separate computers are used for the various tasks, 
but  with  one  of  these  exercising  some  control  over  the others.  The arrangement is shown in Fig 4.  The 
controlling  computer  is  used  to  reduce  operator  workload  by  performing  some  of  the  switching  functions 
needed for the management of the system and to provide centralized control of reversionary routines in the 
event of equipment failure.  The distributed system can have a good real-time performance and there is less 
of a programming problem compared with a multiprocessing arrangement.  Failure of a dedicated computer 
in such a system would probably entail the loss of that element and critical tasks may therefore have to be 
protected by the provision of redundant machines.  System integration will suffer if the controlling computer 
fails; however, the dedicated computers will continue to operate and a well-designed system will make their 
information available, even if in a degraded mode. 
7-27 Fig 4 Distributed Processing System 
Autopilot
Air Data 
Computer
Nav/Attack
Computer
Inertial
Navigation
Displays
Computer
Federated Avionics 
29.  Major  development  of  the  distributed  processing  methodology  took  place  during  the  late  1970s 
and  early  1980s.    Processors  and  sensors  became  smaller.    Heavy  and  cumbersome  point-to-point 
wiring  connections  within  aircraft  avionics  were  replaced  by  the  use  of  shared  data  'highways',  now 
referred to as Data Buses.  This architecture has become known as 'Federated Avionics' and is typical 
of most current military systems (see Fig 5). 
7-27 Fig 5 A Federated Avionics System 
Sensor
Signal
Data
Processor
Output
Processor
Sensor
Signal
Data
Processor
Output
Processor
Databus
Sensor
Signal
Data
Output
Processor
Processor
Integrated Modular Architecture 
30.  Integrated  Modular  Architecture  (IMA)  systems  are  now  being  developed,  to  provide  improved 
processing  flexibility,  and  increased  mean  time  between  failure  (MTBF).    Within  an  IMA  system,  the 
peripheral sub-systems are connected to centralized processors via a high-speed data bus.  However, 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
the  central  processors  each  now  consist  of  multiple,  common  computing  modules.    The  tasks  of  the 
computing  modules  are  software-defined  and,  if  one  module  fails,  any  other  module  can  be 
reconfigured to take over its tasks.  This design therefore provides a very flexible redundancy capability 
and almost instantaneous recovery. 
Open Systems Architecture 
31.  Military  avionics  systems  have  traditionally  been  'closed'  and  largely  aircraft-unique.    The reasons for 
this are largely historic, in that different manufacturers produced differing designs which were not compatible 
with equipment from rival companies.  This is not a problem when a complete system is produced by the 
same  manufacturer.    However,  if  a  sensor  manufactured  by  Company  A  was  used  with  a  display 
manufactured by Company B, then problems may well arise.  To enable the two sides of the system to work 
together,  an  interface  box  would  be  needed  so  that  the  output  from  the  sensor  could  be  translated  into  a 
form that the display would recognise as input.  This interface would be an expensive item to produce, as it 
would  be  specific  to  the  two  pieces  of  equipment  concerned.    This  same  situation  existed  in  the  field  of 
Personal  Computers  (PCs)  until  a  few  years  ago.    However,  things  have  changed  rapidly  and  now  most 
peripherals can be plugged in to any PC and they will work straight away.  This 'plug and play' technology is 
possible  through  comprehensive  agreement  on  interface  specifications,  now  universally  applied  by  all 
manufacturers.  This is 'Open Systems Architecture' and the avionics industry has now realised the benefits 
which can accrue from it and are actively pursuing the methodology. 
DATA BUSES 
Introduction 
32.  Data  buses  are  arrangements  whereby  multiple  electronic  devices  are  connected  to  a  common 
data busbar, and the flow of data is controlled by a bus controller using a predetermined protocol.  The 
bus controller will be informed that a peripheral wishes to transmit and the appropriate receiver will be 
commanded to receive.  The command will be acknowledged and the data transmitted. 
33.  Avionics data buses are designed to accept system expansion or modification efficiently, without the 
costly and time-consuming exercise of changing the aircraft wiring.  A change of equipment would involve 
connections to, or disconnections from, the bus, and modification to the bus controller software. 
34.  The  Bus  Controller.    The  bus  controller  is  the  most  important,  complex,  and  costly  part  of  the 
system  and  its  major  function  is  to  ensure  that  information  is  routed  correctly  between  remote 
terminals.    In  addition,  it  monitors  the  status  of  remote  terminals  and  if,  for  example,  one  source  of 
information failed, the bus controller would automatically arrange for systems requiring that information 
to receive it from a secondary source, if available. 
35.  Data Rates.  The rate at which digital data may be transmitted is measured in 'bits per second' (bps).  
Modern data buses can transfer data at rates from 1 Mbps (Mil-Std-1553B) to 1 Gbps (Fast Ethernet). 
36.  Weight and Space.  The use of a data bus in an aircraft, in place of conventional wiring looms, 
will  save  a  large  amount  of  weight,  even  for  a  small  fighter  aircraft.    They  are  less  prone  to  chafing, 
making them inherently more reliable.  Data buses are also less bulky than the equivalent wiring looms 
and, therefore, save space. 
Data Bus Examples 
37.  The  are  a  number  of  different  databuses  in  use  in  avionics  applications,  with  slight  differences 
between civil and military design.  However, high development costs may bring them more closely aligned 
in the future. 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
38.  Flight safety is the key consideration for avionics databuses.  At present, well-proven and reliable 
avionics databuses include ARINC 429, Mil-Std-1553B and Mil-Std-1773.  These three databuses are 
described briefly in the following paragraphs. 
39.  Mil  Std  1553B  (NATO  STANAG  3838)  Data  Bus.    The  Mil  Std  1553B  data  bus  (known  as 
“Fifteen Fifty-three”) was introduced in 1973 by the US Department of Defense as a standard format for 
aircraft data buses and all new US aircraft were to employ the system.  The system utilizes time division 
multiplexing, and is organized such that up to 30 remote terminals can be connected to a common data 
bus (Fig 6).  A remote terminal can be embedded in a particular avionic component, or can stand alone 
and  service  up  to  five  avionic  systems.    The  disadvantages  of  the  system  are  its  complexity  and  slow 
speed.  The transmission medium is a twisted pair of copper wires, which limits the bandwidth to 1 MHz 
and suffers from the other disadvantages of electrical transmission (see para 18). 
7-27 Fig 6 Example of Mil Std 1553B Architecture 
Bus
Remote
Controller
Remote
Terminal
Terminal
Data Bus
Remote
Remote
Remote
Terminal
Terminal
Terminal
40.  Mil  Std  1773  Data  Bus.    The  Mil-Std-1773  ("Seventeen  Seventy-three")  introduces  the  use  of 
fibre optics as the transmission medium for the Mil-Std-1553B.  This provides military aircraft with an 
EMI-resistant data bus.  Differences between the two standards were kept to a minimum to permit Mil-
Std-1553B  compatible  equipment  to  be  upgraded  to  a  fibre-optic  transmission  medium.    The  actual 
fibre-optic  bus  architecture  is  not  specified  and  Mil-Std-1773  allows  several  acceptable  bus 
configurations.  Optical power levels, wavelength and power distribution are left to the designers. 
41.  ARINC 429.  The ARINC 429 standard was agreed by the commercial airline industry in 1977-78.  It 
is a single-source, multiple-receiver data bus constructed on uni-directional flows of data  (see Fig 7). 
7-27 Fig 7 ARINC 429 Architecture 
Remote
Remote
Terminal
Terminal
Remote
Remote
Terminal
Terminal
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-27 - Airborne Computers 
ARINC 429 uses simple, reliable hardware which is relatively inexpensive.  Because its bus data rates are 
relatively  slow,  and  the  bus  is  uni-directional,  there  is  no  requirement  to  incorporate  sophisticated  bus 
access protocols to prevent transmission collisions.  Consequently, it finds favour in commercial aviation 
since flight certification is easier.  The data bus uses two single wires to transmit 32-bit words.  No more 
than 20 receivers should be connected to a single bus.  Since each terminal must be connected to each 
of  the  others  in  order  to  communicate,  expansion  of  the  system  is  complicated,  requiring  a  significant 
number of extra connections. 
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 – 7-28 - Real-time Programs 
CHAPTER 28 – REAL-TIME PROGRAMS 
Introduction 
1. 
A  real-time  system  is  a  combination of computer hardware and software which has the ability to 
process data sufficiently quickly that it can keep pace with events and influence or control responses 
with minimal time lag.  In the case of airborne systems, the acceptable time lag will be in the order of 
milliseconds. 
2. 
A system’s ability to operate in real time depends principally on the amount of Central Processor Unit 
(CPU)  time  available  and,  as  suggested  in  Volume  7,  Chapter  27,  multiprocessing  or  distributed 
processing systems are normally used.  In a multiprocessing system, the supervisory software allocates 
tasks to the CPU based on priorities.  Despite the complex software involved, this system is very flexible 
and  is  probably  the  most  suitable  when  tasks  occur  at  random  times.    The  distributed  arrangement 
allocates  specific  tasks  to  dedicated  computers.    This  avoids  the  need  for  a  complex  supervisory 
program, but requires careful initial design and accurate forecasting of system workload.  Communication 
between  machines  may  cause  delays,  especially  if  dissimilar  computers  are  used,  as  different  word 
lengths and input/output characteristics dictate the need for complicated interface units. 
Iteration Rates 
3. 
An  airborne  computer  will  usually  have  several  different  programs  to  run.    Each  program  will  take  a 
certain  amount  of  time  and  must  be  repeated  at  certain  intervals.    The  number  of  times  each  program is 
repeated  in  1  second  is  termed  the  iteration  rate  and  is  expressed  in  Hertz  (Hz).    Thus,  for  example,  an 
iteration rate of 10 Hz means that the program must be completed every 100 ms.  The iteration rate will be 
determined by consideration of the maximum error in a variable that can be permitted and the maximum rate 
at which the variable can change.  For example, it may be that a certain aircraft navigation system cannot 
tolerate an error in pitch of greater than 1º if it is to meet the specified accuracy.  If the maximum pitch rate of 
the aircraft is 20º per second, the iteration rate must be at least 20 Hz, and, in practice, a higher rate would 
be chosen to give a safety margin, provided that sufficient CPU time is available.  Some typical iteration rates 
for various airborne computing tasks are shown in Table 1. 
Table 1 Typical Iteration Rates 
Iteration 
System 
Rate (Hz) 
Air Data Computer 
20 
Autopilot (stability) 
100 
Autopilot (control) 
50 
Head-up Display 
50 
Weapon Aiming 
50 
Routine Navigation 
10 
Priority and Interrupt System 
4. 
In  order  to  achieve  the  required  real-time  performance  with  a  digital  computer,  the  tasks  will  be 
grouped into a number of priority levels with the most important tasks (generally those with the highest 
iteration rates) having the highest priority.  A series of interrupt pulses generated by a real-time clock 
will be used.  Interrupt signals from a peripheral, such as a navigator’s control unit, may also be used.  
For convenience of organization, the iteration rates of programs on the same level may be changed to 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-28 - Real-time Programs 
ensure that they are multiples or sub-multiples of each other.  As an example, it may be necessary to 
run three programs, A, B, and C at the same level, with program A requiring a rate of 5 Hz, B a rate of 
7 Hz, and C a rate of 9 Hz.  In this situation, it would be more convenient to run A at 5 Hz as needed, 
but  to  increase  the  iteration  rates  of  both  B  and  C  to  10  Hz.    Iteration  rates  would  not  normally  be 
reduced as this would, in most cases, entail either a lower safety margin or decreased accuracy. 
5. 
The  timing,  initialization,  control,  and  scheduling  of  work  is  accomplished  by  a  supervisory 
program, which also handles the input and output of data and the servicing of interrupts.  The heart of 
the supervisory program is the main scheduler routine which determines the order in which processing 
is done, and allocates resources to the various programs. 
6. 
The sequence of events is as follows: 
a. 
After each instruction is complete, a check will be made on the contents of an interrupt status 
word (ISW) in a special register.  If a particular bit is set to 0, this indicates that an interrupt has 
not  been  generated  and  the  computer  will  go  on  to  the  next  instruction.    If,  however,  a  1  is 
present, an interrupt has been generated. 
b. 
If  a  1  is  present,  the  rest  of  the  ISW  will  be  examined  to  determine  the  priority  level  of  the 
interrupt. 
c. 
If the interrupt is of lower priority than the program currently running, the interrupt will be ignored.  If 
it is of a higher priority, the contents of various registers, such as the accumulator, will be stored, and 
the location of the first instruction of the new program will be loaded into the program counter. 
d. 
The  new  program  will  then  be  run  until  it  is  complete  or  is,  in  its  turn,  interrupted  by  a  still 
higher-level program. 
e. 
When a program is complete, and there are no further programs to be run at that level, the 
last  instruction  will  cause  the  registers  to  be  loaded  with  the  values  pertinent  to  the  next  most 
important program, which will then be run until it is complete or interrupted. 
7. 
As an example, consider a computer being used in a nav/attack system, having the following four 
program priority levels: 
a. 
Level  1  is  the  highest  priority  level  and  is  used  only  for  switch  on,  switch  off,  and  fault 
conditions. 
b. 
Level  2  is  used  for  programs  requiring  an  iteration  rate  of  50  Hz,  such  as  an  Inertial 
Navigation Schuler loop, or weapon aiming calculations.  An interrupt signal is generated every 
20 ms to ensure that a rate of 50 Hz is achieved. 
c. 
Level 3 services routine navigation equations and the generation of display information.  The 
iteration rate required is 10 Hz and so interrupts are generated every 100 ms. 
d. 
Level 4 is used for self-test routines and programs are run only when time is available in the 
CPU after the tasks at the higher levels have been completed. 
8. 
The nav/attack system may be operated in several modes and, in this example, it will be assumed that 
the  computer  is  operating  in  the  routine  navigation  mode  in  which  Level  2  programs  require  5  ms  per 
iteration  and  Level  3  programs  require  50  ms  per  iteration.    The  allocation  of  computer  time  and  the 
associated hardware interrupt signals is illustrated in Fig 1 and described below: 
a. 
At t = 0, the CPU begins the Level 2 program. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-28 - Real-time Programs 
b. 
At  point  A  (t  =  5  ms),  the  Level  2  program  is  complete  and  the  last  instruction  causes  an 
automatic reversion to the next lowest priority level - Level 3. 
c. 
At point B (t = 20 ms), a hardware interrupt signal is generated which demands that the Level 2 
program is serviced again.  Before the computer leaves Level 3 the address of the current instruction 
and intermediate data results are automatically stored in protected memory locations.  Only 15 ms of 
the 50 ms needed by the Level 3 program has been made available at this stage. 
7-28 Fig 1 Priority System 
d. 
The sequence now repeats with the Level 2 program being serviced every 20 ms to maintain 
the 50 Hz iteration rate.  The time available between Level 2 iterations is spent at Level 3 where 
the stored data and instruction addresses are used to ensure continuity. 
e. 
At  point  C  (t  =  70  ms),  the  Level  3  program  has  been  completed  and  time  is  available  for 
Level 4 programs.  Program running will now alternate between Levels 2 and 4. 
f. 
At  point  D  (t  =  100  ms), interrupt signals are received for Levels 2 and 3.  Level 3 must be 
serviced  again  to  achieve  the  required  10  Hz  iteration  rate,  but  the  Level  2  has  priority  and  the 
Level  3  interrupt  is  stored  until  the  Level  2  program  is  complete  (point  E),  when  the  Level  3 
program can be commenced.  The whole cycle is then repeated. 
9. 
The  time  spent  at  various  levels  will  vary  with  the  mode  of  operation.    Suppose  that  the  operator 
carries  out  an  attack  using  a  weapon-aiming  mode  which  requires  5  ms  of  calculation  at  Level  2.   The 
total time required at Level 2 is now 10 ms.  In every 100 ms period the time required by Levels 2 and 3 is 
now 100 ms (5 × 10 ms at Level 2 and 1 × 50 ms at Level 3).  Thus, no time is available to service the 
self-test programs at Level 4 and these must be dropped for the duration of the attack. 
10.  It  may be necessary to adjust the Level 3 tasks at some stages of flight.  Suppose the weapon-
aiming mode selected requires 7 ms of time at Level 2, giving a total of 12 ms per iteration.  In every 
100  ms  period  the  Level  2  program  now  requires  60  ms  (5  × 12 ms) leaving only 40 ms available at 
Level 3.  As Level 3 requires 50 ms in every 100 ms to achieve a 10 Hz iteration rate some adjustment 
must be made, either by accepting a lower iteration rate for the Level 3 programs, or by reducing the 
Level 3 tasks, ie during the period of the attack some less important facility or information will be lost.  
In most cases, this will be possible without significantly degrading the overall system performance. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 3 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
CHAPTER 29 - FLAT DISPLAYS 
Introduction 
1. 
Although  CRTs  will  have  a  place  in  airborne  displays  for  the  foreseeable  future,  they  have  a 
number  of  disadvantages.    They  are  bulky  -  in  particular  requiring  considerable  depth  behind  the 
display  face;  they  are  heavy;  they  operate  at  very  high  voltages;  and  interfacing  them  with  digital 
equipment is complex.  These disadvantages can be overcome by the use of flat panel displays. 
2. 
Flat  panel  displays  normally  consist  of  a  matrix  of  individual  elements  and  the  display resolution 
will be defined by the number of these elements.  For example, a display of comparable resolution to a 
625  line  TV  picture  would  require  a  matrix  consisting  of  585  ×  704  elements  -  a  total  of  411,840 
elements.  The problem of controlling the voltages across such a large number of individual elements 
is usually overcome by using an X-Y (Cartesian co-ordinate) addressing procedure. 
3. 
The  simplest  addressing  procedure  is  called  a  'Passive  Matrix'  in  which  the  element  at  the 
intersection of two power strips is energized.  The passive matrix display is constructed as a three layer 
sandwich.    The  middle  layer  comprises  the  display  elements;  the  top  and  bottom  layers  are  strip 
electrodes,  set  mutually  at  right  angles.    The  top  electrode  layer  is  transparent  so  that  the  display 
elements  can  be  viewed  through  it  (Fig  1).    Any  individual  element  can  be  addressed  by  a  signal 
passing through one electrode strip in each layer (Fig 2). 
4. 
This  arrangement  is  suitable  for  binary  signalling  and,  for  example,  an  array  of  1,024  ×  1,024 
elements can be addressed by two ten-digit X and Y inputs.  Such systems can be scanned in a raster 
manner as in a conventional CRT, or elements can be randomly addressed by means of their unique 
X,  Y  label.    A  problem  with  this  type  of  system  is  that  for  a  typical  display  of  106  pixels,  and  with  a 
refresh rate of 50 Hz, each element can only be addressed for (50 × 106)–1 secs during each frame and 
so the ideal element will have a very short 'turn-on' time and will remain on until extinguished (inherent 
memory). 
5. 
An  alternative  to  the  passive  matrix  is  to  directly  address  individual  elements  (called  an  'Active 
Matrix').    The  main  difficulty  with  an  active  matrix  is  the  number  of  individual  connections.    An  active 
matrix display with 1,024 × 1,024 elements will need 1,048,576 connections, whilst the passive matrix 
would  only  require  2,048  connections.    The  principal  advantages  of  the  active  matrix  are  that  each 
element can be switched on and off directly.  Also, any connection failure will affect only one element 
and not the entire row, as would be the case with a passive matrix. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
7-29 Fig 1 Construction of a Matrix Display 
Clear Upper Plate with
Transparent Electrode
Display Elements
Substrate with Strip
Electrode
7-29 Fig 2 Matrix Addressing 
Column Access (x)
+V
Row Access (y)
V
V
+V
V
2V V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
Element is 'ON' if voltage across it exceeds 1.5V
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 8 



AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
Display Types 
6. 
Five types of flat panel displays are currently in use in avionic systems: 
a. 
Light Emitting Diode (LED). 
b. 
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD). 
c. 
Active Matrix LCD (AMLCD). 
d. 
Plasma Display. 
e. 
Electroluminescent Display. 
Light Emitting Diode (LED) 
7. 
A  light  emitting  diode  is  a  semiconductive  junction  which  emits  light  when  a  current  is  passed 
through  it.    Fig  3  shows  the  construction  of  a  typical  LED,  in  which  a  shallow  p-n  junction  is  formed.  
While  electrical  contact  is  made  to  both  regions,  the  upper  surface  of  the  p  material  is  largely 
uncovered  so  that  the  flow  of  radiation  from the device is impeded as little as possible.  The primary 
materials  used  are  gallium  arsenide,  gallium  phosphide,  and  gallium  arsenide  phosphide.    LEDs  are 
most  suitable  for  'on-off'  displays  rather  than  in  applications  requiring  a  grey  scale.    LEDs  have  no 
inherent storage and, if addressed with a passive matrix, the display must be refreshed at a rate fast 
enough to avoid flicker.  LEDs are lightweight, have good brightness, low power requirements and long 
life; they are currently replacing most CRT displays in Helmet Mounted Displays. 
7-29 Fig 3 Construction of Typical LED 
p
Electrical
Contacts
n
Substrate
Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) 
8. 
Liquid crystal displays are unlike other flat displays in that they are not light emitters, but rely on an 
external light source for their operation.  Often the light source is placed behind the LCD, as is the case 
with laptop computer displays. 
9. 
Liquid crystal is an organic compound which, while having the physical characteristics of a liquid, 
has a molecular structure akin to a crystalline solid.  There are three classes of liquid crystal which vary 
in  their  molecular  structure  and,  although  all  three  have  been  used  in  LCDs,  the  structure  known  as 
'nematic'  is  by  far  the  most  common.    In  this  structure,  the  elongated,  rod-shaped  molecules  are 
aligned parallel to each other but not in regular layers (Fig 4). 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
7-29 Fig 4 Nematic Molecular Structure 
10.  In  the  display  cell,  the  inner  surfaces  of  the  top  and bottom glass or perspex walls are grooved, 
with  the  top  grooves  aligned  at  90º  to  the  bottom  grooves.    The  grooves  induce  a  corresponding 
alignment  of  the  molecules  so  that  their  alignment  within  the  liquid  crystal  twists  through  90º  (the 
twisted nematic structure).  The top and bottom of the display cell is covered by linear polarizing plates 
such that the plane of polarization of one plate is at 90º to the other. 
11.  When light passes through the initial plate it is polarized, and the twisted nematic structure causes 
the  plane  of  polarization  to  be  rotated  through  90º  so  that  the  light  is  able  to  pass  out  through  the 
second  polarizer  unimpeded;  the  cell  therefore  has  a  transparent  appearance.    When  a  voltage  is 
applied across the cell, the molecules tend to align themselves with the field thus destroying the twisted 
structure.    The  polarized  light  entering  the  cell  will  no  longer  have  its  plane  of  polarization  twisted 
through 90º and it will not therefore be transmitted by the second polarizer and the cell will appear dark.  
When  the  field  is  removed,  the  molecules  return  to  the  original  twisted  nematic  structure.    The 
structure and operation of a twisted nematic LCD is shown in Fig 5. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
7-29 Fig 5 Structure and Operation of Twisted Nematic LCD 
Unpolarized Light
Polarizer
Transparent
Electrode
Alignment Layer
Nematic
Liquid Crystal
Polarized Light
Analysing
Polarizer
No Transmitted Light
Transmitted Light
12.  The  normal  display  is  one  of  dark  characters  on  a  light  background  although  this  can  be 
reversed by arranging the polarizers parallel rather than at 90º.  Coloured displays are possible by 
adding  dyes  to  the  liquid  crystal  material  or  by  the  use  of  colour  filters.    Full  colour  displays  are 
now  easily  produced  and  available  for  most  applications.    LCDs  must  be  either  front  or  back  lit 
and do not operate at very low temperatures (heating is required for aviation displays). 
Active Matrix LCD (AMLCD) 
13.  AMLCDs  are  more  common  in  aviation  than  passive  matrix  LCDs.    In  an  AMLCD,  the  voltage 
applied on each element is actively controlled by a transistor, as shown in Fig 6, ensuring that the liquid 
crystal receives the correct voltage during the address time, and is isolated from stray voltages when it 
is switched off. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
7-29 Fig 6 AMLCD Element 
Column (Video Voltage)
Row
(on/off)
Transistor
Liquid Crystal
Earth Electrode
14.  Fig 7 shows a cross-section of an AMLCD.  In this example, rows and columns of the matrix are 
disposed  on  the  lower  substrate,  the  upper  substrate  carrying  the  earth  electrode.    An  element  (or 
pixel)  is  addressed  by  applying  the  video  voltage  corresponding  to  the  signal  to  be  displayed  on  the 
column, and a voltage to energize the element on the appropriate row.  The element is then turned off 
while the other rows of the display are successively addressed. 
7-29 Fig 7 Representative Cross-section of AMLCD Display 
Earth Electrode
Upper Substrate
Row
Electrodes
Lower Substrate
Column Electrodes
15.  A limited grey effect can be obtained by modulating the amplitude of the input video voltage.  The 
display needs to be refreshed periodically due to leakage currents. 
Plasma Displays 
16.  Plasma  (gas  discharge)  displays  use  an  electrical  discharge  in  a  gas  to  produce  light;  both  DC 
and AC systems are available. 
17.  A  DC  plasma  display  consists  essentially  of  a  gas  filled  space  between  two  electrodes  (Fig  8).  
When the DC potential across the electrodes exceeds a certain value (typically 180V), which depends 
on the gas type, pressure and the electrode gap and type, the gas molecules ionize and emit light.  The 
DC technique has no inherent memory and therefore requires constant refreshing. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
7-29 Fig 8 DC Plasma Display 
Top Glass
Row
Perforated
Conductors
Spacer
Rear Glass
Column
Conductors
Neon Gas
18.  An AC plasma display has a similar basic concept, but the electrodes are insulated; the structure 
is  illustrated  in  Fig 9.    A  voltage  is  applied  to  all  the  row  electrodes  and  is  antiphase  to  all  column 
electrodes.  The field generated across the gas is insufficient to strike a discharge and, in order to light 
a particular pixel, the AC voltages on the appropriate row and column are increased for one half cycle.  
This  causes  a  capacitive  current  to  flow  and  build  up  a  charge  at  the  insulating  layers.    Subsequent 
cycles are at the normal AC voltage, but this is sufficient to maintain the discharge previously created.  
To  switch  off  the  pixel,  row  and  column  voltage  must  be  selectively  lowered.    AC  types  of  plasma 
displays have inherent memory for each element. 
7-29 Fig 9 AC Plasma Display 
Row Conductors
Top Glass
Rear Glass
Neon Gas
Spacer
Column Conductors
19.  Older  plasma  (gas  discharge)  displays  are  not  generally  suitable  for  producing  grey  scales  and 
are primarily available in neon orange colour for use in on-off displays. 
20.  Plasma  displays  are  now  available  in  full  colour  and  operate  on  a  principle  much  like  the  CRT.  
The  display  is  made  up  of  an  array  of  individual  cells,  each  containing  plasma  gas,  coated  with  red, 
green  or  blue  phosphorous.    Energizing  the  cell  excites  the  plasma  which  emits  Ultra-Violet  (UV) 
radiation.    The UV radiation, in turn, energizes the phosphorous which glows red, green or blue, with 
each  pixel  on  the display made up of one red, one green and one blue element.  The advantages of 
the plasma display are its brightness and wide viewing angle. 
Electroluminescent Displays 
21.  Electroluminescent displays consist of a layer of phosphor, sandwiched between two electrodes, 
which glows when an electrical field is applied across it.  Displays may be either AC or DC driven and 
the structure of each type is somewhat different. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 7-29 - Flat Displays 
22.  Fig  10  shows  the  structure  of  an  AC  device  in  which  phosphor  particles  are  suspended within a 
transparent  insulating  medium  (thick  film  technique)  and sandwiched between two electrodes, one of 
which is transparent.  As an alternative, the phosphor can be deposited, normally by evaporation, as a 
thin  layer  onto  a  dielectric  base  (thin  film  technique).    The  phosphor  particles  emit  light  when  an  AC 
voltage is applied. 
7-29 Fig 10 Structure of Thick Film AC Electroluminescent Device 
Transparent Electrode
(Usually SnO 2 )
Glass Cover
Phosphor Particles
Metal Electrode
in Non-conducting
Binding Medium
23.  Fig  11  shows  the  construction  of  a  DC  device.    The  phosphor  particles  have  a  coating  of  either 
Cu2S or Cu3S (generally termed CuxS) which is removed from the anode side of the particles in contact 
with  the  anode  by  the  application  of  an  initial  high  current  pulse.    Light  is  emitted  from  the  CuxS 
depleted particles when a normal DC voltage is applied. 
7-29 Fig 11 Structure of DC Electroluminescent Device 
Transparent
Glass Cover
Anode
Copper Depleted
Surface
Cu S Coating
x
Phosphor
Particles
Cathode
24.  Electroluminescent  devices  have  full  video  capability  and  have  potential  as  a  replacement  for 
CRTs in Head Mounted Displays.  All colours are available, dependent on the phosphor selected, and 
a full colour display is available in very small devices. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 7-30 - Projected and Electronically Displayed Maps 
CHAPTER 30 - PROJECTED AND ELECTRONICALLY DISPLAYED MAPS 
Introduction 
1. 
The most widely used navigation aid for low level VMC operations is the topographical map.  Such 
a map allows very accurate pinpoints to be obtained, and also presents information about the aircraft’s 
position  in  relation  to  its  surroundings  in  a  relatively  easily  assimilated  way.    However,  the  use  of 
conventional  maps,  covering  large  areas,  presents  handling  problems  in  small  aircraft  cockpits.  
Moving and electronic map systems were devised to overcome these difficulties. 
2. 
Early systems used strips of paper maps wound on rollers with an overlying cursor to indicate position; 
the rollers and cursor were driven by outputs from a doppler or radio navigation aid.  However, because the 
map was cut to suit the planned route, these early systems offered limited flexibility when faced with changes 
to route during flight.  The second generation of moving map displays solved this problem by projecting a 
35mm  film  strip  onto  a  display  screen.    These  offered  much  improved  tactical  capability  although,  being 
analogue  systems,  they  had  minor  problems  in  accuracy.    The  latest  generation  of  moving  maps  use 
electronic data and are rapidly replacing the projected systems. 
Projected Map Displays 
3. 
The  projected  map  display  (PMD)  employs  a  coloured  map  transferred  to  35mm  film.    This  is 
back-projected, using conventional optics, to give a bright image on a translucent screen.  The map is 
driven by an inertial or mixed inertial navigation system, such that the drive mechanism keeps up with 
the aircraft’s ground position.  The map projection can be orientated with aircraft track or true north. 
4. 
A  typical  PMD  system  is  illustrated  in  Fig  l.    The  screen  is  designed  to  concentrate  the  image 
luminance  within  a  limited  field  of  view,  matched  to  the  observer’s  eye,  in  order  to  increase  the 
resistance  to  strong  ambient  light.    It  will  be  seen  that  the  screen  has  three  layers.    The  first  (inner) 
layer is a Fresnel lens which converts the light cone from the projection lens into a light cylinder in the 
plane  of  the  operator’s  eye  datum.    The  image  is  formed  on  the  second  layer  which  is  designed  to 
minimize hot spots towards the centre, and image degradation towards the circumference.  The third 
(outer)  layer  is  a  polarizing  filter  which  eliminates  reflections  from  both  inside  and  outside  the  PMD 
which might otherwise obscure the image. 
7-30 Fig 1 Schematic of a Projected Map Display 
Projection
Condenser
Projection
Three Layer
Lamp
Lens
Lens
Viewing Screen
Eye
Datum
Neutral
Map
Density
Film
Filter
Cone to
Anti-
Cylinder
Reflective
Conversion
Polarized
Lens
Filter
Scattering
Screen
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 7-30 - Projected and Electronically Displayed Maps 
5. 
In a typical PMD, the map is photographed in segments onto 35mm film.  Up to 4 million square miles 
of map coverage, at a scale of 1:500,000, can be reproduced on a 20 metre strip of 35mm film.  In practice, 
some area coverage will usually be sacrificed in order to have a selection of map scales available, and there 
may also be check lists and terminal charts included.  In normal operation, the change over from one frame 
to the next is automatic and is usually accomplished in under three seconds.  The life of the film strip tends to 
be limited by the currency of the map rather than by fading, or wear and tear. 
6. 
Within a PMD, scale change can be accomplished by either: 
a. 
Increasing magnification by lenses. 
b. 
Changing between map segments on the 35mm film. 
Fig  2  shows  a  simplified  diagram  of  the  internal  construction  of  a  typical  PMD.    In  this  example,  the 
magnification option is employed. 
7-30 Fig 2 Simplified Diagram of a Typical PMD 
E-W Transport Motor
Scale Change Lenses
Film Cassette Carriage
Brightness Control Filters
Bulb & Spare
Focus
Reflector Mirror
Orientation
Condenser Lens
Rotating Screen with
Compass Rose and
N-S Transport Motor
Track Arrow
7. 
The accuracy of a PMD is governed by: 
a. 
The accuracy of the navigation system driving it. 
b. 
The manufacturing tolerances in the electro-mechanical projection system. 
Errors  due  to  map  scale  and  convergency  limitations  are  reduced  to  relatively  insignificant  levels by 
automatically  applying  a  correction  to  the  map  drive  system,  or  by  applying  a  correcting  distortion 
during the photographic process.  Typical values for the overall accuracy of the system are ¼ nm on a 
1:500,000 map and 50 metres on a 1:50,000 map. 
8. 
Limitations of the PMD.